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Патент USA US2116815

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May 10, 1938.
J. G. WILSON
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DRY CONCENTRATOR
2 Sheets-Sheet -1 `
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May l0, 1938,.
J. G. WILSQNl
`
` 2,116,815
DRY CONCIENTRATOR
Filed Sept. 19, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
50c,
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Patented May 10, 1938
2,116,815
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,116,815
DRY CONCENTRATOR
Joseph G. Wilson, Tulsa, Okla.
Application September 19, 19136, Serial No. 101,625
6 Claims. (Cl. 209-479)
This invention relates to new and useful im
which an example of the invention is shown, and
provements in dry concentrators.
wherein:
i
One object of the invention is to provide an
Figure l is an isometric view, partly in section,
improved device adapted for use in separating of a concentrator constructed in accordance with
heavier mineral grains from a mass of dry mate
rial, whereby precious metals, such as gold, may
be recovered without the use of water or other
iiuids.
An important object of the invention is to pro~
vide an improved dry concentrator which is ar
ranged to impart movement to the material to
be separated and which is so constructed that
the inertia of the mass of material is overcome,
whereby progress of the material through the de-15 vice is accelerated, and at the same time loosely
consolidated masses of the material are disinte
grated, thereby improving the degree of separa
tion of the heavier mineral grains from the re
20
mainder.
Another object of the invention is to provide
an improved dry concentrator having a series of
stepped trays so arranged that the material
placed therein will travel in one direction there
through upon movement of the trays, and at the
25 same time the higher gravity material will be re
strained from such movement and retained in
the trays, while the waste material will be voided
from the trays without the use of agitating means
other than the movement of said trays.
A further object of the invention is to provide
30
an improved dry concentrator having a series of
stepped trays, each tray being provided with a
plurality of transverse bañles which act to impart
the movement of the tray to the material therein,
.so as to overcome the natural inertia of the ma
terial, whereby the separating action of the mo
tion of the trays is distributed throughout the
material in said trays.
A .still further object of the invention is to
provide an improved device adapted for use in
separating material of a higher specific gravity
from a mass of dry material which may be easily
adjusted for use with a large variety of mate
rials.
Another object of the invention is to provide
an improved dry concentrator which is portable
and simple in structure, whereby manufacture is
economical and replacement or repair of dam
aged parts may be readily accomplished.
A construction designed to carry out the in
vention will be hereinafter described, together
with other features of the invention.
The invention will be more readily understood
from a reading of the following specification and
,by reference to the accompanying drawings, in
the invention,
Figure 2 is an enlarged, transverse, vertical,
sectional view of a portion of the stepped trays,
Figure 3 is a plan view of the frame and car
riage,
Figure 4 is a plan view of the trays,
10
Figure 5 is a view taken on the line 5--5 of
Figure 3, and
Figure 6 is a view taken on the line 6-6 of
Figure 3.
»
In the drawings, the numeral Il) designates a 15
series of elongate trays made of wood, or other
suitable material, and arranged in stepped order,
Each tray is formed with a back wall I I, a slightly
inclined bottom I2 and a front wall, the back
wall of each tray forming the front wall of the
tray next above, whereby the upper edge of the N) 0
front wall of each tray is lower than the upper
edge of its back wall, as best shown in Figure 2.
Side walls I3 common to all the trays are pro
vided, each side wall having its upper edge in_clined at substantially the same angle as the in~
clination of the stepped trays. 'I’he back wall i4
f
of the uppermost tray has its upper edge iiush
with the upper edges of the side walls` I 3, said
walls thereby forming in effect an inclined trough 30
in which the trays are positioned. If desired,
the walls and bottom of the trays may be covered
with a suitable sheathing I5 conforming to the
shape of the trays and extending throughout the
series as shown in Figures l and 2. It is noted 3.
that the sheathing is not necessary to the inven
tion but may be used if desired.
Elongate inclined tray supporting bars I6 are
secured to the underside of the trays by screws
or other means and lie contiguous to the side 40
walls I3, being suitably fastened to said side walls.
Vertically extending posts Il have their upper
ends suitably secured, as by bolts Il', to the rear
end of each supporting bar and are of such length
that the front and rear walls of each tray lie in 45
a substantially vertical plane. It is noted, how
ever, that the inclination of the series of trays
may be varied by varying the height of the verti
cal posts I'I.
A suitable baffle supporting frame I 8 is pro- 50
vided for insertion int-o the trays, and includes
suitable side frame members I9 which have their
lower portion bent to conform to the stepped
trays in cross-section. The upper portion of each
side member is formed so as to lie approximately 55
2,116,815
2
parallel to the upper edge of the side walls I3.
The side members are connected by horizontal
rods 2t, which extend longitudinally of the trays
and have .substantially the same length as the
trays whereby the side members I9 are held in en
gagement with the side walls I3 of the trays. In
each tray the horizontal rods 20 are shown as
four in number, two having their ends secured
to the side members IS below the upper edge of
10 the front wall of the tray so as to be slightly
spaced from the bottom of the tray; the other two
horizontal rods have their ends secured to the
side members so as to lie in a plane slightly above
the upper edge of the front wall of the tray, as
clearly shown in Figure 2. It is noted that the
frame IB is not secured to the trays but is held
in position by frictional engagement with the
walls of the trays.
A plurality of spaced transverse baffles ‘22 are
20 provided within each tray, and are supported upon
transverse rods 2l which have their ends secured
to the longitudinal rods 20. It will be seen,
therefore, that the baffles divide each tray into
a plurality of compartments, and. it is preferable
25 that, in each adjoining tray, the baffles be ar
ranged in staggered relation (Figure 4), though
any suitable arrangement may be used. The
bañles are preferably made of some foraminous
material, such as coarse wire screen, but any suit
30... able material may be used. It is noted that the
‘l " transverse rods 2l are» so positioned on the longi
tudinal rods 2@ that a space is formed between the
bottoms of the bañies and the bottom of the tray,
as clearly shown in Figure 2. While the baflies
. have been described as carried by a suitable frame
" i3, it is obvious that the baffles could be Secured
to the front and back walls of each tray, thereby
eliminating the use of said frame. It has been
found advantageous, however, to use the frame,
40 since the baffles may be more readily positioned
within, or removed from, the trays when carried
by said frame, and thus, baliies of various sizes
and disposition or location may be used in the
trays.
,
in operation, the mass of material to be sepa
45
rated is fed, preferably in a steady stream, into
the uppermost tray, while a horizontally re
would tend to move Said heavier grains into the
next lower tray.
It will be seen, therefore, that the baflles act
upon the material Within the trays to accelerate
the separation thereof, as well as to accelerate
the movement of the material through the device
by acting as banking walls which tend to void
>the lighter waste material over the front `walls of
the trays. It is further noted that any desired
arrangement of the baflles may be obtained by 10
using a frame having said arrangement secured
thereto, and since the frames are removable sub
stitution of any one arrangement for another is
facilitated.
_
Any suitable means may be used for transmit
ting a reciprocating motion to the trays, where
15
by said trays are made to reciprocate longitudi~
nally, but the means illustrated and hereinafter
described has been found satisfactory and de
20
sirable.
A frame 30, substantially rectangular in shape
and made of wood or other suitable material,
rests upon blocks 30’. A pair of parallel arms
or extensions 3l extend laterally from one side of
the frame and have a crankshaft 32 journaled in
their outer ends.
A suitable carriage 33 lies within the frame 30,
and includes a plurality of horizontal supporting
bars 33’ supported on bearings 34 which are
slidable on transverse carriage guide shafts 35. 30
The shafts have their ends secured to» the sides
of the frame 3l), and are so positioned that thei
upper edges of the supporting bars 33’ are sub- ,
stantially flush with the top of the frame 30,
whereby a pair of flat bars 38, which are secured «
to the upper edges of the supporting bars 33'
near their ends, move in a plane above said
frame. The fiat bars 38 are so spaced that the
bottom edge of the lowermost tray Iû may be
secured to one of said bars while the vertical posts
ll supporting the rear tray are suitably secured
to the other flat bar, whereby the series of
stepped trays is carried by the slidable carriage 33.
A U-shaped drive bar 36 has its inner ends se
cured to the slidable carriage 33 and its outer
end journaled in one end of a pitman arm 3l.
The other end of the pitman is journaled on the
crank arm 32’ of the crankshaft 32. A suit
able pulley 52 is provided on one end of the
ciprocating motion in a longitudinal direction, is
applied to the trays. It will be seen that the
baffles carried within each tray will be moved crankshaft whereby a drive belt or other means
(not shown) for rotating said crankshaft may
therewith, and each baffle will act upon the mate
be connected.
rial in the vicinity thereof to impart motion there
It will be seen, therefore, that when the crank
to, whereby said material will be agitated .and the -
heavier grains sifted to the bottom of the tray,
55 while the vlighter or waste material will rise to
the top and be voided over the lower front wall of
each tray into the tray next below. The motion
of the trays causes the material therein to pile up
against the baffles, whereby a portion of the lighter
60 particles, which are on top, will naturally fall
over the low front wall of the tray into the next
lower tray. It is obvious that any loosely con
solidated mass of material being struck by one
of the baliles will be disintegrated, thereby accom
plishing a more complete separation of the ma
terial. As hereinbefore stated, the heavier, or
valuable, material will be sifted, due to the mo
tion of the trays, to the bottom thereof, where
it will be restrained from movement down the
steps of the trays by their forward walls, while
70
the space between the bottoms of the baffles and
the bottom of the tray additionally serves to
retain said heavier grains by allowing them to
acquire a natural inertia to agitation, thereby
escaping the agitating action of the baffles which
75,
shaft is rotated, it will act through the pitmanï
arm 31 and the drive bar 36 to move- the car
55
riage 33 reciprocally on the transverse shafts 35.
The bearings 34 may be made of any suitable
material, such as babbitt or the like, but it is pref
erable that they be constructed as hereinafter
described. As clearly shown in Figures. 5 and 6, 60
keach bearing is made of wood and includes an
upper half llü which is securely i'lxed to the sup
porting bars by bolts 4I and has a suitable recess
112 provided in its bottom face for receiving the
shaft 35. The lower half 43 of the bearing is 65
formed with a recess 0.4 in its upper face for re
ceiving the shaft 35, and is provided with ver
-tically extending slots 45 through which bolts 46,
carried by the supporting bars, extend, whereby
said lower half of the bearing may undergo ver 70
tical adjustment. Vertical bolts 41 extend
through both halves of the bearing and nuts 48
are provided on their lower end whereby, should
the bearings become loose for any reason, said
nuts may be drawn up to move the lower half 75
2,116,815
of the bearing into closer engagement with the
shaft.
`
The shafts 35 are provided with suitable lubri»
eating connections 49 on one end, whereby a
lubricant may be injected into the shaft and pass
through openings 50 therein to lubricate the bear
ings sliding thereon. Suitable dust sleeves 5I are
provided for the shafts.
It will be seen that since the device may be
readily constructed of wood, pipe or other suit-
able material, manufacture is made economical
and maintenance simple. ’I‘he simple structure
also makes for a portable device which may be
easily assembled.
_
It is noted that by varying the spacing of the
baflles Within the trays, varying the height of the
Walls of the trays, and also varying the angle of
inclination of the series of trays, the device may
be used to separate different kinds of materials.
It is further noted that, due to the stepped ar~
rangement of the trays and the disposition of
the bañles within said trays, separation of diy
material is accomplished without the use of
water or other fluid to aid in the separation.
This is a feature of the invention, since water or
other fluid may not be available or desirable in
some instances.
What I claim and desire to secure by Letters
Patent, is:
1. A dry concentrator including, a plurality of
transversely stepped closely arranged longitudi
nally elongate trays mounted to reciprocate lon
gitudinally in a fixed horizontal plane, and a
plurality of transverse partitions secured in each
tray and extending from the rear wall to the front
wall but spaced from the bottom of the- tray with
the top thereof substantially level with the top
of the lower Wall of the tray.
,
2. A dry concentrator including, a plurality of
transversely stepped closely arranged longitudi
nally elongate trays mounted to reciprocate lon
gitudinally in a fixed horizontal plane, and a plu
rality of transverse foraminous partitions secured
in each tray and extending from the rear wall
to the front wall with the top thereof substan
tially level with the top of the lower wall of the
tray.
3
3. A dry concentrator including, a plurality of
transversely stepped closely arranged longitudi
nally elongate trays mounted for longitudinal
reciprocation, the rear wall of one tray extending
up to constitute the front wall of the tray stepped
next above, and a plurality of transverse parti
tions secured in each tray and extending from `
the rear wall to the front wall but spaced from
the bottom of the tray with the top thereof sub
stantially level with the top of the lower wall of 10
the tray.
4. A dry concentrator including, a plurality of
transversely stepped closely arranged longitudi
nally elongate trays mounted for longitudinal re
ciprocation, the rear wall of one tray extending
up to constitute the front wall of the tray stepped
next above, and a plurality of transverse parti
tions secured in each tray and extending from
the rear wall to the front wall but spaced from
the bottom of the tray with the top thereof sub 20
stantially level with the top of the lower wall of
the tray, the transverse partitions being rela
tively staggered in the respective adjoining trays.
5. A dry concentrator including, a plurality of
receiving trays arranged in stepped order one
above the other, means for imparting a longi
25
tudinally reciprocating movement to the trays,
and transverse partitions within and carried by
each tray the tops of said partitions being sub
stantially ñush with the lower wall of the tray,
for substantially overcoming the inertia of the
major portion of the material over-riding the
trays.
6. A dry concentrator including, a plurality of
receiving trays arranged in stepped order one c
above the other, means for imparting a longitudi
nally reciprocating movement to the trays, and
transverse partitions within and carried by each
tray the tops of said partitions being substantial
ly ñush with the lower wall of the tray, for sub 40
stantially overcoming the inertia of the major
portion of the material over-riding the trays, the
partitions in each` adjoining tray being arranged
in staggered relation.
JOSEPH G. WILSON.
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