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Патент USA US2119464

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May 31, 1938.
2,119,464
J. A. LITZ'LER
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE
Filed Dec. 28, 1936
3 Sheetsesheet 1
26‘
A5
27
425
May 31, 1938.
J.A.UTZLER
2,119,464
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE
Filed Dec. 28, 1936
5 sheetsésheet 2
May 31, 1938.
I
~ J. A. LITZLER
2,1 19,464 -
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE ,
Fillevd Dec. 28, 1956 > ‘
H3 Sheets-Sheet 3
2,119,464 ,7
Patented May 31, 1933
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,119,464
INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE
Joseph A. Litzler, Enid, Okla.
Application December 28, 1936, Serial No. 117,990
3 Claims. (Cl. 123-—76)
This invention relates to an improved internal
combustion engine of the four cycle type, and the
primary object of the present invention is to
provide an engine of the above kind which is eco
6 nomical to- produce and operate, as well as e?i
cient and powerful in operation.
More particularly, the present invention con
templates the provision of an engine of the above
kind having novel and eilicient means for con
10 trollably supplying additional air to the cylinders
of the engine during completion of the intake
strokes of the pistons in such cylinders, and for
permitting partial exhaust of the products of
combustion and consequent partial release of
15 pressure from said cylinders at the completion
of the power strokes of said pistons. In this way,
I provide for maximum power output and eco
nomical consumption of fuel, as well as relieving
the conventional exhaust valves of much of their
20 work and more nearly scavenging the cylinders.
A further and more specific- object of the pres
ent invention is to provide simple and efficient
means for controlling the passage of additional
air to the engine cylinders and partial exhaust
25 of products of combustion from said cylinders,
so that the engine will operate at lower speeds
only on the normal fuel supply and exhaust un
der control of the usual intake and exhaust
3
valves, but will operate at the higher speeds
where the efliciency of an engine normally drops,
with the charges supplemented by additional air
and the exhaust pressure partially relieved by
said controlling means.
a
A still further object of the present invention is 35» to provide an improved means for controlling the
ders, such thermostatic means being responsive
to the heat of the engine cylinders so that the
additional air ‘will be supplied to- the cylinders
only after the latter have attained a predeter
mined temperature or heated condition. In this
way, emcient starting and operation of the en
gine until heated up is insured before the ad
ditional air may be supplied to the cylinders.
With the above general objects in view, and 1
others that will become apparent as the nature 10*
of the invention is better understood, such in—
vention consists in the novel form, combination
and arrangement of parts hereinafter more fully
described, shown in the accompanying drawings,
and claimed.
In the drawings:
15
Figure 1 is va view of an internal combustion
engine embodying the present invention, partly
in vertical transverse section, and partly in ele
vation.
20
"
Figure 2 is a somewhat diagrammatic top plan
view of the engine shown in'Figure 1, drawn on a
smaller scale and with parts omitted forsake
of clearness.
‘ Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view partly 25'
in section, illustrating the gearing between the‘
driven shaft and the rotary valve of Figure 1.
'
Figure'4 is an enlarged central longitudinal
section taken through the rotary valve and the
oscillating sleeve valve‘in which said rotary valve‘ 39’
is ?tted.
Figure‘5'is a transverse section'on line 5‘—5 of Figure 4; and
'
.
'
Figures 6, '7, 8, 9 and 10 are diagrammatic views,
illustrating different positions of the valves and
supply of additional air and partial exhaust of pistons with respect to each cylinder of the en
’
products of combustionto and from the engine gine when the latter is in operation.
The engine‘ illustrated has four cylinders 5 ‘in
cylinders, respectively, such improved means em
bodying a rotary valve, and an oscillating sleeve each of which is ?tted a piston 6 connected by
40 valve controlling communication with the engine a rod 1 with a crank shaft 8 in the usual man- 40?
her. Intake and exhaust valves 9 and Ill re—,
cylinders through said rotary valve and oper
atively connected with the usual throttle valve spectively are located at or near the outer end
which controls the volume of fuel supplied to the of each cylinder, each valve being normally seated
'by a spring H and unseate'd at predetermined
cylinders for varying the speed of the engine.
45- A more general object of the present invention intervals by a cam I2 on the cam shaft l3 geared 4'5
by a two-to-one gearing at bite the crank shaft'
is to provide an improved valve mechanism for in
ternal combustion engines embodying a rotary 8. Ignition current is supplied at proper inter
cylindrical valve, and a manually operable oscil-' vals to the spark plugs l5 through a distributor
IS in a well known manner, the rotor of the lat-.
lating sleeve .valve for controlling communica
50‘ tion with the engine cylinders through said rotary ter being carried by one'end of a shaft ll Vex- 50'
valve and in which the rotary valve is journaled. tending transversely of the engine and geared at
Still another object of the present invention is
to provide thermostatic means for controlling
the supply of air to the means for controlling
55" the passage of additional air-to the-engine cylin
the other end to the camshaft l3 as at l8.
,
Each cylinder 5 has one or more'ports l9 ar
ranged to be uncovered on the insidegof "the cyl- ‘
inder by the piston 6 of said “cylinder and" at 55‘:
72,119,464 f
the’ end time instroke of'said piston. jrhe’ peas tions of valve 20 are adapted to enter the sockets,’v
2
r
,
l9 are controlled on the outside by a rotaryrvalve
‘39 of the inner sections thereof to axially aline the
2i! and an’ oscillating sleeve valve '2| common ' sections thus interengaged, relative turning of
‘ ,to' all cylinders,’ thevalve '26 being rotatably ?tted r such sections 'being'prevented by means of long‘ie
tudinally extending pins at llll entering a, plu
in the valve 2|, and the valve 2| being rotatably
Cl
?tted in a cylindrical valve casing 22. The valve lrality of alined and relatively smaller sockets in
20 is gearedby a twoV-to-one'gearing,v at 2,3’ to’ and ‘ the opposed ends of adjacent sections of said -
driven by shaft in, while; valve'2l is within con
valvei20. > The projections 38 of the inner sections
trol of the operator and operativelyconnected of valve‘ 20 are thus'opposed at the inner ends of
as at '21! with‘ the throttle valve 25 which con- ~ the latter, and a gear 4| maybe ?tted on these‘
opposed ‘projections 38 to providepart of the geare
trols the supply oil-fuelifrom'the'carburetorf?
to the engine cylinders. HMounted ‘onthe'valve
ing23 ‘between the ValVe'ZB a'ndsha‘ft ll, such ’
casing ,22; is an air intake manifold ‘21 com; __ cgearing'beingcompleted by another gear '42 se
, municatingwith ports 28 provided in the top'of cured on said shaft H. In order to permitinter-
said valve casing; 22, and having an airIinl'etj29,
The valve casing 22 also has ports ?ll 1.111 the
meshing ofzthe gears 42 at adjacent sides, the
' _
V
'
,15
'
a
‘
surrounding sleeve valve 2| may
It will
be thus
cut ‘away,
be seen'
at .
bottom thereof, and the ports I9, 28 "and_30" are 7 one side as~indicated at 43.
' controlled by the valves '20and' 2'|.~- The rotary‘ ; that thesections of valve 2?_are1interchangeab1e L
valve 20 is, solid and formed with ‘areuaenana or of similar form so that only one form of valve
[verse passages 3| and 32~"for;connecti'ng ports section is required, to be assembled in plurality 20'
‘ 28'within "portsilél andhport's‘v |9Mwith ports 30 torconstruotjthe complete valve 25L- While this
is a very, simple and e?icient arrangementffor '
under certain conditions and at predetermined in
tervals. 'I’h'e,valve,2| has'ports,33,»34 and 35 driving valve 20, it is obvious that otheriformsr‘of
adapted to 'be'ésimultaneously ‘registered " with , gearing'may be provided between the cam shaft
ports l9, 284a'nd 3B’respectively'or'moved‘out,of
25
registry with the latter; I
'7
'
‘
‘
|3 and valve'2ii. ,The sleeve valve 2| is closed at 15
'
'Ar'r'anged ini‘the, air inlet‘ 29“ is; an aerating having a projecting arm 4% for ‘connection at 24
valvej?runder control of a thermostat"?! 'rIe-f with the ‘means’ for manually actuating the‘
' ,spons'iv'e to the temperature of the engineas ire-V
30:
.
?ect'ed by the cooling system‘ of the latter;
V
c
'
throttle
valve
25.
h
'
r
7
~
g
a
"From the foregoing description, it'is’believed
l '7 Assuming that the engine is not running and
the
that advantages
the construction
of the and
present
operation;
invention
as, well
wlll'b'e
as ,
readily understood ‘ and; ‘appreciated'fby those
' valves ‘will remain closed‘or substantially closed' skilled in the art.’ It will be ‘seen’ that the air for
augmentingr'rthe normal charges is primarily 35;
35 4(see FigurelO) when the engine is started and
" cold, the fuel throttle ‘valve"25, sleeve-valve'?,
' and air-throttle valve 36'will be closed, and these
running at idling or the relatively lower, speeds; under control of the operatorv duerto'v opening of
When the throttle ‘valve 25 is opened to cause the
engine to run at the relatively higher speeds, the‘
sleeve valve 2| issimultaneously opened. fAs'soon
valve 2| when" the throttle .valve 25 isf-opened,
and to closing of valve 2! when throttle valve 25 ~
is closed. 'This insures'admissicn of the ad-,
as the engine becomes heatedrther air-valve 7357. ditional .air only at the relatively higher engine
40 will
be opened by thermostat 731', whereupon~ air speeds, preventing admission of suchad'clitional
f is admitted to manifold 2'|'.' "As each'piston $iap-,
1 preaches the end of its intake ‘stroke,;it uncovers
the ports IQ of its cylinder Sand admits a'charge '
- 45
‘of atmospheric air beneath the fuel charge‘ which
has been drawn into said cylinder past its intake
valve 9, as shown in Figure‘ 6. ‘At’ this time,’ the‘
.valve 20 connects portsp28 and I9 through ports
' 33 and'34jof valve 2| as ‘shown, the charge‘jo'frair
50
entering the, cylinder due to fthe partial vacuum,
existing at this time in the cylinder‘. Onv the:
subsequent compression stroke of the piston, the
' latter closes ports’ l9, Iandjlvalve 20 turnsitda
position to also close such ports 1,19 as shown
air at the relatively lower; engine speeds when} ~
the throttle valve 5 is closed or nearlyiclos'edc '
However; the admission’iof additional air isv also
prevented at relatively high, engine speed until
the engine has become properly, ‘heated and .,
capable of advantageouslylutilizing the. additional
air, this being accomplished by theme .of the
thermostatically operated 'air control 'valve (36.;501'
>>
in the inlet 29 of air intake ‘manifold ,Z'i. Due
to a slight vacuum'vvhic'h’exists in'each cylin-J
der at’ the end of the intake stroke'of the. piston"
V
in such'jcylinder, a chargeeo‘f ‘cool air atj-atmos- ,
"
, V
pheric pressure is admitted to the cylinder at‘, '
l : ~
'At theend of the power stroke- of the " that time under the fuel already taken inthrough 557
a j piston; which follows; the portsj|9 are uncovered‘ the conventional fuel intake valve. This has the 1
55 ' Figured.
' by said ,piston'and connected by Tvalve'2? with eliect or ?llingithe cylinder as nearly as possible /
ports 30,’ partially ' releasing the pressure 'in the Without the use of. expensive and complicated
cylinder ,by allowing someioffthe exhaust gases 1 superchargers‘ for forcingwair' into the cylinders
'to
pass’ outwardly through said vvalve 29‘ as shown; under pressure. Also, on, the exhaust stroke of 60.;
60
in'Figure 8.
The remaining exhaust-gases are
each piston, the pressure is ' partially v:r-eleased
through the rotary valve so as to relieve the con; ’
' valve HJ'by'the piston during‘ the subsequent ex; ,v'entional exhaust'valve of much'of its work and ,
7 haust strokeeof'the latter as shown’ in Figure 9.1 > lengthening the life of said conventionalexhaust' 7‘
then forced out of the cylinder pastiits exhaust‘
1
65 Obviously, "the ports~39 may leadrto .aT-common:
valve.’ In addition, the pressure in the Cylinder
isrreduced against which the piston has to force 65;
exhaust manifold in a manner similar; to the (36m:
munication of airv intake passages 2V81with» air I out the ‘expanded exhaust gases, thus providing,
intake manifolds 21.;
a
V
»
To facilitate manufacture, assembly, and repair,
therotary valve 520 is preferably'composedof a
plurality of sections arranged emits enagjoae;
for nearly complete'scavenging of the’ cylinders;
1
iMinor changes inrthe detailsrrof construction -i-l'-*' ~ ‘
'lustratedand described by wayof example, ‘are 70.1,"
contemplated within the spirit and scope‘ of the‘
for each cylinder, as shown‘in‘Figure 4,~each<sec , invention as‘ claimed,
time having an axial projection 38 ationeend and ‘
' a corresponding axialfrecess/ or}socket‘39j at the
'What’l claim' as new is}:
' 1." In a fourcycle internal combustion enginaa
other end." The projectionsBB of the?outer sec-V cylinder, a piston working in said;cylinder;~said, 7:5:
'
2,119,464
cylinder having a single port arranged to be
uncovered on the inside of the cylinder by said
piston at the end of the instroke of said piston, a
rotary valve arranged to control said port, on the
outside of said cylinder, and mechanism operated
by said piston for rotating said valve to admit air
at atmospheric pressure through said port to said
cylinder directly above and at the end of the in
take stroke of the piston, and for permitting
10 partial
exhaust of products of combustion
through said port from the cylinder at the end
of the power stroke of said piston.
2. In a four cycle internal combustion engine, a
cylinder, a piston working in said cylinder, rotary
15 valve mechanism operated by said piston for ad
mitting air at atmospheric pressure to said cyl
inder directly above and at the end of the intake
stroke of the piston and for permitting partial
exhaust of products of combustion from the cyl
20 inder at the end of the power stroke of said
piston, a manually operable valve for controlling
the admission of fuel to the cylinder for varying
the speed of the engine, and a sleeve valve op
eratively connected with said fuel control valve
26 for preventing admission of additional air to the
cylinder by means of said valve mechanism when
said fuel control valve is closed or nearly closed
to cause operation of the engine at relatively lower
engine speeds, and for permitting admission of
3
the additional air by said valve mechanism when
said fuel control valve is opened to cause opera
tion of the engine at the relatively higher engine
speeds.
3. In a four cycle internal combustion engine, a
cylinder, a piston working in said cylinder, rotary
valve mechanism operated by said piston for ad
mitting air at atmospheric pressure to said cylin
der directly above and at the end of the intake
stroke of the piston and for permitting partial 10
exhaust of products of combustion from the cyl
inder at the end of the power stroke of said pis
ton, a manually operable valve for controlling the
admission of fuel to the cylinder for varying the
speed of the engine, and an oscillatory sleeve 15
valve operatively connected with said fuel con
trol valve for preventing admission of additional
air to the cylinder by means of said valve mecha
nism when said fuel control valve is closed or
nearly closed to cause operation of the engine at 20
relatively lower engine speeds and for permitting
admission of the additional air by said valve
mechanism when said fuel control valve is opened
to cause operation of the engine at the relatively
higher engine speeds, said valve mechanism in 25
cluding a rotary cylindrical valve journaled in
said sleeve valve.
JOSEPH A. HTZLER.
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