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Патент USA US2119716

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June 7,1938.
'
H, H, MQKEE‘
2,119,716
METHOD OF TREATING BACON
Filed Dec. 22, 1934
Early ii Mgffee
INVENTOR
w/TIYEJJ‘
%“ C’- QKM
‘
BY
’
,
ATTORNEY
_‘ 2,119,716
Patented June 7, 1938
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,119,716
_
METHOD or TREATING BACON
Harry H. McKee, Chicago, Ill., assignor to In
dustrial Patents Corporation, Chicago, 11]., a
corporation of Delaware
Application December 22, 1934, Serial No. 758,806
In Canada December 22, 1932
5 ‘Claims.
This invention relates to a ‘method for treating
bacon.
One of the objects of the present invention is
to provide a simple, practical and comparatively
Ul inexpensive method for treating conventional
pieces or slabs of bacon preparatory to slicing.
Other objects of the invention will be apparent
from the description and claims which follow.
This application is a continuation in part of
0 my application entitled Method of treating bacon,
Serial No. 640,799, ?led November 2, 1932.
In ordinary practice, bacon is prepared by ?rst
curing green bellies and then smoking the cured
bellies.
Inasmuch as contact is undesirable dur
5 ing the smoking operatiomit is unsatisfactory to
attempt to control the shape'of the bacon to any
great extent during smoking. ”" Large quantities
of smoked bacon are sliced in the packing houses
for the package trade. A considerable» quantity
0 of bacon is sold in the slab to be sliced by re
tailers. A comparatively small quantity of slab
bacon ?nds its way to the ultimate consumer to
be sliced in the household.
It is desirable that the slices of packaged bacon
5 be as nearly uniform as may be.
Due to the nat
ural curling and distortion of the bacon slab dur
ing smoking, the ends and edges are normally ir
regular after smoking.
The present invention contemplates the treat
3 'ment of bacon to permit the entire slab to be
sliced into uniform slices. The purpose of the
present invention may be accomplished by appro
priate pressing means which do not form a part
of the present invention and are not claimed
; therein.
Referring now to the drawing;
_
Figure 1 is a perspective view of an ordinary
slab of bacon after smoking.
(Cl. 99-107)
half inch greater in width and length than is the
mold.
.
. By placing in the mold box slabs of‘bacon one
half an inch- greater in length and width than
the interior of the mold box, the slabs of bacon 5
are reduced in area- by compression of their side
and end edges and uniformity in the thickness of
the molded slab, as well as contour, is assured.
The bacon is preferably forced into the mold by
hand although of course,'it.may be done by me- 10
chanical means. A wooden block which ?ts into
the mold is placed on top after the desired num
ber of slabs have been packed into the mold.
The mold is then placed under a press and su?i
cient pressure applied to the top of the wooden 15
block to cause the several slabs of bacon in the,
mold to assume a regular squared rectangular
shape with all six faces ?at. The invention may
be carried out with slabs from which the skin has
been removed or not as may be desired. How- an
ever, since bacon so treated is normally designed
for machine slicing, in ordinary practice skinned
bellies are used. In either event, the skin side or
the skinned side as the case may be, of one slab
is adjacent to the face side of the next slab, ex- 25
cept of course, the top and bottom slab, one side
of each of which is not in contact with another
slab. It is found that the face or lean surface is
su?iciently rigid to provide a ?attening surface
for the fat or skinned side of the adjacent slab. 30
It is also clear that the weight of the superim
posed slabyas well as the weight of the wooden
block or other weight on the top of the mold con
tributes to the pressing of the lowermost slab
and this would be true irrespective of whether or 35‘
not other pressure be applied, as with a press
‘such as a conventional export press.
In carrying out the invention, slabs of bacon
which have been processed as by curing and
i a similar slab after being treated in accordance smoking may be reduced to a temperature of ap- 40
_ with the present invention.
proximately 60° F. and the skin removed. The
It will be seen from the drawing that the slab ” slabs of bacon are arranged in a tier in the form
depicted in Figure 2 is clearly more desirable as has already been described and the bacon sub
‘for slicing purposes due to the fact that the en
jected to a temperature of approximately 0? F. a
; tire slab may be subdivided into slices of uniform sumcient length of time to cause the bacon to as- 45
thickness and area.
sume the desired shape.
'
It is within the purview of the present inven
In one modi?cation of the invention, ?at sep
tion not only to square the ends and sides but arators, which may be of rigid metal or any other
Figure 2 is a perspective view of the same or
to ?atten both surfaces. This treatment permits .desired material, are interposed between suc
, the production of a slice which is for all prac
tical purposes rectangular in shape.
In carrying out the invention, I prefer to pre
chill the slab bacon to a temperature of ap
proximately 28° F. and use a wooden box mold.
It is preferable to select slabs approximately one
cessive slabs. .
50
It is to be understood, of course, that any mold
or die press may be used to carry out the present
invention to produce bacon slabs and dry salt
bellies which require a minimum of trimming.
It, also, will be understood that changes may be. 55
2
2,119,716
made in the manner of carrying out ‘he invention
ing pressure against the slabs to ?atten the fat
without departing from the spirit thereof as de
and lean surfaces and to reduce the area of the
slabs to correspond to the area of the form, and
subjecting the slabs while under pressure to a
temperature sufliciently low and for a sufficient "I
length of time to cause the slabs to set.
4. The method of treating bacon which con-1
sists in arranging skinned slabs of bacon with
their fat and lean surfaces in alternately super
?ned in the following claims:
'
What is claimed is:
1. The method of treating bacon which con
sists in arranging skinned slabs of bacon with
their fat and lean surfaces in superposed rela
tionship in a form of less area than the slabs,
applying pressure against the slabs to flatten the
10 fat and lean surfaces and to reduce the area of
posed relationship with ?at separators between
thelslabs to correspond to the area of the form,
and subjecting the slabs while under pressure to
a temperature su?iciently low and for a su?icient
length of time to cause the slabs to set.
2. The method of treating bacon which con
15
sists in reducing the temperature of slabs of bacon
to approximately 60° F., removing the skin from
the slabs, arranging the skinned slabs with their
fat and lean surfaces in superposed relationship
20 in a form of less area than the slabs, applying
pressure against the slabs to ?atten the fat and
the slabs and in a form of less area than the slabs,
lean surfaces and to reduce the area of the slabs
to correspond to the area of the form, and sub
jecting the slabs while under pressure to a
25 temperature sufficiently low and for a su?icient
' length of time to cause the slabs to set.
3. The method of treating bacon which
sists in arranging skinned slabs 'of bacon
their fat and lean surfaces in superposed
so tionship with ?at separators between the
con
with
rela
slabs
and in a form of less area than the slabs, apply
10
applyingpressure against the slabs to ?atten the
fat and lean surfaces and to‘ reduce the area of
the slabs to correspond to the area of the form,
and subjecting the slabs while under pressure to a
temperature sumciently low and for a sufficient
length of time to cause the slabs to set.
5. The method of treating bacon which con
sists in reducing the temperature of slabs of bacon '
to approximately 60° F., removing the skin from 20
~each of the slabs, arranging the slabs with their
fat and lean surfaces in alternately superposed
relationship with ?at separators between succes
sive slabs and in a form of less area than the
slabs, applying pressure against the slabs to flat 25
ten the fat and lean surfaces and to reduce the
area of the slabs to correspond to the area of the
form, and subjecting the slabs while under pres
sure to a temperature approximately 0° F. for a
sufficient length of time to cause the slabs to set. 30
- HARRY H. McKEE.
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