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Патент USA US2120803

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June 14, 1938. -
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A, Q GRAN-r
2,120,803
HEATING SYSTEM
I
Filed Feb. 4, 1935
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Arthur 0., Giant
June 14, ‘1938.
A. CJGRANT
'
HEATING SYSTEM
'
2,120,803"
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Filed Feb. 4, 1935 ‘
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Arthur C. Grant '
2,120,,8
Patented June 14, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,120,803
HEATING SYSTEM
Arthur C. Grant, St. Paul, Minn., asslgnor to
Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Company,
Minneapolis, Minn, a. corporation of Delaware
Application February 4, 1935, Serial No. have,
21 claims.
This invention relates to a control system and
is more speci?cally directed to control systems
for heating systems.
It is an oioject of this invention to provide a
control system for a heating system wherein the
heating ?uid delivered to the space to'be heated
and the temperature of the heater is varied ac
cording to changes in the temperature of the
space to he heated.
_
‘Another object is to provide a control system
i
for a heating system wherein the circulatory
movement of the heating fluid is started and
stopped according to heater conditions and
wherein the amount of heating fluid so circu~
l lated is varied according to changes in tempera
ture of the space to be heated.
it. further ohlect is to provide a heating con
trol system wherein the circulatory movement of
the heating fluid is started and stopped accord
l log} to heater temperatures and wherein the
amount of heating
so circulated and the
temperature of the, heater are varied according to
changes in temperature of the space to be heated.
(or. sic-min
'
culated and the‘ temperature of the heater is
varied by an auxiliary heater type thermostat
which is responsive to changes in temperature
of the space to be heated.
Still another‘object of this invention is to pro»,
vide a combination of control elements related in
such manner that a sensitive and accurate con
trol over a heating system'is obtained whereby
the over-all efficiency of the system is increased
and unevenness of control caused by “over-shoot“ M)
ing” and “under-shooting” is eliminated.
Other objects and advantages will become ap
parent to those skilled in the art by referring to
the accompanying specification, claims and draw
ings in which:
Fig. 1 is‘ a diagrammatic showing of a domestic
heating system with one form of the control sys
tem of» this invention associated therewith and,
,Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic showing of a domestic
heating system with another form of control si s” 20
tern of this invention associated therewith.
Referring now to Fig. l, the heating system of
this modi?cation comprises a heater which may
be in the form of a warm air furnace designated
It is an object of one form of this invention to
provide a control system for a heating system ‘ at it) and having a loonnet 9. Located within 25
wherein the amount of heating ?uid delivered to the heater or furnace iii is a heat exchanger it
having a ?ue it’ extending therefrom through
the space to ‘be heated and the amount of fuel
fed to the heater is varied proportionately to ‘ the furnace it and outwardly to a suitable stock
variations in the temperature of the space to be or chimney shown at iii. A fuel feeding means
which may be in the form of a pipe is designated heated.
Another object of this form of the invention at Mi and the flow of fuel therethrough is con“
trolled by means of a valve it. Although the
is to provide a control system for a heating sys
tem wherein the amount of heating ?uid de
livered to the space to be heated is varied in
)
proportion to changes in temperature of the
space to he heated and wherein the fuel supply
to the heater is controlled by variations in tem
perature of the space to be heated and by changes
in heater conditions.
Still another objectof this form of the inven
U
tion is to provide a heating control system
' wherein the circulatory movement of the heat
ing system is primarily controlled according’ to
changes in a condition of the heater and wherein
it is secondarily controlled according to changes
in temperature of the space to‘be heated with
provision for'controlling the condition of? the
heater according to changes in the temperature
of the space to be heated and according , to
fuel feeding means is shown tohe a. pipe iii
for-conveying liquid or‘ gaseous fuel to the heat
exchanger ll it may be of any type. This inven
tion contemplates the use of and control of gas
or liquid or solid fuel.
Leading from the bonnet 9 of the furnace iii
are ducts it which extend upwardly and termi
mate in registers ill for delivering heated air from 40
the furnace it to the rooms or spaces to be
heated. Cold air is returned from the rooms or
spaces to be heated to the furnace or heater it
through a. cold air return grating ill, a cold air
return duct It, a fan mechanism 20 and an inlet 45
duct 2i.
_
_
\
Located in the cold air return pipe l3 are
louvers or dampers 242 which are moved between
open and closed positions by means of a linkage
23 connected‘ to- a reciprocating rack 24 which 50
changes in the condition of the heater.
An object of another form 01' my invention is is operatedjby a rotary pinion 25. The rotary
to provide a heating control system wherein the‘ pinion 25 is driven by means of a proportioning
or modulating motor 26, which may be of the
circulatory movement of the heated fluid is start
ed and stopped according to heater temperatures type described and shown in U. S. Patent
1,989,972 granted to Lewis L. Cunningham on 55
and wherein the amount of heating ?uid so cir
2
l
1
2,120,803
Feb. 5, 1935. The proportioning or modulating
means of a wire 50 to the line wire 4| so that
motor 26 is suitably supported by means of a
‘when the fan switch 33 is closed, the motor 231s
energized to operate the fan mechanism 20.
The proportioning motor 26 which operates the
louvers 22 is connected by means of wires 5| and
52 to the line wires 40 and 4| respectively so
that energy is always supplied to the proportion
ing motor 26. The thermostat 34 and each end
of the potentiometer coil 35 are connected by
support diagrammatically shown at ,21. Since
the construction and operation of the proportion
ing motor 26 is speci?cally shown and described
in the above referred to patent, a detailed de
scription here is not considered necessary.
The fan mechanism 20 comprises a fan which
is driven by means of a motor 28 through the
10 medium of a belt 29 to force air through the sys-'
tem in the manner pointed out above.
means of wires 55, 56 and 51 respectively to the
proportioning motor 26 in the manner shown in
The valve l5 controlling the supply of fuel
through the pipe I4 is operated by means of a
proportioning or modulating motor 30 of the
the ?rst mentioned Cunningham patent to con
trol the operation thereof.
Carried by a moving part of the proportioning
15 power failure type which may take the form that
is shown and described in U. S. Patent 2,029,465
granted to Lewis L. Cunningham on Feb. 4, 1936,
so that for a given position of theparts oi the
proportioning motor 26, the slider arm 6| as
tion and operation of the proportioning motor 36 - sumes a like position with respect to the coil 62.
for operating the valve I5 is speci?callyshown Although I have shown the slider 6| to be oper
and described in this Cunningham patent, a de
ated by the linkage 23, it may in'practice be op- \
tailed description here is not considered neces
erated by any movable part of the proportioning
sary.
.
motor. The slider 6| and each end of the po
Located in the bonnet 9 of the furnace or heater~ tentiometer coil 62 are connected by means of
I5 is a condition responsive device preferably in wires 58, 59 and 63 respectively to the propor to
the form of a thermostatic switching mechanism tioning motor 33 to control the operation thereof.
of the type shown and described in Patent No.
The operation of the proportioning motor 26
1,951,663 to John P._ Krieohbaum and patented may be brie?y stated as follows: with the parts in
March 20th, 1934. This thermostatic switching the positions shown in Fig. 1, upon a rise in tem
mechanism contains a high limit mercury switch perature in the space to be heated, the thermo- .5
32, and a fan mercury switch 33. These switches
stat will move the slider to the right along the
?led November 11th, 1933.
20
25
30
.
motor 261s a slider arm 6| which is adapted 1
to engage and slide over a potentiometer coil 62
Since the construc
contain suitable electrodes as shown to be en
_ gaged by the usual mercury upon tilting of the
switches to closed circuit positions in a manner
35 to be described hereafter.
The thermostatic de
vice 3| and the switches 32 and 33 contained
‘therein are so arranged and operated that upon
. a rise in temperature in the bonnet 3 to a prede
termined value, switch 32 is opened thereby ef
potentiometer coil 35, causing an unbalancing oi
the resistances therein. The'eil‘ect of these un
balanced resistances is transmitted by wires 55,
56 and 51 to the proportioning motor 26 to cause <
the same to move the rack 24 and consequently
the louvers 22 toward a closed position a prede
termined amount. By reason of a follow up
40 fecting a high limit safety control of the circuit
mechanism located within the proportioning
motor 26, the proportioning motor 26 and con
controlled thereby and upon a rise in temperature
'‘ in the bonnet 9 to another predetermined value
sequently the louvers 22 are positioned in direct
switch 33 is closed. Upon the lowering of the
temperature to a lesser predetermined value,
45 switch ‘33 is opened. The switch 33 is therefore
space to be heated. Upon a decrease in tem
perature in the space to be heated, the slider of
the thermostat 34 is'moved to the left along the 4
responsive to selective differentialheater temper
potentiometer coil 35 to cause a reverse unbalanc
atures for starting and stopping the tan mecha
ing of the resistances in the potentiometer coil 35
to cause the proportioning motor 26 to move the
louvers 22 a predetermined distance toward the
nism 23.
'
Located in one of the rooms or spaces to be
50 heated is a condition responsive device which may
take the form of a thermostat 34, having a slider
which is adapted to contact and slide across a
open position.
The louvers 22 are opened in ,
changes existing within the room or space'to be
direct relation to the temperature decrease in the
space to be heated. From the above, it is seen
that the rack 24 and louvers 22 assume given posi
tions in direct response to the temperature exist
heated.
ing in the space to be heated.
potentiometer coil 35 according to temperature
55
relation to the temperature existing within the
’ .
Leading irom- some source of power, not shown,
to a primary 43 oi’ a step-down transformer gen
erally designated at 42 are line wires 43 and 4|.
n
Since the rack 24 is moved in proportion to tem
perature changes existing within the space to‘be
heated and since the slider 6| is carried by the
One end of the secondary 44 or the step-down rack 24, the slider 6| will be moved along the
transformer 42 is connected by means oi’ a wire potentiometer coil 62 in proportion to tempera- f
'43 to one o{ the electrodes of high limit switch ture changes existing‘ within the space to be
32. The other electrode oi! thehigh limit switch heated. Movement of the slider 6| in this man
32 is connected by means or a wire ‘Itothe pro
ner along the potentiometer coil 32 causes un
portioning or modulating motor 33 and this pro- ' balancing of resistances therein and the eirect
portioning or modulating motor 33 is in turn con- ' of these unbalanced resistances is transmitted by 1
nected by means oi’ a wire 41 to the other end wires 53, 53 and63 to the proportioning motor 33
‘of the secondary 44 of the step-down trans
to operate the same. to proportionately position I
former 42 so that when the high limit switch 32 ' the valve l3 between open and closed positions
is closed, energy is supplied to the proportioning
‘
.
70 motor 33 of fuel valve 33.
The‘ line wire 43 is also connected by means
ot'a wire '43 to one of the electrodes oi’ the fan
switch 33 and the other electrode of the fan switch
33 is connected by means of a wire 43 to the
electric motor 23 which in turn is connected by
according to temperature changes existing within
the space to‘be heated.
,
,
1
From the above, it is seen that both the louvers
22 and the valve II are‘ proportionately opened
and closed in response to temperature variations
in the space to be heated. By, reason of this
proportioning control, the amount, of heating 1
araae'cs
iiirdd or air circulated through the system and the
temperature of’ the heater is varied in direct
proportion to temperature variations in the se
to he heated so that a line and accurate control is
obtained whereby “over-shooting” and “under
shooting” are prevented.
With the parts in the positions shown in Fig. 1
oi‘ the drawings, mercury switches lit and 3d are
in closed circuit positions and a circuit is com
pleted from the secondary lid of the step-down
transformer it through wire it, mercury switch
wire tit, proportioning' motor 3t and wire till
hack to the secondary (it to permit energization
of the proportioning motor lit. Another circuit
15 is completed from line wire (it through wire lid,
mercury switch 33, wire ti), fan motor it and wire
baclr to the line wire iii to maintain the tan
motor it and consequently the tan mechanism Ed
in operation. ‘Upon a rise in bonnet temperature
above a predetermined value, switch 332 isv moved
by means hf a fan motor it through the medium.
of a belt ‘it.
/
Located in the cold air return duct ‘it is a
damper ‘it which is adapted to be moved between
closed and opened positions. An adjustable stop
it is located in the'cold air return duct ‘it to
prevent complete closure of the damper ‘it so that
some circulation of the heating fluid will always
be present when the fan mechanism ‘it is in op
eration to prevent a cold sensation," sometimes 10
termed “cold to” from existing in the spaces or
rooms to he heated. The damper ‘it is moved
hetween opened and closed positions by means
of .an arm {Bil connected thereto. The heamr
or furnace id is fired in the usual manner and 15
the amount of draft therethrough and conse
duently the ten'iperatmre thereoi is controlled by
means oi a draft door 86.
Cables or chains
and till extend from the
arm 8d of the damper ‘iii and the draft door ti 20
to an open position to edect a high limit cut-out . respectively to arms lid and th respectively oi’
to prevent energization of the proportioning
motor til whereby the valve i5 is moved to a
closed position since the. proportioning motor lid
is of the power failure type. Upon a decrease
in temperature existing in the bonnet t below a
predetermined value, mercury switch tt is moved
to an open position to stop operation of the fan
motor to and the tan mechanism it to prevent
30 circulation of the air or heating fluid through
the system. In this manner, cold air is prevented
from being circulated through the system.
a damper motor dd which may he of the type
shown and descrihed in Patent No. luddb?ll’l to
Roy W. Johnson, patented December 8th, 1931.
The chain or cable d2 passes over a suitable pul
ley mechanism till. Upon operation of the damp
or motor tt, the draft door ti and the damper
‘it are opened or closed.
.
Located in the bonnet ‘ii oi the. heater ‘iii is
a condition responsive device which may take the 30
form or a thermostatic switching mechanism oi
the type she
and described in Patent No.
1,7825%
to
Charles
P. Dougherty and patented
From the above, it is seen that the fan mecha» November 25th, i930. This condition responsive
nism it is'started and stopped accordingr to "
selected differential temperatures existing in the device til operates a mercury switch tt having 35
the usual electrodes and mercury contained
bonnet 9 whereby the movement of the circulat
therein. Upon a rise in temperature above a
ing hind from the furnace or heater iii through predetermined value, the switch 89 is moved in
the duct it into the space to be heated and the circuit closing position and upon a decrease in
return of cold air through the cold air return temperature to a value ,less than the first pre 40
40 pipe it and the inlet 2! to the heater it! is con
determined value, the switch at is moved to cir
trolled by the heater I0. It is also seen from the cuit opening position.
above, that the amount of circulation or rate of
Leading from some source of power not shown
?ow oi’ heating ?uid and the amount of fluid are line wires W and 98. Line wire 90 connects
delivered to the heater and consequently the tem
to one electrode of the mercury switch 88 and
45 perature of the heater is directly and proportion
the other electrode of the mercury switch 89 is
ately controlled according to variations in the connected by means of a wire 92 to the fan mo
room temperature.
'
tor 16. The line wire 9| is also connected to fan
Having referred to Fig. 1, it is seen that I have _motor 18. When the switch 89 is moved to a
provided in this modi?cation a control system closed position in response to the existence of a
for a heating system having a heater and heating predetermined high temperature within the bon 50
?uid conveying means adapted to heat a space, net ‘li, a circuit is'completed from line wire 90
which control system comprises: a fan for oil"
through the mercury switch 89, wire 92, and fan
culating the ?uid through the ?uid conducting motor 18 to line wire 9| to cause energization
means; a fan switch responsive to a predeter
of the fan motor 16 and consequent operation
minedhigh temperature of the heater for start; of the fan mechanism 14 to cause circulation of
ing the fan and responsive to a predetermined the heating ?uid through the system. When the
low temperature for stopping the fan; louvers in switch 89 is moved to circuit opening position in
the fluid conducting means for controlling the response to the existence of a predetermined low
rate or flow of heating ?uid which are propor
temperature in the bonnet ‘H, the above circuit 60
UL) tionately opened or closed according to variations
is broken and the fan mechanism 14 is stopped
in room temperature; a valve for controlling the to prevent the circulation of cold air through
?ow of fuel to the heater which is proportionately the rooms or spaces to be heated.
opened or closed according to variations in room
_Wires 93 and 94 connect a primary 95 of a step
temperature and a high limit safety device re
down transformer 98 to the line wires 90 and
sponsive to a predetermined high bonnet tem
9|. This step-down transformer 96 is provided
perature for closing the fuel valve. X
Referring now to Fig. 2, I have shown a heater
which may take the form of a warm, air furnace
10, having a bonnet 1i. \ Leading upwardly from
the bonnet ‘II tor-the rooms or spaces to be heated
are ducts ‘I2 for conveying heated air to said
rooms or spaces. A cold air return?duct 13 con- .
with a Secondary 91. In a like manner, wires 98
and 88 connect aprimary "In of a step-down
transformer llll- to the line wires 90 and M. This
step-down transformer l?l is provided with a 70
secondary I02.
_
'
-
Located in one of the rooms or spaces to be
veys cold air from the space to be heated through heated is an auxiliary heater type thermostat I03
a fan mechanism 14 and a cold air inlet 16 to which carries contacts I“ and I”. The con
- the heater 10. The fan mechanism 14 is operated tacts HM and I05 are adapted to sequentially en 75
4
2,120,808
gage stationary contacts I06 and I01. The dis
tance between contacts I04 and I00 is less than
the distance between contacts I05 and IN so that
upon a decrease in temperature existing in the
space to be heated, contact I04 is caused to en
gage contact I06 before contact I05 engages con
tact I01. Connected to a binding‘post which se
cures the thermostat I03 in position is one end
of a wire I00, the other end of the wire I00_being
10 connected to a heating element I00 which is lo
cated in close proximity to the bimetal of the
contacts I00 and I04, contacts I00 and I01, wire
III, relay coil H2 and wire IIO back to the sec
ondary 01 of the step-down transformer 00.
Upon completion of this circuit, the relay coil
H2 is energized to move switch arm IIO into en
gagement with the contact III thereby complet
ing a second circuit from the secondary 01 of
step-down transformer 00 through wire IIO, con
tacts I00 and I04, thermostat I00, wire- I00, heat
er I00, wire II4, contact III, switch arm IIO, wire 10
I", relay coil H2 and wire “3 back to the sec
thermostat I03.
One end of the secondary 91 of the step-down
transformer 96 is connected by means of a wire
16 IIO to the stationary contact I06. The other
stationary contact I0‘! is connected by means of
a, wireIII to one end of a relay coil II2. The
other end of the relay coil II2 is connected by
means of a wire II3 to the other end of second
20 ary 01 of the step-down transformer 06. The
heating element I00 is connected by means of a
wire I I4 to a contact I I5. Coacting with the sta
tionary contact H5 and adapted 'to engage the
ondary 01 of the step-down transformer 86.
Since the resistance through this second circuit
is greater than the resistance through the ?rst
mentioned circuit. there will be very little cur 15
rent ?owing through‘this second circuit, practi
cally all of the current ?owing through the ?rst
mentioned circuit there being practically no heat
given off by the heating element I09. Upon a
rise in temperature in the space to be heated, the
same‘ at predetermined-times is a switch arm II6
25 which is connected by means of a wire I H to the
second circuit closed. Upon breaking this first
thermostatic element I00 will cause contact I00
to move out of- engagement with contact I01
thereby breaking the ?rst circuit but leaving the
circuit, all of the current passes through the
point of} connection of wire III with ‘the relay ' second circuit causing heating of the heating ele
coil II2. Upon energization of relay coil II2, the ment I00. Since the heating ‘element I00is lo
switch arm “'6 is moved into engagement with cated adjacent to the bimetal of the thermostat
the contact H5‘ and upon deenergization thereof I00, this heating element causes heating of the
30 the switch arm H6 is moved out of engagement
bimetal and consequent movement of the con
with the contact II5 by some biasing means such tact I04 out of engagement with the contact I00
as a spring or weight, not shown.
to break this second circuit to cause deenergiza
One end of the secondary I02 of the step-down tion of relay coil II2 to move switch arm II6 out
transformer IN is connected by means of a wire of engagement with the contact H0 and to move
35 IIO to a switch'arm H9. The switch arm H0 is
switch arm IIO out of engagement with contact
operatively connected to the switch arm H6 and
I20 and into engagement withcontact I2I. By
consequently upon energization of the relay coil reason of this heating element I00, the circuit
II2, the switch arm H9 is moved to the left into opening action of the thermostat is hastened so
engagement with ‘a stationary contact I20 and that the temperature of the room or space to be
40 upon deenergization of the relay coil Il2‘, the~ ‘- heated will not have to rise so high to cause open- .
switch arm H9 is moved out of engagement with
the contact I20 and into engagement‘ with con
ing of the second circuit and consequent deener
,gization of relay coil II2. By reason of this heat
tact I2I. The contact I20 is connected by means
of a wire I22 to the damper motor 06 and the
anticipating effect given to the thermostat I03,
“over-shooting" is largely prevented in this mod
45 contact I2I is also connected by means of a
i?cation which tends to give uniform and ac
motor 86 is in turn connected by means of a wire
I24 to the secondary I02 of the step-down trans
former IOI. When the switch arm H0 is moved
50 into engagement with the contact I20 a circuit is
the rooms orspaces to‘ be heated. i
wire I23 to the damper motor 86. The damper
completed from the secondary I 02 of the step
down» transformer IOI through wire H0, switch
arm II9, contact I20,rwire I22, damper motor 00
and wire I24 back to the secondary I02 to cause
curate control of the temperature existing within
From the above, it is seen that I have provided
in this modi?cation a control system for a heat
ing system, having a heater and heating ?uid , .
conveying means adapted’ to heat a space which
control system comprises: a fan for circulating
?uid through the ?uid conducting means; a fan '
switch responsive to a predetermined high tem
55 energization of damper motor 06 to move a draft '-perature of the heater for starting the fan and
door 0| and the damper ‘I0 to open position. respomsive to a'predetermine'd low temperature
Upon engagement of the switch arm H0 with the for stopping the fan; a damper in the ?uid con- , .
contact I2I, a circuit is completed from the sec
ducting means for controlling the rate of ?ow of
ondary I 02 of the step-down transformer III
heating ?uid which is moved to open or closed
60 through wire I I0, switch arm IIO, wire I20,
positions according to variations in room tem
perature; a draft door for controlling the draft
damper motor 86 and wire I24 back to the sec
ondary I02 of the step-down transformer IN to
cause energization of the damper motor 00 to
move the draft door Ill and the damper ‘I0 to
65
closed position.
-
Upon a decrease in temperature eriisting in the
space to be heated, contact I04 is moved into
engagement with contact I06 but since ‘switch
arm H6 is out of engagement with its contact
70 H0 no ‘circuit is completed by this movement.
Upon a further slight decrease in temperature ex
isting within the space to be heated, contact I00
is moved into engagement with contact I01 and
a circuit is completed from the secondary 01 of
75 the step-‘down transformer 06 through wire III,
through the heater and consequently the temper
ature thereof which is opened or closed according
to variations in room temperature; and an aux
iliary heater type thermostat for controlling the 65
opening and closing movements of the draft door
and the damper whereby “over-shooting" is '
largely prevented. '
Various modi?cations may be made in the sys
tem embodying my invention without departing 70
from the spirit and scope thereof and I desire
therefore that only such limitations shall be
placed therein as are Imposed by the priorsartl
or set forth in the appended claims.
I claim as my invention:
70
5
2, 120,808
1. In a heating system of the class described, a
space to be heated, a heater for heating said space
to be heated, means associated with said heater
for conducting heating ?uid to and from said
space to be heated, means responsive to heater
conditions for circulating said heating iiuid
through said conducting means, valve means re~
sponsive to temperature changes in said space to
be heated for controlling the circulation of said
10 heating fluid, and means for limiting closing
movement of said valve means.
2. In a heating system having an air heater, a
duct for conveying heated air to“ a space to he
heated and a return duct for returning air to the
Ni heater, the combination of means for circulating
air through the heater and ducts, a damper in
the return duct for controlling the rate of cir
culation oi air, means responsive to heater tern~=
perature ior placing the circulating means in op~
oration, and means responsive to space tempera
ture for controlling said damper.
3. In a heating system having an air heater, a
duct for conveying heated air to a space to he
heated and a return duct for returning air to the
25 heater, the combination of means iior circulating
air through the heater and ducts, a damper in
the return duct for controlling the rate of circu
lation of air, means responsive to heater temperaw
ture for placing the circulating means in opera
fill tion, means responsive to space temperature for
controlling said damper, and means ior limiting
closing movement of said damper.
ii. In combination with a'heating system hav
ing a heater and heating ?uid conducting means
36 for heating a space, means responsive to selected
differential heater conditions for starting and
stopping circulation of said heating iiuid, and
temperature responsive means for modulating
the rate of circulation according to variations in
space to be heated, means for modulating the rate
of circulation of said heating ?uid and the heat
ing effect of said heater according to variations in
the space temperature, and means responsive to
the heating effect of the heater conditions for
also controlling the heating effect of said heater.
9. The combination with a heating system
having a heater and ?uid conducting means for
heating a space, of control means for modulating
the rate of circulation of heating fluid and the 10
temperature of said heater according to varia
tions in the space temperature, and means re
sponsive to a predetermined heater temperature
for preventing said control means from control
ling the temperature of said heater.
115
iii. In a heating system, a space to be heated, a
heater for heating said space, movable means for
modulating thev rate of circulation of heating
?uid from said heater to said space to be heated
according to space temperature variations, means 20
responsive to the movement of said movable
means for modulatingly controlling the tempera
ture of said heater according to space tempera
ture variations, and means responsive to heater
temperatures for rendering said last mentioned
means inoperative to control the temperature of
said heater.
-
ii. In a heating system having an air heater, a
duct for conveying heated air to a space to be
heated and a return duct for returning air to 30
the heater, the combination of means for circulat
ing air through the heater and ducts, a damper in
the return duct for controlling the rate of cir
culation of air, control means for changing the
heating effect ‘of said heater, means responsive 35
to heater temperature for placing-the circulating
means in operation, and means responsive-to
space temperature for controlling said damper
and said control means. '
12. In a heating system having an air heater,
5. In a heating system having a heater and - a duct for conveying heated air to a space to be
heating ?uid conducting means for heating a ' heated and a return duct for returning air to the
space, means responsive to selected high tem— heater, the combination of means for circulating
peratures of said heater for starting circulation air through the heater and ducts, a damper in
45 of said heating ?uid and to ‘selected low tempera; the return duct for controlling the rate of circu
tures of said heater for stopping circulation of lation of air, control means ‘for changing the
said heating ?uid, and-temperature responsive heating effect of said heater, means responsive to
heater temperature for placing the circulating
means for modulating the rate of circulation ac
means in operation, means responsive to space
cording to variations in the space temperature.
6. In a heating system having an air heater, temperature for controlling said damper and said
50
a duct for conveying heated air to a space to be control means, and means for limiting closing
heated and a return duct forreturning air to the movement of said damper.
13. In combination with a heating system hav
heater, the combination of means for circulating
air through the heater and ducts, a damper in ing a heater and heating ?uid conducting means
for heating a space, means responsive to selected‘
65 the return duct for controlling the rate of circu
differential heater conditions for starting and
lation of air, means responsive to heater tem
perature for placing the circulating means in stopping the circulation of heating ?uid through
said conducting means, means responsive to
operation, and control means responsive to varia
thespace temperature.
'
40
46
60
55.
tions in space temperature for controlling said variations in space temperature for modulating .
damper to modulate said damper in, accordance the rate of circulation of said heating ?uid, and 60
with space temperature variations.
,
7. In a heating system having an air heater. a
duct for conveying heated air to a space to be
heated and a return duct for returning air to the
05 heater, the combination of a damper in the re
turn duct, control means for changing the heat
ing effect of the heater, means responsive to space
temperature for controlling said damper and said
control means, and means responsive to heater
70 temperatures for preventing said space tempera
ture responsive means from controlling said con
trol means.
8. In a heating system of the class described, a
space to be heated, a. heater, means for conduct
ing heating ?uid between said heater and s'aid
means responsive to said last mentioned means
for modulatingly controlling the condition of
said heater lnproportion to variations in space
temperature.
14. In a heating system having an air heater, 05
a duct for conveying heated air to a space to be
heated and a return duct for returning air to the
heater, the combination of means for circulat- _
ing air through the heater and ‘ducts, a damper
in the return duct for controlling the rate of 70
circulation of air, control means for changing _
the heating effect of said heater, means respon
sive to heater temperature for placing the cir
culating means in operation, and control means
responsivle to variations in space temperature 76
. 6
'
2,120,803
'
'
/
for modulating said damper and said control
said heater, proportioning means controlled by‘
means.
said proportioning motor’ means for operating
said fuel controlling means, and thermostatic
15. In a heating system having a heater and
heating ?uid conducting means for heating a ' means responsive to a predetermined high tem
space, means responsive to heater conditions for perature of said heater for rendering said pro
- controlling the starting and stopping of circula
portioning means inoperative to control said fuel
tion of heating'?uid, damper means responsive controlling means. '
to variations in space temperature for controlling
19. In combination-with a heating system hav
‘the amount of heating ?uid circulated, and ing a heater and heating ?uid conducting means
10 means responsive to heater conditions and to for heating a space, a fan for circulating ?uid
variations in space temperature for controlling through said ?uid conducting means,’ thermo
the condition of said heater.
static means responsive to a predetermined high
16. In a heating system having a heater and temperature of said heater for starting said fan
heating ?uid conducting means for heating‘ a and responsive ,to a predetermined low temper
15 space, means responsive to heater conditions for
ature for stopping said fan, valve means in said
controlling the starting and stopping of circu
?uid conducting means for controlling the rate
lation of heating ?uid, means including damp
of flow of said heating ?uid therethrough, draft
er means responsive to variations in space tem
‘means for controlling the temperature of saidv
perature for controlling the amount of heating heater, motor means for operating said valve
20 ?uid circulated, and means responsive to heater means and said draft means, and an auxiliary
conditions and to said means for controlling the ‘heater type space thermostat for controlling said
amount of heating ?uid circulated for control
motor means.
ling the condition of said heater.
20. A heating circulating system comprising,
17. The combination with a heating system a heater, a circulating system for conducting a
25 having a heater and heating ?uid conducting heating medium from said heater to a space-to be
means for heating a space, of means responsive
to selected heater conditions for starting and
stopping the circulation of heating ?uid, means
for proportionately controlling the circulation
30 of heating ?uid according to variations in space
temperature, means for proportionately control
ling the condition of said heater in response to
20
.
25
means for automatically causing operation or
cessation of said circulation inducing means
when said heater is above or below, respectively, 30
a predetermined temperature and damper means
for automatically varying the delivery capacity
?uid through said ?uid conducting means, ther
tinuous and constant speed operation of said
mostatic means responsive to a predetermined
high temperature of said heater for starting said
fan at all times when the heat of said furnace is
above a predetermined degree and cessation of
fan and responsive to a predetermined low tem
operation below said predetermined degree,
perature for stopping said fan, valve means in
15
heated, means for inducing circulation of said
heating medium in said circulating system,
variations in space temperature and means re
of said circulation inducing means responsive to
sponstve to heater conditions for rendering said ' temperature changes in the space to be heated.
last mentioned means inoperative to control the
' 21. A heating circulating system comprising, a
condition of said heater.
warm air heating furnace, means to conduct
18. In a heating system-having a heater and heated air from .said furnace to a space to be
heating ?uid conducting means adapted to heat heated, a fan to circulate air from said furnace
a space, the combination of a fan for circulating to said space,'automatic means for causing con
40
10
35
means for varying the delivery capacity of said
, said ?uid conducting means for controlling the
fan, said means being variable during the op 45
rate of ?ow of said heating ?uid therein, pro
eration of said fan and electric means controlled
portioning motor means responsive to variations - by the temperature in said space to actuate said
in space temperature for operating said valve means for varying the delivery capacity.
means, means for controlling the flow of fuel to AR'I'I-IUR C. GRANT.
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