close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2120428

код для вставки
' June 14, 1938.
‘
2,120,428
H. R. LEE
RAIL JOINT AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME
Filed Feb. 28, 1934
(l8
29/
3//
Z0
/)
27
33
28
FFZ
7 /23\ 35) <5‘) 3237) r35 r”? (26 [lg/24
' \\
28/
INVENTOR
.
HARRY R, L_££
BY
I
ATTORNEY
Patented June 14, 1938
2,120,428
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,120,428
RAIL JOINT AND METHOD OF
.
_
s
H
THE
_
.
Harry R. Lee, White Plains, N. Y., assignor, by
mesne assignments, to Union Carbide and Car
bon Corporation, a corporation of New York
Application February 28, 1934, Serial No. 713,278
18 Claims.
This invention relates to the art of recondition
ing rail joints, and more especially it concerns a
method of reforming Worn joint bars or plates
to accurately ?t the abutting ends of battered or
5
worn rails.
The usual rail joint comprises a pair of joint
bars arranged at the ends of two abutting aligned
rails, the bars being disposed on opposite sides
of the rails and bolted together through openings
in the webs of the rails and the bars. When new,
the upper’ fishing or bearing surfaces of the bars
contact with the bottom surfaces of the rail heads,
and the lower ?shing surfaces of the bars con
tact with the top surfaces of the rail ?anges, so
v) that the bars ?t accurately between the heads and
?anges of the rails.
After a joint has been in use for some time,
there develops progressive wear of the bars at
their ?shing surfaces, due to the constant pound
2 O ing or battering of the rail ends at the joint by
the wheels of tra?ic moving upon the rails. The
joints gradually become loose and the ?shing
2
surfaces of the bars become depressed at their
mid-portions adjacent the worn ends of the rails.
Since the amount and shape of wear at the
bearing surfaces of the bars and rails is not the
same at all joints, it has long been known that
the usual methods for rail joint repair, requiring
removal of the bars from the joints and a sub
sequent crowning operation for building up the
depressed portions of the bars, in addition to
being relatively slow and costly, failed to pro
vide at the respective rail joints the accurate
fits required for effectively prolonging the active
35 life of the joint members.
Among the important recent advances in the
art of conditioning and repairing rail joints was
(o1. 2ss_243)
degree of impact is not uniform for successive
blows. Furthermore, variations in the width of
the slots produced in the bars or of the size or
degree of‘ bevel on the wedge members some
times requires ?tting of some of the wedge mem
bers to the slotted joint bars before driving the
wedges into place.
The present invention is based upon the dis
covery that the important results attained in the
above type of operation can be fully attained in 10
a simple, easy manner, While eliminating in large
measure the need for the said ?tting of specially
sized parts. Moreover, standard interchangeable
parts may in all cases be used as the rail bar
spreading agency.
15
Among the more important objects of the in
vention are the following: to provide in'novel
manner for the reforming of joint bars while
positioned at a rail joint; to provide in novel
manner for reforming worn rail joint bars having 20
therein one or more longitudinal slots and having
at least one enlarged transverse aperture extend
ing ,therethrough in a mid-portion of each of the
said slots; to provide in novel manner for reform
ing a rail joint bar to produce a'crowned effect 25
which compensates for its own wear and also
the uneven’wear in the rail bearing surfaces con
tacting therewith; and to provide a novel re
formed rail joint bar having a crowned portion
individually shaped under steady pressure to con so
form to the shape of the particular rail bearing
surfaces contacting therewith.
Further objects and advantages of my inven
tion will become apparent from the following
description.
The various features of novelty
which characterize my invention are pointed out
the discovery that by reforming the joint bars
with particularity in the accompanying claims.
Referring to the drawing:
while positioned at the rail joint the depressed
Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a worn rail joint
having joint bars of angle bar form;
40 areas of the bearing surfaces of the joint bars
40
can be raised just enough to compensate for their , V Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section taken through
own wear and the wear of the bearing surfaces
of the rails adjacent thereto. This is accom
plished by forming one or more slots in each joint
bar and then by suitable wedging means spread
ing the walls of said slot or slots vertically to
press either or both of the upper and lower bear
ing surfaces of the bar into tight and conforming
contact with the rail heads and ?anges.
The above-mentioned method of rail joint
50
conditioning depends upon driving the wedges by
a series of sudden sharp blows applied at approxi
a worn rail joint bar embodying one form of my
invention;
Fig. 3 is a perspective View of a Worn joint bar
illustrating a feature of the invention;
45
Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional view through
a rail joint illustrating one embodiment of my in
vention;
Fig. .5 is a transverse sectional view through a
rail joint showing another embodiment of the 50
invention;
Fig. 6 is a perspective view of one form of
mately right angles to the rail length. Since this
usually is done manually with a trackman’s ham
expansion member;
mer, the force applied is widely variable, as the
expansion member and associated parts;
Fig. 7 is a perspective view of another form of
55
2
2,120,425
Figs. 8 and 9, respectively, are fragmentary
views of rail joint bars illustrating still other
modi?cations of the invention; and
Fig. 10 is a fragmentary front view of an ellip
tical expansion member and associated parts.
Referring to the drawing, there is shown a
typical rail joint comprising a pair of joint bars
I5, 16, having upper and lower ?shing surfaces
24, 25. These bars may be of any well-known
10 type, such as angle bars, disposed against the
webs I1, 18, of two abutting rails I9, 20, and ar
ranged on opposite sides of the rails. The bars
are secured tightly together by bolts 2| passing
through aligned apertures in the webs l1, l8, and
15 apertures 22 in the bars l5, I6, the bolts having
threaded ends to receive nuts 23.
When the rail joint is new, the upper and lower
?shing surfaces 24, 25, of the bars 15, I6, ?t the
rails perfectly throughout the entire length of the
20 bars. However, after the bars become slightly
worn near the rail ends, the continual passage of
tra?ic over the rails causes gradually increasing
wear on the rail bearing surfaces 32, 33, that
make occasional contact with the worn portions
25 30, 3|, of the bar. As progressive wear forms
depressed areas, the bars no longer ?ll the spaces
between the bearing surfaces of the rail heads
and ?anges.
The depressed worn areas of different joint
30 bars may Vary in length and depth according to
the amount of traffic that passes over different
portions of track; and the said, areas will vary in
shape according as the traf?c is one-way, two
way with approximately the same amount in both
35 directions, or two-way with the traffic in one
direction exceeding the tra?ic in the opposite
direction.
In accordance with one form of the present
invention the joint bars I5, I6, may be reformed
40
while positioned at the rail joint against the rails
19, 20. When this is done the rail heads 26, 21,
and rail flanges 23, 29, serve as cooperating die
elements to reshape the bearing surfaces of the
joint bars.
45
In the practice of the invention, one or more
relatively narrow longitudinal slots 35 are out
or otherwise formed in the mid-portions of the
bars l5, l6 adjacent the depressed worn portions
30, 3|. Each slot is located su?iciently close to
50 the bearing surface to be reshaped that the ap
plication of an expanding force within the slot
will cause the metal of the bar to spring or flow
and thus to ?ll the depressed areas formed by
wear on the bearing surfaces of the bars and the
55 rails, to provide a satisfactory reformed rail joint.
In the form of the invention illustrated in Figs.
2 to 5, a single long narrow slot 35 is shown as
joining the two track-bolt apertures 22 nearest
the joint between abutting rails. However, the
forming the apertures 31 may be tapered, as
shown in Fig. 4.
A pair of cooperating, channel-shaped, inter
nally-threaded expansion members or segments
39 of hardened metal or alloy, each having a lon
gitudinally-tapered outer surface 4|, are adapted
to be removably mounted within the aperture 31
with a portion projecting outwardly therefrom.
The outer surfaces of the respective segments 39
adjacent the margins of the slot 35 preferably are 10
?attened in parallel planes normal to a horizontal
plane through the said slot to provide lips 42, 42.
The pair of members 39, 39 are inserted into the
circular apertures 3'! with these flattened por
tions vertically disposed. Then when the mem 15
bers 39, 39 are urged apart under the action of a
bolt 43, all or the major portion of the pressure is
transmitted vertically upward and downward to
ward the worn ?shing surfaces of the joint bar.
Moreover, it will be seen that the area of that 20
portion of the bar at the aperture 3'! that is acted
upon by the downwardly-directed forces, applied
through the segments 39, is approximately the
same as the area of the portion of the bar at the
aperture which is acted upon by upwardly-di
25
rected forces.
The curved portion of the outer surface of each
of the pair of separate cooperating channel
shaped expansion members 39 preferably sub
tends an angle of about 90° (see Fig. 6). The 30
members are adapted to be placed in juxtaposi
tion with their lips closely adjacent or in contact.
The inner surfaces of the members 39, 39, are
threaded to accommodate a heavy or armored
threaded bolt or a tapered cap screw 43 of hard 35
ened metal, preferably of around 1% inches to
1% inches or more in diameter.
The construc
tion of these parts is such that the threadwise
movement of the bolt into the members 39 forces
the segments apart and presses them against the
inner wall of the aperture 31.
These segments are placed with the curved por
tions of their outer surfacesrespectively below
and above the bolt. When the progressively in
creasing pressure developed as the bolt advances 45
in the members 39 has reached a suitable mag
nitude, slight movement of the metal of the
joint bars occurs in the direction of the upper
and lower bearing surfaces of the bars to effect
the desired spreading action.
.
50
This spreading action at the selected areas of a
joint bar may be facilitated, and the ?t of the bar
to the bearing surfaces of the rail may be im
proved, by heating those portions of the joint bar
in which plastic flow of the metal in response 55
to the pressure is desired. Such heating may be
performed either before or during the tightening
of the screw or bolt 43.
This can be accom
plished, for instance, through raising selected
areas of the joint bar to a dull red near the 60
60 slot may be shorter, so as to terminate at one or
both ends in solid metal of the rail web, provided _ bearing surfaces to be corrected; and for this the
always that the slot has such length and position
that the expanding force within it will cause a
springing or flowing movement of the surround
65 ing metal of the bar su?icient to ?ll the worn de
pressed areas in the ?shing surfaces.
For applying force to spread the joint bars
vertically for ?lling the spaces between the bars
and rails due to wear, a large transverse aperture
70 31, preferably circular in cross section and at
least 11/; inches in diameter, is drilled‘or other
wise formed in each of the joint bars l5, H5, at
about midlength of the slot 35. It is advanta
geous to position this aperture approximately
75 midway of the height ‘of the slot 35. The walls
oxy-acetylene flame is preferred.
Where heating is to be utilized, the expansion
members and the cooperating bolt or other
spreading member preferably are made of air
hardening steel or other air-hardening alloy,
such as the alloy steel containing chromium,
manganese and silicon, commercially known as
Cromansil. Thus the subsequent air cooling will
restore much of the original strength and hard
ness of the metal.
' Although for purposes of illustration I have
shown the slot or slots 35 to be long, narrow, and
of uniform width, such construction is not essen
tial to the practice of the invention. However,
3
2,120,428
the longer this slot, the more readily can the
metal between the slot and the rail bearing sur
face be forced into place for reforming the joint.
The slot or slots 35 and the transverse aperture
or apertures 31 may, if desired, be formed with
out removing the bars l5, I6, from the rails, by
means of a cutting torch or other well-known
means.
After the slots 35 and apertures 3'! have been
10 formed in each bar [5, [6, the expansion mem
bers 39 are placed in the apertures of the respec
tive bars and these segments are forced apart by
screwing the bolt 43 into the same to force either
or both the upper and‘lower surfaces of each
15 bar into contact with the adjacent surfaces of
the rail head and/or ?ange.
After restoring the joint, the bolt 43 may be
locked in position in the members 39, 39 in suit
able manner, if desired, as for example, by pins
20 extending through the shaft of the bolt and en
gaging the walls of the members 39 or of the
bar.
The pitch and shape of thread and the diam
eter of the bolt most effective for practicing the
25 invention will naturally depend on such factors
as the cross-sections of metal to be deformed, the
thickness of the bar at the apertures receiving
the expansion members, and the number, design,
and locations of the expansion members.
30
Fig. 5 illustrates another modi?cation of the
invention in accordance with which a transverse
aperture 45 is drilled or otherwise formed in the
rail web or webs in or near the junction of the
rails. This aperture is aligned with the aper
35 tures 3'! in the webs of the joint bars l5, it. A
large bolt 47 provided with cooperating nut 49
of large threaded bearing surface is adapted to
extend through the apertures 3'1, 31, and 45 in
the bars and rail web respectively, with its ends
40 projecting therefrom.
Collars or tubular bearing members 5|, each
having a tapered outer surface 53 of frusto-con
ical shape and having an inner passage adapted
freely to accommodate the bolt 41, are positioned
45 within the apertures 37, 3'! in the joint bars. The
bolt 4'! extends through these collars in the man
ner illustrated in Fig. 5. By turning the nut on
the bolt 41 the two collars can be forced toward
each other to the extent necessary to spread the
upper
and lower ?shing areas of each bar to prop“
50
erly contact them with the adjacent portions of
the rail head and rail ?ange respectively. Stud
bolts or other equivalent means for the purpose
tively near and at points equidistant from the rail
ends and on opposite sides of the abutting joint.
The expansion members previously described are
positioned within these apertures; and each may
then be adjusted to re?t the joint bar to the rail
bearing surfaces with the application of a mini
mum of force to those portions of the rail and
bar where the least re?tting is required.
Instead of utilizing only one longitudinal slot
35, two such slots may be used, respectively placed
adjacent the upper and lower ?shing surfaces of
the joint bars l5, Hi. This modi?cation is illus
trated in Fig. 9; and it is of especial utility in
reforming the heavier rails, such as 100 pound to
136 pound rails and upward. By this construc 15
tion it is possible to place the slots 35 su?iciently
close to the ?shing surfaces of the joint bars of
heavy rails that the spreading force developed
readily produces the necessary springing or ?ow
ing movement of the portion of the bar adjacent 20
the ?shing surfaces to complete the reforming
operation.
‘
It is to be understood that the apertures 31
together with the expansion members 39, or the
collars 5!, may be elliptical, square, rectangular,
or may have other conformations, provided they
are tapered in one direction longitudinally of the
associated bolt or force-transmitting member and
can function in the general manner described.
Fig. 10 illustrates a form of construction in which 30
is provided a smooth-bored aperture 37" that
is generally elliptical in cross-section, with its
major axis preferably disposed longitudinally
of the rail. The bolt 43 is replaced in this con
struction by an unthreaded bar 46 of hardened
metal, of generally elliptical cross-section, having
its major transverse axis slightly longer than
the minor transverse axis of the aperture 31".
By rotating the bar Within the aperture 31” a
steady vertically-directed spreading pressure may 40
be exerted upon the walls of the joint bar at the
slot. When the reforming process is completed,
the portion of the bar within the aperture can be
spot welded or otherwise secured in place. One
or more such elliptical expansion members may be 45
employed.
By the practice of the present invention, rail
joints may be reconditioned at regular intervals
accurately and readily, using standard track tools
and wrenches for the purpose.
There is no
necessity for sledging or otherwise suddenlyand
severely impacting the rails and the adjacent
50
joint bars.
may be substituted for the bolt 41.
1 By developing the spreading force at the aper
Fig. '7 illustrates a modi?cation of the inven
tures 31, generally midway of the length of the 55
55
tion according to which the midportion of the ' joint and of the slot 35, and by distributing the
outer surface of each tapered expansion member force from that point, the'resultant movement of
is substantially ?at as indicated at 44. The simi
the metal is greatest at the rail ends, where the,
larly shaped polygonal aperture 31’ may be greatest wear is usually encountered. Because of
60 formed by means of an oxy-acetylene torch or in
other suitable manner. It preferably is of less
width than the expansion members 44.
Fig. 8 illustrates a modi?cation of the inven
tion ‘especially adapted for use where for any
65 reason the bearing surfaces between the rail and
the joint bars have been worn irregularly. In
this form of the invention, two or more longi
tudinally-spaced transverse apertures 31, 3'! are
provided in the joint bars l5, IS, in the manner
previously described, each having its axis at least
approximately intersecting the line of the longi
tudinal axis of slot 35.
These apertures may be of the same or differ
ent sizes and shapes. Preferably, where two ap
75 ertures 31, 31 are used, they are located respec
the ease with which the trackman can adjust the
rail joints, simple periodic tightening upon the
bolts to increase the steady pressure exerted by
the expansion members will maintain the joints
in perfect condition with a minimum of labor
and expense.
The amount of wear on the bearing surfaces of
rails and joint bars is actually very small. Hence
a slight corrective movement of the metal of the
65
joint bar at the depressed portion is sufficient,
when periodically produced with proper fre 70
quency,-—to maintain a satisfactorily tight rail
joint. On the other hand, as the depths of the
depressed areas of the joint bar and rail endsbe
come greater with the constant batter of the
traffic on the rails, the rateofincreasein'depth
4
2,120,428
of this depressed area is accelerated, and the
rails and joint bars rapidly wear away.
Where it is desirable in reforming the joint to
change the contour of but one ?shing surface, the
slot 35 may be out near the depressed worn area.
Instead of slotting standard rail joint bars in
the manner described after they are worn, the
slotted and/or apertured structure can be built
5. A method of crowning a ?shing surface of a
bar having a comparatively long and narrow lon
When new slotted and
gitudinal slot therein, which comprises forming
in the bar adjacent the said ?shing surface an
enlarged transverse aperture limited in part by
15 removed and ‘the expansible member or mem
bers then placed in position within the apertures.
In certain instances where it is desired to re
form joint bars, utilizing the rails as die ele
ments,--after the depressed worn area of the joint
20 bar has been forced into contact with the ad
jacent worn bearing surfaces of the rails under
pressure from the expansion members,-the por
tion of the slot not occupied by‘ the latter may be
built up with welding metal to provide a rigid rail
tapered walls extending through the bar, the said
aperture having a portion thereof in the longi
tudinal axis of the said slot, and forcing apart
portions of the bar at the aperture and on oppo
site sides of the slot under relatively steady pres
sure produced by a force having its principal com
ponent applied at the aperture and directed to
ward a ?shing surface of the bar across the
entire thickness of the bar to change the contour 20
of the said ?shing surface and form a crowned
area therein opposite said slot.
6. A reconditioned rail joint comprising opposed
rail ends and a joint bar connecting the same
joint.
having a crowned area in at least one ?shing sur
According to my invention, the forces applied
within the body of the joint bar to reform it are
face thereof, a longitudinal slot in said bar oppo
site said crowned area, said slot being adapted to
be spread to produce such crowned area, a sec
tional tapered member adapted to extend into
said slot, and rotatable means for regulatably 30
spreading the sections of the said tapered mem
ber and the slot and for maintaining the slot in
steadily and uniformly applied in vertical planes
extending longitudinally of the joint bar, with
30 out subjecting the bar to severe impacts or to the
sudden application of a force principally directed
transversely of the bar.
It will be apparent to those skilled in the art
that types of rail joint bars otherthan the angle
35 bar type illustrated may be employed. The in
vention is susceptible of modi?cation within the
scope of the appended claims.
I claim:
1. A method of crowning a ?shing surface of a
40
ing operation.
apertured bars are used, metal blocks of suitable
shape may be inserted into and ?ll the slots and/or
apertures and be secured to the bars in any suita
ble manner, for example, by spot welding. When
the joints become worn, the metal block may be
into the bars at the mill.
25
steady spreading pressure to the bar at the said
aperture uniformly across the entire thickness of
the bar so as laterally to spread the portion of
the bar adjacent the aperture, and releasably
locking said slot in its spread condition by a weld
25
spread condition.
‘7. A reconditioned rail joint comprising opposed
rail ends and a joint bar connecting the same
having a crowned area in at least one ?shing sur
face thereof, a longitudinal slot in the bar oppo
site the said crowned area, and at least one see
rail joint bar, which comprises longitudinally
tional transversely expansible member in said slot
and cooperating therewith to produce and main .40
slotting said bar intermediate its ends, enlarg
tain said crowned area.
ing the slot at a midportion thereof to provide a
curved bearing surface of relatively large area
8. A rail joint comprising opposed rail ends and
joint bars connecting the same, each bar having
free from abrupt changes in cross-section, slowly
expanding the slot at a regulated rate by forces
applied to the said bearing surface approximately
uniformly across the entire thickness of the bar,
thereby forming a crowned area in said ?shing
surface, and locking the slot in its expanded con
50 dition.
2. A method of crowning a ?shing surface of a
longitudinally-slotted joint bar, which comprises
forming an enlarged tapered aperture in the bar
in the line of the said slot, gradually spreading the
55 walls of the slot by force uniformly and gradually
applied thereto at the said aperture and approxi-
mately uniformly across the entire thickness of
the bar to raise a midportion of the said ?shing
surface, and releasably locking the said slot in
60 its widened condition.
‘
'1
a crowned area in at least one ?shing surface
thereof, a longitudinal slot in each bar opposite 45
the crowned area, at least one sectional member
extending transversely through the joint bars and
slot and expansible radially of and within the
plane of each joint bar and adapted to produce
and maintain the said crowned area, and rotat 50
able means for expanding the said expansible
member.
9. A rail joint bar having upper and. lower ?sh
ing surfaces with crowned areas, a narrow longi
tudinal slot in said bar adjacent said crowned
55
- areas and having at least one enlarged portion, a
tapered segmental expansion member extending
within the said enlarged portion and adapted to
engage the bar only adjacent the said crowned
3. A method of crowning a fishing surface of a
areas in the upper and lower ?shing surfaces, and
rotatable means cooperating with the said mem
longitudinally-slotted joint bar, which comprises
ber for maintaining the slot in widened condition
forming an enlarged polygonal aperture free from
abrupt changes in cross-section in the bar in the
65 midportion of the line of the slot, and applying
a spreading pressure to the bar across the entire
width thereof at the aperture and directed mainly
toward a ?shing surface to spread the said slot
so as laterally to expand the portion of the bar
70 opposite the slot, and releasably locking said slot
in its spread condition.
4. A method of crowning a ?shing surface of a
longitudinally-slotted joint bar, which comprises
forming an enlarged aperture in the bar in the
76 midportion of the line of the slot, applying a
adjacent the said enlarged portion to produce the
said crowned areas.
10. A reconditioned rail joint comprising op 65
posed rail ends, a joint bar connecting the same
and having a crowned area in at least one ?shing
surface thereof, a longitudinal slot in the bar
opposite the said crowned area, the said slot
having at least one enlarged portion of generally 70
elliptical cross-section, the same being free from
abrupt changes in transverse cross-section, and
being adapted to be spread to produce the said
crowned area, and rotatable means of generally
elliptical cross-section and free from abrupt 76
5
2,120,428
changes in such cross-section, adapted to ex
tend into the said enlarged portion for regu
lating the extent of the spreading action and
for maintaining the slot in spread condition.
11. A rail joint comprising opposed rail ends
and joint bars connecting the same, each bar
having a crowned area in at least one ?shing
surface thereof, a longitudinal slot in each bar
midway of its length, a relatively large trans
10 verse aperture extending through the respec
tive bars and rail ends and intersecting the lines
of the said slots, expansion means extending
within the aperture and comprising a pair of
ferrous metal alloy in said slot, and cooperating
therewith to produce and maintain said crowned
area.
15. A reconditioned rail joint comprising op
posed rail ends, a joint bar connecting the same
having a crowned area in at least one ?shing sur
face thereof, a longitudinal slot in the bar oppo
site the said crowned area, and means disposed in
said slot and expansible transversely of the bar
and cooperating with the walls of the slot to pro
duce and maintain said crowned area.
10
16. A reconditioned rail joint comprising op
posed rail ends, a joint bar connecting the same
cooperating members each having portions of
having a crowned area in at least one ?shing sur
its outer surface shaped to ?t the Wall of the
aperture and having other portions out of con
tact with the said walls, and a member for
actuating the expansion means.
12. A method of crowning a ?shing surface
of a longitudinally-slotted joint bar having an
enlarged aperture therein in the line of the
slot, which comprises heating at least the ?shing
surface to be crowned, gradually spreading the
walls of the slot by the steady application there
to of forces applied to the bar at the said aper
ture, thereby raising a midportion of the said
?shing surface to form a crowned area, and
welding the bar to maintain the crowned ?shing
surface in its new position.
13. A method of crowning a fishing surface of
a longitudinally-slotted joint bar, which com
prises forming a large tapered aperture in the
bar in the line of the said slot, gradually spread
ing the walls of the slot by forces applied thereto
at the said aperture to raise a midportion of
face thereof, a longitudinal slot in the bar op 15
posite the said crowned area, and means includ
ing a threaded member disposed in said slot and
having parts movable vertically within the ver
tical plane of the bar and cooperating with the
Walls of the slot to produce and maintain said 20
crowned area.
17. A rail joint comprising opposed rail ends
and joint bars connecting the same, each bar hav
ing a crowned area in at least one fishing surface,
a longitudinal slot in each bar opposite the said 25
crowned area, and at least one pair of internally
threaded segmental expansion members extend
ing transversely of and through a corresponding
one of the bars but not through the rails, and
threaded members adapted respectively to co- -
operate with a corresponding pair of the ex
pansion members to» cause a spreading movement
of the latter.
18. A rail joint bar having upper and lower
?shing surfaces, parallel narrow longitudinal ‘
the said ?shing surface, while applying heat to
slots in the bar respectively adjacent the said
that portion of the ?shing surface adjacent
the said aperture, and releasably locking the said
slot in its widened condition.
14. A reconditioned rail joint, comprising op
40
posed rail ends and a joint bar connecting the
surfaces, each of the said slots having at least one
enlarged midportion, tapered segmental expan
sion members respectively extending within each
same having a crowned area in at least one ?sh
of the said enlarged portions, and means cooper
ating with the respective segments of the said
members for spreading apart the latter and for
ing surface thereof, a longitudinal slot in the bar
maintaining the slots in widened condition.
opposite the said crowned area, and at least one
45 sectional expandible member of ‘air-hardening
HARRY R. LEE.
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
880 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа