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Патент USA US2116762

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May 10, 1938. ‘
2,116,762
A. A. KRAEUTER _
GOLF CLUB JOINT
Original Filed Dec. 28, 1928
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BY‘
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AZH'WATTOMEY
2,116,762
Patented May 10, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,116,762
GOLF CLUB JOINT
Arthur A. Kraeuter, South Orange, N. J., assignor
to The Kroydon Company, a corporation of
New Jersey
Application December 28, 1928, Serial No. 328,927
Renewed July 29, 1937
4 Claims. (Cl. 273--80)
This invention relates to golf clubs and more
particularly to clubs having metallic or other
fabricated material handle shafts in which are
used continuously tapering shafts secured to a
5 head having an integral hosel.
It has for its objects the construction of a golf
club having all of the necessary resilient and
other characteristics. of previously constructed
clubs having wooden handle shafts and yet re
10 taining all of the desirable ‘features obtainable
with the use of metallic or other fabricated mate
rial shafts without the undesirable features of
well known wooden shafts which are likely to
warp, check, crack, be susceptible to uneven ?ex
ibility and other undesirable features due to at
mospheric conditions or from those beyond the
control of the user.
‘
It is another object of this invention to ar
range a golf club having a head and hosel of
the same con?guration but provided with a sleeve
20
portion for connecting the hosel and shaft in
such a way that no uneven joints result and that
the metallic fabricated or other shaft will be
reenforced and provide the necessary rigidity in
25 the same manner‘ as would be supplied by the
customary wooden shaft. In addition to these
advantages it is possible with a fabricated shaft
to control the proper weight, resiliency and bal
ance of the club so that it Will maintain this bal
30 ance regardless of the presence or absence of
moisture and independent of the strength re
quirements.
.
Another object is to simplify the construction of
a golf club utilizing a metal or fabricated shaft
35 in which the necessary reenforcing is provided
in the shaft without rendering the club con
struction more dif?cult by utilizing aspecial or
intricate metal working operation which is
needed to form a hollow metal shaft of the same
40 con?guration as the previously used wooden one.
Another object is to provide a construction of‘
club in which a hollow metal or other fabricated
material shaft, having a continuous and uninter
rupted taper, may be used.
45
Another object is to simplify the construct
tion of a golf club head which is utilized in con—
Fig. 3 shows a similar cross section of a form
of construction of golf club embodying my inven
tion.
Referring now more particularly to the draw
ing, the golf club I is constructed with a tubular
metal shaft 2, preferably of steel, ?tting through
a sleeve 3 and into the hosel 4 of the head 5.
These parts are rigidly secured together by
means of a pin, rivet, or other device 6.
The
general contour of this club‘ is precisely the same
as that of a previously used club having a wood
en shaft or handle. However the handle 2 may
be composed of tubular metal having a continu 15
ous taper so arranged that it may be easily
constructed, either of seamed or seamless tubing.
This construction is more clearly shown in
Fig. 2 wherein the shaft 2 is shown as a tubular
element of continuously tapering contour, being 20
larger at its outer end and smaller at its inner
end. This type of tubing readily adapts itself
for construction by rolling a strip of sheet metal
into the form of a tubing so that the seam may
be joined by welding or otherwise and a rigid 25
tubing results.
The head 5 may be of the ordinary construc
tion which is commonly utilized in connection
with-‘wooden shafts having a hosel portion 4 of
outwardly ?aring con?guration. In order to
permit the use of the tapering tubular handle 2
a sleeve 3 is secured thereto which ?ts a portion
of the tubing a considerable distance from the
end and the end ‘i of the sleeve having a bevel
or otherwise for ?tting the outer end of the
hosel 4. The lower end of the hosel is provided
with a hole 8 which will ?t closely to the end of
the handle 2 so that the handle may be supported
at its end and also an appreciable distance away
from the end. The adapter 3 may be arranged
to ?t tightly upon the shaft 2 or may be welded at
9 as indicated or‘may be sweated, brazed, sol
dered or secured in any suitable way so as to
form an integral and securely attached reen
forcing portion.
The outer surface then may be 45
?nished or polished in any manner desired so
as to give an appearance of a continuous solid
nection with a straight continuously tapering
handle piece. It is often necessary when a weld
ing operation is done to heat treat all of the parts
shaft.
adjacent the weld so as to prevent unnecessary 50
weaknesses from stresses set up in the metal dur
,
Further and more de?nite objects will appear
50 in connection with the following detailed speci
?cation, claims, and drawing in which:—
65
view of a golf club with the handle partially
separated from the head; and
Fig. 1 shows a golf club embodying the fea
tures of my invention;
Fig. 2 shows an enlarged sectional detailed
ing the welding operation.
This can be readily
done with this arrangement without subjecting
portions of the head to this heat, by heat treating
the handle as a whole together with the sleeve 3. “5,5
Q
2
2,116,762
When the parts are then properly treated and
?nished off they may be inserted within the
hosel 4 of the handle 5 and secured thereto by
the customary manner, indicated by means of
rivets or otherwise.
Vfhere greater weight is necessary in the con
struction of golf clubs the parts indicated in Fig.
2 may be constructed of solid material or por
tions may be cut away therefrom.
Such an ar
10 rangement is shown in Fig. 3 where the hosel II!)
is constructed of solid material having an open
ing H into which the shaft i2 is ?tted. A
sleeve 13 ?ts closely to this shaft and may be
welded thereto as at I 4. The sleeve and hosel
15 have inter?tting portions l5 and i6 respectively
so as to render the joints more ?rm and less
likely to undesirable movements.
These parts
may be threaded or otherwise secured as indi
cated in connection With Fig. 2. However it has
20 been found sufficient to merely secure the parts
by riveting through the holes I1 and I8, as
previously indicated. The sleeve l3 might be
utilized in connection with a hollow hosel, as in
dicated at 4 in Fig. 2, or the hosel It! might be
25 used in connection with a hollow sleeve 3 having
the proper inter?tting surface. By these con
structions various degrees of rigidity and re
silience might be provided and the balance of
the club arranged in any way which would ren
30 der it more easily used.
It is thus apparent, that with the end of the
handle inserted in the recess portion at the bot
tom of the ferrule 4 and rigidly supported at the
upper end of the downward ?aring portion and
35 prevented from removal therefrom by means of
the pin or rivet, the handle will be rigidly re
enforced, providing the necessary rigidity and also
permitting ?exibility corresponding to that pro
duced by previously utilized wooden handles. It
40 also permits the use of a continuously tapered
shaft which may be readily manufactured or car
ried in stock without machining or otherwise con
structing complicated and di?icult formations
thereon. Also with the solid construction of
45 Fig. 3 slight variations may be made from that of
Fig. 2.
The advantage of this construction lies in the
fact that the reenforcing takes place in the nec
essary location so that continuously tapering han
dle portions will have the same resilient char
acteristics as those of a handle having special en
largements or reduced portions.
According to the construction of Fig. 2 a stand
ard form of golf club head previously used in con
55 nection with wooden shafts and carried in stock
for that purpose may be used for shafts of steel
or other fabricated material without complicated
machine operations or di?icult modi?cations
thereof. The conformation of the head of Fig. 3
is also substantially the ‘same shape except that
the inner bore of the hosel Ill may be slightly
modi?ed to suit the use in connectionwith a
fabricated form of shaft. It is thus apparent
that a simple and effective arrangement is pro
65 vided for utilizing a metallic or fabricated form
of shaft handle for use in connection with a golf
club and that with such construction all of the
resiliency and characteristics are retained with
out the di?iculties encountered in the use of
70 wooden shafts.
It is not intended to be limited
to the exact modi?cations shown but slight devia
tions, variations of the principles embodied here
in, might be utilized without departingvfrom the
spirit and the scope herein set forth.
75
It will be observed that the exterior surface of
the portions 3 and I3 is a curved concaved surf
ace. The presence of this curvature causes the
flexibility of the shaft to be graduated and dis
tributed so as to give the desired flexibility and
“feel” of the club, and this may be varied by vary
ing the concave curvature.
It will be observed that the abutting surfaces
of the hosel I0 and the sleeve 13 may slide upon
each other when the shaft twists incidental to
the striking of the ball. The sleeve I3 thus acts 10
as a re-enforcement against longitudinal ?exing
of the shaft but without stiffening or re-enforc
ing the shaft against torsional ?exure, this last
?exure being desirable to cushion the hands of
the player against the torsional effect of the im
pact of the ball with the head, while the re
enforcement of the shaft against longitudinal
?exing by the sleeve I3 is desirable as graduating
the longitudinal ?exure at that location.
‘;
I desire to be limited only to the extent indi
cated in the following claims.
What I claim is:
1. In a golf club, the combination with a metal
head provided with a hosel having a socket there
in, of a metal shaft ?tting and ?xedly secured ~
within said socket in said hosel metal to metal,
and an upwardly tapered metal sleeve immovably
?xed upon said shaft metal to metal with its
lower end in spaced relation to the lower end of
the shaft and in supporting abutting engage 30
ment with the hosel, the abutting surfaces of the
hosel and sleeve being of substantial extent ra
dially, said sleeve lying entirely outside of the
socket in said hosel and said abutting surfaces of
said hosel and sleeve being slidable upon each
other.
2. In a golf club, the combination with a metal
head provided with a hosel having a socket there
in, of a metal shaft ?tting and ?xedly secured
within said socket in said hosel metal to metal,
and an upwardly tapered metal sleeve immovably 9.0
?xed upon said shaft metal to metal with its lower
end in spaced relation to the lower end of the
shaft and in supporting abutting engagement with
the hosel, the abutting surfaces of the hosel and
sleeve being of substantial .extent radially, said
sleeve lying entirely outside of the socket in said
hosel, the abutting surfaces of the sleeve and the
hosel being in transverse planes longitudinally
spaced along the axis of said shaft and said abut
ting surfaces of said hosel and sleeve being slid
able upon each other.
3. In a golf club the combination with a metal
head provided with a hosel having a socket there
in, of a metal shaft ?tting and ?xedly secured
within said socket metal-to-metal and a sleeve
arranged on and ?xedly secured to said shaft
with its lower end in spaced relation to the lower
end of the shaft and in supporting abutting rela
tion to the hosel, the abutting surfaces of the hosel 60
and sleeve being of substantial extent radially,
said sleeve lying entirely outside of the socket in
said hosel and the abutting surfaces of the hosel
and sleeve being slidable upon each other.
4. In a golf club, the combination with a metal
head provided with a hosel having a socket there
in, of a metal shaft ?tting and ?xedly secured
within said socket metal-to-metal and a sleeve
arranged on and ?xedly secured to said shaft with
its lower end in spaced relation to the lower end
of the shaft and in supporting abutting relation
to the hosel, the abutting surfaces of the hosel
and sleeve being of substantial extent radially and
slidable upon each other.
ARTHUR A. KRAEU'I'ER. 75
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