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Патент USA US2116696

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May 10, 1938.
Gt DE MONGE
THERMIONIC TUBE COMPENSATOR. FOR AERlALS
Filed Jan. 24, 1936
2,116,696
l
Search @AQUÍ
Patented May 10, 1938
2,116,696
UNITED STATES PATENT ÓFFICE2,116,696
THERDIIONIC TUBE- COMPENSATOR FOR
AERIALS
Gerard de Monge, Flostoy, Belgium
Application January 24, 1936, Serial No. 60,712
In Belgium January 24, 1935
8 Claims.
(Cl. Z50-20)
The invention essentially consists in applying
thermionìc valve circuits, including, for example,
triodes and the like, for the suppression or re
duction of interference.
`
It is known that a great deal of interference
is of industrial origin reaching particularly the
down-lead of the aerial but having less effect
upon the aerial proper, especially when the latter
10
is high.
Diiîerent systems have been proposed for
screening or shrouding the down-lead of the
aerial or to counter-balance the action of this
down-lead in order to reduce the eiîect of inter
ference.
`
It has been proposed notably to screen the
down-lead, but that could not be realized Without
a considerable loss of power, resulting in mag
netic loss due to capacity between the conductor
Wire and earth.
The counter-balance of the down-lead by in
20
fluence of a second parallel wire admits less loss
by capacity, but it necessitates the transforma
tion of the current into magnetic ñux, which also
could not be done without considerable loss.
On the other hand, compensating windings
25
cannot be used without the effects Qf resonance
on certain wave-lengths impairing their ef
ñciency.
earth there should be a resistance of the same
magnitude.
An appropriate potential can be given to the
grid in such a way that the valve is in good
working condition irrespective of the potential 1
which will be applied to the cathode from the re
sistance between this latter and the anode cur
rent return point, e. g. the earth.
The grid and the cathode resistances can be so
regulated or arranged as to give to each branch 1b
of reception (the aerial on the one hand and the
down-lead compensator on the other) ap
propriate values for the achievement of the best
result.
In order to balance not only the interference 15
collected by the down-lead of the aerial, but also
the interference collected by the uncompensated
part of the aerial, the control for the secondary
collector or compensator can be regulated to a
greater extent than that of the aerial.
20
These regulations can be accomplished without
causing alteration to the value of grid >potential '
relative to the cathode and vice versa in such a
way as to leave these at the most advantageous
level for permitting control of the input to one
of these two electrodes.
A simple way of realizing this condition is to
25
make the impedance determining the amplitude
.
of the approaching potentials variable by means
According to the invention, a system of com
30 pensation or counter-balance is realized which is of a small condenser operating by its reaction '30
eiîective with minimum loss of eñiciency and without influencing the potential between the
without having recourse to any inductive action cathode and the grid.
by using in the first stage of the receiver an
'I'he regulation oi the extent of action can be
established, either by constant means or by a
ordinary thermionic valve ampliiier circuit ar
35 ranged in such a way as to be operable at the- part of the constant impedance and a variable 35
same time by its grid and by its cathode, whereby ‘ part, which can operate in a differential sense
one of the collectors, for example the aerial, is upon both elements, for example by disposing re
connected to the grid, while the other, for ex
sistances in the cathode and grid circuits, and in
ample the down-lead compensator, is connecte
having between these resistances a potentiometer
40
to the cathode.
~
As it is known, all the variations of the anode
the sliding contact of which can be connected to 40
earth.
.
current of a valve circuit (triode or the like) are
The means for controlling the impedances can
functions of the voltage relation between the grid
be adjusted but it is preferable that they are
aperiodic in order to avoid any trouble which 45
might be caused by resonance.
45 and the cathode, and it is evident that if similar
charges reach both electrodes simultaneously, they
do not produce any variation of the plate current
In the accompanying drawing, forming part
so long as they are of the same small magnitude
of the speciñcation and in which like numerals
are employed to denote like parts throughout the
with respect to the permanent anode voltage,
50 which is obviously the case of high frequency cur
rents gathered by the aerial.
To realize the dual control of the valve circuit,
the cathode must in relation to the return point
of the current, for instance the earth, have a high
impedance, and, moreover, between the grid and
same:
Fig. 1 is a circuit diagram showing the ap
plication of the invention to the neutralization of
an aerial down-lead;
Fig. 2 is a circuit diagram representing a modi
ñcation of the circuit shown in Fig. 1;
50
2
2,1 16,696
Fig. 3 is a circuit diagram illustrating yet a
further modification.
In Fig. 1 the aerial l, situated at a considerable
height in a region relatively sheltered from .the
industrial interference, is connected to the grid
G of the valve T. This aerial is also connected to
earth through the medium of the rheostat 2.
'I'his rheostat 2 is connected to the grid ter
minal and so provides for regulation of the grid
10 voltage. A second wave collector 3 running
connected to the other of said elements, and a
high-frequency aperiodic impedance between the
grid element and the neutral point of the receiv
ing circuit.
3. In a radio receiver, a triode valve including 5
a cathode element and a grid element, and an
effective high-frequency impedance interposed
between the cathode element and a neutral point
of the receiving circuit, a main aerial connected
to one of said elements, a secondary aerial con
10
alongside the down-lead 8 of the aerial, but not
nected to the other of said elements, and a high
connected to it, feeds the cathode C of the same
valve T. A rheostat 4 similarly allows the ampli
tude of the gathered potentials to be regulated by
varying the resistance between the cathode C and
earth. The plate P of the same valve T receives
the high tension current by the choke 5 and trans
mits to the point l, through the condenser 6, the
frequency impedance between the grid element
and the neutral point of the receiving circuit, and
amplified high frequency currents resulting from
the variations of the relative potentials between
the grid G and the cathode C.
It will be understood that when the equal
charges of the same sense arrive simultaneously
on the grid G and the cathode C, the valve T
25 does not work, and that no variation of current is
noticeable at the point 1. In consequence none
of the charges gathered simultaneously by the
down-lead 8 of the aerial l and by the auxiliary
down-lead or compensator 3 will be transmitted
30 to the point l and will thus be eliminated in the
subsequent stages of the receiver. The charges
collected by the uncompensated part of the aerial
I, reaching the grid G only, cause the valve T
to operate in the ordinary way and transmit ordi
35 nary current variations to the point l.
It is conceivable that instead ci a triode, any
other convenient form of valve may be used, e. g.
a screen-grid, pentode or the like.
The circuit represented in Fig. 2 is such that
40 the regulation of the impedances determining the
balance of the two operating electrodes can be
realized without inñuencing the potential given
to the grid with reference to the cathode. The
grid G and the cathode C are each connected to
45 the earth by fixed resistances 2 and 4 respectively
and by the variable condensers 9 and I0 respec
tively which allow the variation of the total im
pedance constituting a point of balance of these
electrodes as regards high frequency currents
without
influencing their ñxed potential.
50
In the arrangement shown in Fig. 3, the cir
cuits of the electrodes G and C each contain a
ñxed resistance 2 and 4 respectively and a differ
ential control in the form of a potentiometer Il
55 of which the sliding contact is connected to earth.
What I claim is:
1. In a radio receiver, a triode valve including
means for varying said irnpedances.
4. In a radio receiver, a triode valve including 15
a cathode element and a grid element, and an
effective high-frequency impedance interposed
between the cathode element and a neutral point
of the receiving circuit, a main aerial connected
to one of said elements, and a secondary aerial 20
connected to the other of said elements, means
for controlling the degree of action of the sec
ondary aerial on the receiver with a voltage high
er than that of the main aerial for compensating
not only the interference collected in the zone 25
common to the two aerials but also the interfer
ence collected by the part not common to the
main aerial.
5. In a radio-receiver, a thermionic tube in
cluding a cathode element and a grid element, 30
an effective high-frequency impedance interposed
between the cathode element and an earth equiv
alent point of the receiving circuit, a main aerial
connected to one of said elements and a second
aerial connected to the other of said elements, 35
and said second aerial extending in a spaced re
lation along the main aerial.
6. In a radio receiver, a thermionic tube in
cluding a cathode element and a grid element, an
effective high frequency impedance interposed 40
between the cathode element and a neutral point
of the receiving circuit, a main aerial connected
to one of said elements, a secondary aerial con
nected to the other of said elements and extend
ing adjacently along the main aerial, and means 45
for controlling the amplitude of high frequency
potentials applied to said cathode and grid ele
ments.
'7. In a radio receiver, a thermionic tube in
cluding a cathode element and a grid elemreniguan 50
effective high frequency. impeda?ïcewint
between the cathode element and. a neu mal
ñ
of the receiving circuit, a mainq _aerial coni'ieçtçëdI
to one of said elements, a secondary aerialwgon
nected to the other of saiïiu'elements'and exigenci-~~ 55
ing along a portion of the main aerial in a spaced
a cathode element and a grid element, and an
relation, and independent means fci‘ controlling
the amplitude of high' frequency potentials -ap
effective high-frequency impedance interposed
plied to said cathode 4and grid'elen'ientsfßMv ‘ ` u
between the cathode element and a neutral point
of the receiving circuit, a main aerial connected
to one of said elements, a secondary aerial con
nected to the other of said elements, and a high
frequency impedance between the grid element
and the neutral point of the receiving circuit.
2. In a radio receiver, a triode valve including
a cathode element and a grid element, and an
effective high-frequency impedance interposed
between the cathode element and a neutral point
of the receiving circuit, a main aerial connected
to one of said elements, and a secondary aerial
8. In a radio receiver, a thermionic tube in
60
cluding a cathode element and a grid element,
an eifective high frequency impedance interposed
between the cathode element and a neutral point
of the receiving circuit, a main aerial connected
to one of said elements, a secondary aerial con
65
nected to the other of said elements and extend
ing in a spaced relation along the main aerial,
and means for controlling the amplitude of high
frequency potentials applied to said cathode and
grid elements comprising variable condensers.
70
GERARD DE MONGE.
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