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Патент USA US2120332

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June 14, 1938.
F_ H, JACKSON
PACK
BOAT
-
Filed June 8, 19556
7
2,120,332
,
5- Sheets-Sheat 1
ATTO RN EYS
June 14, 1938.
F. H. JACKSON
2,120,332
PACK BOAT
Filed June 8, 1936
3 Sheets-Sheet 2
ATTO RN EYS
June 14, 1938.
_
F_ H, JACKSON
2,120,332‘
PACK BOAT
Filed June ‘a, 1936
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ATTORNEY6
Patented June 14, 1938
' 2,120,332
UNITED STATES
PATENT orrice
2,120,332
PACK BOAT
Fred H. Jackson, Ilion, N. Y., assignor of one
half to George S. Jackson, Ilion, N. Y.
Application June 8, 1936, Serial No. 84,065
2 Claims.
My present invention relates to pack boats
meaning thereby folding, collapsible and knock
down boats that are of such construction and
of such light weight that they may be readily
'5 carried in a camper’s pack.
The purpose of this invention is to provide a
pack boat of new and improved construction and
particularly one where the parts are so‘ con
structed'and of such light weight that the parts
0 may be readily carried in a camper’s pack by
even one man. Heretofore most collapsible or
folding boats have included constructions or»
‘parts that make the boat awkward to pack and
carry and too heavy for the ordinary man to
'15 carry with comfort.
Further purposes of this invention are to pro
vide an article of the type mentioned which has
its parts of such form, size, weight and combina
tion that the parts can be readily placed in one
‘270 or two compact relatively light packages for
carrying in a camper’s pack or in an automo
bile; to have the parts of such new and im
proved construction that they may be readily
and very quickly assembled by the ordinary per
=25 son and without the use of any tools and yet pro—
vide a boat that is strong, rigid, durable and
readily able to carry three men and similarly to
have the construction and combination of parts
such that the boat may be'as readily taken apart
'30 by any one without the use of tools in a very
short time and packed into one or more com
pact packages ready for carrying or storing, to
provide a new and improved form of keel for
a pack boat that is made in sections, but readily
35 assembled to be extremely strong and rigid and
not liable to break or be strained even under
hard usage and to have ‘the keel of such form
as to combine with the other parts of my pack
boat in a' specially convenient and effective man
40 ner and further to provide a pack boat having
a new type of ribs in the form of half ribs, the
parts of each pair of which are separate for
‘making and packing, but are assembled together
to form a rib for mounting upon the keel and
45 combining with the rest of the boat, to provide
in such a pack boat a complete gunwale formed
of a plurality 'of sections permanently pivoted
together and adapted to be folded into very com
pact form for carrying and storage but adapted
'50 to be readily unfolded and mounted upon the
upper ends of the ribs and the bow and stem
pieces of the boat without the use of tools and
without the use of any separate fastening
members.
55 ~ Fig. lis a plan view of the frame, that is the
(o1. 9-2)
keeL'the ribs, the bow and stern pieces and the
gunwale of a pack boat embodying my invention.
Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the frame shown
in Fig. 1.
'
_
Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view on a some- 5
what enlarged scale on line 3-—3 of Fig. 1 but
showing the canvas shell in place.
Fig. ll is a cabinet projection of one of the
intermediate keel sections.
'
Fig. 5 is a longitudinalcentral section through ' 10
the intermediate keel section shown in Fig. 4
and Fig. 6 is a similar section showing two keel
splines in place upon the said intermediate sec
tion of the keel and with the metallic reinforc
ingv cross pieces in place upon the keel section. 15
Fig. 7 isan isometric projection of one of the ‘
_ keel splines.
Fig. 8 is'a cabinet projection of an end section
of the keel with'a bow or stern piece assembled
therewith.
’
20
Fig. 9 is a central longitudinal section through
the end section of the keel shown in Fig. 8.
Fig. 10 is a plan view of the gunwale in partly
folded condition.
‘
Fig. 11_ is an isometric projection of the inner 25
end of a metallic half rib provided with the pair
of dowel pins used to connect the two halves of
a rib.
Fig. 12 is an isometric projection of the inner
portion of the complementary or mortised half 30
of a metallic rib.
Fig. 13 is a similar View when the inner ends
of these half ribs are assembled and connected
by the dowel pins.
Fig. 14 is a view similar to Fig. 13 showing the 35
inner ends of these, half ribs inserted in place
upon the keel but with the locking clip still open.
Fig. 15 is an isometric projection of the inner
ends of a pair of half ribs when the halves are
placed side ‘by side throughout their length for 40
the purpose of packing.
} _ Figures 16 and 17 are transverse sections of the
gunwale and cover.
Referring to the drawings in a more particu
lar description it will be seen that a pack boat 45
embodying this invention comprises a keel formed
of several separate sections adapted to be at
tached end to end, a bow piece and a stern piece
projecting respectively from the forward and
rear keel section and then extending upwardly 50
to form the bow and stern posts respectively,‘ a
plurality of ribs preferably in the form of pairs
of half ribs projecting laterally from the keel
and turned up in the properform to givethe
desired ‘shape to the boat and a gunwale formed 55
2,120,332
2
of a plurality of sections permanently hinged
together and attached to the upper ends of the
bow and stem posts and the upper ends of the
half ribs. Upon this frame is removably secured
a shell preferably formed of strong durable fabric
or ?brous material such as canvas.
The keel is composed of a plurality of separate
detachable sections, each preferably formed of
wood and adapted to be placed ‘end to end with
10 the sections of the keel held in alignment by a
set of strong light metallic splines 20. See Fig. 'I.
tion against strain placed upon the spline or upon
the wooden section. Preferably the lower re
inforcing strips 25 are let into the wood at the
bottom the full thickness or height of the said
strips so as to have the bottom face of the keel
sections ?at and free from the projections so as
not to cause any local wear below the keel upon
the canvas shell 29.
It will now be seen thatthe lower reinforcing
strips‘25 close the bottom of the spline recesses 10
24 and that the tops of these reinforcing strips
Preferably these splines will be formed of straight
pieces of strong aluminum, preferably rectangular
in cross section.
15
I have found that splines made out of
rolled aluminum one-half inch wide and one
high is su?iciently strong and rigid for the
pose for an ordinary convenient sized pack
adapted to carry two or three men.
cold
inch
pur
boat
For a boat
20 of the size suggested there will be a front keel
section 2|, a rear keel section 22 and. ordinarily
two intermediate keel sections 23--23. Obviously
the number of intermediate keel sections may
be varied to produce a larger or smaller boat or
25 ‘to produce a boat where the'keel sections may be
25 are engaged directly by the bottom edge of the
half of the spline coming into recess 24. The cen
tral longitudinal sectional view, Fig. 5, shows the
location and general proportion of these recesses 15
24 at the opposite ends of the intermediate keel
sections. In Fig.4 a similar view of one of these
intermediate keel sections is shown but with the
lower re-inforcing strips 25 and the upper re
inforcing strips 28 in place and with a spline 20 20
shown inplace in both ends of the keel section.
It will be un-derstoodthat the recess 24 as closed
keel sections are more in number as by having
at the bottom by strips 25 will readily but closely
receive half of a spline 20 by inserting the spline
endwise through the open end of the recess 24 25
and-sliding it inwardly of the recess. It will be
noted that with the recesses 24 centrally dis
posed in the several intermediate sections and in
more than two intermediate sections, but with
the sections including the front and rear keel
sections shorter. I found from experience, how
sections 2| and 22, the recesses of adjoining
pairs of keel sections will be in alignment to re
less in number but proportionately longer than
herein suggested or to produce, a keel where the
ever, that a boat having two intermediate sec
tions is satisfactory as it combines a minimum
number of sections and joints for the keel with
35 a convenient length of the keel sections for pack
ing the parts of the boat into compact bundles.
As will be seen from Fig. 4 which is a cabinet
projection of one of the intermediatekeel sec-'
tions 23, these sections are preferably rectangular
40 in cross section so as to be readily and easily
formed out of wood with a minimum of work.
Into the opposite end of each of the intermediate
keel sections there is provided a longitudinally
extending recess 24 projecting into the section
45 from the end and from the bottom face of the
section. These recesses are placed or made tov be
in the center of the section measured crosswise
thereof. As this boat is illustrated and assuming
the splines to be of the cross sectional size above
50 indicated, the recesses 24 will be one-half inch
in width to closely receive and hold one half of
a spline 20. The length of each recess 24 will be
half the length of the spline: 20. As shown in
the drawings, the recess 24 will be slightly higher
55 measured from the bottom of the keel section
than the one inch height of the spline 20. This
is for the purpose of allowing at least a spaced
pair of strong metallic re-inforcing strips 25 to
be let into notches26and 21 extending prefer
ably the full width of the bottom of the keel
the adjoining ends of the front and rear keel
solve the straight spline and hold adjacent pairs
of keel sections also in proper straight alignment.
In Fig. 8 there is shown a cabinet projection
of an end section of the keel. For deflniteness
this view is numbered to show. the front section’
2! of the keel, but the rear section is of similar
construction and so does'not need to be separately
illustrated nor described. At the inner end of
this end keel section there is provided a spline
recess'3l) projecting in from the extremity of this
section for the length of half of a spline 20 and
extending up from the bottom of the keel section
and closed by a pair of bottom re-inforcing strips
25 as already described in detail with regard to
the intermediate sections of the keel. Preferably
also. there is let into the wood of the end section
'a top reinforcing strip 28 connected by long
through bolts or rivets to the corresponding re
inforcing strip 25 nearest this end of the keel
section. In other words, the inner ends of both
the front and rear keel sections are constructed
similar to the two ends of the intermediate sec
tions of the keel and are adapted to receive one
half of the spline, the other end of which is
ultimately housed in a recess 24 of an intermedi
ate section. It will thus be seen that the four
or more sections of the keel are assembled by in
serting half of a spline in one section and the
other half of the spline in an aligned section
pieces. These re-inforcing strips are strongly ' of the keel and drawing the said pair of sections
secured to the Wood of the section as by long together. The splines ?t the recesses abovethe
screws extending vertically of the sections or by reinforcing strips 25 easily enough to allow the
through bolts or rivets extending through the
65 opposite ends of these reinforcing strips and then
through the Whole height of the keel section.
Preferably in order to make a still stronger con
struction near the extreme end of the keel section
there is provided a top reinforcing strip 28 let
into a notch in the upper face of the keel section
opposite the end bottom notch 21. The through
bolts or rivets for the end lower strip‘25 then
preferably pass through the upper reinforcing
strip 28 so as to give to the structure .the full
75 strength of all of the wood at the end of the set:
keel to be assembled without undue labor and
entirely without the use of tools or implements.
On the other hand, the splines ?t into the sec
tions closely enough to hold the pairs of sections
closely and rigidly in proper alignment and
tightly enough to keep the four or more sections
of the keel all together while the ribs are being 70
placed thereon and while the bow and stem
pieces are being placed in position and until the
sectional gunwale has been mounted upon the
frame so provided. The gunwale in connection
With'the half ribs and the bow and stern pieces 17-5
2,120,332
forms the ultimate and positive locking means to
hold the sections of the keel from any possible
endwise dislocation. It will be seen that I have
provided no locking means adjacent the keel and
keel sections and splines for holding these parts
together against endwise dislocation and I have
found that the gunwale in combination with the
other parts of the frame forms an adequate and
sure locking means for the keel sections.
10
The bow piece 30 and the stern piece 3| are
preferably substantially alike in that they are
formed of metal preferably and conveniently cold
rolled aluminum one-half inch square in cross
section of the proper length to be bent or shaped
15 so as to form upon the bow piece a horizontal
part 32 and a bow post proper 33 while the stern
piece 3| has the horizontal part 34 and the rear
or stern post 35. The suggestion here made as to
the size of the metal is simple illustrative as in
20 dicating a size and grade of metal strong enough
for the purpose.
As is best shown in Figs. 8 and 9, the forward
part of the front keel section 2| is provided with
a longitudinally extending recess 36 extending
25 from the front end of this keel section rearwardly
a su?icient distance to house about the rearward
half of the horizontal part 32 of the bow piece
36. This recess 36 in general construction is like
the recesses 24 in the intermediate sections and
30 the recess 36 in the rear end of the front keel
section 2| except that the recess 36 is of lesser
height to closely receive the horizontal part 32 of
the bow piece.
This recess is closed at the bot
tom by front and back crosswise extending rein
35 forcing metal strips 31 and 38 let into the bottom
:of the said keel section so as to be ?ush with the
bottom of the keel section and so that their upper
faces will directly support the bottom of the hori
zontal part 32. Preferably a front upper reinforc
40 ing piece 39 is let into‘ the upper side of the
forward extremity of the front keel section 2|
about as shown in Fig. 8 directly over the front
reinforcing piece 37. Through rivets 40 per
manently connect the reinforcing strip 31 at the
45 bottom and the top reinforcing strip 38 and
pass through the intermediate wood of the sec
tion. The slot 36 is formed in the central portion
of the keel and extends accurately longitudinally
thereof so that the projecting portion of the part
32 and the stem 38 of the bow piece are held ac
curately in alignment with the longitudinal axis
of the keel. The bow piece is inserted in its
recess 36 in an obvious manner by inserting the
rear portion of the horizontal part 32 into the
forward part of the recess 36 and pushing the
metal piece to the rear.
A similar recess 4! in the rear end of the stern
keel section 22 receives in a similar manner the
forward portion of the horizontal part 34 of the
stern piece 3|. The rear end of the stern keel
section 22 is reinforced by a top reinforcing piece
and a pair of bottom reinforcing pieces which
bottom reinforcing pieces engage and support the
bottom surface of the part of the stern piece ?t
ting into said recess 4|.
The upper ends of the bow post 33 and the stern
post 35 are provided with suitable means for
mounting thereon the bow and stern respectively
of the sectional gunwale. Such mounting means
conveniently consist of an L-shaped bracket 42
most plainly shown in Fig. 8 permanently se
cured at its lower end to the post and affording
an upwardly opening slot 43 on the forward side
of the bow post and the rearward side of the
75 stern post.
3
The ribs are of metal preferably cold rolled
aluminum and conveniently of the size of one
half inch square in cross section.
The ribs are
formed of pairs of halfribs 44 and 45 respective—
ly. The half ribs of each pair are similarly
shaped as to length and curve according to the .5
position in the boat that any pair of ribs is to
occupy. The pairs of half ribs 44 and 45 ‘overlap
each other at the keel a little more than the.
width of the keel as appears best in Figs. 1, 3 and
14. Each half rib 44 is provided at its inner or
10
keel end with a pair of metal pins 46 extending
horizontally crosswise through the said. half rib
and with their ends’ projecting beyond the metal
of the half rib at the same side thereof as shown 15
in Fig. 11. The inner or keel end of the comple
mentary half rib 45 is provided with a pair of
correspondingly located and shaped holes 41
adapted to easily and closely but detachably re
ceive the projecting pins 46. Pins 46 are of a 20
length not only to go‘ through the holes 4'! in the
half rib 45 but to project therebeyond a short
distance when the half ribs of a pair are as
sembled as appears inrFigs. 13 and 14. The pins
46 and holes 41 it will be understood are so lo 25
cated as to hold the overlapping parts of the two
half ribs securely in alignment when the two half
ribs are assembled“ At the points in the keel
where the ribs are to be mounted thereon the
upper part of the several wooden keel sections 30
are provided with crosswise notches 48 of a depth
corresponding to the height of the ribs and of a
width equalling the width of the two overlapping
parts of the half ribs. Assuming as above sug
gested that the ribs are formed of metal one 35
half inch square, then these notches 48 will be
one-half an inch deep and one inch wide. The
overlapped portions of a pair of half ribs when
placed in their proper recess 48 in the keel will be
held securely but removably therein against any 40~
twisting or swinging in a horizontal manner.
Each pair of half ribs will be locked in place in
its notch 48 by a button 49 pivotally mounted on
the top of the keel adjacent the notch by means
of a headed screw 50 or the equivalent there
of. In Figs. 4 and 14 these buttons are shown 45.
in open position. By swinging the buttons
way around from the position shown they
come over the overlapped part of the half
and securely hold said rib from movement
ward relative to the keel.
half
will
ribs
up
‘
50
The pair of pins 46 on each rib are spaced
apart slightly more than the width of the keel
so that when each rib is mounted upon the keel
and seated in its notch 48 the pins 46 will be
close to the opposite vertical sides of the adjacent 65
portion of the keel. These projecting pins there
fore formthe ready means for properly locating
the ribs upon the keel when the ribs are put in
place and when the ribs are once mounted the
pins prevent the ribs from moving crosswise of 60
the keel.
'
'
The primary purpose of making the ribs in the
form of half ribs 44 and 45 is for convenience
in packing the parts of the boat into compact
small bundles convenient to be carried or stored. 65
The ribs near the middle of a boat of this sort
are bow-shaped as will be seen by the Widest ribs
shown in Fig. 3; Farther to the bow or stem
the ribs decrease in extent from free end to free 70
end as the boat decreases in Width. It will be
seen, therefore, that in a boat of the sort herein
illustrated there will be at least four different
patterns of complete ribs and that these shapes
are not adapted to nest closely together nor to
2,120,332
lie compact ‘against other parts of the boat.
Furthermore, the, distance between the free ends
of a rib especially the ribs at the middle of the
boat may be about forty inches ‘which is too long
to make a convenient package for a man to carry
in a pack. The bow-shaped form of the neces
sary ribs and the variance in the form of the
different ribs further make the'parts unadapted
to be nested closely together or to form a con
ll) venient size or shape of a package of parts to be
carried either together or especially in conjunc
tion'with other parts of the boat. Accordingly
I have formed the ribs of this boat'as-half ribs
with the parts of each rib adapted to be readily
assembled .when the boat is to be set up. By
forming the ribs in such half ribs the over—all
length of 'the parts for packing is reduced by
about half the length. The sixteen parts of an
eight ~rib boat can then be much more con
20 veniently placed together and carried in contact
with other parts. The large number of these
separate‘parts, however, is reduced because when
the boat is taken apart the half ribs of a pair
are ?rst taken apart from their extended use-d
position and are mounted upon each other in re
versed position, but with the curved parts of the
two halves of a rib aligning with or next to each
other and held in this aligned position by the pins
46 again being placed through the holes 4'! as
30 appears in Fig. 15. Accordingly in an eight-rib
boat there will be eight packages of parts, each
pair of 'half ribs'conveniently held together by
the pins 46. The eight pairs commonly of four
different ‘sizes and shapes as suggested in Fig. 3
may then be conveniently nested into a fairly
compact package of convenient length and of not
such excessive curvature as to prevent placing
these pairs together into a compact bundle.
For a boat of about the size and capacity
herein illustrated and described, eight ribs are
ample to hold the canvas shell 29 properly ex
tended and out in the desired shape. This allows
two ribs to be mounted upon each keel section
which is a convenient arrangement in that it al
lows the proper spacing of the ribs and provides
for the mounting of the ribs upon the keel sec
tions'at convenient distances from the ends of
the keel sections.
The gunwale 5! is composed of an angular
shaped bow piece 52, an angular shaped stern
ill)
piece 53 and two sets of gunwale sections 54.
These parts are permanently but pivotally con
nected as by copper rivets 55 connecting the ad
jacent ends of the gunwale sections of each se—
ries and by sirnilar rivets 5% connecting the front
section of each series to the bow piece 52 and
similar rivets 5'! connecting the rear end of the
rear gunwale sections to the stern piece 53. The
pieces forming the sections of the gunwale are of
60 metal preferably aluminum strips for which pur
pose-I ?nd strips one-inch wide and one-eighth
inch thick are suf?ciently strong and rigid and
light enough for the purpose.
The end pieces 52 and 53 of the gunwale will
be
formed of similar aluminum strips of about
65
the same size and weight or if desired slightly
heavier material. Each of these pieces will have
a central part 52' and 53’ adapted to be slipped
down into the open slot 43 at the top of the bow
and stern posts respectively. The end of the
70
pieces 52 and 53 will slant outwardly as they
project toward the other end of the boat so as
to align more or less closely with the adjacent
end of the end sections upon the opposite sides
of the boat. Convenient means are provided at
theupper free ends of the half ribs to detach
ablyreceive the gunwale sections. Such means
conveniently consist of‘ an upwardly opening slot
formed in the upper ends of the ribs of a width
to readily but closely receive the gunwale. As
suming that the keel has been assembled as al
ready outlined and the bow and stern pieces and
the ribs assembled thereon, the gunwale will be
assembled upon the upper ends of the bow and
stern pieces‘ and the ribs by ?rst placing one end 10
piece. as 52- of the gunwale in the slot 43 of the
bow post.‘ Then with the gunwale unfolded its
successive sections will be placed in the slots pro
vided in the several ribs and then the stern piece
.15
53 mounted at the top of the stern post.
One-preferred form of construction or com
bination of parts of my boat is clearly shown in
Figs. 1' and 2 and consists in having each of the
gunwale sections except the end sections thereof
engaged by and supported in the upper ends of 1
two half ribs. In other words, it will be seen that
these intermediate sections of the gunwale are
supported at two well-spaced points by the half
ribs of adjacent ribs. Assuming that the boat is
constructed as herein illustrated by using eight _
ribs, the gunwale on each side of the boat will
have four intermediate sections. This spaced
supporting of a gunwale section by at least two
“half ribs tends to rigidity when the framework
is
up‘ by very largely reducing any tendency .
of these sections to pivot or swing upon the ribs.
Obviously any downward pressure upon an inter
mediate section of the gunwale between its two
supporting ribs will simply seat the gunwale more
strongly in the ribs. Any possibility of the gun- ,
wale so swinging or its adjacent sections folding
is entirely obviated when the canvas shell 29 has
been mounted upon the framework of the boat
because the said shell is so shaped and is of a
size that when its opposite sides or edges are se
cured to the opposite series of gunwale sections a
very considerable tension is placed upon the
canvas‘ shell ‘to keep the shell taut and this ten
sion operates to produce a downward pull upon
'all of the sections of the gunwale which is thereby 45
e?ectively locked from disengagement of any of
its parts from the upper ends of the ribs.
It ‘will be understood, furthermore, that the
length of the complete gunwale relative to the up
per end of the bow piece 30, the upper end of the
stern piece 3| and the upper ends of the several
half ribs“ and 45 will be such as to place a
considerable inward endwise draw or tension
upon the bow and stern pieces and some inward
tension upon the several half ribs.
The con
65
siderable endwise tension placed upon the bow
and stem pieces operate not only to hold the
horizontal parts 32 and 34 of said end pieces
securely‘ in their respective recesses in the end
keel sections, but also operates to hold all of the 60
keel sections from any possible longitudinal dis
placement relative to each‘ other. In other
words, the gunwale is the positive means for
locking the several sections of the keel together
and for locking the bow and stern pieces to the 65
keel. The slight inward draw of the gunwale
‘upon the upper ends of the ribs operates to hold
.each of the intermediate gunwale sections snugly
in the ribs and to stretch out any endwise play
or looseness between the pivotally connected sec 70
tions of thergunwale.
The-fabric shell 29 is conveniently formed of
relatively heavy strong, durable canvas suitably
?lled and coated to be water-tight and leak
proof and durable.
at
2,120,332
I prefer to make this canvas shell 29 of one
integral piece of canvas of such length as to
extend the whole length of the boat and of a
width greater than the outside outline of the
ribs so that there will be an appreciable hem
or overlapping portion outside the gunwale of the
boat. Preferably the piece of canvas is longer
than the boat and its end parts are overlapped
or pleated at the bow and stem and secured to
10 gether thus avoiding the cutting of the material
and also providing considerable re-inforcement.
Convenient means are provided for readily at
taching the gunwale edges of the canvas shell to
the opposite sides of the gunwale. These at
15 taching means also are such as to allow for plac
ing the whole canvas shell under desired tension.
To accomplish both of these purposes I provide
on one edge of the canvas shell of the boat a
series of hooks 58. See Fig. 16. Each of these
20 hooks is preferably made from a narrow strip of
metal inserted in a suitable grommet 59 placed
in the hemmed edge of the cloth and then having
the two halves of the strip‘ bent towards each
other in line with the fabric and then together
25 bent over to form an open bottomed hook that
can be readily placed over the gunwale as ap
pears in Fig. 16. The proper number of these
hooks 58 will be placed all along one edge of the
shell and when the shell is to be placed upon
30 the boat these hooks will be ?rst placed over
the gunwale on that side of the boat. The shell
will then be stretched towards the other side of
the boat and that edge of the shell will be
stretched up to the gunwale on that side of the
35 boat with a proper tension and securely but de
tachably fastened thereto by means of one or
more cords 60 run through grommets 6| on that
side of the casing near its edge.
Between or near the grommets 6| the cord 60
40 is run through or tied to eyes 62 provided pref
erably on the inside face of the half ribs near,
their upper end as appears in Figs. 3 and. 17.
In Fig. 3 the near end of the cord 60 is shown
not yet run through several of the nearer eyes 62.
45
What I claim as new and desire to secure by
Letters Patent is:
1. In a pack boat construction the combina
tion of a plurality of foldable ribs, each rib com
posed of two bent, metal half-ribs shaped to have
5
their keel ends detachably placed side by side in
overlapping relation and their gunwale ends pro
jecting away from each other and forming when
so assembled a complete rib, the half-ribs of each
rib having in their overlapping keel ends a pair
of spaced cooperating ?xed permanently mounted
metal projections and laterally arranged sockets .
to detachably receive the same whereby a rigid
whole rib is formed by assembling the two half
ribs sidewise in such extended position, a keel 10
having in its top, laterally extending rib-receiv
ing spaced slots, each the width of the combined
overlapping keel portions of a rib, the opposite
walls of said slots holding together the half
ribs of each rib, a gunwale detachably connect
ing the upper ends of the ribs and a ?exible cas
15
ing stretched beneath and around said keel, gun
wale and ribs, the tension of said casing holding
the ribs down in the keel and'so keeping the
ribs extended.
20
2. In a pack boat construction the combina
tion of a plurality of foldable ribs, each rib com
posed of two bent, metal half-ribs shaped to have
their keel ends detachably placed side by side in
overlapping relation and their gunwale ends pro 25
jecting away from each other and forming when
so assembled a complete rib, the half-ribs of each
rib having in their overlapping keel ends a pair
of spaced cooperating ?xed permanently mounted
metal projections and laterally arranged sockets 30
to detachably receive the same whereby a rigid
whole rib is formed by assembling the two half
ribs sidewise in such' extended position, a keel
having in its top, laterally extending rib-receiving
spaced slots, each the width of the combined 35
overlapping keel portions of a rib, the opposite
walls of said slots holding together the half ribs
of each rib, a gunwale detachably connecting the
upper ends of the ribs and a ?exible casing
stretched beneath and around said keel, gunwale 40
and ribs, the tension of said casing holding the
ribs down in the keel and so keeping the ribs l
extended, the said projections on said rib sections
extending beyond the overlapped parts of said
sections close to the opposite sides of the keel
and serving to hold the several complete two-part
ribs from movement laterally of the keel.
FRED H. JACKSON.
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