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Патент USA US2119324

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May 31,‘ 1938. '
-
|__ J_ GOLDEN"
2,119,324
CHILD’S ‘SL’IPPER SHOE AND METHOD FOR MAKING SAME
Filed May 11, 1936
Patented May 31, 1938‘
2,119,324
UNITED STATES ‘P’ZQATIET
.
,
.
2,119,324
orriécs
’
omens SLIPPER- snon' AND‘ METHOD FOR
MAKING SAME
Louis J. Golden, Highland-Park, 111., assignor to
vB and B. Shoe Company, Chicago, >I_ll., a cor
'poration of Illinois
1936, serial 'No. 79,082
' Application May 11,
(01. 12-146)
' _‘ .9 Claims.
This invention relates to a new and improved
child’s slipper shoe and the method» of' making
the
same.
>
i
l
7
l
‘l
‘
It is an object of this invention to, provide a
child’s slipper shoe and the method of making
the same which is‘ simpler and more economic
in point of labor and material consumed.
It is a further object of this invention ~to-pro
vide a child’s slipper shoe and the method of
10 making the same which more accurately ?ts the
contour of the foot.
It is an additional object of the present inven
tion to provide a child’s slipper shoe and the
method of making the same in which the vamp
15 portion of the shoe is made of a two-piece pat~
tern formed in such a manner as to give the ap
pearance of a one-piece front.
It is a further object of this invention to pro
vide a child’s slipper shoe and method of making
2O
the same which has no protruding or lumpy
'
It is likewise an object of this invention to pro
vide a child’s slipper shoe and the method of
seams in the instep portion of the shoe.
making the same which is of simple construc
‘25 tion, warm, durable and easy for a‘ small child
to put
on.
a
‘
_
‘
‘
Other objects and advantages ofthe present
invention will appear more fully from the fol
lowing detailed, description, which, taken in con
nection
with the accompanying drawing, will dis
3O
close to those skilled in the art the construction
and operation of a preferred form of the present
invention.
Referring to the drawing:
3
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a preferred em
bodiment of the present invention‘;
Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic representation of the
various pieces forming the upper member of the
embodiment shown in Fig. 1, showing those pieces
40 in line for assembly;
Fig. 3 is a pattern view of the main vamp mem
ber shown in Fig. 2;
Fig. 2. As this split is spread, the vamp portion
4 begins to take on a rounded shape whereby to
form the toe portion of the shoe. The triangu»
lar insert 1 is stitched in place by a zigzag stitch
8, as shown in Fig. 4. This makes possible the
formation of a butt joint along the seam line,
whereby the seam will be entirely ?at on the in
side of the shoe. A trim-strip i0 is die out out
of a ?at piece of leather in the shape as shown
in Fig. 5. This trim-strip is formed with a cen
trally extending split 5 I. This trim-strip is then 1-:
spread apart, somewhat as shown in Fig. 2, to
form a V-shaped member adapted to ?t over the
seam 8. After the triangular insert l is stitched
in place in the vamp member‘ 4, the trim-strip
is placed over the seam line. ‘This should be
somewhat wider than the width of the zigzag
2%
stitches so as to cover ‘the stitches completely
and hide the same. ‘This trim-strip is then sewed ,
in place by a double line of stitches l2 and i3,
respectively, as shown in Fig. 1. As this opera
tion is ?nished it will be found that the vamp
or combined instep covering and toe covering
portion of the slipper will have acquired shape.
The heel member 5 is out out of a flat piece of
leather according to the pattern shown in Fig. 6.
The shoe is completed by sewing or otherwise
attaching the ?nished vamp member ii and. the
heel member 5 to the sole member !. The front‘
member is attached to the heel member only by
a short line of bar stitching M, as shown in Fig.
1. This line of bar stitching is preferably used
on both sides of the shoe. The heel member and
Fig. 4 is a detail view of the toe of the em
bodiment shown in Fig. 1, with the vamp insert
45 in place;
Fig. 5 is a perspective View of the trim-strip;
and
tion 4 is formed according to the pattern as
shown in Fig. 3. A toe split 6 is formed in this
vamp portion. A V-shaped insert 1, as shown in
Figs. 2 and 4, is cut out of a flat piece of simi
lar leather, preferably in such a way that the
grain matches up with the grain of the leather
in the member 4. The split 6 in the member it
is then spread to form a notch to accommodate
the triangular insert 1, somewhat ‘as shown in
-
-
r
Fig. 6 is a pattern view of the heel member of
the upper shown in Figs. 1 and 2.
The embodiment shown in Fig. 1 comprises a
sole l which has a padded heel portion 2 as is
customary in flat sole house slippers of this gen
eral type. Attached to the sole member I is an
upper'3 which comprises a front or vamp portion
55 4 and. a back or heel portion 5. The front por
front member, respectively, are free and overlap
ping along the edges i5 and It, respectively, as
shown in Fig. 1. Suitable fastening means, such
as snap fasteners IT and It, may be ?xed adja
cent the ankle line of the shoe to secure the front
and back members, respectively, together at the
top.
If it is desired to make a lined house shoe or 50'
slipper, a separate lining may be formed in a
manner similar to that described above for the
upper member, and then secured inside the shoe.
It has been found preferable, however, to cement
a suitable lining material onto the back of the 55
2
2,119,324
leather out of which the shoe is to be made, prior
to stamping out the patterns. Thus the lining
and upper member may be cut at one and the
same time and the entire job of forming the
shoe be completed with fewer operations.
It will be apparent that the present invention
results in the formation of a child’s house shoe
which may be made in a very economical fashion.
The patterns are such that an unusually small '
10 amount of waste need be suffered; the shoe may
be formed without the expenditure of a great
deal of effort or labor in lasting or forming the
shoe; the number of stitching operations required
is greatly simpli?ed and cut down; and the shoe
15 when ?nished has a smooth inside surface which
is not rough or seamed and can not therefore
hurt or annoy the child’s foot when the shoe is
in use. The shoe is furthermore easy to put
on and take off so that even the smallest child
may use the shoe without parental assistance.
The shoe is of a type which ?ts the foot neatly
and snugly, ?ts well up around the child’s ankle,
and keeps the foot warm in winter.
It is thought that the invention and numerous
of its attendant advantages will be understood
from the foregoing description and it is obvious
that numerous changes may be made in the form,
construction and arrangement of the several
parts without departing from the spirit or scope
30 of my invention, or sacri?cing any of its at
tendant advantages, the form herein described
being a preferred embodiment for the purpose of
illustrating my invention.
Having thus described the invention what is
35 claimed as new and desired to be secured by
Letters Patent is as follows:
1. The method of forming a shoe upper com
prising cutting a front member as a single piece
from a ?at sheet of material, splitting the front
40 member longitudinally inwardly of its forward
4. A shoe having a heel-covering portion and
a one-piece front member comprising the toe or
vamp portion of the shoe and having a rounded
shape suitable to ?t the contour of the forward
part of the foot, said front member being formed
of a blank comprising a normally substantially
flat sheet of material, said blank being notched
from the forward edge thereof a predetermined
distance longitudinally inwardly, and an insert
10
sewn thereinto.
5. A shoe having a heel-covering portion and
a one-piece front member comprising a blank
formed of a sheet of normally substantially ?at
material, said front member being notched from
the forward edge thereof a predetermined dis
tance inwardly, and a triangular insert fastened
across the notch to maintain the unit in a shape
suitable for ?tting the contour of the forward
part of the foot.
6. A shoe having a heel-covering portion and 20
a one-piece front member formed of a sheet of
normally substantially ?at material, said front
member being notched from the forward edge
thereof a predetermined distance, and an insert
sewn into the notch to provide a unit of rounded 25
shape suitable to ?t the contour of the forward
part of the foot, said front member terminating
rearwardly in a pair of upwardly extending edges
disposed on either side of the shoe, said front
member being joined to the heel-covering por 30
tion along said edges.
'7. A shoe having a heel-covering portion and
a one-piece front member comprising a blank
formed of a sheet of normally substantially flat
material, said front member being notched from
the forward edge thereof a predetermined dis
tance inwardly, and a triangular insert fastened
across the notch to maintain the unit in a shape
suitable for ?tting the contour of the forward
part of the foot, said front member and said 40
~ edge, spreading the edges of the split to form a
heel-covering portion being contiguous adjacent
V-shaped opening, forming a triangular insert
said edges and being joined together for a short
distance adjacent each of the contiguous por
tions.
8. A shoe having a heel-covering portion and a
member, ' and
securing
the
triangular
insert
member across the opening of the front member
by fastening said insert member adjacent- the
edges of said V-shaped opening whereby to give
one-piece front member formed of a sheet of
normally substantially ?at material, said front
member being notched from the forward edge
the unit a rounded shape suitable for enclosing
the front portion of the foot.
2. The method of forming a shoe upper com
prising cutting a front member as a single piece
from a ?at sheet of material, splitting the front
member longitudinally inwardly of its forward
edge, spreading the edges of the split to form a
shape suitable to fit the contour of the forward
part of the‘ foot, said front member terminating
rearwardly in a pair of upwardly extending edges
V-shaped opening, forming a triangular insert
55 member, securing the triangular insert member
in the opening of the front member in a ?at
abutting relationship, forming a heel-covering
disposed on either side of the shoe, said front
member being joined to the heel-covering por
tion along the lower portions of said edges only,
the upper contiguous portions of the adjacent
portion, securing the heel-covering portion to
the front member, forming a V-shaped strip
60 member, and securing the V-shaped strip mem
ber to the insert and the front member respec
tively.
3. A shoe having a heel-covering portion and
a one-piece front member formed of a sheet of
65 normally substantially ?at material, said front
member being notched from the forward edge
thereof a predetermined distance, and an insert
sewn into the notch to provide a unit of rounded
shape suitable to ?t the contour of the forward
70, part of the foot.
thereof a predetermined distance, and an insert
sewn into the notch to provide a unit of rounded
edges being free of permanent attachment.
9. A shoe having a heel-covering portion and
a one-piece front member, said front member be 60
ing formed from a substantially flat piece of
sheet material and being notched from the for
ward edge thereof a predetermined distance in
wardly, a triangular insert sewn into the notch
to provide a rounded shape suitable to ?t the
contour of the forward part of the foot, and a
V-shaped member sewn over the seam formed
between the insert and the front member to form
a covering for the seam therebetween.
LOUIS J. GOLDEN.
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