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Патент USA US2117394

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May 17, 1938.
s. s. BERNSTEIN
2,117,394
WEBBING SUPPORT FOR UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE
Filed June 25, 1957
' gmaémli
2 Sheets-Sheet l
May 17, 1938.
s. s. BERNSTEIN
2,117,394
WEBBING SUPPORT FOR UPI-IOLSTERED FURNITURE
Filed June 23, 1937
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‘inventor,
Samuel .5 ?emsfem
Patented May 17, 1938
2,117,394
UNTED STATES PATENT OFFECE
2,117,394
VVEBBING
SUPPORT FOR UPHOLSTE'RED
FURNITURE
Samuel S. Bernstein, Beverly Hills,‘Calif.
Application June 23, 1937, Serial No. 149,932
5 Claims. (Cl. 155-179)
This invention relates generally to furniture
and more particularly to the construction of
upholstered furniture in which the seat springs
are supported by a farbic sheet secured to the
5 seat frame.
This invention is an improvement over the
invention disclosed and claimed in Patent No.
2,673,777, issued to me on March 16, 1937.
It is a primary object of this invention to pro
10 vide improved yieldable supporting means for the
spring supporting fabric sheet used in the seat
construction of upholstered furniture whereby
the fabric is yieldably supported inwardly of the
frame at all times. In this connection it is an
15 object to support the fabric sheet so that the
sheet is maintained level when the seat is un
occupied and whereby it is allowed to “give”
somewhat when the seat is occupied.
In order to accomplish this object it is a fur
ther
object of this invention to provide the chief
20
means of support above the fabric sheet and
connected to the frame at points vertically spaced
from the bottom thereof but positioned in such
a manner that the supporting means will‘not in
25 terfere with the ordinary cushioning springs or
with a body occupying the seat. It is also an
object to provide secondary support for the fabric
sheet in substantially the plane of the sheet
whereby the fabric sheet is maintained taut.
30
It is a still further object of this invention to
provide means under the fabric sheet which may
or may not be attached directly to the frame
and to which the ?exible supporting means for
the fabric sheet may be attached.
35
It is a particular object of this invention to
provide a supporting means for the fabric sheet
in furniture of the type indicated which is par
ticularly adapted to absorb the initial stress of
a body load dropping into the seat and which is
40 adapted to thereafter accommodate itself to the
subsequent substantially constant load.
These and other objects will be apparent from
the drawings and the following description. Re
ferring to the drawings which are for illustra
45 tive purposes only:
Fig. 1 is an inverted plan view showing a chair
bottom equipped with one form of the invention.
Fig. 2 is an enlarged sectional elevation taken
in a plane represented by the line 2'--2 of Fig. 1.
50‘
Fig. 3 is a perspective View of a supporting
plate as shown in the form of the invention
illustrated in Fig. 1.
Fig. 4 is an inverted plan view showing a chair
bottom equipped with another form of the in
55 vention.
Fig. 5 is an enlarged sectional elevation taken
in a plane represented by the line 5—5 of Fig. 4.
Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a supporting
plate as shown in the form of the invention illus
trated in Fig. 4.
Fig. 7 is an inverted plan view showing a chair
bottom equipped with still another form of the
invention.
Fig. 8 is an enlarged sectional elevation taken
in a plane represented by the line 8—8 of Fig. 7. 10
Referring more particularly to the drawings,
reference numeral l ! generally indicated the seat
frame of a chair or the like which comprises side
rails l2 and I2’, a front rail l3 and a rear rail
It. The chair is provided with legs it of any 15
suitable type. Reference numeral 16 indicates a
?exible spring supporting sheet made of fabric
of any suitable material such as burlap or the
like. This fabric sheet is secured at three of
its marginal edges by tacks i‘! to the bottom of 20
side rails l2 and I2’ and front rail I3.
The fabric sheet supports a coil spring assem
bly of any conventional type, generally indicated
by reference numeral [8. This spring assembly
is ordinarily sewed to the fabric sheet and secured 25
to the rails of the frame by means of twine (not
shown) and is designed to support a chair base
cushion (not shown).
The fabric sheet H6 in the form of the inven
tion shown in Figures 1 and 2 is shown spaced 30
away from the rear rail of the frame and is pro
vided at its rear edge with a rod !9 secured
thereto in any suitable manner. As a means of
keeping the fabric taut, tension springs 20 are
mounted on the lower edge of the rear rail Ill by 35
means of brackets 2i and securing tacks 22. At
their forward ends the springs are hooked about
the rod 19 and through the fabric l6. These
springs serve to hold the fabric taut and tend
to prevent it from assuming a bulging position 40
when the seat is unoccupied.
It was pointed out as a primary object of this
invention to provide improved yieldable support
ing means for the spring supporting fabric sheet
used in the seat construction of upholstered 45
furniture and that the chief means of providing
this support was in providing supporting means .
above the fabric. To carry out this object flexible
cables 25 of wire, or flexible metal strap material
or any suitable ?exible material are provided 50
which are secured at their ends by means of tacks
26 to the upper edges of the front and rear rails
l3 and M respectively of the seat frame. Under
neath the fabric l6 are supporting plates 21 which
are pressed out to provide the eyes 28 at three 55
2
2,117,394
spaced points.
These plates are positioned one
beneath each of the cables 25 and in the same
longitudinal plane. Connecting the cables 25 and
the plates 27 are coil springs 29 which are hooked,
one to each of the eyes 28, through the fabric
and are attached to the cables 25.
As shown in Fig. 3 the plates 21 are preferably
formed with a convex upper surface in order
that they will not present sharp edges to the
10 fabric.
to the bottom of the frame on all four of its
edges by tacks H. In this case supporting plates
This eliminates the possibility of the
plates cutting through the fabric at their side
39 are employed which extend entirely across the
under side of the fabric sheet and are secured
edges.
to the lower edges of the frame by tacks 40, one
at each end. Referring to Fig. 8 it can be seen
that at each end these plates have formed there
on upwardly extending pointed lips ill which may 15
be secured to the inner rails of the frame by
means of tacks 92. These lips 4! are similar in
all respects to the lips 35 of the plates 32 which
are particularly illustrated in Fig. 6. Each of the
With this construction the cables 25 are pref
erably located between the rows of seat springs,
15 as is shown in Fig. 1 and thereby provide a yield
able support for the fabric sheet. Although there
is illustrated three coil springs connecting each
cable 25 with each plate 21 it is not an essential
feature of this invention that any particular
20 number of springs be used to connect the two
elements.
In the form of the invention shown in Figures
1 and 2 it has been found advisable to employ
a shorter spring connecting the middle of each
25 plate 2? than the springs connecting the ends
of each plate 2'! with the respective cables 25.
However this construction is not essential to the
invention and the springs may be made of any
suitable length.
30
The construction whereby one end of the sup
porting plates is secured to the bottom of the
frame provides a stronger and somewhat stiffer
action at the front of the seat.
Referring to Figures '7 and 8, a further form
of the invention is shown in which the fabric,
here indicated as reference numeral 38, is tacked
With the construction as shown, when the seat
is occupied pressure on the upper portion of the
seat supporting spring assembly l8 compresses
the spring assembly l8 and depresses the fabric
sheet it‘ to some extent. The downward move
35 ment of the fabric sheet is yieldably resisted by
the ?exible cable 25 and tension coil springs 29
connecting it to the plate 21. When the seat is
unoccupied the cable 25 and the springs 29 serve
to restore the fabric sheet to its normal position
as shown in Fig. 2, thus preventing permanent
sagging or bulging of the ?exible sheet. In this
connection the springs 20 cooperate with the sup
porting structure above the sheet to keep the
sheet taut and thereby aid in preventing sagging
or bulging of the sheet.
A modi?ed form of supporting means is shown
in Figures 4, 5 and 6 in which parts similar to
those in Fig. 1 bear corresponding reference nu
merals. In this form of the invention a different
type of supporting plate is provided beneath the
fabric sheet, which is indicated by reference nu
meral 32. This plate is attached at one end to
the under edge of the front rail l3 by means of
tack 33.
The supporting plate is also provided
with eyes 34 which are pressed from the plate
and are similar to the eyes 28 of the plate 21.
Near the end of the plate which is attached to
the front rail of the seat frame, the plate is pro
vided with an upwardly extending pointed lip 35
which is adapted to abut against the inner side
of the front rail [3 and is secured thereto by
means of tack 36.
In the form of the invention shown in Figures
1i, 5 and 6 it has also been found useful to employ
65 the tension springs 28 to hold the fabric sheet
taut. In this form of the invention, as an alter
native construction, only two springs 29 are
shown connecting each of the plates 32 to the
respective cables 25 instead of the three con
70 necting spring construction as shown in Fig. 2.
However the number of springs employed is op
tional and it is not intended to limit this inven
tion to any particular number of connecting
springs between the various types of plate and
75 the cable 25.
plates is formed with a convex upper surface ~
similar to plates 21 and 32.
.
In this construction there is also provided a
?exible cable 25 above each of the plates 39 and
to which each of the plates are respectively con
nected by means of the tension springs 29 which
are hooked through the pressed eye portions 43
in each of the plates 39.
The construction illustrated in Figures '7 and 8
is stronger and more rigid than either of the
other forms of the invention and is particularly -
useful where a strong rugged construction is de
sired.
In all forms of the invention shown it is to be
noted that the cables 25 and springs 29 form yield
able suspension members above the fabric sheet
for supporting the fabric, the cables and springs
being so arranged that they do not interfere with
ihe upper spring supported structure or the seat.
It is also to be noted that the placement of the
tension springs connecting the cables and sup 40
porting plates at a substantial distance inwardly
of the frame makes possible the assumption of
the body load at points where it is applied. This
is a decided advantage over other types of con
struction.
I claim as my invention:
1. In an article of furniture which includes a
45
frame having ?exible spring supporting fabric
means connected to the bottom of said frame,
means for yieldably supporting said fabric means 50
inwardly of the frame comprising a plate beneath
said fabric means, a ?exible member above said
fabric means having its ends secured to oppo
site sides of said frame at points vertically spaced
from the bottom of said frame, and tension spring 55
means connecting said plate and said ?exible
member inwardly of said frame.
2. In an article of furniture which includes
a frame having a ?exible spring supporting mem
ber connected to the bottom of said frame, means
for yieldably supporting said spring supporting
member inwardly of the frame comprising a plate
beneath said spring supporting member, said
plate having one end secured to the bottom of
said frame, a flexible member above said spring 65
supporting member having its ends secured to
opposite sides of said frame at points vertically
spaced from the bottom of said frame, and tension
springs connecting said plate and said ?exible
member inwardly of said frame at horizontally 70
spaced points.
3. In an article of furniture which includes a
frame having a ?exible spring supporting mem
ber connected to the bottom of said frame, means
for yieldably supporting said spring supporting 75
3
2,117,394
member inwardly of the frame comprising a plate
beneath said spring supporting member, said plate
extending completely across the under side of said
spring supporting member and being secured at
having its ends secured to opposite sides of said
its ends to opposite sides of the bottom of said
frame, a flexible member above said spring sup
porting member having its ends secured to oppo
tally spaced points inwardly of said frame.
site sides of said frame at points vertically spaced
from the bottom of said frame, and tension
10 springs connecting said plate and said flexible
member inwardly of said frame at horizontally
spaced points,
‘
4. In an article of furniture, a frame, a fabric
sheet secured at three edges to the bottom of said
15 frame and having its rear edge spaced from the
rear of said frame, tension spring means connect
‘ing said rear edge to the rear of said frame, a
spring assembly supported on said sheet, a plate
under said sheet, a ?exible cable above said sheet
frame at a substantial distance above the bot
tom of said frame, and tension spring means
connecting said plate and said cable at horizon
5. In an article of furniture which includes a
frame having a ?exible spring supporting member
connected to the bottom of said frame, means for
yieldably supporting said spring supporting mem
ber inwardly of the frame comprising a plate 10
beneath said sheet, the ends of said plate being
spaced inwardly from the frame, a ?exible mem
ber above said spring supporting member having
its ends secured to opposite sides of said frame
at points vertically spaced from the bottom of 15
said frame, and tension springs connecting said
plate and said ?exible member inwardly of said
frame at horizontally spaced points.
SAMUEL S. BERNSTEIN.
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