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Патент USA US2118390

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May 24, 1938.
B. s. AlKMAN
2,118,390
BRAKE CONTROL MEANS
'
Filed July 28, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
$1
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I119
INVENTOR
BUR TON S. AIKMAN
BY
‘
ATTORNEY
Patented may 24, 1938
2,118,390
UNITED STATES PATENT QFFEQE
2,118,390
BRAKE CONTROL MEANS
Burton S. Aikman, Wilkinsburg, Pa., assignor to
The Westinghouse Air Brake Company, Wil
moi-ding, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania
Application July 28, 1936, Serial No. 92,965
22 Claims.
My invention relates to brake control systems
and more particularly to such systems employing
a plurality of braking means including a mag
netic track shoe braking means.
One object of my invention is the provision
of control means for magnetic track shoe brakes
in which the track shoe windings are slightly
energized before the shoes are brought into en
gagement with the track rail.
Another object of my invention is to control
10
5)
the degree of energization of the magnetic track
shoe brakes in accordance with variations in
straight air pipe pressure.
A further object of my invention is to so
15 control the track shoe raising cylinder as to
cause the track shoes to be lowered into engage
ment with the rail at the time the braking cur
rent is supplied to the shoe and to be raised from
engagement with the rail at the time the ener
20 gizing circuit for the track shoe is interrupted.
Another object of my invention is the provi~
sion of means for automatically interrupting
the energization of the magnetic track shoe when
the vehicle comes to rest or the rate of retarda~
tion of the vehicle decreases to a predetermined
low value, to prevent the windings thereof from
burning out or becoming overheated.
A further object of my invention is the pro
vision of means responsive to the rate of retarda
30 tion of the vehicle for controlling the applica
tion and release of the magnetic track shoe brak
ing means after the brake controller device is
moved to its brake applying position.
A still further object of my invention‘ is the
35 provision of meansv responsive to movement of
the brake controller device to a brake applying
position for effecting the initial application of
the track shoe braking means independently of
the rate of retardation of the vehicle.
Other objects and advantages of my invention
40
will appear from the following description, refer
ence being had to the accompanying drawings in
which
Figs. 1 and 2, taken together, are a diagram
matic view of apparatus ‘and circuits compris
ing one preferred embodiment of the invention,
Fig. 3 is a plan view of the brake valve device
shown in Fig. 1, and
Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken on the line
.20 4-4 in Fig. 1.
Referring to the drawings, my invention con
templates the use of a ?uid pressure braking
means comprising a brake cylinder I that is
supplied with ?uid under pressure from the main
reservoir 2 through main reservoir pipe 3, as
(Cl. 303-3)
controlled by the brake valve device 4, through
straight air pipe 5, the automatic valve device
6 and brake cylinder
l. A magnetic track
braking means is also provided comprising the
track shoe 8 that is controlled by the resistor 5
device 9 and the contactor 12 in cccrdance with
the pressure in the brake cylinder pipe T as
controlled by the brake valve device ii. The
magnetic track brake is controlled by the re
sistor unit device Q in accordance with the pres 10
sure in the brake cylinder pipe 1, by a contactor
l2 and an inertia controlled pilot switch device
13 that is carried on the brake valve device 4.
The brake valve device 4 comprises a casing
having a main body portion 54, a seli~lapping 15
valve portion 55 and a base or bracket portion
IS, the three portions together de?ning a pressure chamber i“! that is in open communication
with the brake cylinder
through straight air
passage and pipe E8, the automatic valve device
6 and brake cylinder pipe ‘I.
The self-lapping valve portion i5 is provided
with a supply valve chamber l9 to which a feed
valve device 22 of the usual type supplies ?uid
under pressure at a reduced pressure from the
main reservoir 2 through the main reservoir pipe
and passage 3. A supply valve 23 is provided
in the valve chamber l9 and is slidably disposed
within a bore 24 in the casing to engage a seat
25 provided in the valve portion of the casing.
The supply valve 23 is subject to the pressure of ‘
a spring 26, one end of which engages the valve
and the other end of which engages a nut 21
screw-threadedly attached within a bore in the
valve portion of the casing.
The self-lapping valve portion or section of the
casing I4 is also provided with a cylinder 28
which is open at one end to the pressure cham
ber H, the other end of the cylinder being closed
by an adjusting member 29 screw-threadedly at
tached Within a bore in the self-lapping valve
casing portion. The adjusting member 25 is pro
vided with a central bore 32 which, at its outer
end, is adapted to receive a screw 33 for attache
ing a cap member 34.
Operatively mounted in the cylinder 28, ad
45
jacent its open end, is a movable abutment in
the form of a piston 36 having a stem 31 which
is slidably guided by the adjusting member 29
within the inner end of a bore 32. At one end
of the piston 36 is a chamber 38 which is con
stantly open to the atmosphere through an ex
haust passage and port 39. A coil spring M is
contained in the chamber 38 and is interposed
between and engages the inner face of the piston 56
2
2,118,390
36 and the inner face of the adjusting member 29.
A release valve chamber IE2 is provided within
the piston
that is in open communication
with the pressure chamber l‘i through a pas
sage 133. A release valve M is contained within
the Valve chamber i2 and is adapted to seat on
the valve seat
formed on the piston and which
is operative to control communication between
the valve chamber i2 and the chamber 38 through
The release valve is
10 connecting passages
provided with a stem (ii, the small end of which
slides within a bore in the stem of the piston
36 and the larger end of which is provided with
a collar 138 which slidably engages the piston
15 within a central bore 129 and is subject to the
pressure of the release valve spring 52 interposed
between the engaging collar 48 and the annular
flange 53 on the piston. Outward. movement
of the release valve relative to the piston 35} is
limited by the collar llil which engages a stop
?ange 515 that is secured to the piston 33.
A mechanism is provided for controlling the
operation of the supply valve 23 and the release
Valve 42 comprising spaced levers 55, that are
'‘ pivotally mounted intermediate their ends on a
pin 56, supported in a plunger all that is slidably
guided within a bore 58 in the casing of the self
lapping valve portion it.
The lower end of the spaced levers 55 are con
nected together by a pin 5Q which is loosely
mounted within a roller 62 that is adapted to
operatively engage the outer end of the release
valve stem 137. The upper end of the spaced levers
55 are connected‘ together by a pin 63 to which
one end of the operating rod '65: is pivotally
mounted, the opposite end of the rod 65 opera
tively engaging the supply valve 23 within a recess
65 formed in its face. For the purpose of operat
ing the plunger 5i toward the right is provided an
40 operating cam 6K5 mounted upon a shaft 161 that
is carried in an upper bearing 6%} and in a lower
bearing 69, and is arranged to be operated by the
an opening Ail in one end of the casing and 10
adapted to engage the pendulum 82.
The piston
89 divides the bore 92 into a chamber 95 that is
in constant communication with a chamber 9%
through port ill‘, and a chamber 93 that is in con
stant communication with the atmosphere 15
through port 99. A spring liiél is provided with
in the chamber 98, one end of which engages the
outer end of the bore
and the other end of
which engages one side of the piston
to force
the piston toward the right until the stop mem 20
ber Hi3 thereon engages the opposite end of the
bore.
A vertical bore EM is provided in the casing
above the bore 92, containing a piston Hi5 dividing
the bore into the aforenamed chamber 96 and a 25
chamber we that is in communication with the
atmosphere through port lili. A spring W8 is
provided within the chamber
the lower end of
which engages a partition in the casing and the
upper end of which engages the piston N35 to 30
force it upwardly against a stop Hi9 extending
downwardly from the upper casing wall. The
piston i535 is provided with a stern H2 extending
upwardly through an opening in the upper cas-e
ing wall and adapted to engage a lever H3 that
is pivotally mounted on a pin lid on the bracket
'53
in the opposite end of which is an open
ing M5.
A piston chamber M6 is also provided in the
bracket casing that is in constant communica
tion with a safety control pipe ill and which
contains a piston H8 having a stem li?l extend
brake valve handle '52. As the handle 712 is moved
progressively from its release position toward full
service position the cam 55!)‘ forces the plunger 5'!
ing
the upper
upwardly
casing
therefrom
wall andthrough
having aanreduced
openingpor~
progressively toward the right.
lever H3, and provided with a head
on the
upper end thereof for a purpose to be later ex
It will be appreciated that the force of the re~
lease valve spring 52 is less than the force of the
supply valve spring 26, which is lessv than the
force of the regulating spring il l. When the cam
56 and the plunger 5'? are in their release posi
tions, as shown in Fig. l, the spring 25 forces the
supply valve 23 toward the left to its seated
position and the spring 52 forces the release
55 valve M toward the left to its unseated position.
The inertia controlled pilot switch device it is
mounted on a bracket ‘:73 supported from the body
portion M of the brake valve device and com—
prises ?xed contact members it and it that are
60 adapted to be engaged by a movable contact mem
ber '66 that is carried by a lever 'll mounted on
a pin '58 that is attached to the bracket iii. A
spring ‘.79 is provided for urging the lever ‘ii and
the switch contact member "i5 downwardly to nor
mally maintain the contact member '53 out of‘ en
gagement with the contact members "iii and 75.
An inertia pendulum 32 is provided that is
mounted on a hub 83 extending from the bracket
'53, the ball bearings 3d providing easy move
70 ment of the pendulum in accordance with the
rate of retardation of the vehicle to present a
cam face 55 against a roller 36 that is mounted on
a pivot pin 8i carried by the lever ll.
A raised
portion
the lever88‘l7is and
provided
the switch
for raising
contact
themember
roller l6
75
upon movement of the pendulum 32 toward the
left from its vertical or illustrated position.
A time limiting mechanism is provided for urg
ing the pendulum 8'2 toward the left for a short
interval of time upon movement of the brake valve
handle “52 to a brake applying position. This
mechanism includes a movable piston 89 posi
tioned within a bore 92 provided in the bracket
casing and having a stem 93 extending through
tion that extends through the opening 2
in the 45
plained. A spring l23 is provided about the stem
M9, the upper end of which engages the casing
wall and the lower end of which engages the 50
piston l 58 for urging the piston 2 l8 and the stem
H9 downwardly upon the release of fluid under
pressure from the piston
5 iii. The lever
H3 is provided with a ?at portion i211- that is
so positioned as to be adapted to be engaged by 55
a cam surface E25 on the under side of a seg
ment I26 mounted on the shaft 5i and rotat
able therewith upon movement of the brake valve
handle '52.
The automatic valve device 5 comprises a oas~
ing providing a piston chamber iii? containing a
piston I28 having a stem i223, extending into a
valve chamber ifil on the opposite side of the
piston
that is in constant communi cation
with a main reservoir pipe
w‘:
1 con~
tains a slide valve E32 operatively connected to
the stem 529.
A spring
'
provided within
the piston chamber £2‘? for norn ally urging the
piston E28 and the slide valve liifi to their illus
trated positions in which a cavity M12 in the slide
valve [32 effects communication between the
straight air pipe 5
the brake cylinder pipe l’.
A foot valve device 535 is provided having a
casing providing a valve chamber l?t that is in
constant communication with a main reservoir 75
2,1 18,390
pipe 3, a chamber I31 that is in constant com
munciation with the safety control pipe I I1 and
a chamber I38 that is in constant communication
with the atmosphere through exhaust port I39.
A diaphragm valve I42 is provided within the
chamber I38 and is adapted to be forced by a
follower I43 against its rib seat I44 to close com
munication from the safety control pipe and
chamber I31 to the atmosphere through chamber
10 I38 and exhaust port I39. A foot lever I45 is
provided pivotally connected to the casing by a
pin I46 and urged in a counterclockwise direc—
tion by a. spring I41 one end of which engages
the lever I45 and the other end of which engages
15 the casing of the foot valve device. A valve I48
is provided within the chamber I36 and is pro
vided with a stem I49 extending through the
chamber I31 into engagement with the dia
phragm valve I 42, the valve I42 acting against
20 the stem I49 to force the valve I48 from its seat
against the bias of a spring I5I provided within
the chamber I36 when the valve I42 is in its.
seated position. Upon the release of pressure
from the lever I45, the spring I41 urges the lever
25 upwardly, thus relieving pressure against the fol
lower I43 and permitting the spring I5I to force
the valve I43 to its seat to close communica
tion between the main reservoir pipe 3 and the
safety control pipe I I1, ‘the stem I49 acting at the
80 same time to force the diaphragm valve I42 from
its seat to effect communication between the
safety control pipe H1 and the atmosphere
through chambers I31 and I38.
The resistor device 9 comprises a tubular casing
35 I52 having a lining I53 of insulating material
therein containing a stack of Wafers I54 of con
ducting material, such as carbon, connected be
tween the ?xed terminal I55 at the right hand
end and a movable pressure terminal I56, carried
40 by a lever I51 that is pivotally mounted on a pin
I58 carried at one end of a rod I59 extending
through an opening in a bracket I62 that extends
upwardly from the casing I53. A spring I 63 is
provided about the rod I59, one end of which
45 engages the bracket I62 and the other-end of
which engages a collar I64 carried on the rod
I59 for urging the rod and pivot pin I58 toward
the right to their illustrated positions, so long
as the pressure on the spring I63 is below a pre
50 determined value. A contact member I65 that is
electrically connected to the terminal I56 is car
ried by the resilient support I66 and is adapted
to engage the ?xed contact member I61 that is
connected by conductor I68 to the terminal I55
55 for a purpose to be later explained.
On the under side of the casing I52 a pressure
operated switch is provided comprising ?xed con
tact members I12 and I13 that are carried by
a supporting bracket I14 and insulated from the
60 casing structure, and a movable contact member
I 15 that is carried by a stem I16, the smaller end
of which is guided within a bore in the bracket
I14 and the larger end of which is guided within
a bore in a stem I11 that is carried in a bore
65 I18 within the casing structure and terminates
in a diaphragm follower I19 that engages one
side of the diaphragm I82 on the opposite side
of which is provided a diaphragm chamber I83
that is in constant communication with a
70 cylinder pipe 1. A spring I84 is provided
the rod I16, one end of which engages a
I85 on the end of the stem I11 and the
3
ber I15 and the stem I11 upon movement there
of to a switch closing position. A spring I81 is
provided within the bore I18, the right hand end
of which engages a nut I88 that is screw-thread
edly attached within the end of the bore I18,
and the other end of which engages in. an en
larged portion of the stem I11 to urge the stem.
toward the left. A portion of the stem is reduced
to form shoulders I92 and I93 to engage opposite
sides of the bifurcated end I 94 of the lever I51 for
actuating the lever and the pressure terminal I56
upon movement of the same. A resistor I95 is
permanently connected between the switch ter
minal I13 and the common power terminal I55.
The contactor device I2 comprises a magnetic
core consisting of the ?xed portion I96 and a
movable armature portion I98 pivotally connect
ed thereto by a pin I99, and adapted to be actu
ated thereby upon the energization of a winding
I91, to cause engagement of the movable contact
member 204 with a ?xed contact member 203.
A spring 202 normally urges the armature mem
ber and the contact member 204 toward their
illustrated positions. The core portion I96 is
mounted upon a casing providing a valve cham
ber 205 containing a valve 206 that is urged to
ward its seat by a spring 201 therein to close
communication between the chamber 205 and a
chamber 208 that is in constant communication
with a pipe 209 and a piston chamber 2“ of the
track shoe device 8. An exhaust valve chamber is
also provided that is in constant communication
with the atmosphere through exhaust port 2I2
and which contains a valve 2I3 having a valve
stem 2I4 provided with collars 2I5 for engaging
the opposite sides of the bifurcated lower end
2I6 of the armature. I98. The valve 206 is pro
vided with a stem 2 I 1 for engaging the valve 2 I3.
In the deenergized condition of the contactor I2
the spring 202 urges the armature I98 to its il
lustrated position, the lower end 2I6 thereof bias
ing the valve 2I3 to its seat and the valve 206
from its seat against the bias of the spring 201,
thus eifecting communication from the main
reservoir pipe 3 to the piston chamber 2“ of the
track shoe device 8.
The track shoe device 8 comprises a track shoe
2“! for engaging the track rail 2I9 and is nor
mally held suspended above the track rail by the
supporting bracket 22I, the piston stem 222 and
the piston 223 in the aforementioned piston
chamber 2“ provided in a casing 224 carried on
the car or truck structure.
Charging the system
The system is charged by the ?ow of ?uid
under pressure from the main reservoir 2 as sup
plied by the feed valve device 22 at a reduced
pressure to the main reservoir pipe 3, to charge
the supply valve chamber I9 on the brake valve
device 4. Fluid under pressure also ?ows from
the main reservoir pipe 3 through chambers 205
and 208 of the contactor device I2, pipe 209, to
the. piston chamber 2| I of the track shoe raising
cylinder 224, thus forcing the piston 223 and
the track shoe 2I8 upwardly to disengage the
track shoe from the rail.
To charge the system it is necessary that the
brake
operator maintain pressure on the foot lever I45
about
urging the lever downwardly against the bias of 70
the spring I41 to its illustrated position, thus
forcing the diaphragm valve I42 against its rib
seat I44 to close communication between the
safety control pipe H1 and the. atmosphere and
to unseat the valve I48 to effect communication
collar
other
end of which engages the support I86 carrying
the movable contact member I15 to provide a
75 resilient connection between the contact mem
4
2,118,390
between the main reservoir pipe 3 and the safe
ty control pipe ill. Fluid under pressure thus
flows from the main reservoir pipe 3 to the safe
ty control pipe I I1 and to the piston chamber I27
of the automatic valve device 6, the combined
pressure within the piston chamber I2‘! and the
force of the spring I33 forces the piston I28 and
the slide valve I32 to the right or to their illus
trated positions. Fluid under pressure also ?ows
10 from the safety control pipe ill to the piston
chamber H6 of a time limiting control mecha
and, consequently, the greater will be. the compression of the regulating spring 4! necessary to
permit movement of the lever 55 and of the rod
6% to effect the seating of the supply valve 22%.
It will be apparent therefore, that the brake valve
device is self-lapping on a pressure basis, the de
gree of ?uid pressure within the pressure cham
ber I’! necessary to effect the movement of the
valve to lap position being dependent upon the
degree of movement of the operating lever “52 10
from its release position.
nism for controlling the inertia pilot switch, thus
forcing the piston H8 upwardly against the bias
As the lever ‘E2 of the brake valve device It is
moved to any position within the pneumatic
of the spring I23 thus reducing pressure on the
15 upper side of the lever H3 and permitting the
spring 108 to force the piston I05, the stem H2
and the lever H3 upwardly to their illustrated
positions. Fluid under pressure also flows from
the main reservoir pipe 3 to charge the slide valve
chamber l3| of the automatic valve device 6.
Service application of the brakes
If the operator wishes to
a service appli
cation of the brakes the. handle '42 of the brake
valve device it is moved from its release position
an amount depending upon the desired degree of
application of the brakes. Upon the initial move
ment of the handle from its release position the
service zone the surface I25 of the segment lZG
engages the surface I24 on the lever H3, thus
causing the lever to move in a clockwise direction
about the pin H4 and to force the stem H2 and
sloping surface of the cam 66 moves against the
30 plunger 51, forcing the plunger toward the right.
The ?rst part of this movement effects a com
pression of the release valve spring 52 and forces
the release Valve 413 to its seat, closing communi
cation between the pressure chamber l‘? and the
Fur
35 atmosphere through passages I33, (iii and
ther movement of the plunger 5'? toward the right
causes the spaced levers 55 to pivot about their
lower end, further movement of the roller e2 being
prevented by the stiffness of the regulating spring
40 4|, thus causing the rod 5!; to force the supply
valve 23 against the compression of the supply
valve spring 26 to open communication between
the main reservoir pipe 3 and the pressure chamher i‘! through the supply valve chamber is, thus
45 supplying ?uid under pressure from the main
reservoir 2 to the pressure chamber l? and to the
brake cylinder l through straight air pipe 53, the
cavity I34 in the slide valve. 532 of the automatic
valve device 6 in its illustrated position, and brake
50 cylinder pipe l. The pressure established in the
pressure chamber ii, and in the brake cylinder l,
is dependent upon the degree. of movement of the
operating lever '32 and of the plunger 5'5 from
their release positions, since, when the pressure
55 within the chamber ii is increased due to the
flow of ?uid thereto through the. supply valve
chamber ii! a like pressure is exerted on the cham
ber side of the piston 36 in opposition to the pres
sure exerted by the regulating spring M. This
60 pressure continues to build up until it becomes
sufficient to force the piston 36 toward the right,
thus relieving the pressure on the roller 62 and
permitting the supply valve spring 25 to force a
rod 64 toward the left, pivoting the lever 55 about
65 the pivot 55 and moving the supply valve '23 into
engagement with its seat 25.
The amount of pressure on the chamber side of
the piston 36 necessary to eifect sufficient move
ment of the piston 36 to cause a supply valve 21% to
seat is dependent upon the amount of movement
of the operating lever “J2 and of the plunger 5?
from their release positions.
The greater the
movement of the operating lever 'ifl from its re
lease position the greater will be the amount of
75 movement of the pivot pin 56 toward the right,
the piston £55 downwardly against the bias of the
spring H38. Fluid under pressure in the chamber
96 is thus forced through the port 97 into the pis 20
ton chamber 95 to force the. piston 39 and the stem
93 toward the left, the end of the stem 93 engag
ing the pendulum 82 and forcing it to move in a
clockwise direction about the central hub
thus
causing the raised surface of the cam
acting 25
against the roller 86 to move the lever ‘ii in a
counterclockwise direction and cause engagement
of the switch contact member '16 with the con—
tact members ‘E5.- and 75. A tickler or magnetiz
ing circuit is thus completed from the over-head 30
line conductor 232 through trolley 233, conductor
234, the switch contact members ‘l4, l5 and ‘iii,
and conductor 235, to the terminal N3 of the
pressure operated switch on the resistor device 9
through resistor lSE, conductor
and the wind~ 35
ing of the track shoe 2 lit, to ground at 231’. rI‘he
resistor 895 is so designed as to permit the supply
of magnetizing current only to the brake shoe 2 I 8,
and is insuf?cient to cause an appreciable braking
action.
40
As the pressure in the brake cylinder pipe "I and
in the diaphragm chamber “33 of the pressure
operated switch builds up to a predetermined low
value, the follower H9 and the stem if‘! are moved
toward the right to cause engagement of the
switch contact member H5 with the contact
members H12 and ll’l‘l to close a circuit from the
over-head line conductor 232, as above traced, to
the. terminal of the contact member i273, through
switch contact members H3, H5, and H2 ,the.
conductor 23? through the winding IQ‘! of the
contactor l2, and conductor 238 to ground at 239,
thus causing movement of the armature Hit in a
counterclockwise direction about the pivot pin Hill
to effect engagement of the contact member 2134
with contact member 283 and movement of the
bifurcated lower end of the. armature 2th toward
the right, thus permitting the valve 286 to be
moved to the right to its seat and the valve 2E3
to be moved to the right from its seat to close
communication as above described between the
main reservoir pipe 3 and the piston chamber 2! l
of the track shoe raising cylinder 224 and to per—
mit the release of ?uid under pressure from the
piston chamber 2H through pipe 269 and eX~ 65
haust port 2 l2.
Engagement of the contact members 204 and
293 completes a braking circuit from the over
head line conductor 232, through trolley
con
tact members 203 and 2M, conductor 2232, to the
terminal I56 of the stack of carbon pile wafers E54,
through the carbon pile stack to the terminal 555,
the conductor 23%, the winding of the. track shoe
magnet and to ground at 231. It will be noted
that a portion of the above traced circuit through 75
5
2,118,390
the carbon pile resistor I54 is in parallel circuit
relation with the said portion of the circuit
through the resistor !05. As the pressure in the
brake cylinder I and in brake cylinder pipe T and
diaphragm chamber I83 builds up, the stem I7?
is urged further toward the right against the bias
of the spring 181, thus moving the lever I51v fur
ther in a counterclockwise direction about the
pivot pin I58 to bring a greater pressure on the
10 resistance
carbon pileofstack
the carbon
I545, and
pilethus
stacktotodecrease
thereby in~
crease the current flow through the winding of
the track shoe 2I8 to provide a braking our cut
15
pressure.
that is substantially
If the pressure
proportional
in thetobrake
brake cylinaer
and in the diaphragm chamber I83 builds up to a
su?iciently high value, thus creating a su?iciently
high pressure of the terminal member 55% on the
carbon pile stack, the force of the
563 will
20 no longer be su?icient to maintain the rod “is
tions,
and the
andpivot
the lever
pin I 58
I51 inwill
their
move
illustrl
in a col
ed :itcr—
clockwise direction about the terminal I56
a
fulcrum, causing the contact member 5555 to en
25 gage the contact member I51 and close a circuit
in shunt relation to the, carbon pile stack i511,
through contact members I05, I51, conductor I03,
to theterminal I55, thus effecting maximum
energization of the track brake shoe.
The initial movement of the pendulum 82 to
30
ward the left, caused by movement of the piston
89 and the stem 93, is of short time duration due
to the leakage of ?uid under pressure past the
piston 89, this being so arranged that after a
35 short time interval the pendulum 82 will no
longer be prevented by the stem 93 again resum
ing its illustrated position.
The retardation of the vehicle causes the pen
dulum 02 to be moved in a clockwise direction,
40 a predetermined minimum rate of retardation
being required to cause the roller 86 to ride upon
the cam surface 88 su?iciently to maintain the
switch contact member ‘I6 in engagement with
the switch contact members ‘I4 and ‘I5, as above
45 described, to permit the energization of the track
shoe brake. So long as the rate of retardation
of the vehicle is su?icient to maintain the switch
contact member ‘I6 in its circuit closing position,
and so long as the pressure in the brake cylinder
50 is sufficient to maintain the pressure operated
switch contact member I15 in its circuit closing
position, the winding of the track shoe 2“! will
remain energized. However, upon a decrease in
the rate of retardation of the vehicle below the
55 predetermined minimum rate, or upon the com-
plete stopping of the vehicle the pendulum 82
will move to substantially its illustrated posi~
tion, permitting the switch contact member ‘IE
to move out of engagement with the contact
60 members ‘I4 and ‘I5.
Upon the disengagement
of contact member ‘I6 from contact members ‘I4
and ‘I5, the contactor I2 is shifted to open the
braking circuit through the winding of the track
shoe 2 I8 and cause re-supply of ?uid under pres
65 sure through pipe 209 to the piston chamber
2II of the track shoe raising cylinder 224 to
raise the track shoe out of contact with the rail
2I9, the track shoe brake being thus released.
It will be evident, and it is so intended, that
70 with the energizing circuit for winding 19‘! of
contactor I2 through the inertia controlled pilot
switch I3 interrupted, the current supplied to the
contactor winding I9‘I from the overhead con~
ductor 232 by way of contact members 203 and
75 204 of contactor I2, wire 242, resistor 9 or paral
lei-connected resistor 9 and shunt I68, resistor
£95, contact members I13, I86, "2 of the brake
cylinder pressure responsive switch, and wire 23‘!
is insufiicient to hold the contact members 203
and 204 of the contactor I2 in engagement
against the tension of the spring 202 of the con
tactor.
t will thus be seen that the pressure in the
brake cylinder pipe ‘I controls both the degree
of application of the ?uid pressure brakes and 10
the degree of application of the track brake to
effect a corresponding increase and decrease in
the degree of application of the two brakes, and,
that upon the stopping of the vehicle the electric
track brake will be deenergized irrespective of
whether the lever ‘I2 is moved to release po
sition to release the ?uid pressure brakes.
If the operator wishes to release the brakes, the
handle ‘I2 is moved to release position, thus mov
ing the cam 66 out of engagement with the plung 20
er 51 and permitting the release valve spring 52
acting against the release valve stem 41 to force
the roller 62 and the spaced levers 55 toward the
left to unseat the release valve 42 and permit
the ?ow of ?uid under pressure from the pres 25
sure chamber I‘! and the brake cylinder I to the
atmosphere through passages 43, 45 and 39.
If the brakes are released while the vehicle is
in motion and the switch contact member ‘I6 is
in engagement with the switch contact mem 30
bers ‘I4 and ‘I5, the winding of the track shoe
2H3 will remain energized until the brake cylin
der pressure has reduced su?iciently to permit
movement of the diaphragm I82 by the spring
IE‘! to move the switch contact member I‘I5 out 35
of engagement with the switch contact members
I ‘I2 and I13, to deenergize the winding I9‘! of
the contactor I2, and permit movement of the
armature :98 thereof to its illustrated position
by the spring 202. Movement of the armature 40
I 98 to cause separation of the contact member
204 from the contact member 203 interrupts the
circuit through the winding of the track shoe
2I8, and, at the same time, causes movement of
the valve 2I3 to its seat to close communication 45
between the piston chamber 2“ of the track
shoe raising piston 224 and the atmosphere
through the exhaust port 2I2 of the contactor
device I2, and causes movement of the valve 206
from its seat to effect the supply of ?uid under 50
pressure from the main reservoir pipe 3 through
pipe 209 to the piston chamber 2! I to raise the
track shoe 2I8 from engagement with the track
rail. It will be noted that the operation of the
contactor device I2 controls both the energiz 55
ing circuit to the track shoe and the supply of
?uid under pressure to the piston chamber 2 I I of
the track shoe raising cylinder to effect the low
ering of the track shoe into engagement with the
track rail at the time the track shoe is energized 60
to effect the raising of the track shoe from
engagement with the rail at the time the track
shoe is deenergized.
Emergency application
65
An emergency application of the brakes may be
effected either by movement of the brake valve
lever ‘I2 to pneumatic emergency position (see
Fig. 3) in which position the portion I42 (see
Fig. ll) of the face of the cam 06 forces the 70
plunger 5'.’ toward the right sufficiently to hold
the supply valve 23 unseated and permit full
main reservoir pipe pressure to build up in the
straight air pipe 5. Emergency application of the
brakes may also be effected by relieving pressure 75
6
2,118,390
on the lever iilli oi the foot valve device H35, to
release fluid under pressure from the piston
chamber
and from 52?
theof safety
the automatic
control pipe
valveil‘i.
device
Upon
relieving pressure from the lever M5 of the root
valve device
the spring ital forces the lever
in a countenclockwise direction, thus per
mitting the spring l5i to force the valve £412 to
its seat to close communication between the main
10 reservoir pipe 3 and the safety control pipe it’
and to force the diaphragm valve iii-2 from its
rib seat
to effect communication between the
safety control pipe li'i and the atmosphere
through chambers i321, lit- and the exhaust port
15 E39.
Upon the release of ?uid under pressure
from the piston chamber it? of the automatic
valve device ‘5 the piston L‘ZS and the slide valve
I32 are moved toward the left against the bias of
the spring l32 by the greater pressure within the
20 slide valve chamber liii to effect communication
between the main reservoir pipe 3 and the brake
cylinder l through slide valve chamber iéil, past
the right hand end of the slide valve E32.
The release of fluid under pressure from the
25 safety control pipe iii also effects a reduction in
pressure in the piston chamber lid of the time
limiting control mechanism
cciated with the
inertia controlled pilot switch it, thus permit
ting the spring i23 to force the stem i it and the
piston H8 downwardly. Upon downward move
ment of the stem Me the head i272 actuates the
lever H3 in a counterclockwise direction about
the pivot pin UM, thus forcing the stem H2 and
the piston m5 downwardly against the bias of
35 the spring 8E8 to force fluid under pressure from
the piston chamber
into the piston chamber
t5 and force the piston 39 and the stem 93 to
tion of said track shoe comprising means re
sponsive to the brake cylinder pressure and in
ertia means responsive to the rate of retarda~
tion of the vehicle, said inertia means being ef—
fective to interrupt the track shoe circuit when
the vehicle comes to rest.
3. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the
track rail, an electric circuit for energizing said 20
track shoe braking means, manually operable
means for eiiecting the supply of fluid under
pressure to the brake cylinder, means responsive
to movement of said manually operable means to
a brake applying position for initially energiz~ 25
ing said track shoe braking means, and inertia
responsive means responsive to the rate of re
tardation of the vehicle when the manually oper
able means is in a brake applying position for
maintaining the energizing circuit for the mag
netic track shoe, and for interrupting said circuit
when the vehicle comes to rest.
4. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com~
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic tracl: shoe
braldng means adapted for engagement with the
track rail, an electric circuit for energizing said
track shoe braking means, manually operable
ward the left. The force of the stem 93 against
means for effecting the supply of ?uid under
the pendulum s2 causes it to move in a clock
pressure to said brake cylinder, inertia means re~
40 wise direction about the hub 83, the cam surface
88 engaging the roller 8% and causing the lever
‘H to be moved in a counterclockwise direction to
effect engagement of the switch contact member
'56 with the switch contact members M and ‘iii
45 to close the above traced tickler circuit through
the resistor i235 and the winding of the track shoe
‘M8. Upon the increase in brake cylinder pres
sure the pressure operated switch contact mem
ber H5 is forced into engagement with the switch
and lid to operate the con
50 contact members
tactor E2 to its circuit closing position in the
manner above described for service application of
the brakes. The carbon pile stack
is com
pressed to increase the energization of the wind
55 ing of the track shoe 258 in correspondence with
the increase in brake cylinder pressure.
While one preferred embodiment of my inven~
tion has been illustrated. and described, it will
be apparent to those skilled in the art that many
60 modi?cations and changes in the apparatus and
circuits illustrated may be made within the
spirit of my invention, and I do not wish to be
limited otherwise than by the scope of the ap
pended claims.
65
brake applying position for maintaining the en
ergizing circuit of said track shoe closed and for
interrupting said circuit when the vehicle comes
to rest.
2. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in combi
nation, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the
track rail, manually operable means for eiTecting
the supply of fluid under pressure to said brake
cylinder, and means for effecting the energiza~ 10
Having now described nly invention, what I
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Pat
ent, is:
1. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com
bination, a brake cyiinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means for engaging the track rail, an
electric circuit for energizing
track shoe
braking means, manually operable means for ap
plying the brakes, and inertia responsive means
responsive to the rate of retardation of the ve
75 hicle when the manually operable means is in a
sponsive to the rate of retardation of the vehicle 40
when the manually operable means is in a brake
applying position for maintaining said track shoe
energizing circuit closed and for interrupting
said circuit when the vehicle comes to rest, and
a dash pot mechanism responsive to movement of 45
said manually operable means to a brake apply
ing position for initially actuating said inertia
means to e?ect an initial slight energization of
said track shoe braking means.
5. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com 50
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the
track rail, an electric circuit for energizing said
track shoe braking means, manually operable
means for effecting the supply of ?uid under 55
pressure to the brake cylinder, means for clos~
ing said electric circuit comprising a contactor
responsive to brake cylinder pressure and an in
ertia switch responsive to the rate of retardation
of the vehicle, and means responsive to movement
of said manually operable means to a brake ap
plying position for actuating said inertia switch
to its circuit closing position and for maintaining
it in that position for a short interval of time.
6. In a brake equipment for vehicles in combi— 65
nation, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the
track rail, an electric circuit for energizing said
track shoe braking means, manually operable
means for effecting the supply of ?uid. under
pressure to said brake cylinder, a contactor de
vice for controlling said electric circuit, and
means for controlling said contactor device com
prising a pressure operated switch responsive to
brake cylinder pressure and an inertia switch
2,118,390
responsive to the rate of retardation of the
vehicle.
'7. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the
track rail, an electric circuit for energizing said
track shoe, manually operable means for effect
ing the supply of ?uid under pressure to said
brake cylinder, a contactor device for controlling
10 said electric circuit, means for controlling said
contactor device comprising a pressure operated
switch responsive to brake cylinder pressure and
an inertia switch responsive to the rate of re
tardation of the vehicle, and means for lowering
15 said track shoe into engagement with the track
rail upon operation of said contactor device to
effect the supply of a braking current to said
track shoe and for raising said track shoe from
engagement with the track rail upon operation
of said contactor device to interrupt the braking
current through said track shoe.
8. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in combi—
nation, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the
25 track rail, an electric circuit for energizing said
track shoe braking means, manually operable
means for effecting the supply of ?uid under
pressure to said brake cylinder, inertia switch
means responsive to the rate of retardation of
30 the vehicle for closing a tickler circuit for mag
netizing the magnetic track shoe, and means in
cluding said inertia switch means for closing a
braking circuit for said track shoe braking means
upon movement of said manually operable means
35 to a brake applying position, said inertia switch
means being effective to interrupt the braking
circuit for said magnetic track shoe braking
means when the vehicle comes to rest.
9. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com
40 bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the
track rails, manually operable means for effect
ing the supply of ?uid under pressure to said
brake cylinder and for establishing a magnetiz~
45 ing circuit for said track shoe, and means re
sponsive to brake cylinder pressure for establish
ing a braking circuit for said track shoe.
10. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com—
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
50 braking means adapted for engagement with the
track rail, manually operable means for effecting
the supply of ?uid under pressure to said brake
cylinder and. for initially effecting the supply of
magnetizing current to said track shoe, and
55 means responsive to a predetermined brake cyl
inder pressure for effecting the supply of a brak
ing current to said track shoe and for thereafter
increasing said braking current in accordance
with the increase in brake cylinder pressure.
60
11. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the
track rail, a tickler circuit for supplying mag
netizing current to said track shoe, a braking cir
cuit for supplying braking current to said track
shoe, manually operable means for effecting the
supply of ?uid under pressure to said brake cyl
inder and for initially closing said tickler circuit,
70 means responsive to brake cylinder pressure while
said manually operable means is in a brake apply
ing position for effecting, simultaneously, the
closing of said braking circuit and the lowering of
said track shoe into engagement with the track
75 rail and for effecting, simultaneously, the inter
7
ruption of said braking circuit and the raising
of said track shoe from the rail.
12. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the 5
track rails, an electric braking circuit for ener
gizing said track shoe, manually operable means
for effecting the supply of ?uid under pressure to
said brake cylinder, and means responsive to
brake cylinder pressure for effecting, simulta 10
neously, the closing of said braking circuit and
the lowering of said track shoe braking means
into contact with the track rail upon an increase
in brake cylinder pressure to a predetermined
value and for effecting the interruption of said
braking circuit and the raising of said track shoe
braking means from engagement with the track
rail upon the lowering of the brake cylinder pres
sure to a predetermined minimum value.
13. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the
track rail, an electric circuit for eifecting the
supply of a magnetizing current only to said
track shoe braking means and an electric brak
$5
ing circuit for controlling the supply of braking
current to said track shoe braking means, manu~
ally operable means for effecting the supply of
fluid under pressure to said brake cylinder, pres
sure responsive means subject to a predetermined 3
low brake cylinder pressure ‘for closing said brak
ing circuit, and a rheostat in said braking circuit
effective upon an increase in brake cylinder pres—
sure above said predetermined low value for con
trolling said braking current for increasing the 35
track shoe braking effort in accordance with the
increase in ‘oral-2e cylinder pressure.
14. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the 40
track rail, an electric circuit for energizing said
track shoe braking means, manually operable
means for effecting the supply of fluid under
pressure to said brake cylinder, switching means
for effecting the energization of said track shoe 45
braking means comprising inertia responsive
switching means responsive to the rate of re
tardation of the vehicle and pressure responsive
switching means subject to brake cylinder pres
sure.
15. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means for engagement with the track
rail, manually operable means for effecting the
supply of fluid under pressure to said brake cyl 55
inder, means for establishing a magnetizing cir
cuit for said track shoe braking means compris
ing an inertia responsive switch responsive to a
predetermined rate of retardation of the vehicle,
means for establishing a braking circuit for said 60
track shoe braking means comprising said in
ertia responsive switch and switch mechanism
responsive to a predetermined low value of brake
cylinder pressure, and means responsive to an
increasing value in brake cylinder pressure for in 65
reasing the braking current to said track shoe
braking means.
16. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means for engagement with the track 70
rail, manually operable means for eifecting the
supply of fluid under pressure to said brake cyl
inder, means for controlling the energization of
said track shoe braking means comprising a pres
sure operated switch responsive to brake cylin 75
8
2,118,890
der pressure and an inertia switch responsive to
?uid pressure controller means for establishing a
the rate of retardation of_ the vehicle, and pres
braking circuit in shunt to said resistor and to
control the current therethrough in accordance
with the degree or" operation of said brake con~
troller in said application zone.
20. In a brake equipment for vehicles, in com~
bination, a brake cylinder, magnetic track shoe
braking means adapted for engagement with the
sure controlled means for lowering said track
shoe into engagement with the track rail upon
the supply of a braking current thereto and for
raising said track shoe from engagement with
the track rail upon the interruption of the brak
ing current to the track shoe.
17. In a vehicle brake system, in combination,
10 an electric brake device, a manually operable
brake controller, and inertia controlled means
conditioned by operation of said brake controller
to a brake applying position to establish a circuit
for energizingr said electric brake device and op
15 erative in response to the rate of retardation of
the vehicle to maintain said circuit closed.
18. In a vehicle brake system, in combination,
an electric brake device, a manually operable
brake controller, and inertia controlled means
conditioned by operation of said brake controller
to a brake applying position to establish a circuit
for energizing said electric brake device and op
erative in response to the rate of retardation of
the vehicle to maintain said circuit closed, and.
operative to open said circuit below a chosen rate
of retardation.
19. In a vehicle brake system, in combination,
electric brake device, a manually operable
brake controller, means operable upon operation
of said brake controller to any brake applying po
sition in an application zone for establishing a
circuit to said electric brake device including a
?xed resistor that is designed to permit the flow
of magnetizing current only therethrough, and
track rails, manually operable means for effecting
the supply of fluid under pressure to said brake 10
cylinder and for establishing a magnetizing cir
cuit for said track shoe, and means responsive to
brake cylinder pressure for establishing a braking
circuit for said track shoe, after the magnetizing
15
circuit is established.
21. In a vehicle brake equipment, a magnetic
track shoe brake device, means manually opera
tive to cause application of the track shoe brake
device, and inertia means responsive to the stop
ping oi the vehicle for eifecting release of the 20
track shoe brake device independently of the
manually operative means.
22. In a vehicle brake equipment, a magnetic
track shoe braking means having an electromag~
net, means manually operative to cause said elec 25
tromagnet to be energized for a certain interval
of time, and inertia means responsive to the re
tardation of the vehicle Within said certain in
terval of time for preventing deenergization of
said electromagnet as long as the vehicle con~ 30
tinues in motion and e?ective when the vehicle
stops to cause deenergization of the electromag
net.
BURTON S. AIKMAN.
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