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Патент USA US2118695

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May 24', 1938.
F. F. BAHNSON ~
2,118,695
HUMIDIFI ER
Filed April 27, v1933
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4 Sheeté-Sheet 1
May .24, 1938.
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F, F; BAHNSQN
HUMIDIFIER
Filed Aprilv27, 193s _
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2,118,695
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4 Sheets-Sheet 2
May 24,‘ 1938..
F_ F_ hAHNsQN
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HUMIDIFIER
Filed April 27, ‘1933
4 Sheets-sheaf s
Patented May 24, ‘1938
2,118,695‘
UNITED» STATES PATENT‘ OF‘FlCE ’
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2,118,695
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HUMIDIFIER
Frederic F. Bahnson, Winston-Salem, N. (3., as‘
signor to The Bahnson Company, Winston'—
Salem, N. 0., a corporation of North Carolina.
Application April 27,‘ 1933, Serial No. 668,279
' 13 Claims.
This invention relates to humidifying appa
ratus, and particularly to a humidi?er of port
able type primarily adapted for domestic use
and so constructed and assembled as to make
possible its enclosure within a cabinet of orna
mental form which may be of a style and ?nish to
harmonize with furniture of various types and
10
current and for breaking up water into parti
cles which may be taken up by the air current;
a water reservoir and control apparatus for feed
ing water to‘ such humidi?er unit; sealing means
whereby the casing is made water tight and ex- 5
cess moisture is returned to the humidi?er unit,
discharge means for directing the effluent mois
provide an attractive and useful adjunct to the
ture-laden air into the room in the desired man
furnishings of a room.
ner, and other structural and functional char
acteristics, all as will be explained more fully 10
hereinafter and ?nally claimed.
One object of the invention is to provide a
portable 'humldifying apparatus which may be
moved from room to room, as desired, and which
embodies a humidi?er unit and a water reservoir
from which water may be fed in appropriate
15 automatically controlled quantities to the humid
In the accompanying drawings illustrating the
invention, in the several ?gures of which like
parts are similarly designated, Figure l is a
vertical, substantially central, sectional eleva
i?er unit, the feed means being so disposed and
constructed, however, as to make possible con
tion of a portable humidifying apparatus em
bodying the features of the invention. Figure
nection with the water system of the house or
2 is a bottom view of the upper portion of the
casing with the water pan, which forms the low
other building in which the apparatus is used,
20 as desired.
Another object is to provide a humidifying ap
paratus, the humidi?er unit of which is capable
of any evaporative or moisture diffusing e?ect
sufiicient to meet the needs of rooms of relatively
25 large size, ‘the unit being, nevertheless, of rela
tively small size and not of bulky or heavy con
struction.
‘
‘A further object of the invention is to provide
a humidi?er unit of the motor driven type and
30 in which the vibration and noise produced by
the unit, and particularly by the motor thereof,
are reduced to the minimum.
A still further object of the invention is to
provide a humidifying apparatus in which the
35 outlet for the e?luent,‘ moisture-laden air is so
disposed as to direct the moistened air in a rela
tively con?ned stream, upwardly, and hence in
such a manner as not to be objectionable to the
occupants of the room.
40
(01. 261-91)
Still another object is to provide a humidifying
apparatus which does not depend for its proper
operation upon the pressure of its water supply;
which has no small ori?ces or other water pas
sages which might become clogged with lint or
45 other extraneous matter; and in which there
are no water absorbent surfaces, the water be
ing broken up or ?nely divided and diffused in
the air stream by purely mechanical means.
With these and other objects in view, as will
50 be apparent from the following detailed descrip
tion, the invention comprises a humidifying ap
paratus including a casing divided into passages
for entrant air and for e?iuent, moisture-laden
air; an assembly, which may be designated a
. humidi?er unit, for creating or inducing an air
15
er‘porti‘on of the casing, removed; Figure 3 is 20
a fragmentary sectional elevation, taken sub
stantially in the plane of line 3-—3 of Fig. 1, and
locking in the direction of the arrows. Figure
4 is a view similar to Figure 2, but with parts of
the humidi?er unit removed.
Figure 5 is an en- 25
larged top plan view of the fan and the rotative
parts of the-humidi?er unit assembled therewith.
Figure 6 is atop plan view of the humidi?er cas
ing with‘ the cover of the water reservoir re
moved. Figure '7 is an enlarged fragmentary
sectional elevation of the water feed control
valve and a part of the water pan with which it
is assembled.
The humidi?er casing comprises an upper
portion I and a lower portion or water pan 2,
and these casing parts are separably connected
0
by suitably riveted and bolted straps 3. A diag
cnally arranged partition 4 divides the upper
portion of the casing section I into a passage 5
for the direction of the ef?uent moisture-laden
air to a discharge nozzle 6, and a water reservoir
1 of a capacity not greater than that of the
water pan 2.
The joints between the casing portions I and 2,
and between the casing portion I and nozzle 6,
are provided with sealing means comprising a
cup or gutter 8 on one part .and a lip 9 on the
other part extending into the cup or gutter.
Thus, when water produced by the moisture col
lecting upon the walls of the passage 5 and
nozzle 6 drains into the cups or gutters 8, it will
provide an effective water seal at these points,
and any excess of water will spill over the edges
of the cups or gutters and drop into the water
pan 2.
55
2
2,118,695
The water reservoir ‘I is provided with a suit
able removable cover IO having a handle II,
and the water pan 2 has a drain and clean-out
?tting I2 provided with a closure I3, and may
also have an over?ow riser or outlet I4 where
connection of the apparatus with a constant
water supply is desired, as will be later described.
Suitable braces, such as the angle iron I5 may
be used to strengthen the casing, which being
10 made preferably of copper or other non-ferrous,
spaced from the lip 31 of the elevator member
36, and the annular opening thus provided forms
a passage for the downwardly directed current
of air induced by the fan 33. The outer circum
ferential edge of the disk is in close proximity
to the teeth of the annulus 3| and functions
therewith as hereinafter explained.
It will be apparent from the foregoing that all
of the parts forming the humidi?er unit are sus
pended from the member I6 by means of the
non-corrosive metal may require such strength
sleeve 2|, and as this sleeve is of non-rigid con
ening.
Arranged substantially centrally of the lower
struction and material, any vibration set up in
the humidi?er unit will be damped by the sleeve
and will not be transmitted to rigid parts of the
portion of the upper casing part I is a preferably
cylindrical partition member I5 which provides a
support for the humidi?er unit, presently de
scribed, and forms, in conjunction with a later
ally disposed housing II, a passageway for the
entrant air which is admitted through the open
20 end I8 of the housing I‘! (see Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4).
The partition member I 6 and housing I‘I are sup
ported in the casing portion I by brackets I9
and the connection of the open end I8 of the
housing with the casing portion, thus providing
25 a rigid assembly.
_
The open end I8 of the housing I1 is braced
by a central strut which preferably takes the
form of a block or strip 20 of sound absorbing
material, such as the cellular compositions used
30 for sound insulation in Wall constructions, the
strip 20 being reinforced by metallic channels 20’
which do not contact with each other.
A sleeve 2| formed of rubber, rubberized fabric
or other appropriate sound absorbing and vibra
tion damping material is removably connected by
means of a strap and bolt arrangement 22 to the
lower end of the member I6 which is provided
with a sustaining bead 23, and this sleeve has
separably attached to its lower end by a strap
and bolt connection 24, similar to that just re
ferred to, the humidi?er unit or means for break
ing up water into particles which may be taken
up by anair current.
This humidi?er unit comprises a cylindrical
45 member 25 preferably made of aluminum, for
lightness, to which the sleeve 2I is attached and
which is provided with radially inwardly extend
ing arms 26 joining a ring 26’ which carries a
sleeve 2'! in which the motor 28 is ?xed and by
50 which it is adjustably supported. Set screws 21'
are provided for maintaining the motor in a de
apparatus.
Water is fed from the reservoir ‘I to the pan 2
by a pipe 40 provided with a strainer 4| and a
stop valve 42, and the feed of the water in requi
site quantities may be regulated by means of a
feed valve 43 (see Fig. 7) having an inlet bore
44 in communication with the pipe 40 and an
outlet bore 45 communicating with the water pan
2 and controlled by a valve member 46 provided
with a rubber, ?bre or other relatively soft coni
cal plug 4‘! and carried upon one end of a lever
48 fulcrumed at 49 on a spring-pressed stem 50
that is axially adjustable by a screw and nut ar
rangement 5I—52. At the other end of the lever
48 is mounted a ?oat 53 which is supported by the
water in the water pan 2. Obviously the feed of
water to the pan to maintain any appropriate
desired water level may be controlled by adjust
ment of the fulcrum 49 of the lever 48. The feed
valve 43 is preferably so located in the pan 2
that adjustment of the fulcrum of the lever 43
may be accomplished by means of a square ended
rod inserted from above through the e?iuent air
passage and engaged with the socket in the
nut 52.
As hereinbefore indicated, the water feed, in 40
stead of coming from the reservoir ‘I, as described,
may be piped direct to the valve 43 from the
water system of the building by a pipe 54 which
is provided with a stop valve 55. When this sys
tem of supply is used, the over?ow pipe I4 should 45
be connected to a waste pipe to avoid damage in
the event of a failure of the ?oat valve.
Although connections for supply of water both
from the reservoir ‘I and from a constant supply
are shown in Fig. 1, it will be understood that 50
when the reservoir ‘I only is to be used the pipe
54, valve 55 and riser I4 will be dispensed with.
sired adjusted position. The member 25 is also
provided with radially outwardly extending arms
The riser I4 is not necessary in such case because
29 carrying posts or studs 30 to the lower ends
of which is attached a toothed annulus 3| pro
provide for a normal full day’s run, is no greater . ;
vided with an inwardly extending skirt 32. This
toothed annulus is similar to that disclosed in the
the capacity of the reservoir ‘I, though ample to
than the capacity of the water pan 2, and hence
no harmful flooding of the apparatus can occur
in case the valve 43 fails to function properly.
copending application of Jerry H. Simpson ?led
Nov. 29, 1930, Serial No. 499,067 (Patent 1,966,872,
60 dated July 7, 1934). All of the parts of the hu
A failure of valve 43 may partially submerge the
motor 28, which is of the waterproof type and
midi?er unit thus far described are stationary or
will not be damaged, but will not result in an
over?ow of Water from the pan 2.
?xed parts.
The rotating parts of the unit, which function
ally cooperate with these stationary parts, include
a Ian 33 having a hub 34 ?xed on the motor shaft
35 and carrying a downwardly axially extending
water elevator member 36 in the form of an in
verted truncated cone which extends into the wa
ter in the pan 2, the large end of the cone being
70 provided with an oifstanding lip 31.
The blades of the fan 33 may be provided at
their outer ends with a rim or ring 38 on which
is mounted an annular disk 39 rotatable with
the fan 33 and elevator member 36. The inner
circumferential edge of this disk 39 is radially
The cable 56 for supplying electric current to
the motor 28 is run out of the casing through
the passage for dry entrant air, where it is pro
tected from moisture, to the switch (not shown)
of a humidostat 51, which switch may be con
nected by means of a cable 58 and plug 59 with
a suitable current outlet. The humidostat 51
may be of a type having essentially the struc 70
tural and functional characteristics of that dis
closed in my Patent No. 1,804,079, granted May 5,
1931, and is carried by the apparatus in such loca
tion that it is out of the zone directly affected by
the moisture-laden air issuing from the nozzle 6. 753
2,118,695
3
The motor 28 is also so mounted that it is in the
entrant dry air currentand hence is not subjected
It has been found by experiment that in this type
to the deleterious effects of moisture.
water reaching the disc 39 and the amount evap
orated is practically constant up to the full ca
pacity of the apparatus. To vary the amount of
air handled, the pitch of the fan may be varied,
and to change both the amount of air handled
and the amount of water evaporated, the speed
of the motor. may be changed. Although the fan
,
The whole aparatus, with the exception of. the
humidostat 51, is enclosed in an ornamental
Wooden‘ or other cabinet 60 having a removable
top 6! which gives vaccess to thereservoir ‘I and
feed valve 43. As shown, the nozzle 6 is prefer
ably carried by the cabinet top 6| and is remov
10 able‘with it, but ‘this is not an essential feature.
‘ The bottom of the cabinet may be open for
passage of the entrant air, or it maybe closed,
as shown, and the air may enter through-an
opening 62 provided in the lower portion of the
rear wall of the cabinet.
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It will be noted that the passages for entrant
air are so designed that they are more restricted
than the passages for eflluent, moisture-laden air.
This resultsin a relatively gentle eflluent air cur
20 rent and makes possible automatic elimination of
large particles or drops of moisture which might
be entrained in a more rapidly ?owing air stream.
Moreover, the walls and partitions for the most
part forming the effluent air passages present ?at
and angular surfaces to the moisture-laden air,
and this is important for the reason that such
surfaces are better suited to retain the objec
tionable large particles or drops of moisture than
are curved surfaces. Furthermore, the cylindri
cal member l6 presenting no angles to the entrant
air tends to a rapid in?ux and thus aids in main
taining eiiicient operation of the apparatus.
In operation, the pan 2 is ?lled with water to
the desired level with respect to the elevator
member or cone 36 and this level is maintained
by a proper setting .of the ?oat 53 and valve ele
ment 46. Then, with the motor running, the
of , humidi?er the percentage relation between
' used may be of variable pitch and the motor of. 10
variable speed, it has been found in practice that
satisfactory results are obtained by using motors
of either 1750 or 3500 revolutions per minute with
fans of pitches to suit.
As hereinbefore indicated, the design and ar 15
rangement of the nozzle 6 are such as to give
the most satisfactory results. Not only is the‘
effluent, moisture-laden air emitted at such an
angle as not to annoy occupants of the room, it
being so directed as to pass over their heads, ‘but 20
the streamline form of the nozzle will effectively
eliminate from the air stream such objectionably'
large particles of moisture as would ordinarily
cause dampness and spotting.
Various changes and modi?cations are consid
ered to be within the spirit of the invention and
the scope of the following claims.
I claim:
. 1. In a humidi?er, a unit for breaking up water
into particles which may be entrained in and 30
evaporated by an air current, said unit including
rotative members and a driving motor therefor,
a casing having partition means for segregating
entrant air from effluent moisture-laden air, said
partition means affording a relatively rigid sup
port for said unit, and a ?exible sleeve connecting’:
rapid rotation of the cone 36 will elevate a ?lm
said partition means and unit and providing a
continuation of said partition means, said flexible
of water to be thrown olf by the lip 31 onto the
disc‘ 39 which is also rotating and which, by cen
sleeve supporting said unit with relation to said
trifugal force projects the water violently againstv
the, stationary teeth of the annulus 3| by which
the water is broken up into a ?ne mist.
Mean
partition means and acting as a vibration damper
and sound deadener between said unit and casing.
2. In a humidi?er, a casing, partition means in
said casing providing a passage for entrant air
while,‘ the rotation of the fan 33 causes air to be
and a passage for e?luent moisture-laden air, a
drawn downwardly through the'housing H and
cylindrical ,member l6 and forced toward the
unit for breaking up water into particles which
may be entrained in and evaporated by an air
current, said unit including a motor, a member
providing a mounting for said motor, ?exible
means for supporting said member upon said par-'
tition means and for enclosingsaid motor within
said entrant air passage, said ?exible means act
ing as a vibration damper and sound deadener
between said unit and casing.
bottom of the pan from which it rises and picks
up the mist produced at the toothed annulus on
its passage to the nozzle 6. Excess water raised
and discharged by the cone 36 and disc 39, and
particles too large to be evaporated by'the e?lu
ent air current drain back into the pan 2.
The
outer ends of the fan blades are secured to, or
preferablyintegral with, a ring 38 to which the
annular and upwardly ?aring disc 39 is appro
priately secured. ‘The lower or inner edge of disc
39 is located slightly below the level of the lip
31 of the water elevator and the outer edge of
the disk is in close proximity to the toothed an
nulus 3|. The ?lm of water lifted by the cone
36 is thrown upon the upper surface of the disk
39 by the lip 31 of the cone, and is projected
upon the atomizing teeth by the disk. The effi
ciency of evaporation is increased and the quan
65 tity of air leaving the outlet 6 is also increased
when an annular shield 39’ is mounted on the
member 25 to overlie the outer edge of disc 39.
The shield 39' precludes a ?ow of air to the fan
from the region of the atomizer blades, thus pre
70 venting a short circuit of the air current around
the disk 39.
The amount of water fed by the disc, and the
consequent amount of evaporation can be gov
erned by the level of water maintained, and this
75 is governed by the setting of the feed Valve 43.
3. In a humidi?er, a water pan, a humidi?er
unit, including a rotative elevator member adapt~
edto pick up» the water from said pan and dis
charge it substantially radially, an annular disk
rotatable with said elevator member and hav
ing its inner circumferential edge radially spaced
therefrom to provide an air passage, said disk 60
arranged to receive the water discharged from
said elevator member and redischarge it, means.
encircling the periphery of said disk and against
which the water is discharged by said disk to
be broken up into particles which may be en 65
trained in an air current induced through said
passage, a fan in said air passage and rotatable
with said elevator member and disk for inducing
a downward air current which is de?ected up
wardly about said encircling means by the water 70
in said pan, and including a shield associated
with said encircling means to prevent an in?ow
of air to said fan through said encircling means.
4. In a humidi?er, a water container, a motor
above said container and having a vertically ar 75
2,118,695
ranged shaft extending towards the same, a water
elevator connected to said shaft and having one
end extending into said container and its upper
end provided with means for discharging water
radially therefrom, an annular disk having its
lower inner edge positioned above and spaced
radially from the water discharging means of
said elevator to provide an air passage, a ring
of'atomizing blades closely surrounding the up
10 per outer edge of said disk, a fan mounted on
said shaft to create an air current through said
passage, and shield means preventing a short
circuit of the air current around said disk.
5. In a humidi?er, a water container, a humidi
' ?er unit, including a rotatable water elevator
member having one end extending into said con
tainer and its other end provided with a radially
offstanding lip, an annular disk arranged ad
jacent to said elevator member and having its
20. inner circumferential edge extending below and
radially spaced from the radial lip of said mem
ber to provide an annular air passage, a ring of
atomizer blades surrounding the outer edge of
said annular disk, a fan for inducing a current of
air through said passage, means for rotating said
elevator member, disk and fan, said fan being
positioned above said outstanding lip of said ele
vator member and constituting means mechani
cally connecting said annular disk to rotating
means.
6. In a humidifier, a water container, a hu
midi?er unit, including a rotatable water ele
vator member having one end extending into
said container and its other end provided with
a radially o?standing lip, an annular disk ar
ranged adjacent to said elevator member and
having its inner circumferential edge positioned
above and radially spaced from said member to
provide an annular air passage, a ring of atom
40 izer blades surrounding the outer edge of said
disk, a fan mechanically connecting said annu
lar disk to said elevator and adapted to induce
a current of air through said passage, means for
rotating said fan and thereby the elevator mem
45 ber and disk connected thereto, and shield means
preventing air ?ow to said fan from said ring of
atomizer blades.
'7. In a humidi?er, a water pan, a humidi?er
unit, including a conical elevator member ro
50 tatable about a vertical axis and adapted to pick
up water from said pan adjacent to its small end
and discharge it substantially radially from its
larger end, an upwardly ?aring annular disk ro
tatable with said elevator member and having
55 its inner circumferential edge positioned below
and radially spaced from the larger end of said
elevator member to provide an annular air pas
sage, means encircling the periphery of said disk
and against which the water is discharged by
60 said disk to be broken up into particles, and a
fan positioned above the water-discharging end
of said elevator member and rotatable with said
elevator member and disk for creating an air
current downwardly through said passage, said
fan constituting the sole mechanical connection
of said disk to said elevator member and com
prising a plurality of blades extending radially
across said annular passage.
8. In a humidi?er, a water pan, a humidi?er
unit, including a rotative conical elevator mem
ber adapted to pick up water from said pan ad
jacent to its small end and discharge it at its
large end substantially radially, an annular disk
rotatable with said elevator member and having 1O
its inner circumferential edge located below and
radially spaced from the water-discharging end
of said elevator member to provide an annular
air passage, said disk arranged to receive the
water discharged from said elevator member and
redischarge it, a toothed annulus encircling the
periphery of said disk and against the teeth of
which the water is discharged by said disk to be
broken up into particles, a fan in said air pas
sage and rotatable with said elevator member
and disk for inducing a downward air current
through said air passage, the air current being
de?ected upwardly about the exterior of said
toothed annulus by the water in said pan, and
means above said fan substantially preventing
said fan from drawing an air current through
said toothed annulus.
9. In a humidi?er, a water tank, an atomizer
in communication with said tank, a motor driv
ing said atomizer, means for establishing a 30
stream of moist air surrounding said motor,
means for establishing a stream of dry air sub
stantially concentric with said moist air stream,
and a sound absorbent partition separating said
air streams and positioned adjacent said motor. 10. In a humidi?er, a water tank, an atomizer
in communication with said tank, a motor driv
ing said atomizer, means for establishing a
stream of moist air surrounding said motor,
means for establishing a stream of dry air sub 40
stantially concentric with said moist air stream,
and a partition separating said air streams and
positioned adjacent said motor, said partition
including a sound absorbent material.
11. In a humidi?er, a casing, a water tank 45
within said casing, an atomizer for withdrawing
water from said tank and atomizing the same,
a motor driving said atomizer, wall means within
said casing de?ning a moist air passage and a
dry air passage substantially coaxial therewith, 50
said passages surrounding said motor and said
wall means including a sound absorbing parti
tion between said passages, and fan means for
establishing a ?ow of air through said passages.
12. A humidi?er as claimed in claim 11, where 55
in said dry air passage is Within said moist air
passage, and said motor is positioned in said dry
air passage in the path of the air ?owing there
through.
13. A humidi?er as claimed in claim 11, where 80
in said passages merge into each other at said
atomizer.
FREDERIC F. BAHNSON.
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