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Патент USA US2117275

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May 17,’ ‘1938.’
R‘, c‘, DAlLEY ’
2,117,275
GAS BURNER
Filed June 20, 1954;
Z3
)6
'
INVENTOR.
Halli)? 6'. Edd/6y
‘BYM
ATTORNEYS.
Patented May 17, 1938
* 2,117,275
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,117,275
GAS BURNER
Rollin C. Dailey, Detroit, Mich., assignor to Ben
john Laboratories, Inc., Detroit, Mich., a cor
poration of Michigan
Application June 20, 1934, Serial No. 731,405
10 Claims. (Cl. 158-416)
The present invention relates to a gas burner
cent the central portion of the burner to thereby
CT!
and more particularly to a burner for use in gas
secure a substantially unifrom distribution of sec
ranges and the like, a burner embodying my in
ondary air in variable amounts as required to
vention being particularly adapted to increase
supply the secondary air to the jets adjacent
the e?iciency of such a burner by decreasing the
amount of gas consumed while at the same time
assuring a combustion of the gas having superior
characteristics over the combustion of gas by
thereto without creating a central “hot spot” as a
result thereof.
It is a further object of the present invention
to provide a gas burner in which the primary air
utilized therein is introduced under substantially
atmospheric pressure but in which all of the
secondary air is ba?led in such a manner as to
burners heretofore in use.
10
Prior to the present invention the burning of
gas in burners for gas ranges and the like, has
been“ accomplished by the use of a primary air
supply which mingled with‘ the gas passing
through the jets in the burner and a secondary
air supply which surrounded the individual jets
in the burner and supported the combustion of
the gas and the intermingled primary air. Prior
to my invention practically no secondary air was
admitted to the gas jets adjacent the central por
tion of the gas burner except where the center
ports of the jets were drilled at an angle which
tended to draw the secondary air upward through
openings provided in the central portion of the
burner. The drilling of the central ports at such
‘an angle resulted in the production of a “hot
spot” in the center of the burner, which caused a
creation of excessive heat in the central portion
of a cooking utensil placed directly above ‘the
burner.
Normal air pressure being approximately ?f
teen pounds per square inch, the velocity of the
secondary air heretofore supplied to a burner
is substantially equal to the velocity of the pri
mary air supplied to the burner and is much
35 higher than is required merely to support the
combustion of the gas and intermingled primary
air at the jet. The use of secondary air at sub
stantially normal atmospheric pressure tends to
cause a scattering of the heat generated by the
40 combustion of the gas before its heat value has
been absorbed or expended on the object to be
heated. Likewise, the use of the secondary air
as heretofore proposed results in a cooling of
the tips of the jets of the burner and the libera
tion of excessive amounts of carbon monoxide
gas.
,
It is an object of the present invention to se
cure a substantial uniform distribution of the
secondary air around all of the gas jets of the
burner and to provide a sufficient amount of sec
ondary air adjacent each jet of the burner to
insure a complete combustion of the intermixed
gas and primary air passing therethrough.
It is a further object of the present invention
55 to provide a heat responsive induction tube adja
be admitted to the burner only in regulated
amounts and at predetermined pressures.
It is a further object of the present invention
to provide a gas burner in which the ?ow of sec
ondary air is de?nitely controlled ‘in such a man
ner as to assist in the uniform dissemination of
the heat generated by the combustion of the gas
to 'the object to be heated.
It is a further object of the present invention 20
to provide a gas burner in which the area of the
burner is such as to- give a superior distribution
of the jets which may be drilled on substantially
vertical lines and of such sizes as to permit the
use of a greater amount of primary air than in 25
gas burners heretofore known. The result is that
an object to be heated can be safely placed at a
lesser distance from the top of the burner than
can be done in many burners of conventional
design.
It is a further object of the present invention
to provide a gas burner in which the relatively
greater ef?ciency of the burner over burners of
conventional design is retained when the burner
is turned. to a low or simmering ?ame and which
burns at such times with blue sharp ?ame char
acteristics.
Other objects of this invention will appear in
the following description and appended claims,
reference being had to the accompanying draw
ing forming a part of this speci?cation wherein
like reference characters designate correspond
ing parts in the several views.
Fig. 1 is a top plan view with parts broken
away of a gas burner embodying the present in 45
vention.
Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken substan
tially on the line 2—2 of Fig. 1 in the direction
of the arrows.
Fig. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken 50
substantially on the line 3-—3 of Fig. 2 in the di
rection of the arrows.
Before explaining in detail the present inven
tion it is to be understood that the invention is
not limited in its application to the details of 55
2
2,117,275
construction and arrangement of parts illustrated
in the accompanying drawing, since the inven
tion is capable of other embodiments and of be
ing practiced or carried out in various ways. Also
it is to be understood that the phraseology or
terminology employed herein is for the purpose
of description and not of limitation, and it is not
10
burner of conventional design having about forty
percent e?iciency will burn between twenty-six
and twenty-nine cubic feet of gas per hour, de
intended to limit the invention claimed herein
beyond the requirements of the prior art. '
pending upon the flame employed. With a
burner of equivalent size but of the present con
Referring to Fig. l, a gas burner embodying my
invention is formed preferably of a cast iron body
II! to which a conduit for admixed gas and pri
struction, the e?iciency of the burner is increased 10
from between eight to ten percent with a decrease
in consumption of gas to approximately twenty
mary air is‘ connected. This conduit may be such
as the pipe II which is screw-threaded thereto.
cubic feet of gas per hour. The time factor is
also reduced in connection with the burner em
bodying my invention from a burner of equivalent 15
size of conventional design.
The operation of a burner embodying my inven
tion is as follows: The supply of gas and inter
mixed primary air passes through the pipe II or
other suitable conduits, such as a cast throat (not 20
15 An interior chamber #2 (Fig. 2), is provided and
is adapted to provide a reservoir of admixed gas
and primary air from which the gas and primary
air are withdrawn through a plurality of jets I3.
The circular portion of the body If! is formed with
a well I4 in which an air induction tube I5 is
placed.
The induction tube I5 has a substan
tially cylindrical body portion I6, opened at its
lower end. A top‘ plate I'I having an annular
frusto-conical surface I8 on the underside thereof,
25 cut on an angle of approximately 15°, is secured
to and encloses the top end of the induction tube
I5. The walls of the body portion I6 and of the
tube I6, forming said well H! are made converg
ing downwardly, their juncture forming the bot—
30 tom of the well I4 in which there are provided
two small openings 25 and 28, as shown in Fig. 3.
A plurality of ports IS extend through the side
walls of the cylindrical body portion It adjacent
the underside of the top plate II.
The ports I9
35 are preferably so arranged that their lower edges
are situated slightly higher than the top surface
of the face portion of the burner, and above the
tips of the jets I3, such as shown in Fig. 2. A
plurality of lugs 29 are secured to the body In of
40 the burner and serve as supports for a baffle ring
2 I. The baf?e ring 2i may, if desired, be provided
with a plurality of notches 22 which may be of
varying depths to permit adjustment of the ring
relative to the burner to meet the varying condi
45 tions under which the burner is to be operated.
As shown, the ring 2| extends completely around
the outer circumference of the burner and is
?anged inwardly at its top portion.
The jets I3 communicate with the interior
50 chamber I2 in the burner and are drilled as at 23
on substantially vertical lines to provide passages
through which the gas and admixed air may pass
from the chamber I2. By the construction here
in shown it is possible to drill the ports as at 23
55 with a. drill of larger diameter than is possible
with burners of a conventional design. This
gives a less tendency of the burner to ?ash back
with full primary air supply than in the conven
tional design in which the ports are of a smaller
diameter than the ports 23 which I can use in
connection with the improved burner of new de
sign. The use of the larger holes also permits
the developing of more heat units per port upon
the combustion of the gas than with burners of
65 conventional design. In casting the burner I pro
vide a plurality of chaplet bosses 36 and 3| to
support the burner head core while pouring the
molten metal.
These have no function, however,
so far as the operation of the burner is con
70
the ?ames at the jets are a blue color and have
sharp outline characteristics. In testing a burner
embodying the present invention against a burner
of conventional design, I have found that a
cerned.
_
The increased efficiency of a burner embodying
my invention over burners of conventional design
is noted throughout the entire range of burning,
that is, at high flame or at low ?ame the same
characteristics are observed. In each instance
shown), to the interior chamber I2 within the
body II] of the burner. The intermixed air and
gas passes through the ports 23 in the jets I3
and is ignited adjacent thereto. The supply of
secondary air for the outer row of the jets I3
passes through the opening between the body ID
of the burner and the lower edge of the ba?ie ring
2!. If desired, the size of the opening between
the body it! of the burner and the baf?e ring 2|
may be regulated by the use of different depth
slots 22 in the edge of the ring ZI.
The supply of secondary air to the central por
tion of the burner is effected through the induc
tion tube I5. When the burner is ?rst started,
the air normally flows slowly through the interior
of the cylindrical body member I6 and is dis
charged through the ports I9. Due to the angu
larity of the surface I8, this air is de?ected out
wardly and downwardly toward the row of jets I3
adjacent thereto. After the gas has been ignited,
25
30
35
40
the heat of combustion heats the induction mem
ber I5 and causes the secondary air to be induced
therethrough
by thermo-convection
at
such
velocities and in such quantities as may be re
quired to supply su?icient secondary air to sup- ‘
port the combustion of the gas and primary air at
the central ports. I have found that the action
of the induction tube and the ba?ie top in supply
ing air to the burner is controlled by the heat of
the ?ame at the jet. This feature permits an
essentially self-regulating flow of air to the jet
because as the induction tube becomes more heat
ed the velocity of the air passing therethrough is
increased. Consequently the induction tube and
baffle act essentially as an air valve, responsive to
the heat of the jet for controlling the flow of air
through the central part of the burner to the jet.
The provision of the induction tube prevents the
starving of the central ports for secondary air,
which now occurs in all burners of conventional
design. It is clear from a consideration of the
drawing taken together with the above description
that the flow of both the primary and the second
ary air is induced by the ?ow of gas discharged
under a certain pressure. In the present embodi
ment of the invention the ?ow of the secondary
air is also assisted by the heating of the tube I5, in
ducing a certain amount of draft therethrough,
this action of the tube I5 being proportional in
effect to the temperature of the tube, and the rate 70
at which the burner is operated. It is equally clear
that the heating of the tube induces the draft
not only on the inside of the tube walls but also on
the outside thereof, in the well I4. However,
while the tube I5 is opened at the bottom, the well
2,117,275 ,
l4 issubstantially closed at its bottom, the small
openings 25 and 26 being ‘of ‘insufficient area. of
ber, a ‘conduit leading 'to ‘said chamber and com;
municating with 'a source of gas supply to supply
slight decrease of pressure created therein. It
should be noted that the draft along the outside‘of
the walls of the tube body portion j‘l6 is‘ greatly in
gas ‘admixed with primary air to said chamber,
a well, an air induction tube disposed in said well
and spaced from the sides thereof, said induction
tube being open at its vlower ‘end to induce sec
lar in eifect to'the sucking action of ‘the gas upon
the primary and secondary air. Thus, draft is
developed along the outside of ‘the‘wal1 l6 toward
the region of the highest temperature. It can. be
appreciated that this region lies at ‘the locality
where secondary air meets ‘the gas streams, and
that the products of combustion ?owing in prox
imity to the plate ‘I’! are cooled down by the excess
of only partially heated air, while ‘the product of
combustion in the space intermediate the plate
I‘! and the baille ring 2! are only partially burned
and contain mostly carbon‘ monoxide gas. The
partially burned ‘products of combustion fill the
spaces between the streams of gas above the face
portion of the body l0, and because of the turbu
lent‘condition of the gases, the static pressure in
said space is higher than in the adjacent portions
of the burner combustion space._ In burners of
conventional designs said partially burned prod
ucts of combustion are allowed to escape, thus
contributing to the inefficiency of a burner. In
my novel burner, the draft in the well I 4 ‘along the
wall l6 induces the flow of said ‘partially burned
products of combustion inwardly toward said Well
and downwardly along the outside walls thereof
toward the bottom of the well M.
The draft in
the well ill causesa flow of ‘fresh air through the
openings ‘25 and 26 and this air is admitted only
in such quantities as tosupply enough oxygen to
insure complete combustion ‘of the carbon mon
oxide gas drawn into the well,
The air admitted
through ‘the openings "25 and ‘26 constitutes, there
fore, the “additional secondary air” or “tertiary
air”. Upon receiving the admixture of fresh air
at the lower part of vthe well I4, the partially
burned products of combustion are drawn up
along the walls of the tube body‘portion l6 and
by the action of the secondary‘air ‘are directed
into the region of highest temperature where they
are completely burned, thus contributing to the
increaseof ef?ciency of my novel burner. ‘
i
ondary air to ‘pass therethrough by thermo-con
vectien'and having ‘a ba?ie member ‘adjacent the
top thereof to de?ect the ‘secondary air ‘passing 10
therethrough outwardly in the direction of, adja
cent concentrically disposed jets, said well being
provided with‘ a plurality of openings for admis
sion of additional air ‘therein.
2. A gas burner including a body portion hav
ing a vgas chamber formed therein, a face portion,
a plurality of jetsa'rranged on concentric lines
and extending through said face portion and com‘
municating with said gas chamber,‘ a ‘conduit
leading to said chamber and communicating with
a source of gas supply to supply gas admixed with
primary air to said, chamber, a well closed at its
lower end, a "centrally disposed air induction tube
disposed in said well, spaced from the sides there
of and having an open end communicating ‘with
the air at the bottom of the burner, thereby to
induce secondary air to pass therethrough, and
a baffle member adjacent the top ‘of said air in
duction tube to-‘deflect the secondary airpassing
therethrough outwardly in the direction of ad so
jacent concentrically disposed jets, said well being
provided at its closed endwith a plurality of open~
ings for admission ‘of additional air therein.
3. A gas burner‘comprising a body portion hav
ing a central chamber therein to which gas and. 35
admixed primary air are supplied, a face portion,
a plurality of jets thereon ‘and extending there
through to communicate with said central cham
her, a well centrally disposed in said body por
tion, and secondary air control members compris
ing a baiile ring extending about the periphery of
the burner, ‘and an air induction tube disposed
centrally of said well and spaced from the sides
thereof‘ and comprising a Substantially cylindrical
body portion having an open end adjacent the
bottom of the ‘burner and its opposite end ter
minating above 'the face portion thereof, a baf?e
member ‘secured to said opposite end, and a plu
ralitylof ports extending through the sides there
of’ and adjacent ‘said ba?‘le member to supply pre
The use of the induction tube l5 as herein
shown and described eliminates the “hot spot” in
the central portion ofthe burner and also re
duces to a minimum the presence of so-called
determined quantities of secondary air to the jets
disposed adjacent thereto, said well being provided
“cold spots” such as occurs in burners of con
ditional air therein.
ventional design. The baffle ring 2! and the in
duction tube I5 will thus be seen to cooperate to
produce a combustion of the gas by my'improved
type of burner in which the heat‘ resulting there
from is distributed substantially uniformly to the
so
portion and communicating with said gas cham
discharge to supply enough ‘air to destroy the
creased ‘by the “sucking, ,action ‘of the air dis
charged froin the'ports H), which ‘action is simi
20
3
object to be heated. I have found that I can use
a burner of my improved design safely where the
object to be heated is placed as close as one and
one-eighth inches to the top of the burner.
Thus in one of its broader aspects my invention
contemplates providing a novel gas burner hav
ing means whereby the partially burned products
of combustion are drawn from the portions of the
gas ?ame most remote from the secondary ‘air
and upon receiving an admixture of “tertiary”
air are directed into the region of highest tem
perature, where they are completely burned.
with a plurality of openings for admission of ad
4. A gas burner comprising a bo‘dy‘po‘rtion hav
ing a central chamber therein to which gas and
admixed primary air are supplied, a face portion,
a plurality of jets thereon and extending there—
through to communicate with said central cham
ber, a'well centrally disposed in said body'portion
and secondary air ‘control members comprising a
braille ring extending about the periphery of the
burner, and an air induction tube disposed cen
trally of said well and spaced ‘from the sides
thereof, said’ induction tube comprising a 'sub
stantially cylindrical body portion ‘having an open
end adjacent the bottom of the burner and ‘its
opposite end terminating above the face portion
thereof, a ba?le membersecured thereto, and a
plurality of ports extending ‘through the“ sides ‘'
1. A gas burner including a body portion hav
ing a gas chamber formed therein, a face portion,
thereof and adjacent said baiiie member, said well
being provided with a plurality of openings for
admission of additional secondary air therein.
5. A gas burner comprising a body portion hav
75 a plurality of jets extending through said face
ing a gas chamber formed therein, a face portion,
I claim:
50
55
4
2,117,275
portion on substantially vertical lines and com
municating with said gas chamber, a conduit
outward direction therefrom; said well being ar
ranged to have the streams of secondary air
passing near its top portion, thereby inducing
leading to said chamber and communicating with
partial vacuum therein, and being provided with
a source of gas supply and operable to supply gas
admixed with primary air to said chamber, and a
a plurality of openings for admission of additional
secondary air therein.
8. A gas burner having a body portion, a face
a plurality of jets extending through said face
centrally disposed well closed at the bottom and
having an air induction tube to supply secondary
air to the jets adjacent thereto at velocities vary
10 ing with the air requirements of the burner and
comprising a substantially cylindrical body por
tion having an open end adjacent the bottom
of the burner and its opposite end terminating
above the face portion thereof, a ba?ie member
15 secured to said opposite end, and a plurality of
ports extending through the sides thereof and
adjacent said baffle member, said well being ar
ranged to have the streams of secondary air pass
ing near its top portion, thereby inducing partial
20 vacuum therein, and being provided with a plu
rality of openings for admission of additional
secondary air therein.
.
6. A gas burner comprising a body portion hav
ing a central chamber therein to which gas‘and
25 admixed primary air are supplied, a face portion,
a central well, a plurality of jets extending
through said face portion on substantially ver
tical lines communicating with said central
chamber, secondary air control members com
30 prising a ba?le ring extending about the periphery
of the burner, an air induction tube disposed
centrally of said well, said induction tube com
prising a substantially cylindrical body portion
having an open end adjacent the bottom of the
35 burner and its opposite end terminating above
the face portion thereof, a ba?le member secured
to said opposite end, and a plurality of ports
extending through the sides thereof and adja
cent said ba?ie member, said baffle member ex
tending outwardly from said tube to‘a point
adjacent said jets whereby heat from the com—
bustion of gas heats said ba?ie member and said
tube thereby to increase the velocity of the air
passing therethrough, said well being arranged
45 to have the streams of secondary air passing near
its top portion, thereby inducing partial vacuum
therein, and being provided with a plurality of
openings for admission of additional secondary
air therein.
7. A gas burner comprising a body portion hav
ing a central chamber therein to which gas and
admixed primary air are supplied, a face por
tion, a plurality of jets thereon and extending
therethrough to communicate with said central
55 chamber, a centrally disposed well, secondary air
control members comprising a baffle ring extend
ing about the periphery of the burner, and an
air induction tube disposed in said well, said
induction tube comprising a substantially cylin
60 drical body portion spaced from the sides of said
well and having an open end adjacent the bottom
of the burner and ‘its opposite end terminating
above the face portion thereof, a ba?ie member
secured thereto, and a plurality of ports extend
65 ing through the sides thereof and adjacent said
baffle member, said ba?ie member extending out
wardly therefrom and having an inclined face
extending at an angle of approximately 15° at
all points of contact with the air passing through
the said ports and cooperating with said ports
to deflect the air passing therethrough in an
portion, a well centrally disposed therein and
extending downwardly from the said face por
tion and through the said body portion and closed 10
at its lower end, a plurality of jets arranged on
lines concentric with said well, a secondary air
inductor and baffle disposed above said well and
spaced from the sides thereof, said air inductor
being adapted to elfeot the flow of air upwardly 15
therethrough and to deflect the air outwardly
thereof to a point adjacent the centrally dis
posed jets in such quantities and at such veloci
ties as may be required to support the combus
tion of the gas at said jets and comprising a 20
substantially cylindrical body portion having an
open end adjacent the bottom of the burner and
its opposite end terminating above the face por
tion thereof, and a plurality of ports extending
through the sides thereof at points adjacent said 25
baffle member, said well being arranged to have
the streams of secondary air passing near its top
portion, thereby inducing partial vacuum therein,
and being provided with a plurality of openings
for admission of additional secondary air therein. 30
9. A gas burner having a body portion, a face
portion, a well centrally disposed therein and ex
tending downwardly from the said face portion
and through the said body portion, a plurality of
jets arranged on lines concentric with said Well, 35
a secondary air inductor and baffle disposed above
said well and adapted to effect the flow of air
upwardly therethrough and to deflect the air
outwardly therefrom to a point adjacent the
centrally disposed jets in such quantities and at 40
such velocities as. may be required to support
the combustion of the gas passing through said
jets and comprising a substantially cylindrical
body portion having an open end adjacent the
bottom of the burner and its opposite end ter 45
minating above the face portion thereof, a ba?le
member secured to said oppposite end, and a
plurality of ports extending through the sides
thereof and adjacent said baf?e member, and a
circumferential baffle member disposed adjacent 50
the outer periphery of the burner and adapted
to control the velocity and direction of the sec
ondary air supplied to the jets adjacent thereto,
said well being arranged to have the streams of
secondary air passing near its top portion, there 55
by inducing partial vacuum therein, and being
provided with a plurality of openings for admis
sion of additional secondary air therein.
10. In a gas burner, a body portion; a draft
inducing tube disposed centrally of said body por 60
tion and adapted to discharge streams of second
ary air outwardly toward the gas jets and above
the tips thereof; a well provided around said
draft inducing tube and formed by the walls of
said tube and by the walls of said body portion,
said well being arranged to have the streams of
secondary air passing near its top portion, there
by inducing partial vacuum therein, and provided
at its bottom with a number of tertiary air ori
?ces.
ROLLIN C. DAILEY.
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