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Патент USA US2120502

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June 14, 1938.
J. MORTON
2,120,502
MOLD FOR PARTS OF KNITTING MACHINERY
Original Filed Jan. 8, 1936
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June 14, 1938.
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2,120,502
MOLD FOR PARTS OF KNITTING MACHINERY
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Original Filve'd Jan. 8, 1936
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2,120,502
Patented June 14, 1938
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,120,502
MOLD‘ FOR PARTS OF KNITTING
MACHINERY
James Morton, Tuether, Carlisle, England, as
signor to F. N. F. Limited, Oroydon, Surrey,
England
Original application January 8, 1936, Serial No.
58,176. Divided and this application Septem
her 4, 1936, Serial No. 99,494. In Great Brit
ain, January 19, 1935
'7 Claims.
This invention relates to the manufacture of
knitting-machine needle and like assemblies (or
so-called “sections”) each consisting of a group
of needles or the like secured in a support, such
, an assembly constituting a single unit.
By the
term “needles or the like” is meant knitting nee
dles, hooked or otherwise, thread-guides (some
times called “pillar-?ngers”), sinkers, and like
working parts of knitting machines—_-particu
10 larly those known as “warp knitting machines”.
Such needle or like assemblies areusually ar
ranged side-by-side along some form of carrying
bar (such as a guide bar, needle-bar or a sinker
bar) to which the supports are attached, the
15 needles or the like extending in a closely spaced
series. The said supports are usually molded of
lead or a lead alloy, in which the needles or the
like are embedded while the metal is molten but
zinc alloys have also been proposed having a spe
ci?c gravity as low as 4.6. The supports are re
movably attached to the carrying bars to facili
tate replacement of any assembly having a broken
needle or the like.
It has heretofore been con
sidered essential to employ metal, or a metallic
25 alloy, for supporting the needles and the like
on account of the necessity for securing them
rigidly in precise co-relationship and maintain
ing such co-relationship throughout their life.
A disadvantage associated with the use of me
30 tallic supports is that their weight is a factor
requiring to be taken into serious consideration
when designing the machines and materially lim
its the speed of operation and consequently the
output of the machines. Experiments made with
(01. 18-42)
therein in correct order and co-relationship can
be produced, these supports being strong and
hard and being capable of retaining their strength
and hardness under normal working conditions
and being also of such lightness as to enable them 5
to be used effectively in machines designed to
run at a high speed.
' The object of the present invention is to pro
vide a mold for use in the manufacture of an
assembly of knitting-machine working parts.
The mold may comprise an outer shell, a part
supporting structure which ?ts into said shell
and presents an open space, means for locating
a group of knitting-machine working parts side
by-side with portions thereof extending into said
open space, which latter can be ?lled with light
weight molding material to surround said por
tions, and a closure adapted to ?t into said shell
to close said space and ‘press upon said powder.
Means provided for locating and maintaining 20
the needles or the like in correct order and @0
relationship preparatory to and during the mold
ing operation, may consist of or include accu
rately spaced serrations or rack members or a
light frame in, or adapted to ?t in, the mold, 25:
in which serrations, members, or frame, the nee
dles or the like are arranged, the plastic material
being supplied in powder form to the mold in
terior so as closely to surround the shanks of the
needles or the like and, when the material is set,
to hold them permanently and securely in posi
tion.
The said serrations or serrated members
may be provided not only externally but also in
ternally of the mold.
35 knitting machinery, particularly with Warp knit- ‘
In the preferred construction, the mold is pro
ting machinery, embodying various improvements vided with serrations and at least one grouprof
directed towards the attainment of speeds of op
knitting needles or the like are accurately held
eration and outputs materially higher than here
in place thereby, molding powder in ?ne condi
tofore, have indicated that owing to the consid
tion is charged into the mold and closely pressed
40 erable weight of the rapidly moving masses,
round the shanks of the needles or the like, then 40
stresses of such magnitude are set up in the ma
the mold is closed and placed in a steam or elec
chine as to neutralize the bene?t of the improve
trically heated press and, ?nally, subjected to
ments and prevent the realization of the high such heat and pressure as to convert the powder
speeds and outputs forwhich the machinery was into a hard solid body constituting the support
45 designed.
which, when removed from the mold, has the 45.
In order to overcome the aforesaid disadvan
tage, needle and like assemblies having supports
group of needles or the like securely-embedded
therein ready to be utilized in a knitting machine.
made of various materials have been tried and I
have now found, after careful selection and trial,
are positively held in correct position and rela
50 that by using a light-weight organic molding
material, or so-called “plastic” for example a res
In use of such a mold the needles or the like
inoid material such as “bakelite”, in which the
tionship by the serrations of the mold while the 50,
molding composition attaches itself to and sup,
ports them so that when the molding operation
needles or the like are set or embedded by a
is ?nished the needles or the like are held very
molding operation under heat and pressure, sup
55 ports with the needles or the like positively held
securely in place and project regularly and evenly
from the support.
65
2
2,120,502
Each support may be molded with two holes
light-weight organic molding material” as used
herein is intended to cover such moldable resin
oi'd substances as the swnthetic resins and com
neatly through the thread-guiding eyes ll of
each group of thread guides and adapted to seat
positions thereof and, in particular, such resins;
itself on the external serrations 26 serves to
or resinous compositions as are thermo-plastic
maintain the heads of said guides in precise
alignment. The members 21 and distance-pieces 10
28 co-operate with an upper clamp 3| which
holds the heads of the guides securely in place.
or otherwise, to its carrying bar or the like.
It is to be understood that the expression “a
10 and thermo-setting, for instance, the phenolic
resinous material known as “Bakelite”, but it is
not con?ned thereto as other well known or
ganic substances or compositions which are
thermo-plastic and of a speci?c gravity appre
15 ciably less than the aforesaid metallic alloys and
which, when molded under heat and pressure
Will be strong and set hard and will retain their
strength and hardness under normal working
20
ally supported by a plain external rest-face 25
and an external serrated
members 21 inserted into
bers 2‘! are spaced apart
held by a screw 29Ito the
permitting it to be removably attached by screws,
conditions, can be used.
Of course as required for strength and light
ness suitable lightweight ?llers would be chosen
for the molding compositions, a variety of such
?llers. being obtainable.
The invention will now be described simply by
26 way of example and with reference to the ac
companying drawings, as applied to needles and
like working parts of warp knitting machines.
On the drawings:
Fig. 1 is an elevation of an assembly compris
30? ing a group of thread-guides and. their Bakelite
support.
Fig. 2isa sectionon the line. ll-—H of Fig. 1.
Fig. 8. is a plan of a mold with parts thereof
removed to expose thread-guides embedded in
3517 “Bakelite”, and Fig. 4 is a corresponding sectional
fragmentary. plan drawn to an enlarged scale.
Fig. 5 is a section on the line V--V of Fig. 3,
Fig. 5 being drawn to a larger scale than Fig. 3.
Fig. 6. is a diagrammatic perspective View,
40; drawn to an enlarged, scale, showing how the
thread-guides are locatedin the mold.
Figs. 7, 8, 9, and were sectional perspective
views of assemblies comprising groups of latch
knitting-needles, sinkers, plush-needles (i. e. pile
forming needles) and bearded knitting-needles,
respectively, and their “Bakelite” supports.
rest 26 on each of two
the die 2|. The mem
by a distance-piece 28
die 2|. A pin 30 ?tted
Theserrations are accurately made so as to
ensure that the needles or the like shall be held
in correct relationship during the molding opera 15
tion.
In the use of the mold, the lower die 2| with the
members 2'! and distance-piece 28 thereon are
?tted into the shell 20. The thread-guides H)
are arranged in two groups, with the pins 30 20
threaded through the eyes ll of the guides of
the respective groups, the guides being accurately‘
disposed between and laterally. supported by the
serrations 24 and 2B and also supported by the
faces 25. The “Bakelite” composition consisting 25
of. the required mixture of synthetic resin and
suitable ?ller in ?nely. powdered form is care
fully packed upon both sides of the die, the
thread-guides l0 thus becoming embedded inthe
powder. The dies 22: and the clamp 3| are placed
in position. The completely assembled mold is
put into a known form of molding press, and
pressure and heat are applied'so as to convert the
composition into a Bakelite body of the required
hardness. After the “Bakelite” composition has
been subjected to the required.“cooking”, the mold
is removed from the molding press and disman-v
tled and the pins 23 are withdrawn from the
thread-guides, whereupon the newly formed
“Bakelite” supports l3, with the stems l2 of the 40
thread-guides» securely and permanently em
bedded therein, are removed.
number of sid-e-by-side guide-holding supports
The provision of the serrations 24 results in the
formation of an open slot 32 in each support I3,
said slot- exposing a short portion of’each stem I2.
The effect however of this slot is negligible as
regards the security and rigidity with which the
thread-guides are held in place.
If desired, serrations similar to the serrations
50'
241might also be provided in the faces 25.
If desired, a series of double molds, each simi
lar to the mold proper above described, may be
provided so that several assemblies may be pro
duced at one molding operation.
If desired,- instead of forming serrations in 55.
tegral with the elements of the mold as in the
construction illustrated, light frame members in
which the thread-guides are located may be in
serted-into the mold and embedded along with the
similar to the support l3 would be likewise at‘
thread-guides in the Bakelite.
Referring to Figs. land 2, the assembly therein
shown- consists of a group of thread-guides l0
each formed with a thread-guiding eye or hole
50 H‘ and each including a stem 12, the guidesbeing
arranged side-by-sid-e and being’ precisely equi
spaced. The support consists of a thin block l3
of‘ “Bakelite” from one side of which the guides
Hi all project to the same extent. The support I3
551 is formedwith a shoulder 14 and ?ange l5 hav
ing screw holes 16 and is- thereby adapted for
removable attachment in the usual manner to a
guide-bar’ (not shown in this view)v to which a
tached.
'
In Figs. 3 to 6 a suitable form of mold has
been shown which is adapted to mold at‘ one
'
602
If desired, reinforcing'material may be incor
porated in the “Bakelite” support. For example,
such reinforcing material may comprise a strip
operation “Bakelite” supports for two separate
of fabric or a thin metallic or other rod-if de
groups of thread-guides ill. The mold structure
includes an outer shell 20; into which the mold'
proper ?ts. ,The chief elements constituting-the‘
sired, serrated-arranged across the shanks and
in- engagement therewith.
mold proper are a lower die 2! and duplicate up
ing type, containing, for instance, wood ?our as
the ?ller, can be advantageously employed, al
though other ?llers, such as asbestos ?bre or‘ 70.
per dies 22, these‘elements being separable. Core‘
70i pins 23' driven tightly into holes in the lower
die: 24 andregistrable with holes in the upper
diesn22- serve to form the screw-holes IS.
The thread-guides‘ ID are spaced apart by series’
of; internal serrations 24- provided at both sides
.of the die 2|. The thread-guides are- addition
“Bakelite” molding powders of the quick-?ow
?aked fabric can be used.
With reference to Figs. 7, 8 and 9, the working
parts there-in‘ shown may be incorporated in the
same warp-‘knitting machine to work in combina-"
tion- with the‘ thread-guides;
2,120,502
Fig. 7 shows members of a group of latch knit
ting-needles 40 whose shanks 4| are securely em
bedded in a “Bakelite” support 42 removably at
tachable to aneedle-bar (notshown in this view)
to which other similar supports would also be
attached side-by-side.
-
Fig. 8 shows members of a group of sinkers 50
which in the construction shown are embedded
at opposite ends in a main “Bakelite” support 5|
and an auxiliary “Bakelite” support 52. This
auxiliary support may, if desired, be dispensed
with. These sinkers 59 pass between the knit
ting needles to control the loops formed in the
threads being knitted and hold down the fabric
15 in the usual manner. The main Bakelite support
5| is removably attachable, side-by-side with
other similar supports, to a sinker-bar (not
shown).
Fig. 9 shows members of a group of plush nee~
20. dles 60. -Such needles can be provided in warp
knitting machines adapted to form. pile loops in
the fabrics knitted by them, these pile loops ex-v
tending from the knitted chains produced by the
individual knitting needles. The stems 6| of
25 these plush-needles are embedded in .a “Bakelite”
support 82 securable to a plush-bar (not shown)
corresponding to the needle-bar 43.
Referring to Fig. 10, the knitting-needles 10
therein shown are bearded needles. Such needles
30 constitute a well known alternative to the latch
needles shown in Fig. 7.
The working parts above described with ref
erence to Figs. 7 to 10 are all assembled as groups
in their “Bakelite” supports in substantially the
35 same manner as already described with reference
to Figs. 1 to 6, the molds employed being modi
?ed in so far as necessary to suit the dimensional
and other differences between the different parts.
In the case of the knitting needles 4!] and ‘Ill, a
40 positioning pin corresponding to the pin 30 can be
threaded through the hooks 40a and ‘Mia of each
group of needles; and in the case of the sinkers
50, a positioning pin may be placed in the recesses
51!21 in the sinkers of each group.
The invention is suitable for application to the
45
manufacture of needle and like assemblies includ
ing groups of needles and the like of standard
form, as heretofore used in knitting machines;
but, if desired, the shanks of the needles or the
50 like may be formed with overturned end projec
tions which would help to lock the shanks in the
plastic composition.
As an example of a suitable light Weight mate
rial the phenolic resinous material (trade name
55 “Bakelite”) has been specially referred to but
other examples may, however, be given; for in
stance, cellulose derivatives such as cellulose ace
tate and rubber derivatives such as ebonite.
Bakelite powder incorporating a light weight
60 ?ller as aforesaid has a substantially lower spe
ci?c gravity than the metallic alloys before men
tioned and it has been found a most suitable
material for the needle and the like assemblies;
but other light weight materials such as above
65 mentioned have also been found to give good re
sults.
This application is a division of my col-pending
application Serial No. 58,176, ?led January 8, 1936.
70
3
side with the recesses thereof in alignment and
with portions thereof extending into said open
space, which latter can be packed with lightweight
plastic material in powder form to surround said
portions, said locating means including serrations
provided on said structure externally of the open
space, seatings in said serrations, a rigid position
ingmember adapted for threading through said
recesses and to rest in said seatings, and a closure
adapted to fit into said shell to close said space 10
and press upon said powder.
2. A mold for use in the manufacture of .an
assembly of knitting-machine working parts con
sisting of head portions and stem portions, said
mold comprising an outer shell, a part-support
ing structure which ?ts into said shell and pre
15
sents an open space, means for locating a group
of said working parts side-by-side with the stem
portions thereof extending into said open spade,
and with the head‘ portions external to said 20
space, which latter can be packed with light
weight plastic material in powder form to sur
round said stem portions, said locating means in
cluding serrations on said part-supporting struc
ture and a clamp to hold the head portions se 25
curely in said serrations, and a closure adapted to
?t alongside of said clamp into said shell to close .
said space and press upon said powder.
3. A mold for use in the manufacture of an
assembly of knitting-machine working parts con 30
sisting of head portions and stem portions, said
mold comprising an outer shell, a part-supporting
structure which ?ts into said shell and presents
an open space, means for locating a group of said
working parts side-by-side with the stem portions 35
thereof extending into said open space, and with
the head portions external to said space, whichv
latter is adapted to receive an organic molding
material to surround said stem portions, said 10
eating means comprising rigid spacers on said 40
part-supporting structure internally of said open
space to support the stem portions, rigid spacers
on said structure externally of said open space to
support the head portions and a clamp to hold
the head portions securely in said spacers and 45
a closure .adapted to ?t alongside of said clamp
into said shell to close said space and press upon
said material.
4. A mold for use in the manufacture of an
assembly of knitting-machine working parts con 50
sisting of head portions and stem portions, said
mold comprising a part-supporting structure
presenting an open space, rigid means for locat
ing a group of said working parts in precise
side-by-side co-relationship, with the stem por 55
tions thereof extending into said open space,
and with the head portions external to said space,
which latter is adapted to receive an organic
molding material to surround said stem portions,
said locating means comprising rigid spacers on 60
said part-supporting structure internally of said
open space to support the stem portions, rigid
spacers on said structure externally of said open
space to support the head portions and a clamp
to hold the head portions securely in said ex 65
ternal spacers, and closure means to close said
space and press upon said material.
5. A mold for use in the manufacture of an
assembly of knitting-machine working parts each
assembly of knitting-machine working parts con
sisting of head portions and stem portions, said 70
mold comprising a part-supporting structure
having a recess, said mold comprising an outer
presenting an open space, rigid means for locat
I claim:—
1. A mold for use in the manufacture of an
shell, a part-supporting structure which ?ts into
ing a group of said working parts spaced apart
said shell and presents an open space, means for in precise side-by-side co-relationship, with the
75 locating a group of said working parts side-by- * stem portions thereof extending into said open 75
2,120,502
space and with the head portions external to
said space, which latter is adapted to receive
an organic molding material to surround said
stem portions, said rigid locating means com
prising serrated spacers on said part-supporting
structure to support the stem portions, said spac
ers projecting into the interior of the open space
so as to be embedded along with the stem por
tions in the molding material, and serrated spac
for threading through said recesses and to rest
in said seatings, and closure means to close said
space and press upon said material.
7. A mold for use in the manufacture of an
assembly of knitting-machine working parts
said material.
6. A mold for use in the manufacture of an
each comprising a stem and a portion with a
recess, said mold comprising a part-supporting
structure presenting an open space, rigid means
for locating a group of said working parts in
precise side-by-side co-relationship, with the re 10
cesses thereof in alignment and with the recessed
portions thereof extending into said open space,
which latter is adapted to receive an organic
molding material to surround said portions, said
assembly of knitting-machine working parts each
locating means comprising serrations provided 18
1.0 ers on said structure externally of said open
space to support the head portions, and a clo
sure means to close said space and press upon
having a recess, said mold comprising a part
supporting structure presenting an open space,
rigid means externally of said space for locating
a ‘group of said working parts in precise side
~ by-side co-relationship, with the recesses there
of in alignment and with portions thereof ex
tending into said open space, which latter is
adapted to receive an organic molding material
to surround said portions, seatings in said locat
\ ing means, a rigid positioning member adapted
on said structure internally of the open space
to receive the stems of the group of said work
ing part and serrations provided on said struc
ture externally of the open space to receive the
recessed portions, seatings in the last-mentioned
serrations, a rigid positioning member adapted
for threading through said recesses and to rest
in said seatings, and closure means to close said
space and press upon said material.
JAMES MORTON.
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