close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2116658

код для вставки
May 10, 1938.
H, J_ L, FRANK
2,ll6,658
SWITCH CABINET
'
Filed Jan. 20, 1956
5 Sheets-Sheet 1
INVENTOR.
M 0%’. 33M
21
BY .AM_‘
ATTORNEY.
May 10, 1938.
H. J. L. FRANK
2,116,658
SWITCH CABINET‘
Filed Jan. 20, 1956
5 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVENTOR.
_P7.7
J
wwwh
ATTORNEY‘
‘
May‘lo, 1938.
H. J. L. FRANK
2,116,658
SWITCH CABINET
Filed Jan. 20, 19:56
T
42? I
__;f
7 _P__
5 Sheets-Sheet 5
_
5o
47
429
My]
INVENTOR.
BY
ATTORNEY.
May 10, 1938.
H. J. L. FRANK
2,116,658 I
SWITCH CABINET
Filed Jan. 20, 1936
swn'cH
SWITCH
I
It.
5 Sheets-Sheet 4
INVENTOR.
‘
. _
J’m?lfd
BY JOM
.
‘
-
.
ATTORNEY.
May 10, 1938.
H, _|_ |__ FRANK
2,116,658
SWITCH CABINET
Filed Jan. 20, 1936
5 Sheets-Sheet 5
W23?”
’‘ ORNEY.
MM my 10.1w
_.
‘
' 2,116,658 I J
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ‘
,
I msf'?cfsl‘fi’fi. m.
Apliucl?nn _Jamlary 2., 1936, Serial N0. 59,875
9 Clllllll. (Cl. 200-114)
This applicationvrelates to fused switch cabiFig. 8 is a back elevation view of the pan
nets, to panels thereof made up of two or more ~ per se;
,
fused switches, and to fused switches generally
' of. the character disclosed in Reissue Patent No.
5 17,910 of April 2, 1935 vgranted to Harrison J.
L. Frank.
_
'
'
'
Fig. 9 is a section on line 2-9, Fig. 8;
Figs. 10 and 11 show di?erent uses of the panel;
se from the back thereof;
A fused switch cabinet includes a sheet metal
box containing a panel of two or more fused
switches, the panel comprising a duplex recepta1'0 cle base, each ‘receptacle of which receives a fuse
carrier plug or head, each receptacle and its head
comprising a switch.
'
Figs. 13-16 are perspective views of conducting
parts of the panel;
'
"
‘
Fig. 1'7 is a section on line I‘l-i‘l, Fig. 8.
Referring to the drawings, it will be seen that 10
the fused switch cabinet of this application in
cludes a box 5 containing a panel comprising a
One invention hereof relates to a novel manner of mounting the panel base in the box.
15
Another invention relates to means preventing
interchange of the heads in the panel receptacles;
unitary block 6 formed with two receptacles dis
posed side by side, each receptacle being cup
shaped and being adapted to receive a fuse carrier 16
or head ‘I.
were such means omitted, a head carrying a
The panel may be mounted in the cabinet in a
large capacity fuse might easily be plugged into
convenient and facile manner. It will be observed
a receptacle controlling a circuit whose maximum
20 load is to be that of a smaller capacity fuse, with
consequent deleterious results.
_
Fig. 121s a perspective view of the‘panel per g
-
that the rear wall of the box is provided with
tongues I and a screw 9, and that the rear wall so
of the panel is provided with ears l0 and a slot
Another invention relates to the provision, in
the heads, of slots on opposite sides of end ribs,
which slots provide vents for the interiors of the
25 switches, ways for test leads, and adequate clearance between switch parts of opposite polarity.
‘Still another invention'relates to the provision,
in the heads, of weakened portions or "knockouts” which may beknocked out if desired to pro30 vide vents for the interiors of the switches and
windows through which it may be determined by
observation alone whether or not fuses are disposed in the switches.
~ Still another invention relatesto features of
35 mounting ‘for conductor parts of the switches
whereby economy of manufacture is enhanced.
il. When a panel is to be mounted, the screw
9 is threaded out to a considerable extent and the.
panel is manipulated so that the screw 9 is re
ceived in the slot ii of the panel. Then the g5
panel is pushed up as far as it will go until the
ears I0 clear the tongues I, after which the panel
is pushed against the back of the box so that the
ears i0 may be received behind the tongues I,
whereupon'the panel is permitted to drop slightly 30
and the screw 9 is tightened up.
Surrounding thepanel is .a masking plate I‘
of conventional construction and adapted to close
the front of the box is a hinge cover i5.
In back of slots i8 formed in the back of each 35
receptacle, and thus accessible from the front of.
Still another feature relates to novel arrange- . the receptacle, are disposed receptacle contacts
ments of conductor parts of'the switches whereby
?exibility of use of the panel is enhanced.
40
For an understanding of the parts disclosed in
the appended drawings, reference should be had
'
to thefollowing speci?cation.
In the drawings,
_
'
’
-
Fig. 1 is a front elevation view of a switch cabie
20. For mating with the receptacle contacts,
there are provided prongs 2| forming terminals
of J-shaped contact straps 22 of copper or the 40
like, whose bights are secured to the heads ‘I
by the spun-over ends of embedded rivets 23,
there being spring clips 24 between the bights and
the heads to help secure in place cartridge fuses
-
45 net containing a panel with two switches, one of
theheads being, removed for purposes of exposing the base of the switch including such head;
Fig.2 isa fragmentary section view of a switch;
25 connecting aligned contacts 22, the ferrules of 45
the fuses being received within the bights and
the spring clips of these contacts.
On the fronts of the‘ heads are handles in the
Fig. 2a is a side view of a head, per se; ,
Fig. 3 is. a fragmentary back view of a head
form of pullrings 21 secured to the heads by cot
ter straps 28, which go through the heads and 50
50
per se;
>
,
I _ Fig. 4 is a fragmentary enlarged front view;
Figs. 5 and 6 are side and front views, relating
to mounting means for the panel; ,
55
Fig. 'I is a detail view of a fuse socket;
terminate in portions disposed in wells 2! in back
of the heads.
When a‘ switch is to be closed, a fuse carrying
head is plugged into a receptacle; the contacts
22,, connected by fuses 25, have their prongs Ii 65
2
2,116,658
fitted through the slots IQ of the receptacles to
engage and make contact with the receptacle
place and sliding the connector end thereof
contacts 20 in back of these slots l8. When a
switch is to bev left open, the head is removed
and reversed 180° and reinserted into the recep
tacle, but with the fuses and contacts exposed
through an end slot of the block, and each unit
is securely mounted on insulation ledges 48-41,
formed integral with the block 6, by a single
screw 45 or 45a, which features enhance the
simplicity and economy of manufacture of the
and projecting towards the front of the cabinet.
Each receptacle is provided in its interior with
panel.
I back wall slots 30 and receptacle end wall slots
The panels are so constructed that various
manners of using the switches thereof may be at- ‘
10 3|. Cooperating with the slots 30-3l are ribs
' 32-33 projecting respectively from the back and
tained. For example, by connecting straps I.
42d-42g through an insulated conductor 50
from each end wall of the head, the ribs 32-43
?tting into the slots 30-—3l respectively. These
ribs function not only as guiding and. barrier ribs,
15 but also, by virtue of the fact that the ribs and
whose ends are hooked around screws 5| mount
slots of one switch are of slightly different con
figuration from those of its neighboring switch,
serve to prevent improper interchange of heads.
It will be observed that the end slots and end
20 ribs of one switch are deep and narrow, whereas
the end slots and end ribs of the adjacent switch
are shallow and wide; a head having shallow
wide ribs cannot fit into a receptacle formed with
deep-narrow. slots, and vice versa, with the result
25 that a head cannot be plugged into a receptacle
other than the one for which it is intended.
For reinforcing and barrier continuing pur
poses, the ribs 32 of a head ‘are connected by the
walls of the well 29 receiving the end of the cot
30 ter strap.
Adjacent and separated by each end rib 33 are
slots 36. The slots provide vents from the inte
rior of the switches to outside the same; the slots
provide ways for test leads whose terminals may
35 be caused to engage contact parts of the heads;
and the slots, together with the barriers formed
by the end ribs 33 therebetween, cooperate to pro
vide greater creepage paths between the opposite
polarity contacts of the heads than would be the
case were the slots not present.
ing the conductor 50 on straps 42d-42a, and by
interconnecting straps 43e-43j through a con
ductor 52 held in place by the threading of cer ll
tain screws 45a into tapped holes thereof, all as
illustrated in Fig. 8, it is possible to connect out
side lines to the panel to obtain two uses of the
panel parts, as shown in Figs. 10 and 11, which
differ from uses obtainable when these parts 55
and 52 are omitted.
In Fig. 10 there is shown an arrangement
wherein branch circuit conductors C53, C54, D53,
D54 are connected to socket shells 53 in a suitable
manner, as by means of socket shell connecting
screws 55 (Fig. 7), wherein branch circuit con
ductors C53, D56 are connected in circuit by con
nectors C44, D44, wherein branch circuit conduc
tors are connected in circuit by connectors A44,
wherein main feed conductors are connected in
circuit by connectors B44, and wherein fuses in
the socket shells connect screws 45a--55 in pairs;
so connected, the panel may be used with switch I
as a main switch and with switch II as a branch
switch, the main switch I controlling the connec
tion between the main feed circuit and all other
circuits and with the branch switch II control
ling only the branch circuit A.
If, as is shown in Fig. 11, the conductors C55,
D56 are the main feed conductors, and all other 40
In. the center of each head and on opposite conductors are branch conductors, switch I will
sides of the cotter strap 28 which mounts the control branch circuit conductors B and switch
pull ring handle of each head are weakened por
II will control branch circuit conductors 'A, and
tions or knock-outs 31. The opening created by branch circuit conductors C53, C54, D53, D54 will
removing a knock-out will provide a large ventv be permanently connected to the feed conductors
45
for the interior of the switch and in addition will and be independent of the switches I and II.
provide a window through which may be viewed
Other uses may be attained by ‘varying the con
the. interior of the switch so that it can be de
nections, with the parts arranged as shown, and
termined by mere observation whether or not still other uses ‘may be attained by varying the
50 certain of the contacts are connected by fuses 25.
arrangements of the parts 50-52 and the con
The switches are connected in circuit through
fuses disposed in socket shells 38 of conducting nections.
I claim:
.
material disposed in depressions or sockets 39;
1. A plug and receptacle switch comprising a
the wall of each socket hugs its shell closely ex
.55 cept where shells are adjacent, in which case the receptacle having adjacent opposite polarity con
walls are cut away, as at 40, between points X, tacts, a plug adapted to be disposed therein and 55
having on its back surface back projecting con
with the result that the requisite minimum creep
age path between shells of opposite polarity is tacts mating with the receptacle contacts, and
preserved even though the eenter-to-center dis ‘ having on its end wall end slots aligned with the
60 tance between shells is below what was hitherto plug contacts to provide vents for the interior of
considered a safe minimum.
The receptacle contacts 20 are formed as lugs
of straps 42—-42g, 42'-—42y’ welded to each other
and transversely directed from straps 43--43g;
65 certain of these straps 43-43g are apertured to
receive axial shanks of terminal connectors 44
having tapped holes receiving screws 45; others
of these straps 43—43g, which .do not have ‘con
nectors 44 associated therewith, have tapped holes
.70 receiving screws 45a whose heads form center or
tip contacts for the socket shells 38; it will be
observed that each unit comprising a receptacle
contact set, a strap, and a terminal connector,’ is
mountable on the block merely by placing the
75 unit against the back of the block in a proper
the receptacle and ways to the plug contacts for 60
test leads, and also to provide an extraordinary
creepage path on the end of the plug between
the plug contacts.
2. A cup shaped insulating block having a slot
in its bottom wall, and a slot in its end wall, 65
and an end ledge, a conductor strap disposed in
the end slot, and having a portion resting on the
ledge, and a portion disposed against the under
surface of the block, a conductor terminal con
nector secured to the portion of the strap disposed
on the ledge, a contact secured to the portion of
the strap disposed against the under surface of
the block and accessible for receiving a prong to
the front of the block through the block bottom 75
9,116,658
wall slot and a single screw for securing the strap,
its connectors, and its contact in place.
3. A duplex receptacle block having eight con
tacts arranged in two groups each of which in
cludes two pairs, two switch plugs, each having a
group of two pairs of contacts, the arrangement
providing two relatively independent switches
each controlling one group comprising two pairs
of contacts, two in each pair, the contacts being
arranged with four at one end of the block and
four at another end of the block, there being one
contact of each pair in each line of four, the con-,
tacts of one line of four being electrically inde
pendent of each other and each having a conduc
15 tor terminal connector, the outside contacts of
the other line of four being electrically intercon
nected and the inside contacts of such other line
of four being electrically interconnected, with the
inside contacts being electrically independent of
the outside pair, a fuse near each contact of the
second line of four and connected at one end to
one contact of that line of four and connected at
its other end to a conductor terminal, and two
conductor terminals, other than the four con
nected to the four fuses, with one connected to
one of an inside pair of contacts and with the
other connected to one of an outside pair of con
tacts.
4. In a receptacle, a plug disposed therein and
80 having conducting parts on its back and having,
on’its end, slots alined with the conducting parts
and running from front to back of the plug pro
viding access to the conducting parts from the
front of the plug and providing an extraordinary
36 creepage path on the end of the plug between the
conducting parts.
, ‘
5. A plug and receptacle switch comprising a
cup shaped receptacle normally closed by the
plug and containing a fuse, and a knockout on
40 the plug front alined with the fuse which may be
knocked out to provide a vent and an observation
hole or window for the receptacle.
6. A cup shaped insulation block having a slot
in its bottom wall, and a slot in its end wall, and
46 an end ledge, a conductor strap disposed in the
end slot, and having a portion resting on the
3
tion of the strap disposed against the under sur
face of the block and accessible for receiving 8.
prong to the front of the block through the block
bottom wall slot and a single screw for securing
the strap, its connectors, and its contact in place,
a plug fuse socket shell in the block, and a screw
passing through the bottom of the shell and the
block and threaded into the strap.
7. A cup shaped insulation block having a slot
in its bottom,‘ wall, and a slot in its end wall, 10
and an end ledge, a conductor strap disposed in
the end slot, and having a portion resting on the
ledge, and a portion disposed against the under
surface of the block, a conductor terminal con
nector secured to the portion of the strap dis
posed on the ledge, a contact secured to the por
tion of the strap disposed against the under sur
face of the block and accessible for receiving a
prong to the front of the block through the block
bottom wall slot and a single screw for securing
the strap, its connectors, and its contact in place,
a plug fuse socket shell in the block, and a screw
passing through the bottom of the shell and the
block and threaded into the strap, the part of the
screw within the shell providing a tip contact in 25
the shell of the same polarity as the strap.
8. A cup shaped insulation block having a slot
in its bottom wall, a conductor strap having a
portion disposed against the under surface of the
block, a contact secured to the portion of the 30
strap disposed against the under surface of the
block and accessible for receiving a prong to the
front of the block through the block bottom wall
slot, a plug fuse socket shell in the block, and a
screw passing through the bottom of the shell 35
and the block and threaded into the strap.
9. A cup shaped insulation block having a slot
in its bottom wall, a conductor strap having a
portion disposed against the under surface of the
block, a contact secured to the portion of the 40
strap disposed against the under surface of the
block and accessible for receiving a prong to the
front of the block through the block bottom wall
slot, a plug fuse socket shell in the block, and a
screw passing through the bottom of the shell and 45
the block and threaded into the strap, the part
ledge, and a portion disposed against the under
of the screw within the shell providing a tip con- '
surface of the block, a conductor terminal con
tact in the shell of the same polarity as the strap.
nector secured to the portion of the strap dis
posed on the ledge, a contact secured to the por
' HARRISON J. L. FRANK.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
586 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа