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Патент USA US2120181

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June 7, 1938.
T. H. JONES ET AL.
«
. 2,120,181
KNITTED FABRIC OR GARMENT AND 1N THE PRODUCTION THEREOF
Filed July
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June 7, 1938.
T. H. JONES ET AL.
2,120,181
KNITTED FABRIC OR GARMENT AND 1N THE PRODUCTION THEREOF
Filed July 17, 1956
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T. H. JONES ET AL.
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Filed July 17, 1936
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Patented @one 7„
esta.. orare
srs
ENE'ETED FABRE@ @R GÀRFJÄIENT ANB EN
s
THE E’RÜEDUCTHÜN 'EWREÜF
ehomies, Woodtlliorpe, and
rooms ne
nos
hert
, shemales, adriana, assieme
to Eonery Beveioprnents mitad,
Nottingham,
`
England
Lßiprilieation ,Holly i7, i936, Seriali No. Mld@
in Great Britain ."i'uliy 2%, 13.935
il@ (Claims.
ici eef-reo)
This invention comprises improvements in
knitted îa‘orics or garments and in the produuc
tion thereof and has particular, although not ex
clusive, reference to ladies’ stockings made of iine
gauge iahric.
'
-
important object oi the present invention
is to eliminate or minimize the possibility oí the
quality or appearance oi knitted fabric, articles
or garments being impaired 'oy the production
therein' of undesirable lines due to inequalities
or variations in the size and/or shade of the yarn
employed in knitting the articles; said lines, in
the case oi ladies’ toll-fashioned iine gauge silk
stockings made on a Cotton’s patent or like
straight tar machine, usually appearing in the
îorm of rings.
'it has heretofore ‘been proposed, with the ob
ject oí minimizing this defect in the production
function as a ground thread on some courses
and as a stitch-locking thread on other courses.
The improved knitted fabric or garment may
be of the kind which is rendered ladderproof
or ladder-resistant by the incorporation of
Ul
stitches that are locked or tied by the introduc
tion of stitch-locking thread additional to
the stitch-forming thread.
Advantageously, al
though not necessarily, locking or tying of the
stitch loops is eiîecœd by passing a thread loop
through and also around or over another loop, .
or, in other words, by >completely encircling each
side har or leg of- a stitch loop with locking thread
which also extends from one side to the other of
said loop.
'
For the purpose oi more fully describing the
'nature oi this invention reference will now he
made to the accompanying drawings, wherein:
lï'igs. i to 6 illustrate six embodiments of im
of stocb'ngs on a straight har machine, to knit
a succession oi groups oí stitch courses ci which
proved iabricaccording to the present invention. 20
each group is composed of successive courses each
knit from a diñerent thread, i. e. a `thread drawn
:trom a separate supply; and in this way thread
miring is eñected, that is to say threads of the
same colour and character taken from diüerent
supplies, and no two successive courses vare lrnit
írom the saine thread at that part of the stoch
plies. in the construction shown in Fig. 1 four
threads drawn from different supplies are in
ì ing where the ini?ng is edected.
The fabric or articles in this invention has
30 incorporated therein stitches that are locked or
tied by the introduction ci stitch-«locmng thread
additional to the stitch-‘forming thread, thereby
eliminating or reducing the possibility of stitch
iaddering or running; and according to the pres«
35 ent‘invention a knitted i’abric or article of this
kind produced on a straight har knitting machine
is provided composed of two or more threads and
in which diñerent threads, (threads drawn from
diner-ent supplies) íunctioning either as ground
40 thread (stitch thread) and/or stitch-locking
in every case the fabric is composed of two
different or distinct threads, i. e. threads of the
same kind and shade drawn from different sup
corporated, three ci said threads a, h and c he
ing employed as ground or stitch-forming
threads, hereinafter referred to as ground
threads, and the fourth thread d being employed
as a stitch-locking thread.
Stitch courses are
iormed in succession írorn the three ground
threads a, b and c and the stitches in each course
are ioclred by one and the same stitch-locking
thread d.
‘
. in. producing this fabric on a Cotton’s patent
or similar straight bar knitting machine, such as
is employed in the production ci full-fashioned
stockings, four thread carriers or guides operate
over each section of the machine, each carrier
receiving thread from .a separate supply, and all
the threads being advantageously of the saine
kind in every respect. Three oi the carriers opn
thread, are laid in successive knitted courses. In
this way a ladderprooi or ladder-resistant ` crate to lay the three ground threads o, b and c,
knitted fabric knitted on a straight bar machine
provided wherein different threads appear in
4Ul successively knitted courses as ground threads
and/or as stitch-¿locking threads, and the
threads in the fabric are thereby effectively
mixed so as to eliminate or u' ».
5O
irregulari
ties in the :finished fabric as aforesaid.
The particular construction of the fabric can
while the fourth carrier operates to traverse the
stitch-locking thread d. One carrier supplied
with the thread a is ñrst traversed across the
needles which are then operated to produce the
ñrst course l of knitted stitches in the customary
manner, said carrier being retained at the end
of >its traverse. The carrier supplied with the
locking thread d is then traversed to lay its
thread _and the needles are operated to produce
therefrom locking loops about the ground thread
be varied in many ways within the ambit of the
present invention.Y For example, the- fabric or
article maybe composed of two or more threads Stitches in course I. The carrier supplied with
the second ground thread b is then, traversed to 55
55 and each thread oi at leest two threads mayr
2
2,120,181
make a second course 2 of stitch loops inter
linking with the stitch loops in course I, and the
courses, and each thread being subsequently
traversed in an opposite direction as a locking
carrier appertaining to this ground thread b is l thread to lock the stitches in a subsequently
retained at the end of its traverse. The carrier knitted course. In this case, however, instead
supplied with the locking thread d is then trav
of returning a thread laid as a ground thread
ersed back across the needles in an opposite di
in one course to lock the stitches formed from
rection to lock the stitch loops in course 2, after
Which the ground thread carrier supplied with the
thread cis then traversed to form a third course
10 3 of ground thread loops interlinking in the
customary manner with the stitches of the last
produced course 2, and the carrier supplied with
the locking thread d is then again traversed in
îa reverse direction to lock the stitch loops in said
15 third course 3. After this the before-described
movements are repeated by ñrst traversing the
ground thread carrier supplied with the thread a
to produce course 4 of stitches which are then
locked by traversing the carrier supplied with the
20 locking thread d, this being followed by the trav
erse of the carriers to lay the ground threads b
another ground thread in the next succeeding
course, each thread is returned to lock the
stitches in the next but one succeeding course.
In other words, assuming that courses I, 2 and 3 10
of ground thread stitch loops are produced re
spectively from threads q, r and s, the thread q
forming course I is subsequently traversed in a
reverse direction to lock the stitches in course 3,
whilst the thread r forming course 2 is returned
to lock the stitches in course 4, and the thread s
forming course 3 is returned to lock the stitches
of course 5, and so on throughout the fabric.
In the further modification illustrated in Fig. 6
three distinct threads t, u, v are employed. In 20
this construction, however, each thread is first
and c; it being understood that after each course
laid ln 'one direction to produce a course of
of stitches has been produced the locking thread d
ground thread loops and is immediately returned
is traversed to lock said stitches.
'
in an opposite direction to constitute a locking
25
In the construction shown in Fig. 2 six thread thread and lock the stitches formed from the
carriers are employed, three of said carriers func
same thread. When course I has been produced
tioning to lay three different ground threads,
’rom the thread t, said thread is returned as a
e, f and g, and the remaining three carriers locking thread to lock the stitches in said course.
functioning to lay three different locking threads The second thread u is now traversed to form
30 h, i and y'. The production of this fabric shown
course 2 of stitch loops interlinking with the loops in Fig. 2 is similar to that described with refer
of course I and said second thread u is immedi
ence to Fig. 1 except that instead of laying the ately returned to lock the stitches in this course.
same locking thread at each successive course, the The third thread v is now traversed to form a
three distinct locking threads h., i and y' are sepa
third course of interlinking stitches, said thread v
35 rately and sequentially laid at successive stitch
being also returned to lock the stitches in said
courses; consequently each group of. three suc
third course. The thread t appertaining to
cessive stitch courses is composed of three dis
course I is now again traversed to form course 4
tinct ground threads and three distinct stitch
and return in an opposite direction to lock the
locking threads, the order of laying the several stitches of such course, after which the thread u
40 threads in the production of courses I', 2 and 3 » appertaining to course 2 is again traversed to
being repeated in courses 4, 5 and 6 and to any form course 5 and return to lock the stitches of 40
desired extent throughout the fabric.
said course, the third thread v being then
The construction shown in Fig. 3 is the reverse traversed to form course 6 and return to lock
of that shown in Fig. 1, that is' to say whereas the stitches therein, this being repeated through
in Fig. 1 three distinct ground threads a, b and c out the fabric. It will, of course, be appreciated
are employed and selectively laid to form suc
that the number of threads successively laid to
cessive stitch courses, each course being> locked produce ground thread stitches and to lock said
by one and the same stitch-locking thread d, stitches may be varied as desired. For example,
in Fig. 3 one and the same ground thread Ic is `only two such threads may be employed and
50 traversed by one and the same carrier to and fro
traversed alternately.
to produce successive courses of stitches, while
In fabrics according to the present invention
three carriers supplied with three distinct stitch
where a plurality of different or distinct ground
locking threads l, m and n are operated in suc
threads are employed and the locking thread or
cession to traverse their threads and lock the threads is or are retained throughout the fabric
55 stitches in successive courses.
as a locking thread or threads, the latter may be
Figs. 4 and 5 illustrate examples of fabric com- »
posed of two or more different or distinct threads
in which each thread of at least two threads
functions as a ground thread on some courses and
60 as a stitch-locking thread on other courses or
vice versa. In the construction shown in Fig. 4,
two threads o, p are employed, each thread func
tioning at one stitch course as a ground thread >
and at the next succeeding course as a stitch
locking thread, the thread change being, there
fore, effected at successive courses.
In kother
appreciably iincr than said ground threads and
consequently less conspicuous in the ñnished
fabric. In such case, however, it must be borne
in mind that diiferent ground threads are laid
at _successive courses.
From the above it will be appreciated that in
any two consecutive courses> of stitches diiferent
threads are employed either as ground threads
or locking threads or both, consequently the
thread change from one course to another effec 65
tively eliminates or minimizes striping or ring
words, each of the two threads o, p is laid on ^
effects in a knitted fabric or article such as a
alternate courses as a stitch-forming thread and
stocking. The number of different threads, i. e.
threads withdrawn from different supplies intro
on the remaining alternate courses as a stitch
70 locking thread, the alternate traverse of the two
thread carriers being continued throughout the
fabric.
,
In the modification shown in Fig. 5 four threads
q, r, s and w are employed, said threads being'laid
in
succession
to
produce
successive
stitch
60
duced in the fabric can be varied as desired With
in the ambit of the present invention, and in the
production of certain classes of garments or
articles the traverse of the locking thread may be
70
interrupted to suit existing requirements.
We claimz-
‘
75
3
2,120,181
1. A fiat knitted fabric, or article composed , to minimize or obstruct stitch-laddering or run
of a plurality of threads drawn from different . ning, said fabric being composed of a plurality
supplies in which each thread of at least two
threads functions as a ground thread and also
as a stitch-locking thread on the same course
and wherein successive courses of stitches are
formed from diiîerent threads, i. e. threads _With
drawn from different supplies.
2. A ñat knitted fabric or article composed of
10 two different threads, i. e. threads drawn from
different supplies, wherein at each course one
of said threads is laid as a ground or stitch
forming thread and the other thread is laid as a
stitch-locking thread and wherein the thread
15 functioning as a ground thread in one course
constitutes a stitch-locking thread in the next
succeeding course and vice versa.
3. A fiat knitted fabric or article composed
of a plurality of threads drawn from different
20 supplies wherein at least two different threads
function as ground threads and at least another
two different threads function as stitch-locking
threads and wherein both the ground threads
and the stitch-locking threads are changed at
25 successive stitch courses.
4. A fiat knitted fabric embodying stitches
that are locked or tied by stitch-locking thread
to minimize or obstruct stitch-laddering or run
ning, said fabric- being composed of a plurality
30 of different threads (threads drawn from dif
ferent supplies) , each of a succession of knitted
courses comprising ground thread (stitch thread)
and stitch-locking thread and no two successive
ly knitted courses of said succession of courses
35 having therein identical threads embodied and
functioning in the same manner in each course.
5. A fiat knitted fabric embodying stitches that
- are locked or tied by stitch-locking thread to
minimize or obstruct stitch-laddering or run
40 ning, said fabric being composed of a plurality of
diiîerent threads (threads drawn from diñerent
supplies), each of a succession of knitted courses
comprising Vground thread (stitch thread) and
stitch-locking thread and different threads ap
45 peering in successively knitted courses of stitches
as ground threads, (stitch-forming threads).
6. A fiat knitted fabric embodying stitches
that are locked or tied by stitch-locking thread
of diíerent threads (threads drawn from dif
ferent supplies), each of a succession of knitted
courses comprising ground thread (stitch
thread) and stitch-locking thread and different
threads appearing in successively knitted courses
of stitches as stitch-locking threads.
7. A ñat knitted fabric embodying stitches that
are locked or tied by stitch-locking thread to 10
minimize or obstruct stitch-laddering or run
ning, said fabric being composed of a plurality
of different threads (threads drawn from' differ
ent supplies), each of a succession of knitted
courses comprising ground thread (stitch thread)
and stitch-locking thread and different threads
appearing in successively knitted courses of
stitches both as ground threads and as stitch
locking threads.
8. A flat knitted fabric embodying stitches 20
that are locked or tied by stitch-locking thread
to minimize or obstruct stitch-laddering or run
ning, said fabric being composed of a plurality
of different threads (threads drawn from differ
ent supplies), each of a succession of knitted 25
courses comprising ground thread (stitch thread)
and stitch-locking thread andy each thread of
~at least two different threads functioning both
as a ground thread and as. a stitch-locking
thread.
30
_
9. A ñat knitted fabric or article composed
of more than two threads drawn from different
supplies, said threads being employed in suc
cession to form successive courses of stitches, and
said threads beingA also employed 1n succession
to lock the stitch loops formed ,from the same
thread.
10. The production of a knitted fabric orarticle from three different threads, i. e. threads
drawn from diiïerent supplies, said threads being 40
-employed in succession to produce successive
courses of stitches and» each thread after ,being
traversed and laid in one direction' to produce
a course of stitch loops being immediately trav
ersed in an opposite direction to lock the stitch 45
loops thus formed.
'
'
» THOMAS HENRY JONES.
ROBERT KIRKLAN'D MILLS.
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