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Патент USA US2116579

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May 10, 1938.
c. P. LEYDECKER
2,116,579
’
FOOT BALANCING MEANS
Filed Oct. 8, 1956
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CHARLES P. ¿frase/rsf
Patented May 10, 1938
@H6579
UNITED s'rArEs PATENT QFFECE
i
2,116,579
FOOT-BALANCING MEANS
Charles P. Leydecker, St. Louis, Mo.
Application October 8, 1936, Serial No. 104,646
2 Claims. (Cl. Sii-71)
The present invention relates generally to that the lower portion or supporting surface of
shoes, and more particularly to a method for
eifecting foot balance within a shoe, and means
the os calcis is not ñat, but is higher on the
inner side and has a tuberosity on the outer side
for achieving such balance.
which allows the weight to be shifted forward
without wobbling of the foot until the weight
The present invention is predicated upon the
5 theory that there is only one longitudinal bone
arch in the foot construction, the columns or
supports of which comprise the os calcis and the
forward portion of the first matatarsal. Many
authorities aver that there are three or four
arches in the longitudinal dimension of the foot;
l
but a study of the bones in the feet shows that
the many bones which comprise a foot make
up one complete arch, some parts of which are
concave and some parts of which are convex,
but all of which contribute to the one single arch.
Modern shoe construction has resulted in the
dropping of certain bones of the foot, notably
the cuboid and the fifth metatarsal, so that the
rear portion of the fifth metatarsal contacts
20 the shoe in walking which, in effect, provides two
arches, namely, one between the os calcis and
the rear portion of the fifth metatarsal, and the
other between the rear portion of the fifth meta
tarsal and the forward portion of the ñrst meta
25 tarsal or the great toe. This, however, is not a
natural position. This lowering of the enumer
ated bones of the feet has been caused byv con
structing shoes with heels, which raises the posi
tion of the os calcis relative to the forward por
tion of the first metatarsal. Many devices have
been devised in an effort to compensate for the
position of the bones in the foot in this man
made position relative to the ground; and none
of them has been singularly successful.
3
Many
have concentrated on supporting the inner side
of the foot at the center of the arch by means
which are generally designated arch supports.
However, few have seriously considered the outer
side of the longitudinal arch which, in the final
4O analysis, is the primary weight carrier of the
foot. Experiment has shown that the weight of
the body in walking is carried from the os calcis,
or heel bone, as one main support along a sub
stantially curved line through the cuboid` and
the fifth metatarsal to the forward portion of the
first metatarsal as the second main support.
In other words, in walking, the weight of the
body is distributed along the outer edge of the
50
reaches the cuboid and the base of the fifth meta
tarsal. By this construction, the heel bone shifts
the weight forwardly gradually rather than
abruptly. As the weight is shifted forwardly, the
base of the ñfth metatarsahwhich is, in eiîect, 0
a marked protuberance, assists in the forward
shifting thereof by contact with the walking sur
face. However, when the heel bone is elevated,
the base of the ñfth metatarsal is likewise rela
tively elevated and, to contact the walking sur- 15
face, must drop a greater degree, which results
in straining the main longitudinal arch, inas
much as the bone structure must give to allow
this unnatural ultimate position of the base of
the fifth metatarsal. This dropping downward
ly of the rear portion of the fifth metatarsal N) 0
accentuates the rolling weight distribution
throughout the foot and results in the turning
over of the shoe which is one of the greatest wear
points in modern shoe construction; inasmuch
as the majority of shoes, after being worn a short 25
while, show this overturning outwardly of the
upper over the edge of the sole. The present in
vention contemplates correcting this distorted
action of the bone structure by providing a
natural support for the base or rear portion of
the fifth metatarsal which will alleviate strain
in the foot and save this undue overturning of
the shoes outwardly.
The above noted undue lowering of the outside
bone structure of the foot, resultant of raising the 03 5
heel relative to the forward portion of the first
metatarsal, strains the whole foot structure and
causes tiring of an individual prematurely. Only
when the foot is properly balanced is the cir
culation of the blood-normal and can the blood
enter and leave the pedal extremity without
straining the heart. There are nerves passing
through the feet which transmit the proper
amount of nerve impulses when the circulation 45
is normal, and quite obviously impoverished cir
culation will lead to subnormal nerve impulses
and resultant impaired activity of the feet.
Lengthy experiments have proven that a foot
foot in an arc of a circle from the heel bone to
housed in a shoe constructed in line with the 1
the forward portion of the iirst metatarsal. The
present invention has normal blood circulation.
Wearers of such shoes have been able to with
stand very substantially greater strains in usage
of the feet than when wearing shoes of conven
tional design and construction.
55
foot has a tendency to roll, which is a balanced
movement when the heel is not maintained raised
relative to the metatarsals.
Before proceeding, it >should be observed here
55
2
2,116,579
An object of the present invention is to pro
vide a method of balancing a foot within a shoe
the portion I6 the insert slopes gradually for
wardly throughout the portion l to the line 0f
to reduce bone and muscle strain and to prevent
intersection 8 with the bevelled portion M. The
the outward overturning of the shoe upper over
the edge of the sole.
base of the ñfth metatarsal rests on the raised
portion I6. It is to be understood, of course, that
the insert lil may be varied in certain of these
Another object is to provide a device adapted
to support the rear portion of the ñfth meta
tarsal and its associated bones in a modern shoe.
Another object is to provide means for correct
ing modern shoe construction to secure foot bal
ance within the shoe.
Another object is to provide means for utiliz
ing the natural single longitudinal arch of the
foot.
Another object is to provide means for alleviat
15
ing the unnatural position of the fifth metatarsal
when diposed in shoes of modern construction.
Another object is to provide means adapted
details to conform to Speciñc foot requirements.
In Figs. 4, 5 and G the insert l0 is shown in
one disposition relative to the elements of a shoe.
The illustrative shoe comprises an upper I8, a
heel |S, an outsole 2li, an insole 2|, and a lining
22. The insert l0 is disposed between the lining
22 and the insole 2|, though, of course, it could
be inserted between the insole 2| and the out
sole 2B, if desired.
to be used in a shoe to properly balance a foot
20 to relieve muscle and bone strain and to prevent
ñguration substantially equivalent to the insert
Other objects and advantages will be apparent
from the following description, taken in conjunc
tion with the accompanying drawing, in which
25
Fig. l is an insert constructed in line with the
present invention which is adapted to be disposed
within a shoe to effect the purpose and objects of
the present invention.
30
Fig. 2 is a section on the line 2-2 of Fig. l.
Fig. 3 is a section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1.
Fig. 4 is a central longitudinal section through
a shoe showing an insert of the configuration of
Fig. l disposed between the insole and the lin
ing.
Fig. 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4.
Fig. 6 is a section on the line 6_6 of Fig. 5.
Fig. 7 is a transverse section through a last
and associated shoe elements showing a modiñed
means of effecting the present invention.
Fig. S is a diagrammatic view showing the bone
4.0
structure of the outer side of the longitudinal
35
arch disclosing the position of the fifth metatarsal
relative to the -os calcis when the latter is raised.
Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic view of the weight
f distribution through the bones of the foot.
Referring more particularly to the drawing by
reference numerals, IG indicates generally an
insert for a shoe constructed in the light of the
present invention. As is shown in Fig. l, the in
sert l0 is generally elongated and is adapted to
be disposed in a shoe, as is disclosed clearly in
Figs. 4, 5 and 6. In a preferred configuration,
the insert IG is bevelled from the rear edge ||
forwardly to approximately the line |2 to pro
vide a gradual support for the muscles and tissue
forwardly of the supporting point of the osy calcis.
Itis further provided with a sharp bevel i3 along
the side which is remote from the outside of the
shoe, the bevel i3 gradually widening forwardly,
60. as at Ul, to provide a general slope for eiîectively
shifting the weight of the foot from the fifth
metatarsal to the forward portion of the ñrst
metatarsal, which is the second main supporting
point of the longitudinal arch. The outward
edge l5 of the insert lll conforms to the outward
lines of the shoe and is substantially perpendic
ular, as can be seen from an inspection of Fig. 6.
That portion of the upper side of the insert in
dicated l5 is substantially parallel to the under
side, and is of a depth to properly support the
fifth metatarsal and the associated bones. From
the rear edge ¿i of the portion i6 the insert slopes
gradually rearwardly throughout the portion 5
to the line of intersection |2 with the bevelled
75 portion ||.
Likewise, from the front edge 6 of
15
In Fig. 7 there is shown another means of ef
iecting the present invention. A last 25 is con
structed with a portion of the sole cut away at
26, that portion which is cut away being of a con
overturning of the upper over the sole.
Si
shown in Fig. 1. The shoe is constructed on this
preformed last in a manner to provide a built-up
portion 2l between the outsole 28 and the insole
29. The built-up portion may be composed of
strips of leather, composition, metal, or other 25
material which will provide a firm built-up por
tion for the outer side of the longitudinal arch.
The built-up portion 2l and the insert It are of
a material firm enough to withstand the con
tinual application thereto of the base of the fifth 30
metatarsal; for, if it yields, the supporting ef
fectiveness will be lost. However, it must be con
structed and disposed so that the foot does not
have the sensation of treading upon an obstruc
tion within the shoe.
In Fig. 8 there is shown diagrammatically the
disposition of the bones along the outer side of
the foot when the foot is placed in a shoe having
a heel. It will be observed that the os calcis 3|
is a considerable distance above the forward por 40
tion 32 of the fifth metatarsal 33. 'I'he rear por
tion 34 of the ñfth metatarsal assumes a position
on a plane between those of the forward portion
32 and the os calcis 3|.
of the phalanges 35, the
tragalus 3T are as shown.
thus raising the os calcis
The relative positions
cuboid 3S and the as
It is quite obvious that
3| deiînitely forces the
remaining bone structure to assume an unnat
ural position which the present invention posi
tively corrects.
50
In Fig. 9, there is disclosed diagrammatically
by the arrows 4B the line of body weight shifting
in walking, which is from the position 4| of the os
calcis to the position 42 of the forward position
of the ñrst metatarsal. This diagrammatic illus
tration emphasizes the forward rolling of the
weight in walking along an arc of a circle.
Clearly, if no support is afforded the base or rear
portion of the fifth metatarsal, then the foot must
roll outwardly to an extent which will deform
the shoe and cause the upper to substantially
overlap, the edge of the sole.
This undue rolling
of the foot produces a continual strain on the
muscles, the ligaments, and the bones of the foot
which tires an individual in a very short time.
Such rapid tiring of an individual palpably re
sults in impaired and ineiiîcient use of the pedal
extremities and of the rest of the human mecha
nism; for tired feet result in a tired body and an
irritated and restricted mental condition. Hence,
to properly balance` the feet will contribute ma
terially to the total efficiency of an individual.
It is evident that there has been provided a
method and means for balancing a foot within a
shoe to eliminate and remove strain on the mus
3
2,116,579
cles, ligaments, tissues, and bones of the foot.
There has also been provided means for prevent~
ing undue rolling of the foot which habitually re
sults in the overturning of the shoe upper over
the edge of the sole which produces an unsightly
appearance.
It is to be understood that the foregoing de
scription and accompanying drawing have been
given by way of illustration and example and not
10 for limitation, the invention being limited only
by the following claims.
What I claim is:
1. A foot support for use in shoes and adapted
to lie beneath the outer side of the longitudinal
arch of the foot, including a first section elevated
above the normal level of the inside of the shoe
to support in elevated position the rear portion
of the ñfth metatarsal, said section being of sub
stantially even height throughout its area, and
terminated at its rear short of the heel seat and
at its front at a point shortly ahead of the said
rear of the said fifth metatarsal, a second sec
tion extending forwardly from the said front por
tion of the first section and sloping downwardly
toward the inside level ofthe shoe, said second
section extending forwardly under the front por
tion of the fifth metatarsal to provide positive
support thereof at an elevation above the inside
level of the shoe but at a less elevation relative
to the inside level ofV the shoe than is provided
by the ñrst section, said second section, ahead
of the front of the ñfth metatarsal, being then
lowered to the inside level of the shoe.
2. A. foot support for use in shoes and
adapted to lie beneath the outer side of the lon
gitudinal arch of the foot, including a back sec
tion having a rear edge adapted to lie adjacent
the os calcis and said back section extending
forwardly from said rear edge and sloping up 10
Wardly from the normal level of the inside of the
shoe to provide support for the portions forward
ly and on the outer side of the os calcis, a mid
dle section at the forward end of the rear sec~
tion having a substantially constant elevation 15
above the inside level of the shoe, and extending
beneath the rear of the ñfth metatarsal to sup
port such part above the normal level of the in
side of the shoe, and a front section extending
forwardly from the middle section, said front 20
section tapering downwardly from the middle
section toward the front of the shoe, and extend
ing beneath the front of the fifth metatarsal to
support the same above the level of the inside of
the shoe, said front section, ahead of the front 25
of the fifth metatarsal, being then lowered to
the inside level of the shoe.
CHARLES P. LEYDECKER.
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