close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2118947

код для вставки
May 31, 11938.
E, SCHWNE'K
2,118,947 '
CARBURETOR
Filed Jan. 31, 1935
" I
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
17722-02I,é'cka'manek
‘
INVENTOR
BY If’
2/
_
_
ATTORNEY
May 31, 1938.
- E. SCHIM'ANEK
2,118,947
CARBURETOR
,
Filed Jan. 31, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
l'mz'Zdohima/nek
-
’
INVENTOR
I
2,118,947
Patented May 31, 1938
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,118,947
I
cannunn'roa ‘
Emil Schimanek, Muegyetem, Budapest, Hungary '
Application January 31, 1935, Serial No. 4,253
, ' In France February 1‘, 1934
10 Claims. (01. 261_—48)
Object of the invention is a carburetor in
which the ?oat chamber is replaced by a fuel
pressure reduction regulator. Such a carburetor
shall also comply with the demands which are
5 required of the carburetor in certain particular
cases, especially in aviation which requires car
buretors which warrant a regular fuel supply in
all positions of the aircraft in the air and inde
pendently of centrifugal forces and the like.
10
The carburetor according to the invention war-_
rants such a constant fuel supply to the fuel
ori?ce or nozzle, whatever the conditions of ?ight
and the pressure variations of the supplying
source may be.
15
conical part 5a, according to the height-position
of the piston ‘I.
g
A conduit 42' opens'into the upper part 41 of
the channel at its‘ lower end adjacent the cali
brated opening l2, which conduit communicates
through openings 42 with the space 31 of the
discharge passage 3. Further, the cylindrical part.
4_‘| ‘of the channel opens through its upper open
end into the space 4| of the air inlet.
The pressure reduction regulator is constructed 10.
as follows:
In the cylindrical part IS a tube-like slider I4
is slidably arranged and supported by two dia
phragms l6 and It’, the surfaces of: which have
The invention consists in that the fuel supply
to a calibrated opening or nozzle of the carbu
different areas. These diaphragms are fastened 15
retor is regulated by means of a movable mem
body I.
ber, such as for instance a slider, the movement
The fuel is supplied by means of a pump or
from a higher located reservoir or from a reser
of which is determined by a system of two- mem
20 branes or diaphragms with different surface areas,
which are subjected, on the one side, with their
adjacent surfaces to the, preferably constant par
tial vacuum on which the admission'of the air
is dependent, and on, the ‘other side, to the con
25 stant pressure of the fuel.
Fig. 1 shows the carburetor carried out accord
ing to the invention in vertical section, and Fig. 2
a partial section through another modi?cation.
The body I of the carburetor isprovided with
30 an air inlet 2, and a discharge passage 3 for the
combustible mixture which is connected with the
inlet of the motor. By means of the throttle
valve 4, the power of the motor can be regulated.
In the" upper part of the carburetor body a
35 cylinder 6 is arranged in which a piston ‘I is
movable which is pushed downward by a spring
III thus acting in the same direction as the weight
of the piston.
This piston 1, according to its
in a bell-shaped lower part of the carburetor
_
voir under pressure, through the conduit l3\to 20
the carburetor, via the cylindrical part l5 of the
same, into the upper part 23 into which a con
duit orchannel 19' opens at one end and termi
nates' at its other end in a socket l3 serving as
_ over-?ow for the fuel.
~
.25
As can. be seen from the drawing, .the slider
Id, at the same time, governs the‘ fuel supply
through the conduit l3 and the‘ out?ow of the
surplus of the fuel through the conduit l3’. The
length of the slider I4 is such that the fuel only 30
can ?ow through the conduit [3 and the opening
22 in the slider into the interior of .the slider and
into the calibrated opening l2 when the ‘conduit
l3’ to the over-?ow is shut off.
At the lower end of the slider ‘M a cylinder 25 35
is arranged which is closed by a bottom 25a and
in which a piston 26 with valve-?aps 21 is slid
able. By thismeans a braking or damping for
position in the cylinder 6, closes up more or less the movement of the needle system is provided. I
40 an opening H which forms the communication A'conduit 3la between the‘ sockets 3| connects 40
the space 32 between the two diaphragms with .
between the space 31 of the combustible ~dis
the space 39 between the cover of the cylinder 6 _
charge socket 3 and the space ll of the air inlet and the piston ‘I, while another conduit between
2. At the bottom of the piston l, a needle 5 is the sockets 35 and 36 establishes the communi
attached in such ‘a manner that it is adjustable cation between the space 3'l beneath the larger 45
as to its height. This can be accomplished, for diaphragm l6’, and the space M of the air inlet
instance, by screwing the‘ threaded end 8 of the 2. By reason of this construction there exists
'needle into a corresponding thread in the bot
the same partial vacuum above the piston ‘I and _
tom of the piston and securing it by nut 9. The in the space 32 between the diaphragms, and the
50 needle 5 extends through a channel in the body , same-pressure below the piston ‘I, and below the 50
I of the carburetor which channel ,is provided larger diaphragm IS’.
The ‘carburetor operates as follows:
with two cylindrical enlargements l5 and 41 com
municating with each other through a calibrated '
opening I2. The needle 5 passes through this
55 opening and closes it up more or less with its
> When the motor is at rest the pressure in the
space 32 between the two diaphragms is just the
same as the pressure in the spaces 34 and 24, 55
2
2,118,947
below the larger and above the smaller dia
phragms respectively, is equal to atmospheric
pressure when the two diaphragms are in their
position of rest as shown inaFig. 1.
,
_When the motor is running, the partial vacu
um in the space 31, is communicated through
the hole 35 to the space 39 over the piston ‘l
whereupon the piston is raised, uncovering the
opening II. to a corresponding extent so that
the air can flow to the motor in the direction
' of the arrow 4|].
The difference between the pressures which
exist, on the one'hand, in the space 38 above
the piston 1 and, on the other hand, below the
15 piston ‘I, has just the required magnitude in
order to balance the weight of the piston 1 aug
mented by the pressure of the spring Ill and
the weight of the parts connected to the piston.
The pressure of the spring is substantially con
20 stant owing to a sufficiently-great number of
windings which form the spring. Under these
conditions the difference in pressure between the
space 4|, on the one side, and the spaces 39, 31,
on the other side, will be: constant, whatever
25 the load and the number of revolutions of the
motor may be. Therefore, the air will always
flow under the in?uence of the same pressure
difference through the carburetor in the direc
tion of the arrow ll.
30
35
‘
mentioned above.
'
When the motor comes to a standstill the par
tial vacuum in the space 32 disappears; the
slider sinks and, after having shut-off the fuel
supply conduit, opens the over-?ow conduit l9’,
whereby the space 23 is put under atmospheric '
pressure.
The braking or damping cylinder 25 connected 10
to the diaphragm I6 has the following task:
If the throttle valve 4 is rapidly opened the mo
tor starts again, and the partial vacuum in the
space '39 above the piston ‘I instantaneously rises.
This increase of the partial vacuum tends to 15
suddenly lift the piston 1, ‘which movement the
piston 26 (provided with valves) at the'lower
end of the needle 5 tends to counteract in forc- 1
ing upwards thev fuel contained in the space 30.
This pressure is transmittedto the upper cover 20
of the cylinder space 30- and effects the lifting
thereof and therewith that of the slider ll,
whereby, on the other hand, the opening of the
fuel supply conduit l3 isfurther opened and,
on the other hand, the pressure in the space
23 is raised. This has theeffect that a larger
amount of the fuel passes through the calibrated
opening l2, so that a very effective re-starting
of the motor can be attained.
When the load or the number of revolutions
of the motor increases, the piston 'I will rise
higher and higher, and a greater amount of air
can flow through the carburetor under the same
pressure-difference, that is with the'same ve
locity.
fuel is fed through the calibrated opening I 2 in
consequence of the ‘constant pressure-difference
,
,
The air takes the following two ways: firstly,
.
Such an effect of the piston 28 does not occur 30
if the piston moves downwards, because there
by the valve-claps open entirely and the fuel
can ?ow‘without resistance through the piston
provided with the valves.
'
Moreover, the braking which the piston ‘I,
when sinking, experiences by the damping,
one way through the pre-carbureting stage, by though only to a small extent, tends to force the
which the air enters from the space H in they slider l4 downwards and to partially shut off
direction of the arrow 43 into the interior of the
central channel I‘! and mixes there, ?owing in
the fuel supply conduit I 3, whereby the retarding
the direction of the arrow 4,5, with the fuel com- .
In the modi?cation of the carburetor accord
ing to the invention shown in Fig. 2, the over
?ow conduit IQ’ of Fig. 1 has been omitted, and
ing out of the calibrated opening;—and'second-'
of the motor is favoured.
40
ly, another way in the direction of the arrow 4|,‘
by which the air from the space 4| mixes with the interruption of the fuel supply is effected by
45 the mixture coming through the openings 42 the needle by means of its particular formation,
and thereby thoroughly whirls it through.
vone portion 55 of the needle taking over the
The velocity of the air current through the function of 'a clap ‘or a valve. This portion be
channel 4'! may be regulated by changing the comes seated with its lower surface on a seat
entrance-area of the same, .for instance by in
5| and thus shuts off the calibrated opening l2.
50 serting rings 48 with‘ different inner diameters. '
While the‘ motor is running the needle 5 is
The fuel reaches by the following path the lifted and the valve portion 55 is raised from
calibrated opening l2: The. partial vacuum in itsseat so that the fuel can ?ow through the
the cylinder space 35 above the-piston ‘I is com
opening II. The slider H, in this case, regulates
municated through the conduit am to the space the fuelsupply solely through the conduit l3.
55 32 between the two diaphragms l6 and it’. 'Since
It is to‘ be understood that modi?cations in
the diaphragm I5’ is greater than the diaphragm particulars of the construction may be designed 65
' IS, the slider I4 is lifted and thereby first closes
the over~?ow conduit I 9' and then opens the fuel
supply conduit l3 as soon as the holes 22 are in
alignment therewith.
The pressure of the fuel in the space 24 in
creases till it preponderates, whereby the dia
phragm I6" is pressed downwards so that the
slider H tendsto shut off the fuel supply. There
65 upon a balance position of the slider ensues,
whereby the fuel pressure is regulated to a con
stant‘pressure which can be pre-determined.
Under this constant pressure the fuel reaches
the calibrated opening II at the other side of
70 which a partial vacuum exists, which has also a
constant value.
‘
_
'
0n starting the motor the level of the fuel
rises to the height indicated at 49, correspond
ing to the height of the over-?ow conduit l9.
75 As soon as the motor is normally 11.111111118- the
without departing from the spirit of the inven
tion. In particular, a throttle valve 4' may be
placed in the air inlet 2 and either the valve 4
or the valve 4' may be omitted if desired.
60
.What I claim is:
1‘. In a carburetor for an internal combustion
engine, an air inlet, a fuel inlet, a fuel cham
ber, a mixing chamber, a nozzle between the
fuel inlet and chamber, a device for regulating
the fuel supply through said nozzle, said device -
including diaphragms having pressure surfaces
of different sizes to produce a differential ac
tion, the diaphragm having the smaller size pres
sure. surface being subjected 'on one side to the 70
pressure of the fuel in the fuel chamber and,
forming a wall of said chamber and being sub
jected on its other side to the partial vacuum set
up by the engine.
‘
2. A carburetor comprising a main housing 75
2,118,947
3 l
chamber to the ,engine and a device for regu
lower and intermediate compartments, one of
said diaphragms having a larger pressure surface
than the other diaphragm, .said upper compart
lating the ?ow of fuel ,to said mixing chamber,
ment ‘being in communication with the fuel
having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, a fuel chamber,
a mixing chamber, a passage from said ~mixing
said device including a cylindrical casing on the
chamber, said intermediate compartment being
top of‘the housing, a tubular member adapted
in communication with the engine passage and
said lower compartment being in communication
with the air inlet, mechanism for partially regu
lating the flow of air and fuel to the engine pas
sage including a chamber disposed between the 10
air inlet andengine passage and being in con
stant communication with said passage, a piston
to cut off communication between the fuel inlet
and the fuel chamber, another cylinder carried
on the lower end of the tubular member and in
10 communication with the fuel chamber, a piston
in said ?rst cylinder under the influence of a
spring in said cylinder chamber, a stem depend-‘
ing from said piston, another piston at the lower
end of said stem movable in the second cylinder,
15 an auxiliary housing carried on the lower end of
the main housing, spaced. diaphragms dividing
said auxiliary housing into upper, lower and in
termediate compartments, the upper compart
ment being in communication with the fuel in
let, the intermediate compartment being in com
munication with the passage leading to the en
gine and the lower compartment being in com
munication with the air inlet, said diaphragms
having pressure surfaces of different sizes where
by they are actuated by varying pressure condi
tions.
,
3. In a carburetor, a main casing having an
air inlet, a fuel inlet, a fuel chamber, a mixing
chamber and an'outlet to the engine for the
80 mixture, a tubular member for controlling the
flow of fuel to the mixing chamber, an auxiliary
casing ?xed to the lower end of the main casing,
spaced diaphragms ?xed to the tubular member
dividing said latter easing into upper, lower and
movable in said latter chamber and normally_
closing communication between the air inlet and
engine passage, a spring loaded on said piston
to keep it in normal position, a stem depending
from said piston and extending into the air
chamber below the larger diaphragm and adapt-,
ed to curtail the flow of fuel to the mixing cham
ber, a chamber formed in the lower end of the 20
movable tubular member and being in communi
cation with -the fuel chamber, a piston on the
lower end of said stem and movable in said last
named chamber against the ?uid pressure for
damping the movement of the ?rst piston.
25
6. .A carburetor comprising a body having an
air inlet, a fuel inlet, a mixing chamber, a noz
zle for the fuel, a fuel pressure regulating mem
ber including a slider and spaced diaphragms
having pressure surfaces of different sizes for 30
effecting the action of said slider, the movement
of said diaphragms being influenced by the dif
ference between the partial vacuum prevailing
in the carburetor and atmospheric pressure, said ‘
member being adapted to keep constant the fuel
partments being in communication with the air ‘pressure in front of the nozzle and means for
inlet, another of said compartments being in varying said partial vacuum.
communication with the suction side of the en
7. In" a carburetor," an air inlet, a fuel inlet, a
gine, and another of said compartments being in ' mixing chamber, a nozzle disposed between the
40 communication with the fuel inlet and forming fuel inlet and chamber, a device for regulating
part of the fuel chamber and a piston under the the fuel supply through said nozzle, said device
including spaced diaphragms having pressure
in?uence of the suction of the engine for par
tially controlling the ?ow of air and fuel.
surfaces of different sizes to produce a differ
4. In a carburetor, a main casing having an ential action, the pressure surfaces on one side
45 air inlet, a fuel inlet, a fuel chamber, a mixing of said diaphragms being subjected to partial
chamber and an outlet to the engine for the vacuum, and one of said surfaces on the other
mixture, a tubular member for controlling the side of oneof said diaphragms being subjected
?ow of fuel to the mixing chamber, an auxiliary to fuel pressure, the other of said diaphragms
casing ?xed to the lower end of the main casing, being subjected on its opposite side to a pressure
spaced diaphragms ?xed to the tubular member greater than the'pressure between said spaced
,
dividing said latter casing into upper, lower and diaphragms.
8. A ?oatless carburetor comprising an air in
intermediate compartments, one of said com
partments being in communication with the air let,,a fuel inlet, a nozzle for the fuel, a pressure
inlet, another of said compartments being in regulating member for the fuel in front of said
nozzle, an automatic throttling device disposed
.communication'with the suction side of the en
gine, and another of said compartments being in said air inlet and dividing said air inlet into
two spaces, said throttling device being in?u
in communication with the fuel inlet and form
ing part of the fuel chamber, a piston under the enced on the one hand by the atmospheric pres-.
in?uence of the suction side of the engine for sure prevailing in the space of the air inlet in
partially controlling the ?ow of air and fuel and front of the throttling device and on the other
means for damping the movement of said piston, hand by the under pressure prevailing in the
said means including a piston on the lower end space of the air inlet behind said throttling de
of the stem of the ?rst named‘ piston and movable vice caused- by the suction of the engine and
intermediate compartments, one of said com
in the fuel.
‘
'
~
5. A carburetor comprisinga main casing hav
ing an air inlet, a fuel‘ inlet, a fuel chamber, a
mixing chamber and a passage from said mixing
chamber to the engine, an auxiliary casing ?xed
to thebottom of the main casing, mechanism
70 for regulating the flow of fuel to the mixing
chamber including a movable tubular member
having openings adapted to align with the fuel
35.
40
45
-
50'
55
60
means for imparting said difference in pressure
between said spaces to said pressure regulating 65
member for the fuel, said pressure regulating
member being actuated by said pressure differ
ence.
,
.
9. A ?oatless carburetor as claimed in claim‘ 8
in which the throttling device comprises a piston 70
acted upon on the one side by the atmospheric
pressure prevailing in the space in front of the
throttling device and on the other side by the
inlet, a pair of pressure responsive‘ diaphragms
?xed to said tubular member at spaced intervals .under pressure prevailing in the space behind the
a 75
75 for dividing said auxiliary casing into upper, throttling device and in addition thereto
4
2,118,947
constant spring pressure whereby a variation of
the pressure difference on both sides of the piston
causes the piston to throttle more or less the
passage‘ between both said spaces thereby reestab
lishing a constant pressure di?'erence in both
said spaces.
10. A floatless carburetor according to claim 7
in which the device for regulating the fuel sup
ply through the nozzle'is actuated by a constant
10 pressure diiference, said constant pressure dif
ference being obtained by an automatic throt
tling device disposed in the air inlet and dividing
said air inlet into two spaces, said throttling de
vice being influenced‘ on the one hand by the
atmospheric pressure prevailing in the space of
the air inlet in front of the throttling device and
on the other hand by the under pressure prevail
ing in the space of the air inlet behind said throt
tling device caused by‘ the suction of the engine
thereby keeping constant the difference between
the pressures prevailing in the said spaces and
means for imparting said constant pressure dif
ference to said device for regulating the fuel 10
supply through said nozzle.
EMIL SCHIMANEK.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
594 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа