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Патент USA US2117244

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May 10, 1938.
»
W, E; GQEHRING
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`
2,117,244
BANK VAULT VENTILATOR
Filed Dec. 14, 1955
2 >sheets--íihee’rI l
[NI/ENTOR
_B Y
'
ATTORNEY
May 10, 1938. /
w. E. GOEHRING
BANK VAULT VENTILATOR
Filed Dec. 14, 1955
2,117,244
.
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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/N VEN TO/e
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ATTORNEY
Patented May 10, 1938
2,117,244
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,117,244
BANK VAULT VENTILATOR
William E. Goehring, Stamford, Conn., assignor
to The Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company,
Stamford, Conn., a corporation of Connecticut
Application December 14, 1935, Serial No. 54,449
10 Claims.
I 5
This invention relates to a vault ventilator `of
the type in which means operated from the inside
of the vault will open up a passage to the out
side of the vault for sending fresh air into the
vault.
`Bank vault ventilators are well known in the
art and have been developed to a fairly high
state of perfection over a period of several years.
My invention contemplates `an improvement in
6 bank vault ventilators whereby proper and eili
cient ventilation is obtained without the sacrifice
of some of the security of the vault.
In those ventilators of the prior art which
have intake and outlet passages, those intake
and outlet passages are necessarily connected,
due to the method of controlling the vopening of
the intake and outlet passages ,from the inside
of the vault. Thus, where a rotary passage
aligning mechanism is used in the prior art, it
is a practical impossibility to prevent the `setting
up of air short circuiting passages which set
up air circulation in the ventilator itself, rather
than between the vault and the outside atmos
phere. In my invention, due to a particular
arrangement of the intake and outlet passages,
'and due to the particular means of control of
said passages, I am able to maintain the pipes
entirely independent of one another so as to
obtain a very ñne Ventilating arrangement, with
30 no possible short circuiting of the air in the
ventilator itself.
In my invention, by utilizing pipes of par
.ticular shape, and intake and outlet passages
properly arranged relatively to those pipes, to
gether with plunger control means of substan
` tial length, I am able to provide a substantial
wall of steel protecting the vault against attack,
,40
so that the point of application of my ventilator
will, instead of being more vulnerable than the
remainder of the vault, be of at least the strength
of the rest of the vault if not stronger than the
rest of the vault.
My invention contemplates also the provision
of rather simple means for locking the plungers
45 against movement from the outside of the vault
and the simplifying of the means for controlling
the Ventilating motor. The invention contem
plates also a particularly novel arrangement of
the Ventilating motor relatively to the intake
,59
pipe.
More in detail, my invention provides a vault
Ventilating structure having a steel front exposed
to the outside of the vault, and two pipes run
ning from this steel front to the rear of the
vault and terminating in what may be termed
(Cl. 109-1)
.dead ends. Considering but one of these pipes, Y"
sincethe two are preferably duplicates, there is
a passage leading from substantially a midway
point of the pipe to the inside of the Vault.
vA plunger of substantial length and in circum
ferential contact with the pipe is adapted to Y
slide in that pipe, and in one position, the outside
end of this plunger is substantially in the plane
of the outside of the vault, while in its other
position, the outside end is just inside of the
terminal of the passage at substantially the mid li)
way point of the pipe. 'I‘he other end of the
plunger is, preferably, in this position against
the substantially dead end of the pipe. Naturally,
I use circular pipes and cylindrical plungers, but
itis appreciated that other shapes may be used
`if desired. Also, means other than plungers
4may be devised.
Naturally, when the plunger is in its ñrst
position, with its outside end in the plane o_f the
>outside surface of the vault, it prevents com
munication between the passage and -the outside
atmosphere through the pipe.
However, when
the plunger is -moved rearwardly, as previously
_set forth, the point of communication of the
passage with the pipe is exposed to the atmos 25
phere, and a fan connected to the passage will
naturally operate to pull in the air from the
outside >to the inside of the vault.
While I preferably provide a suction fan, it
is naturally possible to expel the air from the 30
inside of the vault to the outside and rely on
the other pipe passage in the ventilator to permit
`the flow of air from the outside into> the interior
of the vault.
The substantially dead ends of the pipes pre
viously described are bored for the housing of
relatively small diameter rods, which are secured
to the plungers at one end, and to a common
handle at the other end. Through this handle 40
and the rods, the plungers may be moved in
their pipes. Naturally, my invention contem
plates such obvious equivalents as plungers mov
able through screw threads, electromagnetic
means, or even springs.
Preferably, the plunger operating handle has
45
a rotatable T end portion adapted to deadlockit relatively to the vault with the plungers main
tained with their outside ends in the plane of
the outside surface of the vault. As a preferred 50
feature of my invention, I provide a switch for
the electric fan which is moved into position to
start the operation of the fan when the plunger
and handle are moved to a position providing
communication between the outside of the `vault
2
2,117,244.
and the inside of the vault, and to stop the op
eration of the fan when this communication is
cut on".
For a better understanding of my invention,
I shall now refer to the drawings wherein Fig. 1
is a section through a vault showing the appli
cation of the ventilator thereto, and with the
mechanism of the ventilator in Ventilating posi
tion. Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 showing
10 some of the parts oi" the ventilator in section,
and illustrating the ventilator with its parts in
non-Ventilating position. Fig. 3 is a view of the
ventilator from the outside of the vault, while
Fig. 4 is a view of the ventilator from the inside
15 of the vault.
Referring now more particularly to the draw
ings, reference numeral iii represents a section
of the vault wall in which is housed the body Il
of the ventilator. This body has iixed thereto
20 a front plate i2, oi steel, having openings i3 and
I4 in communication with an outlet pipe i5 and
an inlet pipe i5. Preferably, the wall ends of
the pipes are screened, as is best seen in Fig. 2.
The pipes i5 and i5 may be formed as bored
25 portions of a solid steel structure, or may simply
be cast iron or cast steel pipes inserted into
bored and threaded openings of the steel body il
of the ventilator. Many methods of fabricating
the construction will of course readily occur to
30 those skilled in the art. These pipes I5 and it
run rearwardly from the body i i, terminating in
what may be called dead ends I1 and I8 respec
tively.
Each pipe has mounted therein a plunger I9
35 to which is secured a rod 2D which traverses small
bore pipes 2i leading to openings in the dead ends
l1 and I8 of the main pipes I5 and lâ. Substan
tially midway of the pipe i5, there leads into
the pipe i5 an offset outlet passage 22 terminat
40 ing at 23 on the inside of the vault in a screened
- opening 24. Similarly, an intake passage 24 com
municates with the pipe i6 and terminates at 25
in the intake passage of an electric fan 26 which
is adapted to pull the air through the passage 24
and exhaust it at 28 on the inside of the vault,
45 as
will be quite clear from a view of Figs. 2 and 4.
The rods 2S are secured to a crossbar 29 on
which is rotatably mounted a handle Sil having a
T end 3l which cooperates with a T slot 32 on
the inside plate 33 of the ventilator. It will be
readily appreciated that with the T end 3i lying
in the T slo-t 32, as in Fig. 2, the rods 20 and the
plungers l5) will be locked in the position of Fig. 2.
This will present a solid steel front to the outside
of the Vault through which it will be impossible
55
to insert nitro-glycerine or any other form of
explosive for the purpose of destroying the vault.
Anyone wishing to ventilate the Vault from the
inside may, however, rotate the handle Si), release
60 the T portion 3i from the slot 32, as best illus
trated in Fig. l, and retract plungers i9, thus
exposing the passages 22 and 2li to the atmos
phere. Incidentally, this movement from Fig. 2
to Fig. 1 of the handle Si) and crossbar 29 is
65
adapted to start 'the operation of -the Ventilating
fan 26 through operation of a switch controlled
by plunger 3st.
The plunger is spring pressed
in a manner which is well understood by those
skilled in the art, so that in the position of Fig. 1
70 with the crossbar 29 removed, it will be in a posi
tion to close
ie electric circuit through the fan
25. When, however, the crossbar 29 is moved to
the position of Fig. 2, the plunger 3ft will be de
75
pressed so as to open the circuit of the fan 2S.
The scope of the invention is now fairly well
indicated. Naturally, various modiñcations of the
invention will readily occur to those skilled in the
art, and the particular contribution presented in
this speciñcation may be utilized in various forms.`
Therefore, the claims appended hereto should be
broadly interpreted so that the monopoly granted
will not be limited to my particular construction.l
I claim:
`
l. In a bank vault ventilator, an intake pipe
and an outlet pipe leading from the vault to the
atmosphere, said pipes being arranged so as to
have no communication one with the other except
through the atmosphere outside the Vault and
inside the vault, and shut off means for each of
said pipes mounted for movement in separate 15
chambers not in communication with one another
except through the atmosphere on the interior
and exterior of the vault.
2. In a bank vault ventilator, an intake pipe
and an outlet pipe leading from the Vault to the 20
atmosphere, said pipes being arranged so as to
have no communication one with the other except
through the atmosphere outside the vault and
inside the vault, shut oiT means for said pipes
mounted for movement in separate chambers not 25
in communication with one another except
through the atmosphere on` the interior and ex
terior of the Vault, and means for moving said
shut off means to and from shut off position.
3. In a bank vault ventilator, an intake pipe
leading from the atmosphere toward the inside
of the vault and terminating in a substantially
dead end short of the inside of the vault, a plunger
in said pipe and adapted to occupy a normal posi
tion with its outside end substantially flush with
the outer surface of the vault, an offset passage
leading from substantially a midpoint of said
pipe to the inside of the vault, said plunger be
ing adapted in its normal position to prevent ac
cess to said offset passage from the outside of 40
the vault, and said plunger being movable in
wardly in said pipe to a second position to open
said oiîset passage to the pipe and to the out
side of the vault.
4. In a bank vault ventilator, an intake pipe ¿5
leading from the atmosphere toward the inside
of the vault and terminating in a substantially
dead end short of the inside of the vault, means
in said pipe adapted to close its open end at
substantially the outer surface of the vault, a
passage leading from an inner point of said pipe
to the inside of the vault, said means being mov
able inwardly in said pipe to expose said inner
point to open said passage to the pipe and to
the outside of the vault.
5. In a bank vault ventilator, an intake pipe
leading from the atmosphere toward the inside
of the vault and terminating in a substantially
dead end short of the inside of the Vault, a
plunger in said pipe and adapted to occupy
a normal position with its outside end substan
tially iiush with the outer surface of the vault,
an offset passage leading from a midpoint of
said pipe to the inside of the vault, said plunger
a
lio
being adapted in its normal position to prevent
access to said offset passage from the outside of
the vault, said plunger being movable to a sec
ond position to open said oiîset passage to the
pipe and to the outside cf the vault, and means
operable from the inside of the vault for mov
ing said plunger.
6. In a bank vault ventilator, an intake pipe
leading from the atmosphere toward the inside of
the vault and terminating in a substantially dead
end short of the inside of the vauu. a. p1unger àà
2,117,244
in said pipe and adapted to occupy a normal posi
tion with its outside end substantially iiush with
the outer surface of the Vault, an offset passage
leading from a midpoint of said pipe to the in
side of the vault, said plunger being adapted
in its normal position to prevent access to said
offset passage from the outside of the vault, said
plunger being movable in said pipe to a second
position to open said offset passage to the pipe
and to the outside of the vault, and normally
locked means operable only from the inside of
the vault for moving said plunger.
7. In a vault ventilator, a steel body of sub
stantial thickness located in the vault wall with
its outer surface aligned with the outer surface
of the Vault and comprising an intake pipe lead
ing from the outer surface interiorly, a pas
sage oiîset relatively to said intake pipe and
leading into said pipe at a point substantially
20 rearwardly of the outside surface of said body
fand of the outside end of said pipe, and a plunger
of substantial length slidably mounted in said
pipe and adapted in one position to close the
front end of said pipe and prevent communi
25 cation of the pipe and its offset passage With the
atmosphere, and in another position to expose
the pipe and passage to the atmosphere, and
an outlet passage and pipe similarly formed in
said body for permitting movement of the air
30 out of said vault.
8. In a bank vault ventilator, an intake pipe
leading from the atmosphere toward the inside
of the vault, means in said intake pipe adapted
`
3
to close its open end at substantially the outer
surface of the vault, a passage leading from an
inner point of said intake pipe to the inside of the
vault, said means being movable inwardly in said
pipe to expose said inner point whereby to open
said passage to the intake pipe and to the out
side of the vault.
9. In a bank vault ventilator, an intake pipe
and an outlet pipe leading from the atmosphere
at the outside of the vault toward the inside
of the vault, said pipes being arranged so as to
have no communication one With the other ex
cept through the atmosphere outside the vault
and inside the vault, a passage leading from a
point substantially spaced from the outside end
of each of said pipes to the inside of the vault,
a pair of plungers adapted in one position to
lie in the outer portion of each of said pipes so
as to obstruct the said passages to the inside of
the vault, and in a second position to open said 20
passages to the pipes.
10. In a bank Vault ventilator, an intake pipe
and an outlet pipe leading from the vault to the
atmosphere, said pipes being arranged so as to
have no communication one with the other eX
cept through the atmosphere outside the vault
and inside the vault, independent plungers for
shutting oiî access from the inside of the vault
to the atmosphere through said pipes, and inde
pendent chambers in which said plungers are 30
mounted for sliding movement into and out of
shutting 01T position.
WILLIAM E. GOEHRING.
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