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Патент USA US2119075

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May 31, 1938.
A_ Q DAY
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2,119,075
SKATE GUARD
Filed Sept. 7. 19s";
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Inue?tor
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?iémz?iag
By M 5m
Attorneys
May 31, 1938.
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AQDAY
SKATE GUARD
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2,119,075
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Filed Sept. 7, 1957
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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1975072 d?ay.
.vBy W 15m
Attorneys
Patented May 31, 1938
2,119,075
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFlE '
2,119,075
SKATE GUARD
Alton 0. Day, Roseland, N. J.
Application September 7, 1937, Serial No. 162,784
8 Claims. (Cl. 280—11.38)
The present invention relates to that class of
Figure 6 is a perspective view of one of the
appliances and accessories embodying skaters’
equipment, and has more particular reference
to a structurally new and novel ice skate guard
5 of the sandal-type designed to facilitate walking
with skates on.
It is a matter of common knowledge that the
inconvenience of attaching skates at the pond
has gradually brought into vogue a now well es
10 tablished practice of attaching the skates at the
club house or sometimes at home before starting
on the journey to the pleasure spot. Moreover,
since it is difficult to walk on skates any appre
ciable distance, and as such walking would prove
15 ruinous to the skate blades, different types of
shields of temporary walker treads are recom
mended.
As implied by the preceding paragraph, I am
su?iciently conversant with the general state of
20 the prior art to appreciate that the use of ice
skate guards is not an original concept. In fact, I
realize in making my entry into this specialized
?eld of invention, I am confronted with protector
attachments of variegated styles and forms. It
25 follows, therefore, that my principal objective
is to improve upon such prior devices through the
adoption and use of a structurally singular guard
assembly believed comparatively unique and more
aptly ?tted for the intended purposes.
30
In keeping with the underlying principles of
my presently adopted construction, I have found
it expedient and practicable to employ a twin or
dual unit assembly wherein the units are prop
erly shaped for walking and coordinated by con
35 necting means calculated to promote the desired
?exibility considered to be the cardinal improve
ment.
Other features and advantages will become
more readily apparent from the following de
40 scription and accompanying drawings.
In the drawings, wherein like numerals are
employed to designate like details and parts
throughout the views:
Figure 1 is a side elevation of a duplex-style,
45 self-accommodating ice skate guard constructed
in accordance with the principles of the present
invention.
Figure 2 is a top plan view of the assembly
disclosed in Figure 1.
50
Figure 3 is a central longitudinal sectional
view.
Figure 4 is an end elevational view of the front
al or so-called toe unit.
Figure 5 is a similar view observing the heel
55 unit in Figure 1 in a direction from left to right.
details.
"
As before indicated, the guard, as a unitary
assemblage, is made up primarily of a pair of
complemental or companion toe and heel units
7 and 8, respectively, and they have common
structural characteristics in that each is in the
nature of a channelled or grooved sheath ade
quately designed to receive the blade portion of
the conventional ice skate (not shown).
The unit 7 is made up of wood and includes a
10
pair of spaced parallel longitudinal side blocks
9 adjoined in spaced parallelism along their low
er edges by a cleat-like runner or tread strip ID.
This arrangement provides the aforementioned 15
channel-shaped receptacle or sheath for the com
plemental portion of the runner or blade of the
skate. .As a unit, this part ‘I may be said to have
its front end tilted forwardly and downwardly,
as indicated at H, to terminate in a pointed tip 20
I2.
The rear edges of the side members are
curved, as at l3, to facilitate walking in snow
or on yieldable frozen ground.
The major por
tion of the bottom of said unit slants upwardly
and forwardly on the approximate plane indi 25
cated at M, where it converges toward the tip l2.
At the juncture of the thus obtuse angled sur
faces l3 and I4 is a rounded portion l5 forming
a fulcrum designed to aid rocking on the ball of
the foot, so to speak, as has been found to be ad
visable to overcome clumsiness and inconven
30
ience found to be evident in completely ?at-faced
tread-equipped devices exempli?ed in certain
prior art structures heretofore recommended for
use. Incidentally, this particular type of a 35
sheath, as indicated at 1, has been found to be
expedient and practicable to facilitate driving
one’s automobile. This makes it possible to put
the skates on at home and to drive the automo
bile to the skating pond or other equivalent 40
point.
Referring now to the heel sheath or unit 8,
it will be observed that this has certain common
characteristics in that it includes spaced paral
lel side blocks l6 joined together at their lower 45
ends by a jointing cleat l1 nailed or otherwise
secured in place, as indicated at Ill. The blocks
l6 are generally approximately rectangular in
form with the rear ends curved to accommodate
a metal plate or shield l9 forming a closure as 50
well as an abutment for the adjacent end portion
of the skate.
The two units 1 and 8 are adjoined in cooper
ative relationship and proper alignment through
the instrumentality of metal tie straps 20. These 55
2,1 19,076
2
are adjustably attached at opposite ends, as indi
cated at the points 2|, whereby to permit su?i
cient play to exist to allow slight relative move
ment of the parts 1 and 8 with respect to each
other and to thus enhance the features of adapt
ability and to provide what is in effect a ?exible
walking shoe for an ice skate.
The wooden wedges 22 are secured in proper
angular relation on the outer sides of the units 1
10 and 8 to permit anchorage thereon of the, end
portions 23 of the saddling or harnessing straps.
Suitable straps including buckles 24 are generally
employed whereby to allow the device to- be sat
isfactorily strapped on the foot of the wearer.
15. It is thought that the description taken in con
nection with the drawings will enable a clear
understanding of the invention to be had. There
'fore, a more lengthy description is thought un
necessary.
While the preferred embodiment of the in
20
vention has been shown and described, it is to be
understood that minor changes coming within.
the ?eld of invention claimed may be resorted to
if desired.
I claim:
1. A temporarily usable walking shoe designed
for use in conjunction with an ice skate com
prising a pair of relatively swingable and tilt
able units for reception of the skate runner, said
30 units being in the nature of sheaths ?exibly ad
joined in cooperative shiftable vWalking relation
ship.
2. A skate guard of the class described com
prising individual heel and toe units adapted for
reception of the blade of the skate, and means
pivotally adjoining said units together to allow
movement of one in relation to the other.
3. An ice skate guard embodying sheath means
for reception of the blade of the skate, said‘means
being provided on its bottom at a predetermined
point with a fulcruming rocker member to facili
tate walking.
4.. An ice skate guard of the class described
comprising an auxiliary walking shoe including
complemental heel and toe units and tie straps
adjoining adjacent ends of the units in spaced
longitudinal alignment.
5. An ice skate guard of the class described
comprising an auxiliary walking shoe including
complemental heel and toe units and tie straps
adjoining adjacent ends of the units in spaced
longitudinal alignment, the heel unit including
spaced parallel side members and an end plate
constituting an abutment for the adjacent end
of the skate.
6. An ice skate guard of the class described
comprising an auxiliary walking shoe including
complemental heel and toe units and tie straps
adjoining adjacent ends of the units in spaced
longitudinal alignment, said toe unit being chan
nel-shaped in cross-section and open at oppo
site ends, the outer frontal end being tapered and
pointed’, the inner rear end being curved rear- -
wardly and upwardly and the intermediate tread
portion being fashioned to provide a rocker as
described.
"I. A skate guard of the class described com
prising a heel unit substantially rectangular in 25
side elevation, channel-shaped in cross-sectional
form, having a flat bottom and a closing plate at
one end constituting a skate abutment, and a
bodily movable companion toe unit swingably
adjoined thereto.
8. A skate guard of the class described com
prising a heel unit substantially rectangular in
side elevation, channel-shaped in cross-sectional
form, having a flat bottom and a closing plate
at one end constituting a skate abutment, a toe
unit movably adjoined thereto, said toe unit being
channel-shaped in cross-section, longitudinally
elongated, open at opposite ends, with its frontal
portion inclined downwardly and the interme
diate part of its basal tread portion convexed to
provide a fulcruming element.
ALTON C. DAY.
3.01
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