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Патент USA US2117217

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May 10, 1938.
P. s. SINCLAIR
2,117,217
DANDY ROLLS AND CYLINDER MOLDS AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME
Filed Jan. 22, 1936
P221[9R”
3 Sheets-Sheet l
BY
ATTORNEY.
May 10,1938.
P. s. SINCLAIR
2,117,217
DANDY ROLLS AND CYLINDER MOLDS AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME
Filed Jan. 22, 1936
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
mVEm0 am,
BY
ATTORNEY.
May 10, 1938.
P. S. SINCLAIR
2,117,217
DANDY ROLLS AND CYLINDER MOLDS AND METHOD OF MAKING ‘SAME
Filed Jan. 22, 1956
5 Sheets-Sheet 5
INVENTOR,
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ATTORNEY.
Patented May 10, 1938
2,117,225;
UNITED STATES @ATENT QFFEQE
2,117,217
DANDY RULE.- AND CYLINDER MOLD AND
METHOD OF MAKING‘ SAl‘IE
Peter S. Sinclair, Holyoke, Mass.
Application January 22, 1936, Serial No. 60,270
7 Claims.
This invention relates to dandy rolls and cylin
der molds used in the manufacture of paper and
more particularly to the manner in which the
woven wire fabric‘ which covers such rolls is joined
5 together at the edges.
I-Ieretofore dandy rolls have usually had a sewed
seam. This sewing is done by passing a wire back
(Cl. 245-40)
has increased the tendency to clog the meshes
and cause seam marking.
There is a somewhat similar seam or joint em
ployed in the manufacture of Fourdrinier wires
for paper-making machines. These also have 5
usually been sewed seams although recently
there have been more or less successful attempts
and forth from one side of the seam to the other
to produce a soldered joint or seam. While there
interlacing with one or two or more of the wires v are similarities in Fourdrinier and dandy-roll
10 on each side which extend parallel to the seam. seams there are nevertheless very important dif
Such seams have several objectionable features.
One objection is that the wire used for the sewing
?lls up the meshes or interstices of the woven
wire fabric to a considerable extent and because
15 of the decreased drainage resulting therefrom
when the dandy roll or cylinder mold is placed in
operation there is left in the paper a mark, a
defect more or less serious depending on the qual
ity of the paper, which is known as “seam-mark
20 ing”. Also such sewed seams are never as strong
as the wire fabric itself and sometimes pull out
soon‘ after the dandy roll has been placed in
operation. While the quality of the workman
ship no doubt has a great deal to do with the fre~
25 quency with which this occurs nevertheless it
may be safely stated that all manufacturers of
such apparatus have experienced it to some ex
tent.
It has been suggested and some attempts have
30 been made heretofore to join the edges together
by means of solder and thus to produce a soldered
seam instead of a sewed seam.
There are a. num
ber of difficulties encountered in such a construc
tion and while it is not necessary to enumerate
35 them all there is one which will be described
somewhat in detail as it is this particular di?i
culty which is an object of the present invention
to eliminate or at least to make such improve
ments in connection therewith as to render it of
40 little practical importance.
This difficulty has
ferences between the requirements for the two
types of seams and it is important to bear this in
mind because it does not by any means necessarily
follow that the production of a certain type of
improved seam for use in connection with Four~
drinier wires can also be used satisfactorily in
dandy rolls and cylinder molds. In the first place
it is desirable to have the wire on. a dandy roll as
Fourdrinier
taut and tight
wire
as which
possible.
is in This
the form
is notoftrue
an endof
20
less belt. It is a cardinal principle in the opera~
tion of moving belts that the tension be kept as
low as possible. Any such tension as is used on
a dandy roll applied to a Fourdrinier belt would
result in all kinds of trouble such as overloading 25
the bearings, springing the shaft around which
the belt passes, and also increasing breakage due
to the continuous cycles of flexure under severe
tension. As a matter of fact Fourdrinier belts
never do operate under anywhere near the same 0
tension as the covering of a dandy roll. Further
more the feature of operation of continually be
ing ?exed as it passes around the rolls upon which
it is supported imposes on a Fourdrinier wire a
requirement for a certain amount of ?exibility 35
which is not needed in a dandy roll.
In one sense a moderate amount of clogging
of the meshes and seam marking would not be
so important in a Fourdrinier seam as in a dandy
away there will nevertheless be sufficient left to
roll seam. Both produce an undesirable mark it
is true but the Fourdrinier mark does not appear
so frequently in the paper web. This is because
the Fourdrinier belt is 40 to 100 feet long while
the dandy roll is only '7 to 24 inches in diameter.
Because of this frequency of reoccurrence a de
gree of seam marking which would be merely
objectionable in a Fourdrinier belt may be intol
erable in a dandy roll. It is also to be noted that
the seam in a Fourdrinier wire'can be, and gen
erally is, made when the wire is not under tension
and therefore relatively easy to handle while the
seam in a dandy roll must be made while the
wire is under a tension which is very considera~
ble. Other differences will be mentioned herein»
65 produce a satisfactory joint, and this very excess
after but for the present it should be emphasized
to do with the tendency of the solder to spread
away from the place where it is desired to have it.
This has a double consequence. In the ?rst place
the union of the parts is not complete and does
45 not constitute a satisfactory soldered joint. If
the solder spreads away too much there may be
places where there is no union of the wires at
all. The second consequence is that the solder
may run into and ?ll up the meshes oi the wire
fabric either partly or completely and thus ac‘
centuate the seam marking. There has hereto
fore been a tendency to use an excess of solder,
so that even after a certain amount has spread
2
2,117,217
that a seam in a dandy roll presents serious diffi
joint where two lower warp wires are in abutting
culties not encountered at all in the making of
relationship with each other;
seams in Fourdrinier wires which at ?rst would
seem to be a very analogous type of construction
wire fabric near the seam or joint between two
and use.
adjacent edges thereof ;
While both “dandy roll’ and “cylinder mold”
are referred to herein it is the former that is used
the more frequently but it is to be understood
that so far as the present invention is concerned
10 a cylinder mold may be considered to be the full
equivalent of a dandy roll and in both speci?ca
tion and claims “dandy roll” is to be considered
generic to both cylinder molds and dandy rolls
without the necessity of employing some in
15 de?nite or little used term for the purpose of in
cluding both structures.
It is an object of the present invention, broadly
stated, to produce a seam or joint in a dandy roll
or cylinder mold which does not require any
20
sewing.
Another object of the invention is to produce
a dandy-roll seam that will be as strong or even
stronger than the wire cloth in which it is made.
A still further object of the invention is to
25 produce a dandy-roll seam that will have no
tendency to stretch and thus loosen the wire on
the roll.
And it is also an object of the invention to pro‘
duce a seam for dandy rolls that will offer prac
30 tically the same area for drainage through the
interstices as is offered at other parts of the wire
fabric where there is no seam.
More speci?cally it is one of the objects of the
invention to provide a soldered seam or joint of
the character escribed which shall have means
employed in the construction thereof to cause
most of the solder to take its position near the
ends of the abutting wires and in which a very
much smaller quantity is allowed to take its po
40 sition away from the ends of the wires to be
fastened together.
Still more speci?cally stated, it is an object of
the invention, in one form thereof, to provide
means for obstructing the ?ow of solder away
45 from the ends of the wires which it is desired to
solder together.
In another form of the invention, it is a spe
ci?c object thereof to provide fins of solder to be
positioned between the ends of the wires to be
50 soldered together to provide a nucleus to hold
most of the solder near the middle of the joint
and prevent it from being drawn away therefrom
so that most of the solder ultimately rests where
it is effective for the purpose intended.
55
These and other objects of the invention will
readily appear to those skilled in the art to which
it appertains by a consideration of the following
description of several different embodiments
thereof taken in connection with the accompany
ing drawings in which
Fig. 1 is a longitudinal section, greatly en~
larged, of the wire fabric of a dandy roll, taken
at the joint and transversely thereof, and ready
for the brazing or soldering operation;
65
Fig. 2 is a section similar to Fig. 1, but after the
brazing or soldering operation, taken on the line
2—2 of Fig. 5, and shows the nature of the joint
where two upper warp wires are in abutting rela
tionship;
Fig. 3 is a similar cross section taken on the
line 3--3 of Fig. 5 and shows the appearance of
the joint midway between the warp wires;
Fig. 4 is a section taken on the line 4-6 of Fig.
5 and shows the appearance of the completed
Fig. 5 is a top plan view of a portion of the
Fig. 6 is a section, similar to Fig. 1, of a modi
?ed form of the invention and shows the parts
in their relative positions just prior to the appli
cation of heat to melt the solder;
Fig. ‘7 is a section, similar to Fig. 6, taken on 10
the line ‘l—‘l of Fig. 10 and shows the appearance
of the completed joint where two of the upper
warp wires are disposed in abutting relationship;
Fig. 8 is a section, similar to Fig. '7, taken on the
line Ti-—'e' of Fig. 10 and shows the appearance of
the completed joint midway of the warp wires;
Fig. 9 is a section, similar to Fig. '7, taken on
the line l——‘l of Fig. 10 and shows the appearance
of the joint where two of the lower warp wires
20
are in abutting relationship;
Fig. 10 is a top plan view of a portion of the
wire fabric, shown in Figs. 6 to 9, taken near the
seam or joint between two adjacent edges thereof;
Fig. 11 is a section, similar to Fig. 1, of another
modi?ed form of the invention showing the parts
just before the opposing edges of the wires have
been brought close together for the application of
the heat for soldering;
Fig. 12 is a section of still another modi?ed
form of the invention, similar to but slightly dif- '
ferent from the form of the invention shown in
Fig. 11;
Fig. 13 is a section, taken on the line |3—l3 of
Fig. 16, of a completed joint and shows the ap
pearance thereof where two upper warp wires are 35
disposed in abutting relationship, the appearance
of the joint in this ?gure and also in the remain
ing ?gures applying equally to both of the forms
of the invention shown in Figs. 11 and 12;
Fig. 14 is a section, taken on the line Ill-ll. of 40
Fig. 16, and shows the appearance of the joint as
it appears midway ‘of the warp wires;
Fig. 15 is a section, taken on the line I5—I5 of
Fig. 16, and shows the appearance of the joint as
it appears where two of the lower warp wires are 45
disposed in abutting relationship; and
Fig. 16 is a top plan View of a portion of a
woven wire fabric taken near the joint therein
made in accordance with the showing of either
Fig. 11, or Fig. 12 and the following Figures 13 to 50
15 inclusive.
Referring to the drawings more in detail and
particularly to the form of the invention shown
in Figs. 1 to 5, the reference characters El, 22,
23, 24 and 25 indicate a part of the warp wires 55
positioned to the left of the joint as seen in
Fig. 1 and above the joint as seen in Fig. 5.
The corresponding warp‘ wires to the right of the
joint as seen in Fig. 1 and below the joint as
seen in Fig. 5 are indicated by the reference
characters 26, 2?, 28, 29 and 38. The weft wire
nearest to the edge where the joint is to be made
on the left side thereof (Fig. 1), is shown at 3|
and the corresponding weft wire on the other side
of the seam or joint is shown at 32.
In prepar
ing the edge of the wire fabric for the making
of the seam or joint one or more weft wires are
removed, the last one to be removed in the edge
to the left of the seam in Fig. 1 being the one just
to the right of the wire 3! . The ends of the warp
wires 2|, 22, 23, etc. are then cut off the proper
distance. This is approximately at, or preferably
slightly beyond, the vertical plane, as seen in Fig.
1, that would pass through the center of the posi
tion of the last weft wire to be removed or in other
65
2,117,217
words the distance between the center of the weft
wire 3! to the end of the warp wires El, 22, 23,
etc. is about equal to or slightly greater than the
distance between weft wires in the fabric.
3
solder of low melting point. It is essential that
the weft member 3| and projecting slightly be
it be a hard solder to provide the necessary
strength and it is also desirable that it have a
low melting point in order to flow under the ac
tion of heat readily without injury to the ends of
the warp wires.
The general appearance of the completed seam
or joint is shown in Fig. 2, the section being taken
as already stated in the longitudinal plane of
two warp wires which are in abutting relationship
at the seam and at the upper part thereof. The
abutting warp wires are indicated by the refer
ence characters 2! and 26 and the next adjacent
pair of warp wires positioned just behind the
wires 2! and 26 are indicated in dotted lines at 15'
22 and 21. It will be noticed that the combined
action of the softening of the solder and the
drawing together of the ends of the warp wires
serves to squeeze the solder upwardly between the
ends of wires 2! and 26 providing a thin layer of
solder 31 therebe'tween. The tendency of the
solder to get into the space between the ends of
the wires 2! and 25 is also largely due not only
to the squeezing effect but also to that phenom
enon of liquids which gives rise ‘to capillary at 25. .
traction and surface tension. This also causes
the drawing up of the solder beneath the warp
wires as indicated at 38 and provides a reinforcing
and strengthening mass of solder. It is to be
understood that while ‘the section taken in Fig. 2 30"
is only able to show the solder as gathered at the
yond the ends of the warp wires is a member 34
of fusible material such as hard silver solder of
under side of the wires 2| and 26 it does as a mat
ter of fact also extend up around the sides. The
a low melting point.
tendency for the solder to be drawn by the same
liquid tension along the warp wires toward the
weft wires and away from the joint is prevented
While throughout both speci?cation and claims
the warp wires are described as extending cir
cumferentially and the weft wires in the other
direction it is possible in the actual construction
to interchange this relationship so that the weft
10 wires extend circumferentially and the warp wires
parallel to the axis. Both dandy rolls and cylin
der molds have been actually constructed in this
manner although as at present advised it does not
seem to be so satisfactory, all things considered,
15 as the other way. However, even though for the
sake of definiteness and clearness, only one form
of construction has been set forth in the speci?ca
tion, drawings and claims, it is to be understood
that it is intended that the invention be consid
20 ered broad enough to include any such mere
reversal of parts.
In the space left vacant by the removal of
the weft wire just to the right of the weft wire 3!
in Fig. 1 there is placed a barrier member 33 which
25 is shown in the drawings as of triangular cross—
sectional form. This barrier member 33 is. pref
erably formed from material that is the same as
or similar to the material that is used for ‘the wires
of the wire fabric. Positioned to the right of the
30 barrier member 33, that is, on the side away from
This member is shown in
35 Fig. 1 as of circular cross section. It will be noted
that the ends of the warp wires 29 and 22 turn
inwardly slightly so as ‘to clinch around the fusi
ble member 3d and hold it in place. This may be
accomplished by cutting off the warp wires slight
40 ly longer than would correspond with the center
of the removed weft wire so that the warp wires
would have this slight inward direction due to
their formation in the fabric. The natural resil
iency of the wires permits the barrier member 33
45 and the fusible member M to be pushed into
place and then the ends of the warp wires snap
back inwardly a slight distance to hold the mem
bers 33 and 34. On the other hand the warp
wires may be out off so that they are straight
50 without any inward turn and after the members
33 and 34 are put in position they may be turned
inward by means of a crimping tool. Or both of
the foregoing methods may be used in combina~
tion. It is to be understood that the members 33
and 34 are not held in place with any great force
but even a slight force is sufficient to be of sub
stantial assistance in preventing them from slip
ping out of place before the subsequent operations
are performed. A similar barrier member 35 and
60 member of fusible material 36 is inserted in the
space between the projecting ends of the warp
wires 26, 21, etc, as shown at the right of the
joint.
After the barrier and fusible members are in
65 position on both sides of the seam the opposed
edges of the wire fabric are drawn together by
means of clamps until the parts are in the rela~
tive positions shown in Fig. 1. Heat is then ap~
plied in any suitable form such as by means of
a gas-acetylene flame. It is not only desirable
but highly important that the temperature of t}. ?ame shall not be higher than necessary in ordo.~
to avoid the danger of overheating the fine warp
wires and injuring them. It is for this reason
75 that the solder was speci?ed as being a hard silver
almost entirely by the barriers 33 and 35.
In Fig. 3, which is a section taken midway
between two warp wires, the fusible material or
solder is shown at 39 as greatly reduced in cross 40"
section due to the drawing of the solder toward
the warp wires and also shows how the same
tension which draws the solder toward the warp
wires also serves to spring the light barrier
members toward each other slightly.
45. 1
Fig. 4 is similar to Fig. 2 but differs in that
the section is taken where two of the lower ends
22 and 2'! of the warp wires are in abutting rela
tionship instead of two upper ones as shown in
Fig. 2. The layer of solder between the ends 50 1."
of the warp wires is shown at 37c and the sup
porting and reinforcing mass of solder above the
wires is indicated at 38a.
The different ?gures of the drawings show
the warp wires as being in exact‘ alinement on
opposite sides of the seam. This is true through
out a part of the length of the seam but not
everywhere. The diameter of a dandy roll is
not exactly the same from one end to the other.
Sometimes this is so because the center is pur 60
posely made larger or the roll is said to be
crowned. In other cases the difference in diam
eter is simply due to irregularities. In any event
it becomes necessary to remove more weft wires
in some parts of the seam than in others. The 65.
result is that the manner in which the warp
wires aline themselves is constantly shifting along
the
In one place the warp wires may be
in alinement as shown in the diiferent ?gures
of the drawings. A little further along the warp
wires are no longer in alinement but are stag
gered with respect to each other. Still further
along they appear in alinement in looking down
upon them but an upper warp wire is opposite
a lower warp wire. The form of soldered con 75.
4.
2,117,217
nections under all these varying conditions has
providing a layer of solder 311) between these
not been shown as those skilled in the art will be
able to amplify the foregoing illustrations to
mass of solder 38b also gathers under the warp
apply to such shifting relationships.
It should
be stated, however, that this is one more dif
ference which distinguishes the problem of pro
viding a seam in a dandy roll from that of pro
viding a seam in a Fourdrinier wire. In the latter
case there is a certain amount of slack in use,
10 as with all belts, and more-over the joint is
usually made before the wire is in place and
therefore not under tension. In such endless
belts it is considered desirable to stagger the
opposed warp wires uniformly clear across the
15 seam as flexibility is deemed more important than
strength which is the chief desideratum in dandy
rolls.
In the modi?cation of the invention shown
in Figs. 6 to 9 barrier members
and 351) are
20’ ‘provided which have a-circular cross section.
The member 83b is placed within the space be
tween the ends of the warp wires 25,
23, etc.,
and the member 351? is placed within the space
between the ends of the warp wires ‘2%, 2?, 28,
25 etc. A member 3652) of fusible material is then
placed against the member 33b and a similar
member 3% is placed against the member 351),
both of the members 2% and 36?) being posi
tioned principally within the space between the
30 warp wires and protruding slightly beyond such
‘space. As described with respect to the form
of the invention shown in Figs. 1. to 5 the warp
wires are converging slightly near the ends and
serve to clinch around the members 3417 and 35b
35 of fusible material and hold them in place. As
already described this may be due to the manner
of cutting the warp wires or to the use of a
crimping tool or to both methods.
The cross-sectional form of the members 341)
40 and 36b is important in obtaining the best results
and while the form shown in the drawings is
considered to be the preferable form it is to be
understood that there may be deviations there
from because of di?icuity and expense in making
it
precisely as shown or because of stock material
45
somewhat different but more available or for any
other reason and such deviations will merely
mar the complete attainment of the purpose of
the invention although such purpose may be
attained more or less approximately depending
50
upon how‘ great such deviations are. The form
of the members 33b and 35b shown in the draw
ings and considered the best for the purpose of
the invention is devised to occupy the space be
55 tween the ends of the warp wires as fully as pos
sible. The upper and lower sides of the mem
bers of fusible material are not parallel but con
verging so as to correspond with the converging
direction of the warp wires. This not only serves
60 to ?ll up the space more completely but provides
a better cross-sectional form for holding the
members in place when the crimping tool is used.
The side of the member of fusible material which
is nearest to the barrier member is preferably
65 curved so as to present a concave surface toward
the barrier member and thus increase the amount
of solder in such member more than would be
the case if it were a plane surface.
As described with respect to the form of the
70 invention shown in Figs. 1 to 5, clamps are ap
plied which tend to draw the ends of the warp
wires together and heat is applied. As the solder
softens the material in liquid or semi-liquid form
is drawn toward the ends of the warp wires and
75 into the space between the ends of the warp wires
ends and holding them together. A supporting
wires and increases the strength of the joint.
It is to be noted that the barrier members 331)
and 35b prevent any substantial amount of solder
from following the warp wires back away from
the joint. In Figs. 8 and 10 is shown how the
solder midway between the warp wires is drawn
away to a very much reduced cross section 391). 10
Fig. 9 shows the manner in which the solder is
distributed where two lower warp wires are in
abutting relationship. A thin layer of solder 370
is drawn into the space between the abutting
ends of the warp wires 22 and 21 and a rein 15
forcing mass of solder 38c gathers on the upper
surfaces of the wires.
Figs. 11 to 15 show another modi?cation of the
invention, in fact two other modi?cations, al
though they are very similar to each other. In 20
Fig. 11 a member 138 of fusible material such as
solder is shown as having two substantially cylin
drical portions, 4| extending to the left, and 42
extending to the right. The member 4|) also has
an upwardly extending ?n 43 or thin layer of 25
solder and a similar downwardly extending ?n
M.
The warp wires on the left of the seam or
joint 2|, 22, 23, etc., are all cut off slightly
longer than would correspond with the center
of the position of the last weft wire to be 30
removed so that the ends of the wires are
positioned in a slightly converging direction. In
a similar manner the warp wires to the right of
the joint, 26, 21, 28, etc., are cut off slightly longer
than would correspond with the center of the po 35
sition of the last weft wire to be removed so that
they are slightly converging in direction. The
fusible member is pushed into position so that
the right hand portion 42 is resiliently held by
the warp wires 26, 21, 28, etc., as shown in Fig. 40
11. The usual clamps are applied to draw the
edges of the fabric together until the left hand
portion 4| of the fusible member Ml is also em
braced by the warp wires 2|, 22, 23, etc. It is
to be understood that Fig. 11 represents the parts 45
just prior to this last named operation of drawing
the edges together which is necessary before heat
is applied.
Fig. 12 shows two members 46a and 40b of
fusible material, the ?rst being positioned to the 50
left of the seam or joint and the other to the
right. The member Mia is provided with a cylin
drical portion Illa positioned between the warp
wires 2|, 22, 23, etc., and resiliently held in place
by them. The member 46b is similarly provided 55
with a cylindrical portion 42a which is positioned
between the warp wires 26, 21, 28, etc., and re
siliently held in place by them. The member 40a
is also provided with an upwardly extending ?n
43a and a downwardly extending ?n Ma. Simi 60
larly the member 402) is provided with an up
wardly extending ?n 43b and a downwardly ex—
tending ?n 441). Just prior to the application of
heat clamps are used for drawing the opposed
edges of the wire fabric toward each other until 65
the flat surfaces are in contact. At this stage
of the process the embodiment shown in Fig. 11
and the embodiment shown in Fig. 12 are sub
stantially the same the only difference being
that in Fig. 11 the upper ?n is one integral piece
and in Fig. 12 it is two separate pieces until
after the heat has been applied.
' After the heat has been applied the end of the
Warp wire 2| and the end of the warp wire 28
are joined together by means of the solder 31d 75
2,117,217’
positioned therebetween as shown in Fig. 13. This
solder 31d acts as a nucleus toward which the
solder is drawn in the form of a reinforcing mass
38d. The result is more or less the same as in the
forms of the invention shown in Figs. 1 to 10 but
the method of accomplishing the result is some
what different in that in Figs. 1_ to 10 the solder
is prevented or obstructed from ?owing along
the warp wires and forced between the ends of
10 the warp wires whereas in Figs. 11 to 15 a certain
amount of solder is positioned initially between
the ends of the warp wires and draws the rest
of the solder away from creeping along the warp
Wires in a direction away from the joint.
15
In Fig. 14 is shown the appearance of the solder
midway between adjacent warp wires. It will be
noted that, as in the previous forms of the in
vention, the tendency to draw the solder into the
space between the ends of the warp wires has de
'20 creased the amount of the solder in this midway
position and the cross section is somewhat less.
Fig. 15 shows the appearance of the joint between
the two lower warp wires 22 and 27. The portion
31c of the solder which was originally the lower
25 fin or ?ns unites the ends of the warp wires and
the rest of the solder gathers around the upper
and lateral sides of the warp wires in a reinforc
ing mass 38c.
It is to be understood that the foregoing em
30 bodiments of the invention have been selected for
purposes of illustration only and various changes
may be made therein without departing from the
spirit and scope of the invention as de?ned in
the subjoined claims.
35
I claim:
1. A seam for the woven wire covering of a
dandy roll comprising a woven wire fabric having
two edges on opposite sides of the seam, said
edges extending parallel to the weft wires and
40 transversely of the warp wires, the weft wire
nearest to each edge being positioned slightly
back therefrom so that the ends of the warp wires
project beyond said weft wires, a member of fu
sible material positioned between the projecting
45 warp wires of each edge, and means for con
trolling the flow of solder upon the application
of heat so that the amount of solder ?owing be
tween the abutting ends of the warp wires is
increased and the amount of solder drawn along
50 the warp wires away from the edge is decreased.
2. A seam for the woven wire covering of a
dandy roll comprising a woven wire fabric hav
ing warp wires and weft wires positioned around
the dandy roll with the warp wires extending
55 circumferentially of the dandy roll and both the
weft wires and the seam extending parallel to
the axis of the roll, the warp wires at each side
of the seam having a space therebetween formed
by the removal of a weft wire, a barrier member
of non-fusible material positioned in each of said
spaces back against the crossed warp wires and
away from the seam, a member of fusible material
in each space between said barrier members and
the ends of the warp wires, said fusible material
extending beyond the ends of the warp wires
and into the space between the abutting ends of
the warp wires.
3. A seam for the woven wire covering of a
dandy roll comprising a woven wire fabric hav
70 ing warp wires and weft wires positioned around
the dandy roll with the warp wires extending
circumferentially of the dandy roll and both the
weft wires and the seam extending parallel to
the axis of the roll, the warp wires at each side
of the seam having a space therebetween formed
5
by the removal of a weft. wire, a member of fu
sible material positioned in said space at each
side of the seam, and ?ns of fusible material in
tegral with and extending from said members
laterally both ways into the space between the
opposed abutting ends of the warp wires.
4. A seam for the woven wire covering of a
dandy roll comprising a woven wire fabric hav
ing warp wires and weft wires positioned around
the dandy roll with the warp wires extending 10
circumferentially of the dandy roll and both the
weft wires' and the seam extending parallel to
the axis of the roll, the Warp wires at each side
of the seam having a space therebetween formed
by the removal of a weft wire, a barrier member 15
of triangular cross-sectional form and of non
fusible material positioned in each of said spaces
with the apex thereof positioned against the
crossed warp wires and away from the seam, a
member of fusible material in each space between 20
said barrier member and the ends of the warp
wires, said fusible material extending beyond the
ends of the warp wires and into the space be
tween the abutting ends of the warp wires.
5. The process of making a seam in the woven 25
wire covering of a dandy roll comprising posi
tioning a woven wire fabric around the support
ing structure of a dandy roll with the warp wires
extending circumferentially and the weft wires
extending parallel to the proposed seam and to 30
the axis of the dandy roll, removing on each side
of the seam one of the weft wires, cutting the
projecting warp wires on each side of the seam
so that they extend to approximately the center
of the position of the removed weft wire, posi 35
tioning a barrier in each space left by a removed
weft wire and against the crossed warp wires,
positioning a member of fusible material in the
rest of each space left by the removal of said
weft wires, said members of fusible material pro 40
jecting slightly beyond the ends of the warp
wires, drawing the opposed edges of the seam
together so that the two members of ‘fusible
material are pressed together with the ends of
the warp wires spaced a slight distance apart,
and applying heat to said members while still 45
under the action of the force which draws them
together whereby the fused material is forced
into the space between the ends of the warp
wires and barred from ?owing along the warp
50
wires away from the seam.
6. A seam for the woven wire covering of a
dandy roll comprising a woven wire fabric hav
ing warp wires and weft wires positioned around
the dandy roll with the warp wires extending
circumferentially of the dandy roll and both the
weft wires and the seam extending parallel to
the axis of the roll, the warp wires at each side
of the seam having a space therebetween formed
by the removal of a weft wire, a member of fusible
material having enlarged portions on opposite 60
sides thereof, one of said enlarged portions being
positioned in said space on one side of said seam
and the other enlarged portion being positioned
in said space on the other side of said seam, and
a pair of ?ns integral with said fusible material 65
extending in opposite directions into the space
between the abutting ends of the warp wires.
7. The process of making a seam in the woven
wire covering of a dandy roll comprising posi
tioning a woven wire fabric around the support
ing structure of a dandy roll with the warp wires
70
extending circumferentially and the weft wires
extending parallel to the proposed seam and to
the axis of the dandy roll, removing on each side 75
6
2,117,217
of the seam one of the weft wires, cutting the
projecting warp wires on each side of the seam
so that they extend to approximately the cen
site ends of the warp wires, drawing the opposed
edges of the wire fabric together and while they
are still under the action of the force applying
ter of the position of the removed weft wire,
heat to the fusible material whereby the melted
positioning a member of fusible material so that
material is drawn toward and between the abut
ting ends of the Warp wires.
portions thereof are in each space left by the
removal of the, Weft wire, said member having ?ns
integral therewith extending between the oppo
PETER S. SINCLAIR.
5
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