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Патент USA US2117736

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May 1'?, 1938.
2,117,736
J. c. LINK
GEM SETTING
Filed OCT.. 25, 1957
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ATTORNEY
Patented Mayl?, 1938
‘2,117,736
UNITED STATES
_PATENT OFFICE ’
2,117,736
GEM SETTING
Julius C. Link, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Application October 25, 1937, Serial N0. 170,777
8 Claims.
This invention relates to jewelry; and more
particularly
to
improvements in
Fig. 9 is a side elevational view of a modified
or _ form
oi' the setting.
settings
mountings for holding ornamental gems and
precious stones in finger rings and rother jewelry.
Heretoiore, gem settings or mountings, espe
cially for diamonds and the like, have been of
such a structure that the major portion of the
gem is concealed and the effectiveness, brilliancy,
and luster of the gem are soon impaired by the ac
cumulation of dirt.
i
It is an object of this invention to provide a
setting for diamonds and the like in which there
are no air spaces between the reflecting surfaces
oi the setting' and the diamond.
A further object is the provision of a setting
having as small a hole as is practical to center
the apex of the diamond, said setting having
prone-s extending upwardly~from the face thereof
and over the ‘girdle of the diamond, thus enabling
20 a maximum exposure of the underside of the
stone.
A further object is the provision of a setting
having the construction which enables maxi
mum reflecting qualities from a stone, with mini
25 mum opportunities for dirt to collect.` The setting
enables ready and convenient cleaning of the
stone, at the same time providing a construction
of maximum strength and rigidity.
w
A further object of the invention is to pro
víde a setting for a precious stone, which has the
smallest aperture possible for, the apex and at the
same time provides the maximum opening in the
bottom of the setting.
,
„
These and other advantageous objects, which
35 will later appear, are accomplished by the simple
and practical construction and arrangement of
parts hereinafter described and exhibited. in the
accompanying drawing, forming part hereof, and
40
is provided on its upper surface with a small
aperture I2 ‘for receiving the apex of a precious
stone such as a diamond or the like. Extending
up from the base I Il andisurrounding the re 10
ñecting surfaces I I are arcuate prongs I3 which
are bent over the girdle of a stone Il, in the
usual manner, as shown in Fig. 1, to ñrmly hold
the stone in position.
The base has a conical
ring having settings embodying my invention, the
a wedding ring.
i
Fig. 2 is a plan view of one of the settings shown
in Fig. 1,
-
>
Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 8-3
of Fig. 2,
Fig. 4 is a side elevational view of a finger
ring having settings embodying my invention,
5 is a top plan view of the setting,
Fig 6 is a bottom pian view of the setting,
Fig. '7 is a sectional view taken on line 1-1 of
Fig. 5,
,
Fig. 8 is a side elevational view of the setting,
55 and
« ,
shaped recess I5 in the bottom thereof which 15
communicates with the aperture I2.
By means of the above structure it will be seen
that a very small aperture I2 is provided in
which the apex'of the diamond extends, and at
the same time there is obtained a recess I5 in the
underside of the base to provide the maximum
opening possible to> enable reflection from the
underside of the stone. The inclined reflecting
surfaces have the upper edges thereof encircling
the aperture I2 so that when the apex of the
diamond or stone is placed in the aperture I 2,' the
sides of the stone will be directly in communica
tion with the reflecting surfaces II, and thus
there `will be no air spaces between the reflecting
surfaces of the setting and the stone.
30
Referring to Fig. 4, there is shown a setting
applied to a. ring of a, different type th'an that
shown in Fig. 1. The ring in Fig. 4 is provided
with a setting such as above described, and in
addition there is alsov provided a large setting 35
which embodies the structure above described.
The large setting shown in Fig. 4 is further illus-l
trated in Figs. 5 to 8, in which the setting is
in which:
,- shown to include a base 20 having inclined reflect
Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a finger ' ing surfaces 2| and provided with an aperture 22
particular ring shown being adapted for use as
45
Referring to the drawing, in Figs. 1, 2 and 3
there is shown a setting comprising a base IU
having the upper surface thereof inclined as shown 5
at I I to provide reñecting surfaces. 'I'he base
» for receiving the apex of a diamond.
The re
ilecting surfaces are bordered by four upstanding
prongs 23 which have the upper surfaces thereof
provided with notches 24 to facilitate the up
setting of portions of the prongs over the girdle of
the diamond or other stone to hold it rigidly in the
setting. On the underside of the base, see Fig. 6
¿there is provided a conical recess 25 which com
municates with the aperture 22 thus providing the
maximum opening for enabling passage of light
to the` stone from theunderside of the base.
As above described, the reflecting surfaces 2|
communicate directly with the ‘sidesV of the stone
so that there will be no air spaces between the
stone and the reflecting surfaces.
g5
3,1 17,736
~2
It is obvious that the structure above described
enables the stone to be easily and conveniently
cleaned as minimum opportunity is provided for
the collection of dirt; at the same time the re
flecting qualities of the stone are enhanced en
abling the exposure of all parts of the stone and
reflections from the bottom part of the stone as
well as from the top. The provision of the
recess in the base provides maximum strength
10 and rigidity of the setting, providing greatest
strength for the setting for the stone.
In Fig. 9 is shown a modified' form in which
the inclined reflecting surfaces 2| are provided
with a plurality of facets 26 which increase the
reflecting qualities of the reflecting surfaces.
15
The foregoing disclosure is to be regarded as
descriptive» and iilustrative only, and not as re
strictive or limitative of the invention, of which,
obviously, embodiments may be considered, in
20 cluding many
, from the spirit
in denoted and
Having thus
modifications without departing
and scope of the invention here
set forth in the appended claims.
described my invention, what I
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters
25 Patent, is:
1. A gem setting, comprising a base having
the upper portion thereof inclined and provided
at the center thereof with an aperture to receive
the apex of a stone, prongs bordering the base
30 and extending upwardly to tightly engage the
girdle of a stone, said base having a conical re
cess in the bottom thereof communicating with
said aperture.
1
2. A gem setting, comprising a base having
35 the upper surfaces thereof inclined and provided
with a downwardly extending recess having an
aperture at the center thereof, said inclined sur
projecting upwardly from the base to engage the
girdle of a stone, said base having a conical re
cess in the bottom thereof communicating with
said aperture.
4. In a gem setting, a base having inclined Ul
upper surfaces and provided With a downwardly
extending conical recess having an aperture at
the center thereof, the said inclined surfaces and
the conical recess having a common upper edge
so »that when a stone is positioned in the recess 10
there will be no air spaces between the inclined
reñecting surfaces and the stone, and prongs
projecting upwardly from the base to engage the
girdle of a stone, said base haw'ng a conical re
cess in the bottom thereof Acommunicating with
said aperture, said inclined reflecting surfaces
having facets cut therein to increase their re
flecting qualities.
5. In a gem setting, a base having inclined
upper surfaces and provided with a downwardly 20
extending conical recess having an aperture at
the center thereof, the said inclined surfaces and '
the conical recess having a common upper edge
so that when a stone is positioned in the recess
there will be no air spaces between the inclined
reflecting surfaces and the stone, and prongs pro
jecting upwardly from the base to engage the
girdle of a stone.
6. In a gem setting, a base having inclined
upper reflecting surfaces and provided at the 30
center thereof with an aperture to receive the
apex of a stone, and prongs projecting upwardly
from the base to engage the girdle of a stone,
there being no air spaces between said inclined
reflecting surfaces land a stone mounted on the 35
base.
'7. In a gem setting, a base having inclined
faces and said recess having a common upper
upper reflecting surfaces and provided at the
edge, prongs bordering the inclined surfaces and
center thereof with means to receive the apex
extending upwardly, said prongs being provided
with means at their upper ends to engage the
of a stone, and prongs projecting upwardly from 40
the base to engage the girdle of a stone, there
being no air spaces between said inclined re
fiecting surfaces and a stone _mounted on the
setting, said base having a recess in the bot
`
tom thereof communicating with said aperture. _ base.
8. In a gern setting, a base having inclined 45
.3. In a gem setting, a base having inclined
girdle of a. stone to hold the stone firmly in the
45 upper surfaces, and provided with a downwardly
extending conical recess having an aperture at
the center thereof, the said inclined surfaces and
the conical recess having a common upper edge
so that when a stone is positioned in the recess
50 there will be no air spaces between the inclined
reflecting surfaces and the stone, and prongs
upper surfaces and provided with adownwardly
conical recess having means at the center there
of to receive the apex of a stone, the inclined
surfaces and the conical recess having a com
mon upper edge, and prongs projecting upward 50
ly from the base to engage the girdle of a stone.
JULIUS C. LINK.
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