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Патент USA US2119295

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May 31, 1938. >
H. SCHICHT
2,119,295
MACHINE FOR GENERATING’ GEARS‘
Filed July 18’, 1936
4 Sheets-Sheet 1
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May 31,1938.
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2,119,295
MACHINE FOR GENERATING GEARS
Filed July- 18, 1936
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May 31, 1938.
H. SCHICHT
2,1 19,295
MACHINE FOR GENERATING GEARS
Filed July 18, 1936
4 Sheets-Sheet 3
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May 31, 1938.
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2,119,295
MACHINE FOR GENERATING GEARS
Filed July 18, 1936
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4 Sheets-Sheei 4
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2,119,295
Patented May 31, 1938 -
' UNITED STATES
‘ PATENT OFFICE
2,119,295
MACHDIE FOR GENERATING GEARS
Heinrich Schicht, Huckeswagen, Germany, as-.
signor to ?rm: W. Ferd. Klingelnberg Siihne,
Remscheid-Berghausen, Germany
Application July 18, 1936, Serial No. 91,416
> '
In Germany February 16, 1934
9 Claims.
(Cl. 90-4)
This invention relates to a method of and a
machine for generating’ gears, and more par
ticularly gears having longitudinally curved teeth.
In certain known processes of manufacturing
bevel gears, the teeth are cut by spiral or heli
coidal cutters, as the tool and work are caused
to roll upon each other, and the tool is‘ swung
about the center of the imaginary crown gear
meshing with the gear being cut. In such proc
esses, the number of tangential cuts which can
be taken is limited to the cutting‘teeth engaged
in the milling process, and teeth having faces
of excess width are generated by the tangential
cuts, and must be polished in order that they may
run smoothly.
This excess width necessitates a
prolonging of the lapping operation in the case
of hardened gears.
'
The object of the present invention is to avoid
the disadvantages of the prior processes and to
20 materially reduce ‘the manufacturing time.
Brie?y stated, the improved process consists in
subjecting the cutting tool to an additional recti
linear displacement in the plane of the crown
‘ gear, without changing the inclination of the tool
25 axis with respect to the crown gear plane, as
'30
shaped cutter in the process of cutting curved
teeth ‘on a bevel gear, the tool displacement being 5
coincident with the line of contact between the
tool and the crown gear plane;
Fig. 4 is a fragmental section ‘showing the
shape of the teeth of the tool in Fig. 3;
.
Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 3, but with the 10
direction of tool displacement inclined with re
spect to the line of contact between the tool and
the crown gear plane;.
-
Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section, partly diagram-.
matic, through a milling machine suitable for use 15
in producing gears according to the method of
the present invention;
Fig. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view of the
dividing head used with the machine shown in
20
‘ Fig. 6;
Fig. 8 is a_ fragmentary sectional view of the
compensating mechanism employed in the ma
chine ofv Fig. 6 for maintaining correct relation
between the work and the tool;
-
Fig. 9 is a face view of the cutting tool face 25
the cutting tool and the work“ roll upon each
plate showing a cylindrical cutter in the process
other, and the tool is swung about the crown gear
center. The cutting tool cuts a width of. tooth
Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 9 showing a
of cutting a spur gear;
_
conical cutting tool in the process of cutting a
30
bevel gear; and
Fig.
11
is
a
view
similar
to
Figs.
9
and
10,
but
advantages of using helicoidal cutters are done '
showing a cylindrical cutting tool in the process
away with.
In view of this action, the cutter can be greatly ‘ of cutting curved teeth on a stationary spur gear.
which is in excess of the distance corresponding
to the length of the tooth, and prior art dis
reduced in length, and hence disc-shaped cutters
can be employed.v .Use of a disc-shaped tool
which is swung round the center of the crown
gear permits simple and most exact positioning
and guiding of the tool during its cutting motion.
is in strong contrast to known processes in
40
Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. ‘1, but showing
the cutting tool as a cylindrical worm;
Fig. 3 is a diagram showing a short or disc
which disc-shaped tools must be actuated by steel
bands or by, tooth segments, and in which the
machine elements must be changed for each new‘
gear ratio or bone angle so that a very largev
stock of generating rolling cones must be kept
available. The prior art devices also failed to
. offer sufficient resistance to cutting pressure to
attain any high degree of ef?ciency.
by the present invention._ This invention will be
50 understood when the following description is read
in conjunction with the accompanying drawings
‘
,
Fig. 1 is a diagram showing a short, spiral
‘ cutter or cone grinding worm in the process of.
cutting curved teeth on a bevel gear;
conical cutter I. This cutter, as shown, is of
_ such a size that its cone or mantle extends over
a portion‘ of the tooth width on the gear being
cut and performs three movements as follows: 40
1. A cutting movement designated by arrow c
and consisting of rotation of the cutter on its
own axis in engagement with the work.
_
2. A rolling movement indicated by the arrow g .
and caused by swinging the cutter about the 45
point 0 designating the center of the imaginary
crown gear.
All of the prior art disadvantages are overcomev
in which:
Referring to Fig. 1 of the drawings, the refer
ence character a represents a bevel gear having 35
curved~ teeth in the process of being cut by a “
'
3. A rectilinear movement, designated by the
double arrow d, in the direction of the line of
contact between the cutter and the crown gear 50
plane on a straight, line touching a circle con- .
centric with the crown gear center 0.
As shown by the double arrow 11 (Figs. ‘1, 2 and
3) the supplementary tool movement may be
performed by the tool once while it makes a'com- 55
2
2,119,295
' plete trip around the crown gear center in en
gagement with the work, or it may reciprocate
several times. The three tool movements also
regulate the rotation of the work.
Rotation of the work is caused by engagement
with the tool and from the swing of the tool
about the center of the crown gear, this latter
movement always producing the same direction of
10
work rotation. In addition, the supplementary
tool displacement during a change in its direc
tion produces its effect. If. this latter displace
ment is in such a direction as to supplement the
- ?rst two movements, it speeds up the rotation of
the work, but if this displacement opposes the
15 other two movements then the speed of rotation
of the work is reduced. In the exterior limit
position the outside diameter of the cutter must
at least touch the outside diameter of the gear,
or preferably, project over it.
In the interior
20 limit position, the inner diameter of. the cutter
must touch the inner diameter of the gear or pro
ject over it slightly.
'
The supplementary tool displacement above
mentioned has a marked advantage, in that a
25 greater number of tangential cuts may be ob
tained in the direction of the tooth length, and
caused by the edges of the cutting teeth contin
uously taking up different positions in the direc
tion of the double arrow (1. The more often this
30 displacement occurs, the more perfect is the
tooth formation. Consequently, when practicing
this method, one is not dependent upon the
number of cutting edges on the tool. If it is de
sired to use a shorter cutter, a disk-shaped cut
ter of the type shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5 may be
employed.
When a disk-shaped tool is employed, the cut
ting must be carried out as a single step process,
although the supplementary tool movement char
40 acterizing the new process remains the same.
This movement is, however, increased so that the
disk-shaped tool covers the whole tooth width
and travels in the direction indicated by the
arrow d in Figs. 3 and 5, at least between the
45 limits designated A and C in Fig. 3.
In Fig. 3 the supplementary displacement of
the tool is in the direction of its line of contact
with the crown gear plane. In Fig. 5 this dis
placement is at an angle to the line of contact
50 with the crown gear plane. By varying this
angle a change in tooth curvature may be ob
tained. For example, in a process according to
Fig. 3, a large spiral angle with a sharp curva
ture is desirable, in order to obtain suflicient
55 covering with a small number of teeth and tooth
widths.
However, for large tooth widths and
great pitch pressures a smaller spiral angle with
a decrease in axial pressure is desirable. An
example of this latter is given in Fig. 5.
to
A machine for generating gears according to
the method above described, is illustrated in Fig.
6 of the drawings. In Fig. 6 reference character
I designates the cutter mounted on a tool spindle
land adapted to be driven by a motor 3 through
suitable gearing which will be described later.
The work 4 is carried on a work spindle 5 also
driven by motor 3 over a bevel gear drive 6, 1
connected to main shaft 9.‘
The drive for producing rolling and generating
70 motion of the cutter I in the ideal crown gear is
journal l3, the axis of this journal being eccen
tric and lying parallel to the central axis of the
face-plate cylinder ll. Mounted in slideway I2
and guided therein is a carriage 14 which can be
moved by means of a threaded spindle l5 con
nected with the machine drive. A tool support
I6 is mounted on the carriage l4. This carriage
makes it possible for the tool to perform the
supplementary movement indicated by the
double arrows d in Figs. 1 and 2, and which is
characteristic of this invention.
The carriage I4 is displaced by a piston l1,
operated by oil pressure from a pump of known
type and controlled by a valve, also of known
type. The number of up and down strokes of
the piston I‘! can be regulated as desired, and
is dependent upon the oil pressure and the cut
ting resistance oifered to the tool. As the re
ciprocating movement, already described, is con
trolling the rolling and generating movement,
the piston l'l acts on a rack on the casing of a
differential I8 on shaft I 9. Fixed on the casing
of differential I8 is a spur gear 20 connected by
change gears 2| and 22 with the rim, of gear
wheel 23. Gear wheel 23 revolves around the
face-plate cylinder II and transmits the turn of
the differential over the spur gears 23-—26, and
bevel gears 21 and 28 to the threaded spindle l5.
The supplementary turn of the work correspond
ing to this turn of the differential is transmitted
along the parts of the drive 29, 30, 42, 43 and 45.
If a short movement is desired when cutting,
then the drive is transmitted from the differen
tial worm shaft 3|, over change gears 32, 33, 34,
35, 36, bevel gears 31 and 38, spur gears 39 and
26 (Fig. 9) and bevel gears 22 to 28, to spindle l5.
This spindle moves the carriage I4, on which the
cutter revolving face-plate is'mounted.
When a disk-shaped cutter is used, any well
known type of dividing head may be connected
to the shaft 40 (Fig. 7) by a coupling 4|. This
dividing head serves to index the work from
tooth to tooth after each forward and return
stroke of the cutter on the slideway I2.
The‘ dividing head shown in Fig. '7 may be
thrown into gear by disconnecting bevel gear 43
from shaft 42 and connecting gear 44 to shaft
40 by moving‘ the coupling 4| from left to right
in Fig. 7. In addition to this, the change gears
45, 46 and 41, Figs. 6 and '7, are dismounted, and _
the dividing worm connected to shaft 40 by
change gears 48 and 49, one only being shown in
Fig. 8.
With the above substitutions made, rotation
of shaft 5| caused by either differential 50 or l8 , r
is transmitted along the casing 52 (Fig. 7), pawl
53, dividing plate 54 to shaft 40, and then
through change gears 48, 49 and worm gear 55,
56 (Fig. 8) to the work. With the supplemen
tary reciprocating movement or displacement of 60
the tool which is characteristic of this process,
any twisting between the tool and work would
make its appearance through the play of the
gears. This twisting is equalized by means of the
apparatus now to be described. In order to - "
maintain simultaneity of the reversing motion
and of the play equalizing means, both motions
are caused by hydraulic pistons acting simul
taneously.
The mechanism for equalizing the gear play is
transmitted from shaft 9 through spur gearing
illustrated in Fig. 8.
to a worm wheel H] on face plate cylinder II.
ing head worm gear 56 is mounted in bearings
which are movable axially between adjustable
This cylinder turns on the horizontal axisv 9.
On the front face of cylinder ll adjacent the
75 work, is a slideway 12 which can be rotated on a
The worm 55 of the divid
limits. A casing 5'! serving as an oil cylinder
encloses a piston 58. Piston 58 is rigidly con
3
_ 2,119,295
nected to the worm shaft and the piston is dis
reversed in order to give the cutter a movement
in- the direction of the arrow (1. Piston 58 (Fig.
placeable between one wall of easing 5'! as one
limit, and the other cylinder wall 59 as the other
limit. Wall 59 can be displaced by worms. The
displacement limits are adjusted in such manner
8) performs this same movement to correct the
rotation of the dividing wheel.
When a cylindrical cutter is to be employed to
form the teeth of bevel gears, as shown in Fig. 2.
the hydraulic pistons are ‘driven in the‘ same
manner as for the tooth formation disclosed in
that when the turning is taken into account, the
tool is again'in correct position with respect to
the tooth spaces to be cut.
-
The slideway I2 is provided at one end with
10 an oil cylinder 60 (Figs. 9, 10 and 11) ., Piston 6|
in this cylinder (Fig. 10) is subject to constant
Fig. 1. The only change required between the
two methods is that for cone cutters the head l6 10
takes the form of Fig. 10, while for cylindrical
oil pressure at all times. Consequently, the car
- riage I4 is at all times held tightly against the
cutters the head I6a has the form shown in Figs.
9 and 11.
.
'
threads of the nut and it is impossible for play
When teeth are being cut- with disk-shaped
to be present in the threads.
cutters, as shown in Figs. 3 and 5, the slideway 15
The above-mentioned arrangement of the" I2 is ?xed in position on the face-plate cylinder
face-plate cylinder, swinging table guide and ro
II and this position depends upon the curvature
tating parts on the table for producing the move
of. the teeth which are being out. Cylinder H on
ments of the tool and work which are character
differential l8, and cylinders 60 and 61 are con
20 istic of this process, make. it possible to give the nected together by means of the regulating valve 20.
tool any position desired for controlling its direc
referred to above. A continuous‘pressure is ap
tion of movement in the crown gear plane, and to plied equally to both cylinders 66 and 67 during
displace it forcibly in any desired direction over
the whole tooth forming process.
the face-plate. Therefore, not only is the ma
chine suitable for practicing the method just de
from pipe lll acts on cylinder 61 to forcethe tool
spindle ‘H and cam 12 continuously against worm 25
spindle 69. This spindle can be adjusted by
scribed, but in addition, it can also be used as a
universal machine for generating teeth on spur
means of worm l3 and the block gauges 68 to
gears and bevel gears according to other known
rolling generating processes.
To this end, two different changeable rotating
30
parts 56 (Fig. 10) and l6a (Figs. 9 and 11) can
regulate the depth of the teeth to be cut.
The oil pressure control valve is operated in
accordance with the movement of_ carriage M. 30
When the cutter has completed a tooth traverse
in one direction, the 'oil supply to cylinder H is
be used as tool supports and ?xed on carriage I4
for this purpose. The difference between these
tool supports is that the one I6a is arranged for
reversed and causes a reversal in the direction of
cutter movement. The dividing device is also
connected to the oil supply so that the hydraulic 35
motor 14 is under continuouspressure in one di
the reception of cylindrical cutters and the other
l6 of cutters having conical or curved conical
,
Oil pressure
pitch surfaces.
rection‘. Mechanism is also provided in connec
The two changeable tool supports can, if de
tion with the regulating valve so as to control
sired; be equipped with grinding wheels instead
piston 58 and, at each stroke of the tool, correct
any discrepancy in position between the tool and 40
scribed.
;
work and caused byplay in the gearing.
The work support‘ 62 (Fig. 6) on which the
When a spiral cutter is to be used to generate
work 4 is ?xed to shaft 5, can be displaced verti- ' spur gears, a cutter head of the type illustrated
cally on a slideway 63. This movement is pro
in Fig. 2 for use in forming bevel gears may be
duced by actuation of worm spindle 64 in order used, also the hydraulic pistons may be actuated
to cut teeth on bevel gears having displaced axes. in the same manner as when generating bevel
Adjustment of the slideway 63 is performed gears. However, the work support 65 is swung
of cutters, for carrying out the process above de
manually and its movement on a circular support
e 55,
65 is guided radially with respect to its center of
motion. The circular support 65 can be rotated
through an angle of ninety degrees about axis
66, to adjust the work so that its pitch line will
lie in the common generating plane 66. This
adjustmentmakes it possible to work bevel gears,
spur gears,‘ worms and numerous other similar
work.
When spiral bevel gears are to be cut by cut
' ters of the type shown in Fig. 1, the bevel gear
so
43 (Fig. 7) is connected to shaft 42 by coupling
4i, thus throwing thedividing head out of gear.
The shaft 42‘ is at the same time in driving rela
tion with worm drive'55, 56 through change gears
65, 46 and 41. Hence‘, the work can make a con
about the axis 66 in such a way that the axis of
the work and the spindle l5 both lie parallel to
the plane of face-plate ll l.
.
In performing this adjustment, change gear 116
on spindle ‘I5 at table 65 (Fig. 6) is brought into
.
mesh with a change gear on shaft ll Spindle 75
then serves to generate the feed motion in the
direction of the work axis, as is usual in processes .
of generating teeth on spur gears. With such a
connection the shaft TI is driven through gear
ing connecting it to shaft 18. Fixed on this
worm shaft '18 is a coupling so arranged that
worm 19 can be coupled to actuate the face-plate , 60
cylinder H or to- cause the gear 80 to drive the
shaft 8|, together with spindle ‘l5 and shaft 78.
The work 4 can be driven and feeding movement
imparted to the wheel in a direction along its
of the'tool. The slideway I2 is adjusted on the ,
65
face plate to a position corresponding to that of axis by a connection which includes the differen-.
tials
which
have
already
been
described.
the cutter and ?xed. The vpistons 61 and 6|
The forward and reverse strokes of piston H
_ (Figs. 6 and 10) are each under continuous equal
pressures during the working process. Piston 61 for displacing the tool on slideway l2 in the di
forces the cutter case against the block gauges 6B rection of double arrow at, is transmitted to the 70
or against stop spindle 69. The piston 6! in slide- - shaft 29 and then to the work through the sec
way. l2, presses the nut in carriage M against ond differential l8. The forward and reverse
the guide spindle I5 in order to compensate or thrust of piston IT effects the rotation of the
eliminate play. At each changein direction of case, the differential l8 and the gear 20. Rotary
75 tool movement the piston H in differential l8'is ' motion of the gear 20 is transmitted to lead screw 75
tinuous turn in correct relation to the rotation
4
2,119,295
in accordance with the point at which it is de
‘I! through gears2l, 22, 23 to 28, to move carriage
sired to crown the tooth.
Use of the machine above described assures
I l on slideway I2 in direction of arrow d.
The machine is so designed that it is capable
not only of generating spur gear teeth in the
5 manner just described, in which the work is
moved along its own axis-toward the tool, but it
is also possible to guide ‘the work tangentially to
absolute identity between pieces of work being
cut. The hydraulic arrangement 61 presses the
work spindle housing ‘ll against a stop which is
adjustable by means of the block gauges 68 and
the screw 69. This adjustment of the depth of
cut by means of block gauges possesses marked
the tool. In this way, an additional advantage is
obtained, namely, that each tooth on the tool
advantages over prior art adjustments by thread
ed spindle and scale. The adjustment can now
10 takes up as many tangential positions as desired,
as its tangential cutting edge moves in the direc
tion of tool feed. Therefore, any desired number
be carried out with accuracy by unskilled'work
men and once the gauges are set, no further at
of tangential cuts can be made, with the resulting
increase in the accuracy of the tooth ?anks.
Fig. 11 of the drawings illustrate the execution
15
of the process just described. The work support
65 (see Fig. 6) is rotated about the axis'66 until
the work _axis is parallel to the plane of face
plate ll. However, the method of Fig. 11 differs
20 from that in Fig. 9 in that no feeding motion is
imparted to the work support in Fig. 11.
The slideway I2 can be adjusted so‘ that the
tool moves tangentially along the dividing cylin
tention need be given to the adjustment.
What is claimed is:
1. A milling machine comprising a bed; an
adjustable work support on said bed; a- tool sup
port on said bed; a main driving means for caus
ing rotation of said work and tool supports; a ?rst
hydraulic means for imparting a supplementary 20
‘rectilinear movement to said tool support; and
a second hydraulic means connected to both said
tool and work supports for eliminating lost mo
tion therebetween.
der of the work, by rotating the face-plate II.
2. A milling machine comprising a frame; an 25
25 The angle of inclination of the teeth to be gen
adjustable work support-on said frame; means,
erated is adjusted by swinging the cutter head
inward.
for rotating said support about the axis of the
As shown in Fig. 11, the cutter is ad
work gear; a face plate rotatable about the cen
justed to produce tangential cuts, and the length
ter of the imaginary face gear meshing with the
gear being out, said face plate having a slide 30
of the cutter is so chosen that it extends over
30 the whole tooth width during the feeding move
thereon; a carriage on said slide; a rotatable tool
support on said carriage; a tool on said tool sup
ment, thus performing an additional back and
forth movement. Thus it becomes possible to
derive the tool movement for tool carriage l4
from a transmission operating solely on differ
35 ential gear 50 and independently of differential
gear [8. In Fig. 11, this tool movement is trans
mitted from differential worm shaft 3| over
change gears 32 to 36, bevel gears 31, 38, spur
gears 39, 24 to 26, bevel gears 21, 28 and along
port; means for causing reciprocatory movement
of said carriage in a direction parallel to the cut—
ting plane of the tool and in a direction sub
stantially parallel to the axis of the tool; means
for rotating the face plate and the tool there
on; and means for causing the reciprocatory
movement of said carriage to take place in timed
relation to the movement of the tool and work 40
40 spindle l6 to the tool carriage l4. .
It is obvious that the machine can be arranged
to carry out the tangential process in which the
tool is ?xed and the work is moved along the
tool.
When bevel gear teeth are to be produced with
longitudinally crowned teeth in which the crown
is obtained by altering the milling depth, use may
be made of a revolving cam 12 which serves as
an eccentric. This cam is ?xed to the housing
50 ‘II and is revolved back and forth through a
de?nite angle of oscillation through change gears
which cause the tool to be displaced in the direc
tion of arrow d (Figs. 1, 2, 3‘and 5). ‘The en
tire housing ‘H is, consequently,v moved back
5.5
and forth in the direction of tooth depth. The
adjustment and motion of the oscillating cam 12
has the following effect:
In position A of Fig. 3, the tool I is slightly
deeper than when at full tooth depth v(full tool
60 depth=2.16 modul).
6
3, A milling machine comprising a frame; an
adjustable work support on said frame; means
for rotating said support about the axis of the
work gear; a face plate rotatable about the axis 45
of the imaginary face gear meshing'with the
gear being cut; a rotatable tool support on said
face plate, said support having a tool thereon;
means for causing reciprocatory movement of
said tool ‘support in a direction parallel to the cut 50
ting plane of the tool and in a direction sub
stantially parallel to the axis of the tool; means
for rotating the face plate and the tool thereon;
and means for causing the reciprocatory move
ment of the tool support to take place in timed 55
relation to the movement of the tool and work
supports.
4; A milling machine comprising a frame; an
adjustable work support on said frame; means
for rotating said support about the axis of the
work gear; a face plate rotatable about the cen
the tool is drawn out of the tooth space until it ter of the imaginary face gear meshing with the
takes the position B at normal tooth depth. In gear being cut, said face plate having a slide
traveling from B to C, the tool again penetrates thereon; a carriage on said slide; a rotatable tool
deeper into the tooth space until it reaches the support on said carriage; a tool on said tool sup 65
same depth as in position A. On the return port; means comprising an hydraulic piston and
travel from C to ’A, this same change in tooth transmission gearing for causing reciprocatory
depth occurs again. .
70
In traveling to position B, I
supports.
>
The width between teeth changes with the
change in tooth depth, so- that the tooth spaces
become narrower in the center than at the ends.
Consequently, when curved teeth are cut, the
convex tooth ?ank has a sharper curvature than
the concave tooth ?ank. The amount and rate
75 of withdrawal and approach can be determined
movement of said carriage in a direction par
allel to the cutting plane of the tool and substan
tially parallel to the axis of the tool; means for
rotating the face plate and the tool thereon; and
'means for causing the reciprocatory movement of
said carriage to take place in timed relation to
the movement of the tool and work supports.
5. A milling machine comprising a frame; an 75
2,119,295
adjustable work support on said frame;'means
for rotating said support about the axis of the
, work gear; a face plate rotatable about the axis
of the imaginary face gear meshing with the gear
being cut; a rotatable tool support on said face
plate, said support having a tool thereon; means
for causing reciprocatory movement of said tool
‘ support in a direction parallel to the cutting
plane of the tool and substantially parallel to
10 the axis of the tool; means for rotating the face
plate and the tool thereon; and means inter
connected withi the means for rotating the face
plate and work supports for causing the recip
rocatory movement of the tool support to take
placev in timed relation ‘to the movement of the
‘ tool and work supports.
6. A milling machine comprising a frame; an
adjustable work support on said frame; means
for rotating said support about the axis of the
20 work gear; a face plate rotatable about the center
of the imaginary face gear meshing with the gear
being out, said face plate having a slide thereon;
S
f
a carriage on said slide; a rotatable tool support
on said carriage; a tool on said tool support;
(ii means for causing reciprocatory movement of
said carriage in a direction parallel to the cut
ting‘plane of the tool and in a direction substan~
tially parallel to the axis of the tool; means for
rotating the-face plate and the tool thereon;
30 means for causing the reciprocatory movement
of said carriage to take place in timed relation
to the movement of the tool and work supports;
a cam; and means for actuating said cam in
accordance with said reciprocatory movement for
controlling the depth of cut of said tool.
7. A milling machine comprising a frame; a
Work support on said frame, said support being
' rotatable about the axis of the work gear; a face
ll)
plate; means for rotating said face plate about
the center of the imaginary face gear meshing
with the gear being cut; a carriage on said face
5
timed relation to the movement of said face plate
to produce spiral bevel gears; and means for
locking said face plate to cause tangential move
ment of the carriage and tool during a milling
operation, whereby the machine may produce
spur gears.
‘
8. A milling machine comprising a frame; a
work support on said frame; said support being
rotatable about the axis of the work gear; a face
plate; means for rotating said face plate about 10
the center of the imaginary face gear meshing
with the gear being cut; a carriage on said face
plate; a rotatable tool support on said carriage;
a tool on said support; means effective during a
milling operation of the machine to impart re
ciprocatory movement to said carriage in timed
relation to the movement of said face plate, said
rmovement being 'in a. direction substantially par
allel to the axis of the tool and parallel to its
cutting plane; a dividing mechanism operatively
connected with said tool support; and means for
connecting and disconnecting said dividing mech
anism and said tool support.
9. A milling machine comprising a frame; a
work support on said frame; said support being
rotatable about the axis of the work gear; a face
plate; means for rotating said face plate about
the center of the imaginary face gear meshing
with the gear being cut; a carriage on said face
plate; a rotatable tool support on said carriage; 30
a tool on said support; means effective during a
milling operation of the machine to impart re
ciprocatory movement to said carriage in a direc
tion parallel to the cutting plane of the tool and
substantially parallel to the axis of the tool in
timed relation to the movement of said ‘face
plate; a housing for the tool support; hydraulic
means for displacing said housing against said
tool support; a rotatable cam between said hous~
ing and said displacing means, said cam being 40
effective to change the depth of cut during a
_ plate; a rotatable tool support on said carriage;
a tool on said support; means effective during a
cutting operation without stopping the machine;
milling operation of the machine to impart re
ciprocatory movement to said carriage in a direc
for gauging the total depth of cut made by the
tion substantially parallel to the axis of the tool
and parallel to the cutting plane of the‘ tool in
and means comprising at least one block gauge
machine.
-
HEINRICH SCHICHT.
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