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Патент USA US2118835

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Ís. cAPEz|o
TOE TAP
Filed April 15, 1935
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INVENToR
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BY
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ATTORNEYS
Patented May 31, 1938
Arent
ETED STATES
2,118,835
TOE TA1’
Salvatore Capezio, East Paterson, N. J.
Application April 15, 1935, Serial No. 16,307
10 Claims. (Cl. 36-8.3)
This invention relates to taps for dancing shoes,
and more particularly to a toe tap for toe dancing
shoes.
`
The primary object of my invention is to gen
erally improve toe >taps for toe dancing shoes.
More particular objects of the invention center
about the mode of applying and securing the tap
to the shoe. It has heretofore been proposed to
stitch the periphery of a tap to a toe dancing
10 shoe, but this is laborious, requires at least one
thread knot within the shoe, and results in un
sightly mutilation of the otherwise graceful and
attractive toe dancing shoe. In accordance with
my invention the tap may be permanently secured
to the toe dancing shoe in a simple manner by
the use of only a single long screw, this screw
passing directly through the front wall of the
tap and being so directed that it is driven into the
shank or solid lower part of the toe dancing shoe
and safely clears the hollow toe cavity.
In accordance with a further feature and ob
ject of my invention the tap is cupped to fit over
the toe portion of the toe dancing shoe, yet no
difficulty is occasioned by reason of variety in
dimension and shape of the various sizes and
makes of toe dancing shoe. To this end the side
wall of the tap is preferably tapered to a relatively
thin edge and the said edge is indented or scal
loped to afford adjustability. I ñnd this im
provement so effective that only three sizes of tap
are needed to cover the entire range of sizes of
toe dancing shoe, and further find the improve
ment to be effective even when the tap is cast,
as is preferably the case. The thinned scalloped
5 edge of the tap is also desirable because it im
proves the appearance of the tap and toe dancing
shoe assembly.
Other objects of my invention concern the use
of a bottom extension on the tap permitting the
dancer to do fiat taps as well as toe taps.
Toe
taps have heretofore been constructed with a
bottom extension, but these have introduced a
number of serious disadvantages including the
fact that they have interfered with proper arch
ing of the foot, and in some cases the extension
is broken, while in others where the tap extension
resisted breakage, the shank or arch of the
shoe itself has been weakened at the end of the
extension, thereby resulting in uneven bending
or arching of the shoe. The tap extension has
also made it diiiicult for the dancer to balance
on the ñat of one foot. It is accordingly another
object of my invention to overcome the foregoing
difficulties. The use of a bottom extension also
55
makes it possible to strengthen the attachment
of the tap to the shoe by the use of appropriate
nails, but I may emphasize that my novel front
screw attachment is so strong that the additional
fastening means passing through the bottom ex
tension, while used out of an excess of caution, CFI
are not at all essential.
Still another object of my invention is to
improve the loudness and clarity of the sound
produced by the tap by the provision of an ap
propriate hollow sound box within the tap or 10
between the tap and the tip of the shoe. This
feature incidentally helps fulñll another object of
the invention which is to lighten the weight of the
tap in order not to fatigue the dancer.
To the accomplishment of the foregoing and 15
other objects which will hereinafter appear, my
invention consists in the toe tap and toe dancing
shoe elements, and their relation one to the
other, as are hereinafter more particularly de
scribed in the specñcation and sought to be de
ñned in the claims. The specification is accom
panied by a drawing, in which:
Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a toe dancing shoe
fitted with a tap embodying features of my in
vention;
25
Fig. 2 is an inverted plan view of the toe por
tion of said shoe and tap;
Fig. 3 is a vertical section taken on the plane
of the line 3_3 of Fig.`2; and
Fig. 4 is a rear elevation of the tap before being 30
applied to the shoe.
Referring to the drawing, the tap T comprises
a cupped body. which is received upon or fitted
over the tip or toe portion of a conventional toe
dancing shoe S. The tap is secured to the shoe
by a single relatively long screw l2 passing
through a preferably countersunk hole ift in the
front wall I6 of the tap. The hole is approxi
mately centrally located on front wall i6, but is
downwardly directed in order to tend to guide 40
the screw l2 on a downwardly sloping path best
shown in Fig. 3, thereby bringing the screw into
the end of the shank or insole i8, and in any case
into the solid bottom part of toe dancing shoe
and clear of the hollow toe cavity. It will be
noted in Fig. 4 that the inner end of the hole
lil is located somewhat below the center of the
approximately circular front wall of the tap, this
being the case even when the outer end of the
hole il! is centrally located, because of the down
ward slope at which the hole is directed. It will
be understood that the location of the hole may
be varied, but I find the described location to be ‘
satisfactory, surprising though it at first seems,
because in the manufacture of this class of toe 55
2
2,118,835
dancing shoe the toe portion is boxed by numerous
layers of stiifening material and this material is
gathered at the bottom of the shoe, thus provid
ing a predominating thickness of solid material
at the bottom of the shoe, which material raises
the insole or shank suñìciently to receive the
screw without in any way interfering with or
causing discomfort to the foot of the dancer.
Because of its length and location, only a single
screw is needed to adequately and securely mount
the tap in place.
The side wall 2U of the tap is preferably ta
pered to a relatively thin edge 22 as is best shown
in Figs. 3 and 4, and the edge 22 is preferably
15 indented by a series of indentations 24 so that
the projecting portions 26 between the indenta
tions are somewhat movable relative to the main
body of the tap. This affords adjustment ofthe
side wall or cavity of the tap to conform to the
20 shape and dimension of the toe portion of the
shoe. If the tap is too small` it tends to expand
to receive the shoe, while if the tap is too large
the projecting portions 26 may be struck lightly
with a hammer to close the same against the
Thus, because of the in
25 surface of the shoe.
dented edge, which may vary in shape but which
for convenience I refer to with generic meaning
as a scalloped edge, the tap may be exactly fitted
to the shoe to produce an assembly having a
30 neat and finished appearance, and the attrac
tive effect is enhanced by the contrast between
the preferably shiny metallic surface of the tap
and the colored satin surface of the shoe, and the
decorative effect produced by the scalloping of
35 the edge of the tap.
The tap is preferably provided with a bottom
extension 30 which is preferably made V-shaped,
as is best shown in Figs. 2 and 4, with the apex
of the V at the toe of the tap and the diverging
40 arms 32 extending rearwardly. The extension
is preferably made short, and I prefer to so di
mension the same as to only slightly overlap the
forward end 34 of the outsole 36 of the shoe.
By thus limiting the length of the extension and
45 confining the same to the normally rigid box
toe portion of the slipper, there is no interfer
ence whatsoever with proper arching of the shoe
by the dancer. The bottom extension 3U of
course permits ñat taps in addition to the toe
50 taps produced on the end I6 of the tap, while
the V formation of the extension makes it easy
for a dancer to balance on the flat of one foot,
there being as wide a support against sideward
tipping of the foot as would be provided by the
55 outsole 36 in the absence of the tap.
The tap may be additionally secured to the
shoe through extension 30 and for this purpose
I provide holes 38 and Gü through the bottom
extension, as is best shown in Fig. 4. Appro
60 priate nails 42 may be driven through holes 38,
of the shoe and thus insuring maintenance of the
desired clearance or sound chamber 50.
The tap is preferably made of metal and may
be cast of a light-weight aluminum alloy. The
weight of the tap is further reduced by the scal
loping of the edge, and the V-shape of the bot
tom extension.
It is believed that the mode of constructing
and applying my improved toe tap, as well as the
many advantages thereof, will be apparent from 10
the foregoing detailed description. The tap is
securely mounted by a long screw which draws
the tap against the shoe at the center of the tap,
yet is guided into the solid bottom portion o-f the
shoe. This screw mounting is much stronger 15
than and avoids stitching with its attendant dis
advantages. The tap does not interfere with
arching of the foot nor is there any danger of
breaking the tap extension or the arch of the
shoe. The dancer has no difñculty in balancing 20
on the fiat of the foot, and of course can do both
fiat and toe taps. Balancing on the toe of the
shoe is facilitated by the provision of a substan
tial area of fiat or plane surface at the front
of the tap. The tapered scalloped outer wall of 25
the tap improves the appearance of the tap and
shoe assembly and affords adjustment to dimen
sion. I find that three sizes of taps are ade
quate to fit the entire range of sizes of toe
dancing shoes. The tap is light, yet produces 30
a loud, clear sound which is amplified by the
provision of va. suitable sound box. While the
front screw mounting is alone sufficient to hold
the tap in place, and may be used alone when
no bottom extension is desired, it is of course 35
both possible and desirable when using a bottom
extension to apply additional fastening means to
said bottom extension.
It will be apparent that while I have shown
and described my invention in preferred form, 40
changes and modifications may be made in the
structure disclosed without departing from the
spirit of the invention defined in the following
claims.
I claim:
45
1. A toe tap comprising a cupped body of metal
having a toe portion dimensioned to be received
over the toe portion of a dancer’s conventional
toe dancing shoe, a bottom extension formed in~
tegrally with said toe portion, said bottom ex 50
tension being short and so dimensioned as to only
slightly overlap the forward end of the short out
sole of the toe dancing shoe, the front wall of
said tap being comparatively thick and the side
wall tapering to a relatively thin edge, said edge 55
being indented to make the same adjustable to
the size and shape of the toe portion of the toe
dancing shoe, and means for mounting the toe
tap on a toe dancing shoe, said means including
a hole passing through the front wall of the tap 60
these nails passing through the pleated bottom
and so directed that a long screw driven there
portion of the slipper and being bent or clinched
at the top of the insole or shank I8. Similar
nails Ml are driven through holes 45, these nails
through passes through the heavy solid lower
filled or thickened part beneath the toe cavity
of a conventional toe dancing shoe and clears the
65 passing through the leather outsole and being
bent or clinched at the top of insole I8, as is
best shown in Fig. 3.
To intensify the sound produced by the tap
I provide a sound box or hollow sound-amplify
70 ing chamber 50 best shown in Fig. 3. For this
purpose the interior of the tap is stepped or
provided with a peripheral ledge 52 against which
the tip of the shoe bears. If desired, a boss 54
may be provided around screw I2, this boss ex
75 tending from the front wall of the tap to the tip
hollow toe cavity, and holes passing upwardly 65
through the aforesaid bottom extension.
2. A toe tap comprising a front wall .and a short
bottom extension, said bottom extension being so
dimensioned as to only slightly overlap the for
ward end of the short outsole of a conventional 70
toe dancing shoe, and means to secure the tap to
a toe dancing shoe, said means including a hole
passing through the front wall of the tap and so
located that a screw passed therethrough enters
the heajßr solid lower filled or thickened part be 75
3
2,118,835
neath the toe cavity of a conventional toe dancing
shoe and escapes the toe cavity, and one or more
additional holes passing through the aforesaid
bottom extension.
3. A toe tap comprising a cupped body having
a front wall and a peripheral wail` and being di
mensioned to be received over the toe portion of
a dancer’s conventional toe dancing shoe, a bo-t
tom extension dimensioned to overlap for a short
10 distance the forward end of the short outsole of
the toe dancing shoe, the peripheral wall taper
ing to a thin edge and the edge of the peripheral
wall of the tap being indented to sufñcient depth
to make the same adjustable to the size and shape
15 of the toe portion of the toe dancing shoe, and
the toe part of the shoe, and a bottom extension,
and means securing the tap to the shoe including
a long screw passing through a hole in the front
wall of the tap and into the heavy solid lower
iilled or thickened part beneath the toe cavity of
the shoe, and fasteners driven upwardly from
the bottom extension of the tap through the bot
tom of the shoe.
8. In combination, a conventional toe dancing
shoe and a toe tap affixed thereto, said shoe hav 10
ing a short outsole terminating a substantial dis
tance short of the front end of the shoe, said
toe tap comprising a cupped body of metal ñtted
over the toe part of the shoe and having a V
shaped bottom extension lying along the bottom 15
of the shoe and only slightly overlapping the out
said bottom extension having one or more holes to
receive fastening means to be driven into the
sole of the shoe, and means securing the tap to
outsole.
4. A toe tap comprising a cupped body shaped
the shoe including a long screw passing through a
hole in the front wall of the tap and into the
20 and dimensioned to ñt over the toe portion of a
dancer’s conventional toe dancing shoe, the edge
of the side wall, being deeply indented to make
the same adjustable to the size of the toe portion
of the toe dancing shoe, and means to secure said
25 tap to the toe dancing shoe, said means including
a hole through the front wall of the tap so located
that a long screw driven therethrough passes into
the heavy solid lower iilled or thickened part be
neath the toe cavity of a conventional toe danc
30 ing shoe and clears the toe cavity.
5. A unitary metallic toe tap comprising a toe
portion and a relatively short bottom extension
adapted to lie along the sole of a conventional toe
dancing shoe to which the tap is adapted to be
35 secured, said bottom extension being V-shaped
with an apex of small dimension connected to the
toe portion and the arms extending rearwardly,
said arms being dimensioned to slightly overlap
the forward end of the short outsole of a ccn
40 ventional toe dancing shoe.
6. A toe tap comprising a cupped metallic body
shaped and dimensioned to ñt over the toe of a
dancer’s toe dancing shoe, said tap being provided
with a countersunk hole therethrough in the front
45 central portion thereof for receiving a long slen
der screw and directed at a slant downwardly
such that the said single long screw when in
serted through said hole is directed through the
toe of a conventional toe dancing shoe and into
50 the heavy solid lower ñlled or thickened part
beneath the toe cavity of the shoe without passing
through the toe cavity.
7. In combination, a conventional toe dancing
shoe and a toe tap afñxed thereto, said toe tap
55 comprising a cupped body of metal ñtted over
heavy, solid lower filled or thickened part be 20
neath the toe cavity of the shoe, and fasteners
driven upwardly from the bottom extension of the
tap through the bottom of the shoe.
9. A unitary metallic toe tap comprising a toe
portion and a relatively short bottom extension ~
adapted to lie along the sole of a conventional
toe dancing shoe to which the tap is adapted to
be secured, said bottom extension being V-shaped
with its apex connected to the toe portion and its
sides diverging rearwardly, said extension being 30
dimensioned to overlap the forward end ofthe
short outsole of a conventional toe dancing shoe,
and means to secure the tap to a toe dancing shoe,
said means including a hole passing through the
front wall of the toe portion of the tap and so lo-'
cated that a screw passed therethrough enters the
heavy solid lower filled or thickened part beneath
the toe cavity of a conventional toe dancing shoe
and escapes the toe cavity, and additional holes
passing through the aforesaid bottom extension. 40
10. A toe tap comprising a` cupped body having
a front wall and a peripheral wall and being di
mensioned to be received over the toe portion of
a dancer-’s conventional toe dancing shoe, and a
bottom >extension dimensioned to overlap for a 45
short distance the forward end of the short out
sole of the toe dancing shoe, said bottom exten
sion being V-shaped with its apex connected to
the cupped body and its sides diverging rearward
ly, said bottom extension having a plurality of 50
holes to receive fastening means, the peripheral
wall of said cupped body tapering to a thin edge
and being indented to make the same adjustable
to the toey portion of the shoe.
SALVATORE CAPEZIO.
55
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