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Патент USA US2118038

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May 24, 193s.
T. BRoDERsEN f-:T Al.
cARBUREToR
Filed April 4, 1934
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2,118,038l
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May 24, 1938.
T. BRÓDl-:RSEN ET AL
2,118,038
CARBURETOR
Filéd" April 4, 1934
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TABRODERSEN ET AL‘
cARBUREToR
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Filed April 4, 1934
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Patented May 24, 19.38
2,118,038
, Aulsu'nazo rSTATES
PATENT OFFICE'
2,11s.oss
caminamos. '
Thorwald Brodersen, Park Ridge, and Williamy
C. Dunn, Chicago, Ill.
.
Application April 4, 1934, Serial No. 718,894
23 Claims.
(Cl. 2617-34)
_
l
'I'his invention relates to improvements in car ' `plying fuel to the supply nozzle
' buretors for internal combustion engines, and has
starting the engine.
in choking or -
_-
`
.
for one of its objects improved means for creat
To the attainment of these ends and the ac
ing and maintaining the most desirable mixture ’ complishment of other new and useful objects asv
proportion for the varying demands of the engine will appear, the invention consists in the features
to which the device is connected.
of novelty in substantially the construction, com- In carburetors where the feedingl of the fuel bination and arrangement of the several parts ‘
is due to aspiration or engine suction, consider
hereinafter more fully described and claimed and
able difllculty is sometimes experienced in start
shown in the` accompanying drawings illustrat
ing the engine in very cold temperaturesby'rea jing this invention, and in which
son of the inability of the engine to pick up the
Figure 1 is a vertical, longitudinal sectional
fuel and carry it into the cylinder. Suchdiillculty view of a carburetor of this character constructed
occurs by reason of stiffness of motor due to ex- ' in accordance with the principles of this inven
cessive friction created by congealed'oil and also
the condition of the gas in extreme cold. Fur
Figure 2 is‘a view similar to Figure l, on a
thermore due to the slowness of the rotation of smaller scale, and with parts omitted, and show
the motor when attempting to start, due to con
ing some of the parts in the position they will
gealed oil, or weak battery resulting from a hard assume when engine suction is operating upon
tion.
‘ starting motor, there is a lack of proper velocity
20 of the air over the fuel jet, and it has heretofore
been attempted to overcome these difi‘lcultiesl by
forcing the fuel directly into the manifold and
cylinder.
»
‘
‘
It is one of the objects of the present invention
25 to provide in a carburetor of this character, im- ,
proved means whereby a high velocity of air is
' obtained across the fuel jets when starting the
motor under any condition, so that there will be
a complete vaporization ofthe gas at ythe fuel
30 jet‘ openings regardless of therate of speed of the
motor when starting, and to also provide im.
‘
-
>
.
the‘piston valve to unseat the latter. 4
Figure 3 is an enlarged detail sectional view of 20
` _
Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 1, showing
the fuelmeteringvalve.
the parts in the position which they assume when
the choke is being operated and with the throttle
about one-third open.
,
Figure 5 is a detail sectional view as taken -on
line 5_5, Figure 7.
'
,
v25
,
- Figure 6 is a sectional view taken on line 6_6,
Figure 1, with parts omitted. `
f
y
yFigure 6a is a detail sectional view on line
Blz-6a. Figure 4.
30
proved choking means byA the use of which it is
Figure 7 is a horizontal sectional vview takenÀ
possible to cut off the auxiliary air supply and on line 1_1, Figure 1, with parts omitted.
open Wide- the fuel'feeding jets or nozzles, and*
Figure 8 is a sectional view taken on line 8-8, .
35 force the fuel into a stream of high `velocity pri
fmary' air, with vthe result that the fuel will be
thoroughly atomized so that it will be readily
' drawn or aspirated into the engine cylinder.
Figure 6, with parts omitted.
.
'
Figure 9 is an enlarged detail sectional view of 35
the metering valve and a supplemental control
valve for the fuel supply to the nozzle.
Figure 10 is a vertical, sectional view as taken
lit i-s va'further object of the present invention
_to provide improved means for automatically de f on line iB_lll, Figure 6.
-40
j'liv'ering to the engine a uniform and lean mix
Figure l1 is an enlarged detail view, partly in
ture over the complete range of speed when op
erating under a light load, and a. slightly richer elevation, partly in section and showing the parts l
of the piston valve and the means for`
mixture over its complete range of speed when separated,
controlling the metering valve.
.
45 operating underv a heavy load, and' improved
Figure l2 is a detail sectionalv view taken on 45
means wherebyïthe fuel mixture will be auto
line l2_i2, Figure 11.
~
matically and readily changed when the load. or
Figure 13 is an enlarged sectional viewvof a
requirements of the engine is changed, regardless detail.
of the position of the throttle valve, with the re
Figure 14 is a detail sectional view, similar to
suit that it is possible to acquire the greatest Figure 6, of a modified form of the invention and
economy when the engine is not required to fur
nish the maximum power when the engine is op
eratingunder'its heavy load-`
with parts omitted.
f
'
Figure 15 is a detail sectional view taken on
line I5_|5, Figure 14’.
'
A further object is to provide improved means
Figure 16 1s a detail sectionn viewv taken on`
55 for holding open an auxiliary fuel supply for sup- ~ line iB_IB, Figure 14.
55
2
2,118,°8s
Figure 1'1 is a sectional view taken on line
I1-I1, Figure 14.
'
in this enlarged portion are arranged valve mem-_
Figure 18 is a detail sectional view taken on line
I3-I3, Figure 17.
Figure 19 is a detail sectional view taken on
line l3--I3, Figure 17.
Referring more particularly to the drawings,
the numeral I3 designates a casing having an
open chamber I3 in the top thereof closed by
10 a cap member I1 within which latter is arranged
a. throttle valve I3. This cap member is pro
vided with a flange I3 having threadedsopenings
23 by means of which the carburetor may be se
cured in position.
`
bers 31-33,‘ the member 31 being provided with`
a tapering opening 33 therethrough and extend
ing through, the top of the valve member, ywhile
the member 33 is provided with an opening 43
therethrough, tapering in the opposite direction
from the opening 33. The tapered opening of
the valve member 31 forms an annular valve
seat 4I, while the tapered portion 40 of the'valve
member 33 forms an annular valve seat 42, and
thediameter of the valve seat 42 is less than the
diameter of the valve seat 4I. These valve mem
bers 31--33 are superposed and are held in posi- ‘
The cap member I1 is removably secured to
15
- the top of the casing by’means of screws 2I, for
a purpose to be hereinafter described.
v
'tends through the bottom of the nozzle. ~With~
-
-The casing I5 is provided with an air inlet
opening 22 which communicates with the cham
20' ber I3, in ya manner ,to be -set forth, and within
the chamber I3 is _arranged a throat tube 23 of
an external diameter considerably less than the
internal diameter of the chamber I3, and the
tion by means of screws 43.
\
The proximate faces of the valve members 31
and 33 are provided respectively with openings
44-45 and the valve members are preferably
cut away as at 43 to form a chamber with which
‘the passages 44-45 communicate. Portions of
the peripheries of the valve members 31--33 are
25 top member 24‘of a chamber 25, the tube being
also cut away so as/'to form an annular cham
ber 41, for a purpose to be hereinafter described.
A metering valve 43 co-operates with the valve
seats 4I -and 42 and this valve increases in di
ameter from both of the extremities 43-53 to
less than the diameter of the chamber I3, and
below the chamber 25 is arranged another .cham
the p'oint 5I of its maximum diameter. which lat
ter is disposed in proximity to,-but_ is spaced for
throat tube is supported in an opening in the
preferably of an external diameter considerably
ber
30
23.
-
.
_
The linterior of the throat tube y23 is preferably
a substantial distance from the extremity 50, and
the valve is of such a shape that portions there
of will co-operate with the respective seats 4I
bell shaped as shown in Figure 1, curving in
wardly toward a central opening 21 through the ' 42 to control the passage of the fuel through the
bottom thereof, and the throat tube may be of openings 43-33, as will be hereinafter described.
The metering valve 43 may be of any desired
any desired length, the same being ilxedly vse
length and is supported by means of a disc or
_
35 cured in position.
member> 52 which is movable in -the chamber 23,k
A nozzle member 23 extends through an open
ing 29 in the bottom of the' chamber 25 and and the' member 52 is supported by means of rods
53-54 that extend respectively through open
forms a closure for such opening, the nozzle be
ings 55-53 in the wall of the chamber 25. .The
ing secured in position by means of suitable fas
upper extremities of the rods 53-54 are secured
40 tening devices 33, inJ the form of screws. The to a piston valve 51 that moves within the charn
nozzle extends through the chamber 25 and> is
provided with a conical upper end 3|, which pro- ` ber I3. This valve 51 is provided with an open
jects into the opening 21 in the «bottom of the ing 53 therethrough and which opening commu
throat tube, and the exterior vdiameter of the nicates with -the chamber I3 as well as with the
` .
p
nozzle 23 is considerably less than the internal opening in the throat tube 23.
A sleeve 53 surrounds the throat tube 23 and is
diameter of the chamber 25.
Openings 32 (see particularly Figures 1 and 7) slidable thereupon. The wall of the sleeve 53 _
increases in diameter at the upper end thereof as
"4 are provided in the wall' 24- between the cham
bers I3 and 25, and these openings 32 may be at 30, and the upper end 4of the sleeve is provided
of any desired length and form communicating with a flared opening 3i. The sleeve is of a
50
length to project for any desired distance above
passages between the chamber 25 and the por
tion-of the chamber I3 in which the throat tube the top of the throat tube 23 and is adapted to
be moved upon and lengthwise of th`e throat tube,
23 is arranged.
‘
'
preferably by means of a rock shaft 32 (see par- '
The nozzle 23 is provided with a _central pas
ticularly
Figures 5 and 7) which is journaled in isis>
sage 33 opening through the bottom thereof, ex
suitable
bearings,
and to the rock shaft is se
tending lengthwise of the nozzle and terminating
short of the apex of the conical end. Branch cured a yoke 33, the arms 34 of which are bifur
cated as at 35 to receive lugs or projections 33
passages 34 lead from the passage 33 and pro
ject through the conical -surface of the end of that extend from opposite sides of the sleeve 53;
A lip or projection 31 extends from the yoke 33
60 the nozzle and the passages 34 are arranged at
substantially -right angles to‘the conical surface and is so positioned that it will be engaged byv
of the nozzle.
Channels 35_ are provided in the conical sur
an adjusting screw 33 threaded into the casing
and by means of which adjusting screw the ex- _
face of the nozzle 23, and these passages 35 ' tent of movement of the sleeve 53 in one direc 65
tion may be varied. It will be manifest that by
65 terminate at substantially the lowerI edge of the
adjusting the screw 33 the movement of the rock
shaft 32 for controlling the longitudinal move
‘ment
of the sleeve‘53 may be varied and thereby
discharge into the channels 35, so that when air .
cause the upper surface v33 >of the sleeve 53 to
currents flow through the channels 35, in a man
be vraised or lowered with respect to the 'top of 70
70 ner to be described and into the throat tube 23, the throat tube 23;J ` Y ‘
opening 21 of the throat tube 23, and thepas
sages 34 in the nozzleI communicate with and
they will ñow across the passages 34 and due to
-their high velocity will entrain or atomize fuel
from the passages 34 into the throat tube 23. ì
The passage 33 in the nozzle is enlarged at its
75 lower end as at 36 and such enlarged portion ex
With this surface 33y (see Figure ‘_1) the piston
valve 51 co-operates'and when the piston valve
51 is in the position shown in Figure ’1, any air
entering the passage 22 will be cut oiï from direct
2,118,038 ’ '
flow into the chamber I6 between the seat 69
and valve 51 and through the opening 58, but
will iìow through the openings 32 and through
the channels 35 across the -fuel jet openings 34
and through the throat tube 23 and opening58
into the chamber I6.
When the piston valve 51 is in the position
shown in Figure ,2 with respect to the seat 69
on the sleeve 59, air entering the passage 22 will
flow into the chamber I6 through the opening
between the piston valve 51 and the seat 69 and
through the opening 59. At the same time some
of the air will also pass through the openings 32
and thence into the channels 35 across the fuel
15 jet openings 34 and thence through the throat
tube 23 and through the opening 58 in the valve
51.
,
~
.
the collar passing through the piston valve to abut
a washer 92 that rests against the shoulder 93
of the rod. A nut 94 is threaded upon the ex
tremity of the reduced portion 88, and ,a washer
95 ‘may be provided between the nut 94 and the
ñange 9| of the collar.
The other rod 54 is loosely secured tothe disc
52 by means of the portion 96 lof the collar 03`
passing through an opening 91 in the discand the
external diameter of the collar is slightly less
than the diameter of the opening. The reduced
end 98 of the rod 54 passes through the collar 96
with the shouldered portion 99 abutting the lend
of the collar 83, and a nut |00 is threaded upon
the‘ end of the reduced portion 98. Likewise, the
upper end of the rod 54 is reduced as at |0| to
form a shoulder |02 which abuts a washer- |03
l
Encompassing the lower portion of the casing
that in turn abuts the end of the portion |04 of
a' collar |05. The portion |04 passes .loosely
is a bowl 10 which is provided with a chamber 1|
20
formed preferably by depressinga portion of the
bottom of the wall of the bowl and which cham
`ber or depression 1| is disposed beneath the disc
or member 52. A cleanout opening 12 having a
closure plug 13 being provided in the bottom of
25
the chamber 1|.-
v
,
_
Within the bowl 10 is arranged a float 14 which
controls a valve 15, the latter controlling thefsupply of fuel to the bowl 10 through the opening
16, a strainer 11 being provided over the opening
30 18 which is controlled by the 'valve 15.
The chamber 1| has communication with the
bowl 10 by means of a passage 19 (see particu
larly Figure 1) and the top of the passage 19 is
disposed below the top of the disc or member
35 52 when the latter- is in its lowermost position,
and the duty of the opening 19 is to feed the fuel
through the piston valve 51 with~ a slight play
therearound, and a nut |06 is threaded on the
end of the portion |0| with the washer |01 vbe
tween the nut and the collar |05.
With this construction it will be manifest that
in the event the openings 55-56 in the casing are
not properly positioned or no't properly alined
' with respect to the rods 53-54, the rod 54 may
' be rocked or positioned withrespect to the disc
52 so that it will pass freely through the opening
56. Also the loose connection of the piston valve
4 51 with the rods 53-54 will permit the piston
valve to move laterally so as to properly seat
itself upon the surface 69, also to take care of any
misalinement of the walls of the chamber I6 in
below the disc 52 to break or overcome any vac
uum which might ¿be caused in the chamber 1|
when the disc or member 52 is raised by the up~
ward movement of the piston valve 51.
When the disc or member 52 is lowered the fuel
will also pass through the opening between the
periphery of the disc 52 and the wall of the cham
ber 26. This opening or space is controlled by
45 means of a ring 80 (see particularly Figures 1,
11, and 13) which surrounds the reduced portion
8| of the disc 52 and is normally seated upon the
face or shoulder 82, and the ring is free to move
upon the disc, being held in position by means of
83-84 which respectively surround the
,5.0 >collars
rods 54-53. The ring_80 is oi an internal diam
eter slightly larger than the diameter of the re ,
duced portion of the disc 52 so as to form a pas
55
sage therebetween, the ring being maintained in
position by being disposed between the portion of
the disc 52 beyond the reduced portion thereof
and the collars 83,-84. When the disc 52 is
lowered the ring 80 will move upwardly, allowing
the passage of fluid between the inner periphery
60 of the ring >and the periphery of the reduced por
tion of the disc 52, but when the disc 52 is raised,
the ring will be seated to close the passagebc.
tween the inner periphery thereof and the pe~
riphery of the reduced portion of the disc. The
65 rod 53 is secured rigidly to the disc 52, the collar
84 encompassing a reduced portion 85 on the ro‘tl
53 so as to abut the shoulder 86 and rest against
the upper surface of the disc. The reduced por
tion of the rod 53 passes through the disc and isl
'secured by means of a nut 81 on the end of the
reduced portion. The upper extremity of the rod
53 is reduced as at 88 and is provided with a
threaded portion 89, and the reduced portion 88
passes through a collar 90 having a flange 9|
75 which rests upon the top of the piston valve 51,
14sl
respect to the rods 53 and 54.
»
'I‘he chamber 26 is provided with another open
ing |08 (see Figure 1) in the wall thereof, which
communicates with the bowl 10, so that the fuel
will iiow through the opening |08 into the cham
ber 2,6 and from there will flow through the open
ings 4|-42 past the valve 48, into the passage 33,
to be'discharged through the passages 34 into the
channels 35 Where it will be met by the air cur
rents of high velocityr and atomized into the
,chamber |6 through the throat tube 23 and open
ing 58 in the piston valve.
'
'as
.
If desired, a valve |09 may be provided with
and secured in position by means of a screw ||0
which is adapted to be adjusted so as to vary the
size of the opening 19.
In operation and assuming the parts to be in
the position shown in Figure 1, and when the
motor is starting, it will be seen that the piston
valve 51 closesthe direct communicationzbetween
the passage '22 and the chamber '|6, with the re
sult that any air entering the passage 22 will flow 55
through the openings 32 to enter the channels v35
to flow across the outlets 34 ofthe passage 33
and into the throat tube, -atomizing the fuel. At
the same time fuel from the bowl will be en 60
trained'or drawn up inthe passage 33 .and out of
the passages 34 _by the >suction -created in the
chamber I6, the fuel flowing through the pas
sages 4|-42 around the metering valve 48.
As the engine suction increases the piston valve
51 will be raised to `the position shown in Figure
2, and while being so raised will move olf cf the
seat 69, thereby producing an opening through
which some of the air currents entering the pas~ `
sage 22 -will flow, and these air lcurrents will pas's 70
through the opening 58 in the piston valve into
the chamber i6 commingling with the air and
fuel discharged through the throat tube 23.
Obviously, as the suction in the engine cylin
der increases, the piston valve 51 will be raised. 75
2,118,088
4
atomized by the high velocity of air flowing
to a greater extent and the adjustment of the
the channels 35.
,
meteringN valve 48 will be commensurate with through
During the choking operation the sleeve 59
the movement of the piston valve 51. The screws will be raised andthis'will correspondingly ad
43 whichv hold the valve seat members 31-38 v just the metering valve 48. However, after par
in position will serve as stops to limit the up-tial choking and when the engine is running, suc
ward movement of the disc 52 as well as the
tion will be manifested upon the piston rod 51 to
piston valve 51.
raise the same off ofthe seat 69, and at the samev
AAs the piston valve 51 rises the disc or mem
time the metering valve 48 will be further ad
ber 52 will operate as a plunger, causing the fuel justed or opened with respect to the seat 4|-42 10
in the chamber 26 thereabove to be forced to permit an augmented supply of fuel to the
through the openings 4I-42, passages 33-34 passages 33-34. 'I'hen the degree of richness
into the air channels 35, where it is met4 by the of the fuel can be controlled by the driver.
incoming air.
'
As soon as the choking operation is completed
Some fuel will find its way out of opening |98, and the wire ||4 released, the spring I|8 will 15
but the volume of fuel above the disc member
force the plunger |I1 against the lip or projec
52 is so great ‘1n chamber 26, that fuel will be tion I I6 to rock the shaft 62 to return the sleeve
forced by the disc 52 through the passages to its normal position. '
Under heavy loads itis desirable to have a rich
33--34.
When the engine suction decreases the pis
mixture and -it is also desirable that when the en-- 20
ton valve, metering valve, and disc member 52 gine is running free or on a light load, the mix
will fall by gravity, and the packing ring 89 will ture should be lighter. Therefore, in order to
be moved off of its seat 82 so- as not to retard vary the mixture by increasing or decreasing its
the lowering movement of the disc or member 52. richness there is provided means for automati
With this construction rit will be manifest that cally controlling the same, and which means is
the chamber 1| and the disc 52 operate as a dash itself automatically controlled by engine suction.
pot to dampen or retard a too sudden move
To that end there is provided a chamber ||9 (see
ment of the piston valve 51 and metering valve particularly Figures 8 and 9) in the wall of the
48 in either an opening or closing movement.
When the disc or member 52 is raised by the
casing, within which a plunger |29 operates. `
Communicating with thechamber ||9 is a pas 30
sage |2I which also has communication with the
movement of the piston valve 51, and due to the
pressure exerted by the movement of the mem
ber 52 in the ‘chamber 26, there would be a' tend
ency for the fuel to flow through the 'openings
55-56 (see Figure 1) varound the rods 53-54,
and unless provisionis made to arrest sucnßow
the fuel might flow through the openings into
`the air passage 22. In order to prevent this,
openings III are provided through the wall of
the chamber 25 which communicate with the
chamber I6, above the throttle valve I8.
The upper extremity of the piston |29 may be
reduced or-tapered as at |22, if desired. A con
trol valve |23 operates in a casing~ |24, and which 35
40 passages 55 and 56 and also with the interior of
the bowl or tank 19.
.
»
With this construction it will be manifest that
any fuel which might find its way through the
openings 55-56 will flow/through the openings
45 II I back into the bowl 19.
Any suitable means may be provided to raise
the sleeve 59 from its normal position (as shown
in Figure 1)- to a choking position, such forin
stance as an arm I|2 provided on the rock shaft
62 (see particularly Figure 10), a swivel member
|I3, secured to the end thereof, and to which
, member ||3 a wire ||4 is connected.
The wire
leads through a tubular member I I5 to any lcon
55 venient point on the dash board. _A lip or projec
tion |I6 is secured to the arm I‘I2 and this pro
jection rests against a plunger I|1 which is nor
mally moved by means of a spring IIB in a di
rection to contact with the projection and oper
60 ates to move the arm in a direction to rock the
:haft 62 to return the sleeve 59 t`o its normal po
sition.
The wire |I4 serves as a choke so that
when it is desired to choke the engine and by
pulling upon the wire, the arm I I2 will be raised
65 to cause the rock shaft 62 (see also Figure 4) to
move in a direction that the sleeve 59 will assume
the position shown in >Figure 4.
During this
movement and as the end of the sleeve 59 con
tactswith the piston valve 51, the latter Will be
70 raised vbythe choking operation, and this in turn
-will raise the-metering valve 48 to the position
shown in Figure 4. At the same time and as the
disc 52 rises the fuel will be forced thereby out of
75 the passages 34 into the channels 35 to be met and
casing |24 has an~-openingf|25 in the top thereofwhich communicates with the bowl or tank 19.
The valve |23 has a conical extremity |26 which
extends through the opening |25 and a spring
|21 tends normally to seat the valve |26. Leading
from the valve casing |24 is a passage |29 which ,
has communication with thev passage 41 in the en
larged portion 36 of the passage 33, ro that'when
lthe valve |26 is opened, fuel will ñow through the
opening |25 into the passage |29, and thence .to 45
the passage 41, through the openings 44--45 inthe valve seat members 31-38, to be discharged
through the passage 4| into the passage 33, there
by augmenting the supply of fuel to be discharged
through the passages 34. The passage 4| is a de 50
termined greater opening than the passage 42
and this greater opening is maintained onv the
entire travel of the metering valve 48.
The valve |26 is normally closed by the spring
|21 and when the engine is running the suction
in the engine cylinder will cause the piston |29 to
rise, and the suction will hold the ypiston in a po
_ sition out of contact with the valve |26. When,
however, the engine suction decreases, the piston
|29 will fall, contacting with the valve |26 and 60
the weight ofthe piston |29 is sufficient to unseat
the valve |26 against the stress of the spring |21,
to permit the fuel to flow through the opening |25
into the passage |29.
~
When the engine suction increases again, such 65
suction will be manifested upon the piston |29,
through the passage I2| and the piston will again
be raised, permitting the spring |21 to move the ‘v
valve |26 in a direction to close the opening |25.
Another means for raising the sleeve 59 so as 70
to raise the seat 69 and also adjusting the meter
ing pin 48 to a fixed position, is shown in Figures
14 to 19, in which there may be provided a shaft -' l
journaled in suitable bearings, with one
end thereof projecting into the portion of the 75
2,118,038
chamber |6 in which the sleeve 59 is arranged.
On the end of this shaft. |3| is secured eccentri
cally a cam |32 which operates in a suitable bear
ing |33 secured to the sleeve. 'I'he other end of
the shaft |3| projects for a distance beyond the
bearing and has secured to it for movement
therewith, in »any suitable manner,V such as by
means of a portion of the shaft being angular in
cross section, to form an angular bearing, an arm
|34 by means of which the shaft |3| may be ro
tated in its bearing.
Carried by the arm |34
is a pin or projection |35 adapted to enter sockets
|36 in a fixed portion of the structure so as to
maintain vthe shaft |3| as well as the eccentric
15 camv |32 and the sleeve 59 in their adjusted po
sitions.
Encompassing the end of the shaft |3| is a
ì sleeve |31 secured thereto in any suitable man
ner, such as by means of a fastening `ñíin |38.
'I'he sleeve is open at the inner .end and is of a
diameter considerably larger than the diameter
of the adjacent portion of the shaft |3|. A
spring |39 encompasses the shaft with one end
5
lieved upon the rod |42, the spring |45 will return
the cam |4| to its normal position.
Obviously, the cam and the shaft will> operate
in a housingA |48, where they will be protected.
At the same time that the piston'51 is held
down, which will be sin' starting or choking,
means are provided for holding down the pis'
ton |20 to hold the valve |23 down and thereby
maintain the fuel passage |25, which communi
Cates with the passage |29, open so as to permit l0
fuel to enter the passage |29 for the- purpose of
supplying fuel to the nozzle 28 in starting.
-
' This may be effected in the following manner.
When the engine suction is not sufficient to hold
the piston |20 elevated, the piston will` fall bygrav
ity to the position shown'in Figure 16. That is, so>
that the piston will engage the extremity of the
valve |23 and depress the same against the stress
of the spring |21, thereby opening the passage
|25. When this piston |20 is in this position, 20
which will occur when the piston l51 is in its low
ermost position or in the position shown in Fig
seated in the cap |31 and resting against the bot- - ure 15, the piston |20 is held against being raised
tom wall thereof. 'I’he other end of the spring by engine suction by another cam |49 secured
abuts the arm |34 and tends normally to move also to the shaft |40. This cam |49 is so posi
tioned that when it is lowered the periphery
it in a direction to cause the pin or projection |35
thereof
will contact with the periphery of the
to enter one of -the recesses |36.
~
piston |20 and will frictionally bind or hold the
. With this construction it will be manifest that
piston | 2Uy against being raised by engine suction.
30 when it is desired to adjust the sleeve 59 the arm
These
two pistons51 and |20 may thus be held, 30
|34 is moved longitudinally of the shaft |3| until
the pin |35 is unseated from one of the recesses locked, so to speak, against being raised by en
|36. When the arm is in this position, the shaft gine suction and when in this position, and the
engine is started, a supply of fuel will be deliv
| 3| may be rocked and when the arm |34 is re
ered to the nozzle until’ the engine starts to run.
35 leased, the stress of the spring |39 will vmove
the arm in a direction on the shaft | 3| to cause ‘ As soon as the engine starts to operate the pistons «
the pin or projection |35 to enter one of the re
cesses |36.
_
It will thus'be manifest that a ñxed adjustment
40 may be given to the sleeve 59.
51 and |20 may be released by releasing the .strain
upon the operating rod |42, and immediately the
spring |45 will operate to turn the shaft |40 in a
direction to raise the cams |4| and |49 so that
In choking the engine, it may be desirable to ' they will be moved respectively out of contact 40
hold the piston 51 down so that the air entering with the peripheries of the pistons 51 and |20,
the passage 22 will not flow directly against after which the pistons 5l and I 20 will operate
the piston to raise the same, and in order to
45 prevent the air from flowing directly from the
passage through the opening 58 in the piston 51
and into the chamber I6, and to cause the air
to take a downward course through the openings
32 and thence through the passages 35 across the
50 fuel outlets 34.
~
In order to effect this, any suitable means may
be provided, such for instance as a shaft |40 jour
naled in suitable bearings andA having secured
thereto for rotation therewith a cam |4|. The
55
shaft |40 and the cam | 4| are so positioned that
the cam may b_e brought into contact with the
periphery of the piston 51, as seen more clearly
in Figures 14 and 15, and this cam is adapted
60 to be moved into binding engagement therewith
by rocking the shaft |40, preferably through the
inthe manner as already described.
With the adjustment means for the sleeve 59
it will be manifest that the sleeve may be raised 45
to any desired extent followed by the rising or
adjustment of the metering pin 48, so that more
fuel may be supplied while starting and at
the same time there will be provided a permanent
adjustment for these parts.
_
ditional openings |30, similar to the opening |2|,A
only one of which however is in communication
with the chamber ||9, and by being removably
secured in position by the screws 2|, it will be 55
manifest that this cap member may be rotat-'
ably adjustedso as to permit the same to be ad
justed to different designs of manifolds.
.
' If desired, a baille 51St may be provided below
the piston 51 and _the upper face thereof is dis
medium of a rod |42 pivoted to the end of an arm ' posed below the lowest plane of the surface 69,'
|43, which in turn is secured as at |44 to the so a's not to interfere with the'seating of the pis
shaft |40. A spring |45 is anchored by one end
as atV |46 to a stationary part of the structure,
and is secured at its other end as at |41 to the
shaft |40. 'I‘he normal tendency of the spring
|45 is to raise the cam |4| to move the same out
of engagement with the periphery of the piston
70 51 so as to permit the latter to have a free move
ment. When, however, the rod |42 is operated,
the arm |34 will be raised> and the cam |4| will
be loweredagainst the stress ofthe spring | 45,
and this will frictionally hold the piston. 51
75 against movement. As soon as the stress is re
50
The cap member |1 may be provided with ad
60
ton valve 61 against the surface '69. The function
of said baille is to deflect the air entering beneath
the piston valve 51 toward the center of the open 65
ing 58, with the result thatthe velocity of the‘air
will not operate or have a tendency to lift or drive
the piston valve 51 towards the top of the cham
ber |6 by the momentum of the air currents,
70
While the preferred forms of the invention have
' been herein shown and described, it is'to be un
derstood that various changes may be made in
the details of construction and in the combina
tion and arrangement of the several parts, with 75
2,118,038
6 .
ing chamber, a'piston operating in said chamber
in the scope of the claims, without departing from
above the nozzle and controlled in its operation
by engine suction, a connection between said `pis
ton and said metering valve whereby the opera
1._ In a carburetor, a fuel nozzle., means for ¿ tion of the valve will be controlled by the move
. supplying fuel to the nozzle, a metering valve for ment of said piston, means also responsive in its
controlling the supply of fuel to the nozzle, an air operation to engine suction and operating -to aug-`
supply passage for directing air across the noz
vment the supply of fuel to the nozzle past said
zle to atomize the fuel therefrom, a fuel mixing metering valve, the last recited means embody
chamber, a piston operating in said chamber i ing a passage having communication with the fuel
above the nozzle and controlled in its operation supply and said nozzle, a valve for the last said
by engine suction, and a connection between said passage, means. tending normally to move the
piston and said metering valve whereby the oper
valve in a direction to close the passage, anda
ation of the valve will be controlled by the move :member reciprocable under the influence of en
ment of said piston, the connection being disposed. gine suction and adapted when the engine suc
out of the path of movement of the fuel from the tion drops, to actuate the last said valve against
the spirit of this invention.
What is claimed as new is:
nozzle to the mixing chamber, all. of the parts - v the stress of the valve `closing means to open the
being entirely .housed within the carburetor.
last said passage.
6. In a carburetor, a fuel supply nozzle, means 20
' 2. In a carburetor, a fuel nozzle, means for sup
plying fuel to the nozzle, a metering valve for con
trolling the said supply, a mixing chamber, an
air supply passage having direct communication
for
for supplying fuel thereto, a mixing chamber,
' an air passage having
„
direct communication with
said chamber above and remote from the nozzle,
with said chamber above the nozzle, means
said air passage also leading across the nozzle to
directing a portion of the air from said passage atomize fuel from the nozzle into said chamber,
across the nozzle to atomize the fuel therefrom means spaced above and substantially concentric 25
into said chamber, a piston in the chamber above with the nozzle and influenced by engine suction
the nozzle and controlled in its operation by en ‘ for opening and closing the saiddirect communi
gine suction, and a connection between said pis
cation between the air passage and said chamber,
ton and said valve whereby the operation of the a metering valve for metering the fuel through
valve will be responsive to` the movement of the the nozzle, and an operative connection between '30
the last said means and the said metering valve
30 piston, said piston also serving as a valve to con
trol the direct connection between the aix` -passage and out of the pathof the fuel discharged from
and said chamber, the said connection between said nozzle whereby the operation of the metering
the piston and the said valve being disposed out valve will be responsive to the movement of the
of the path of movement of the fuel from the noz
former, all of the parts being entirely housed 35
zle to the mixing chamber, all of the parts being
within the~ carburetor.
i
7. In a carburetor, a fuel supply nozzle, means
housed within the carburetor.
3. In a carburetor, a fuel nozzle, means for sup- Y for supplying fuel thereto, a mixing chamber, an
plying fuel-to the nozzle, a metering valve for air passage having direct communication with
controlling 'the said supply, a mixing chamber, said chamber and remote from the nozzle, said 40
an air supply passage having direct communica
air passage also leading across the nozzle to
40
tion with said chamber above the nozzle, means atomize fuel from the nozzle into said chamber,
for directing a portion 'of the air from said pas
means disposed above and in alinement with the
sage across the nozzle to atomize the fuel there ' nozzle and influenced by engine suction for open
from into said chamber, a piston in the chamber ingand closing the said direct communication 45
above thenozzle and controlled in its operation between the air passage and said chamber, a
45
by engine suction, a connection between said pis
metering valve for metering the fuel through the
ton and said valve out of the-path of movement nozzle, an operative connection between the last ì
of the fuel from vthe nozzle to the mixing cham
said means and the said metering valve housed
ber whereby the operation of the valve will be within the carburetor and disposed out of the 50
responsive to the movement of the piston, said path of movement of the fuel from the nozzle to
50
piston also serving as afvalve to control the di
the mixing chamber, whereby the operation of the
rect connection between the air passage and said latter will be responsive to the movement of the
chamber, and a- plunger also responsive in its former, means embodying a valved passage hav
operation to the movement of said piston for
ing communication _withthe fuel supply and the
55 forcing fuel through said nozzle.
.
nozzle for augmenting the supply of fuel to the
4. In a carburetor,- a fuel nozzle, means 4for , nozzle past said metering valve, and means in
supplying fuel to the -nozzle, a metering valve vfor
controlling the supply of fuel to the nozzle, an air
supply passage for directing air across the nozzle
to
atomize the fuel therefrom, a'fuel mixing cham
60
ber, a piston operating in said chamber above said
fluenced by engine suction for actuating the last
said valve to open lthe last said passage.
' nozzle and controlled in its operation by engine
said chamber and remote from the nozzle, said
‘air passage also leading across the nozzle to
atomize fuel from the nozzle into said chamber,
suction, a connection between said piston and
said metering valve below the latter whereby the
8. In a carburetor, a'fuel supply nozzle, means 60
for supplying fuel-thereto, a mixing chamber, an
air passage having direct communication with
n
65 operation of the valve will be controlled by the "j_m'eans
disposed above and concentric with the
movement of said piston, and means independ
ozzle and influenced by engine suction for open
i `
ent of the said piston and remote 'from the valve ’ff"in'g'"a.nd
closing the said direct communication
and also responsive in its operation to engine suc
between the air passage and said chamber, a
tion andoperating to augment the supply of fuel metering valve for metering the fuel through ,
70 to the nozzle past said metering'valve.
fuel nozzle, means for the nozzle, an operative connection between the
5.- In a carburetor, a
supplying fuel to the nozzle, a metering valve for
controlling vthe supply of fuel to the nozzle, an
vair supply passage for directing air across the
76 nozzle to atomize the fuel therefrom, a fuel mix
-
last said means and the said metering valve
whereby the operation of the latter will be re
sponsive to the movement of the former, a valved
passage having communication with the fuel 75
2,118,038r
'Ji
supply and the Anozzle for augmenting the sup
ply of fuel to the nozzle past said metering valve,
a cylinder, a piston movable in said cylinder
under the influence of engine suction, said pis
ton operating when engine suction drops, to open
the valve in the last said passage;v and means
for subsequently closing the last said valve.
9. In a carburetor, a fuel nozzle, means em
bodying a metering valve for supplying fuel to
10 the nozzle; an unobstructed and open throat
tube into which the nozzle discharges, a mix
ing chamber with which the throat tube com
municates, an air passage having communica
tion with said chamber and also leading across
'said nozzle, a piston in the chamber spaced above
and concentric with the throat tube and influ
enced in its movement by engine suction, said
piston having an opening >therethrough in aline
ment with the end of the throat tube, a plunger
with which the piston is connected for forcing
fuel into said nozzle, and an operative connection
between said plunger and said metering valve
for operating the latter, said connection being
disposed out of the path of the fuel discharged
from the said nozzle, said piston operating to
control the communication between the said
chamber and the air passage, all of the parts be
ing housed within the carburetor.
10. In a carburetor, a fuel nozzle, means em
bodying a metering valve for supplying fuel to
the nozzle, a throat tube into which the nozzle
discharges, a mixing chamber with which the
throat tube communicates, an air passage hav
ing communication with said chamber and also
leading across said nozzle, a piston in the cham
ber above and concentric with the throat tube
and influenced in its movement by engine suc
tion, a plunger below the nozzle, with which the
piston is connected for forcing fuel into said
40 nozzle, an operative connection between said
plunger and said metering Valve for operating
the latter, the last said connection being dis
posed out of the path of the flow of the fuel
from the nozzle to the mixing chamber, said pis-ton operating to control the communication be
tween the said chamber and the air passage, said
nozzle being disposed between the piston and
said plunger, and means whereby fuel may be
supplied on both sides of said plunger.
50
11. In a carburetor a mixing chamber, an open
ended upright throat tube in said chamber. a
fuel nozzle discharging into one end of said tubea..
means for supplying fuel to thev nozzle, an air
passage having direct communication with said
chamber over the top of said tube, said passage
also leading across the end of said nozzle, a
sleeve slidable upon and longitudinally of said
tube, the upper end of said sleeve forming a
valve seat at the top of said tube, a piston mov
able in said chamber under the influence of en
gine suction and adapted to co-operate with said
valve seat to control the direct communicating
passage between the air passage and said cham
ber, means whereby the movement of the pis
65 ton will control the supply of’fuel to the noz.
zle, and means for moving said sleeve length
wise of said tube to vary the position of said
valve seat with respect to the end of said tube,
and while the parts of the carburetor remain in
tact.
-
.12. In a carburetor a mixing chamber, an open
ended upright throat tube in said chamber, a
fuel nozzle dischargingv into one end of said tube,
means for supplying fuel to the nozzle, an air
75 passage having direct communication with said
7
chamber over the top _of said tube, said passage
also leading across the end of said nozzle, a
sleeve slidable upon and longitudinally of said
tube, the upper end of said sleeve forming a
valve seat at the top of said tube, a piston mov
able in said chamber above the throat tube, un
der the inñuence of engine suction and adapted
to -co-oizierate with said valve sea't to control
the direct communicating- passage between the
air passage and said chamber, means whereby
the movement of the piston will control the sup
ply of fuel to the nozzle, means for moving‘ said
sleeve lengthwise of said tube to vary the posi
tion of said valve seat with respect to the end
of said tube and while the parts of the carbu 15
retor remain intact, and means operatively con
nected with said piston for forcing fuel into said
nozzle upon the movement of the piston.v
13. In a carburetor a mixing chamber, an open
ended throat‘tube Vin said chamber, a fuel noz 20
zle discharging into one end of said tube, means
for supplying fuel to .the nozzle, an air passage
having direct communication with said cham
ber. over the top of said tube, said passage also
leading across the end of said nozzle, a sleeve
slidable upon and longitudinally of said tube, the
end of said sleeve forming a valve seat at the
top of said tube,.a piston movable in said cham
ber under the influence of engine suction and
adapted to co-operate With said valve` seat to 30
control the direct communicating passage be-`
tween the air passage and said chamber, means
whereby the movement of the piston will control
the supply of fuel to the nozzle, means for mov
ing said> sleeve lengthwise of said tube to vary 35
the position of said valve seat with respect to
the end of said tube, means operatively con
nected with the piston vfor forcingl fuel into said
nozzle, means for augmenting the supply of fuel
to the nozzle, and means also responsive in its 40
action to engine suction for controlling the said
augmenting supply of fuel to the nozzle.
14. In a carburetor, a fuel supply nozzle, a.
mixing chamber into which the nozzle discharges,
a metering valve for controlling the supply of
fuel to the nozzle, a fuel supply chamber below 45
the nozzle, a plunger in the last said chamber,
said plunger operating to actuate said valve, a
piston above the nozzle and responsive in its
operation to engine suction, rods‘connecting the
plunger and piston, said rods passing through 50
bearings which communicate with said fuel sup
ply chamber, and means comprising passages
communicating with and leading from said bear
ings for discharging from , said bearings fuel
which may be drawn thereinto.
-
55
15. In a carburetor, a fuel supply nozzle. a `
mixing chamber into which the nozzle discharges,
a metering valve for controlling the supply of
fuel to the nozzle, a fuel supply chamber below 60
the nozzle, a plunger in the last said chamber,
said plunger operating to actuate said valve, a
piston above the nozzle and responsive in its op
eration to engine suction, rods connecting the
plunger and piston, said rods passing through
bearings which communicate with said fuel sup- .
ply chamber, means comprising passages com
municating with and leading from said bearings
lfor discharging from said bearings fuel which
may be drawn thereinto, and a loose packing ring 70
encompassing said plunger, said ring operating
to permit lpassage of fuel past said plunger in
one direction and preventing passage of the fuel
past the plunger in the opposite direction.
16. In a. carburetor a structure embodying a. 15
»2,118,088
8 .
fuel nozzle, a >piston above and a plunger below
and spaced from the nozzle, and rods connecting
the piston and plunger, one of said rods being
secured to the plunger at one end by a loose con
ings between said seats, an annular chamber in
>said members communicating with the first said
chamber, and means for supplying fuel through
said chambers to augment the supply of fuel clis
charged past said metering valve and into the
nection adapting said rod for lateral movement
with respect to the plunger and the other rod
for assembling purposes.
nozzle.
'
1‘7. In a carburetor a structure embodying- a
fuel nozzle, a piston above and a plunger below
and spaced from the nozzle, and rods connecting
the piston and plunger, one of said rods being
for'directing a portion of the air from said pas
sage across the nozzle to atomize the fuel there
tion tothe plunger adapting said rod for lateral
movement with respect to the plunger and the
other rod, and said rods being secured by one
of their ends with a loose connection to said
piston adapting said piston for free edgewise
movement laterally with respect to said rods.
18. In a carburetor, a mixing chamber, an
open ended throat tube in the chamber, a fuel
nozzle discharging into said tube, an air passage
for atomizing fuel from the nozzle, said air pas
sage also having direct communication with said
chamber, a sleeve slidable upon and lengthwise
of said tube, one end of the sleeve constituting a.
valve seat, a piston movable in the chamber Aand
influenced in its operation by engine suction,
said piston adapted to co-operate with said valve
s_eat to close the direct communication between
the air passage and said chamber, means oper
atively connected with said piston for metering
fuel into said tube, aplunger responsive in its
operation to the movement of the piston for forc
ing fuel into the nozzle, and means for raising the
said sleeve with respect to said tube for raising
said valve seat and for positively' raising said
’
`
1
.
19. In a carburetor a fuel nozzle, having an
inlet opening, valve seat members seated in said
opening and having alined openings therethrough
to form annular valve seats, said openings at the
valve seats being of different diameters, a taper
ing metering valve member passing through said
openings andI co-operating with said seats, and
means responsive in its operation to engine suc
tion for controlling the movement of said valve
member with respect to said seats, the last said
means also operable to force fuel through said
openings and into said nozzle. ,
20. In a carburetor a fuel nozzle, having an
inlet opening, valve seat members seated in said
opening and having alined openings therethrough
to form annular valve seats, said openings at the
valve seats being of different diameters, a taper
ing metering valve member passing through said
openings and co-operating with said seats, means
responsive in its operation to engine suction for
controlling the movement of said valve member
with respect to said seats, the last said means
also operable to force fuel through said open
(il) ings and into said nozzle, there being a chamber
in said members communicating with said open
‘
supplying fuel to the nozzle, a metering `valve for
controlling the said supply, a mixing chamber,
an air supply passage having direct communica 10
tion with said chamber above the nozzle, means
secured byv one of its ends with a loose connec
piston.
V
21. In a carburetor, .a fuel nozzle, means for
from into said chamber, a piston in the chamberb
controlled in its operation by engine suction, a 15
connection between said piston and said valve
whereby the operation of the valve will be re
sponsive to the movement of the piston,~ said pis
kton also serving as a valve to control the direct
connection between the air passage and said» 20
chamber,v and means controllable at will and
movable into and out of contact with said piston
for locking said piston against movement _in
either direction.
22. In a carburetor, a fuel nozzle, means for
supplying fuel to the nozzle, a metering valve for
controlling the supply of fuel to the nozzle, an air
supply passage for directing air across the nozzle
to atomize the fuel therefrom, a fuel mixing
chamber, a piston operating in said chamber and 30
controlled in its operation by engine suction, a
connection between said piston and said metering
valve whereby the operation of the valve will be
lcontrolled by the movement of said piston, means
also responsive in its operationto engine suction
and operating to augment the supply of fuel to
the nozzle past said metering valve, and means
controllable at will and individual to the piston
and the last said means and respectively mov
ableinto and out of engagement therewith, for 40
maintaining them against movement in either
direction.
23. In a carburetor, a fuel nozzle, means for
supplying fuel t‘o the nozzle, a metering valve for
controlling the supply of fuel to the nozzle, an air
supply passage for directing air across the nozzle
to atomize the füel therefrom, a fuel mixing
chamber, a piston operating in said chamber and
controlled in its operation by engine suction, a
connection between said piston and said meter
ing valve whereby the operation of the valve willv
be controlled> by the movement of said piston,
a valve to augment the supply of fuelk to the
nozzle past the metering valve, means embodying
a piston lresponsive in its operation to engine 55
suction and operating -to open the last said
valve, means embodying locking elements in-Y
dlvidual to said pistons for locking them against
operation by engine suction, and means for con
trolling said locking elements atwìll.
THORWALD BRODERSEN.
WILLIAM C. DUNN.
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