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Патент USA US2121172

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June 21,1938.
FQLov‘EJo-Y
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2,121,172
HEEL AND ITS ATTACHMENT TO SHOE
Filed Aug. 22,1936
2 Sheets-Shéet 1
2
J1me 21, v1938.
F. cfLo'vEJoY ‘
'
2,121,172
HEEL AND ITS ATTACHMENT TO SHOE
Fil‘ed Aug. 22, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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Patented ‘Julie- --21, 1938
‘ ‘
2,121,172
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
'
'
3,121,172
HEEL
'
ITS‘ ATTACHIHENT TO SHOEv
Fred 0.10am, St. Louis, Mo., assignor to
United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Pater
son, N. 1., a corporation of New Jersey
_ Application August 22, 1936, .Serial misuse
v
9 Claim. (01. 12-147)
This invention relates to improvements in heel manufacturing the heels as will be hereinafter
and shoe construction and is illustrated as em
described and claimed.
_
bodied in a novel shoe in which a short outsole
The inventionand the many advantages re
is combined with an improved heel in such a sulting therefrom will be readily understood and.
5 way as to overcome the defects of prior short-r appreciated after reading the following descrip
outsole shoe constructions.
-
tion in connection with the accompanying draw
-
Although various expedients for inter?tting
ings in which
heels and short outsoles of shoes have been pro
10
posed, it has beenviound that in all such prior
constructions, there is‘ -a tendency, especially
pronounced in shoes ‘having high Cuban heels,
for the joint between the breast of the heel and
the rear end of the sole in the ?nished shoe to
open up. This is due to the slight but constant
?exing of the‘shoe in the vicinity of its heel
_
r
Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a heel blank from
whichpa Cuban heel embodying the invention may
be made;
_'
.
,
1 10
Fig. 2 shows in perspective the heel blank of
'
Fig.‘ 1 after the sides of its forwardly projecting
lip have been trimmed;
'
‘
.
Fig. 3 is apartly sectional view showing the
heel blank of Fig. 2 in the process of having ma- 15
breast line.
It is an object of this invention to provide
in a shoe having a short outsole an accurate and
jecting lip, a sole-receiving channel being formed
at the same time in its breast immediately be
durable joint between the sole and the breast of
low the lip;
terial trimmed from the under side of its pro
'
the heel which is not visible at the sides of the‘ ‘Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the heel blank
2° 'heel and which is not subject to the drawbacks of Fig. 2 after it has been operated upon by the 20
of prior shoe‘ constructions.
With this object in view, and in accordance‘
with a feature of the invention, I have provided
a heel adapted for interengagement with the rear
end of a short outsole attached to a shoe and hav-‘
ing at the upper portion of its breast va lip suf
?ciently thin and narrow to lie for substantially
its full length between the outsole and the shoe
30 bottom. Below the lip isprovided a ledge so
shaped- and spaced from the lip as to form with
the lip a sole receiving ‘channel of a width sub:
stantially equal to the thickness of a normal out
sole, said channel extending transversely of the
35 heel immediately beneath the‘ lip and having up
wardly turned ends which terminate in the at
taching face adjacent to the breast corners of
the heel. The channel will preferably be of arm
ate shape transversely of the heel and will extend
40 depthwise in. a direction approximately parallel
to the plane of the rim of the attaching face of
the heel. Since the sole-receiving channel of the
heel terminates inwardly from the sides of the
heel no portion of the sole is visible back of the
45 breast of the heel. It is also preferable to extend
the reenforcing lip a‘ considerable distance. for
wardly of the breast of the heeland press the
rear end of the short outsole into the channel
‘ so that there is no relative ?exing of the heel and
channeling machine indicated in Fig. 3; '
,
Figs. 5 and 6 are perspective and plan views,
respectively, of the heel prior to covering;
Fig. '7 shows in perspective the heel~ of Figs.
25
5 and 6 after. it has been covered:
Fig. 8 is _a perspective view of the heel end of
a shoe having a short outsole which has been
trimmed to receive the heel of Fig. 7;
7
Fig. 9 is a section on the line IX-IX of Fig. 8;
Fig. 10 is a view ‘similar to‘ Fig. 8 but showing -
the end of the short outsole, which still has been
prepared to receive the heel of Fig. 7, as of a
somewhat di?erent form;
'
Fig.‘ 11 is a side elevation,‘ partly in longitudin
section, of the heel end of the shoe of Fig. 8 35
after the heel of Fig. 7 has been attached thereto:
Fig. 12 is a perspective view of a Louis heel
embodying the invention;
. Fig. 13 is a perspective view of the rear end of
a shoe having a short outsole the end of which‘
has been fitted for the reception of the heel illus
trated in Fig. 12; and
_
.
Fig. 14 is a perspective view, partly broken
away and in section, of the shoe illustrated in 45
Fig. 113, with the heel of Fig. 12 attached thereto;
Figs. 5, 6 and’! of the drawings illustrate a
Cuban heel 20 having in the upper portion of its
breast 2| a channel 22 shaped toreceive the rear I
the outsole in the vicinity of its heel-breast line
end of a short outsole 24 (Fig. 8) attached to a 50
in the ?nished sh
shoe 26. . The channel 22 terminates inwardly of
. The joint between the sole
and the breast of e heel is therefore not likely '_ the side faces 28 (Fig. 5) of the heel 26. and pref
to open up as in prior shoe constructions having erably intersects the attaching face 3. 01' the
inter?tting heels and short outsoles.
_
The invention resides also in improvements in
heel back of the subjacent portion of the breast
at opposite sides of the base portion of a reen- 55
2
2,121,172
forcing lip 32 which extends a substantial dis
tance forwardly from the breast 2| of the heel.
The upper wall of the channel 22 is formed by
the under face 36 of the lip 32 which is of less
width than the upper portion of the breast 2i
of the heel 20, and the width of the channel is
substantially equal to the thickness of a normal
outsole. In heels for women’s shoes, for exam
ple, this thickness would be of the order of six
10 or eight irons, more ‘or less, as distinguished from
that of a very thin piece of leather such as is
commonly used to cover the breast of a heel.
The heel 20‘ may be described as having a sole
supporting ledge or lower channel wall 38 which
15 extends from one forward portion of the rim 40
of the attaching face 30 of the heel to the other,
and an approximately vertical shoulder 42 which
It will be noted that the rim 40‘ of the attach
ing face 30 of the heel 20 lies in a plane which
is spaced from and overlies the lip 32. The lip
32 may therefore be described as being located be
tween the sole-receiving channel 22 and the plane
of the rim of the attaching face of the heel.
The heel 20 (Figs. 5 and 6) may be covered by
a single piece of covering material 68 (Fig. 7) I
the forward margins of which are secured in
overlapping relation to the breast 2i of the heel,
the top margin of the cover being inturned upon
and secured to the attaching face 30 of the heel
and to the lower wall 38 of the channel 22, or it
may be covered in any other suitable manner,
15
or otherwise ?nished, as by lacquering.
The short outsole 24 of the shoe 26 has a rear or
end face 12 which is located a short distance rear
wardly of the heel-breast line 10 of the sole. It is
'
The heel 20 (Figs. 5 and 6) may be formed from common practice to skive material from the lat
a heel blank 44 (Fig. 1) of the type used in the eral margins of the ?esh side of the shank por
construction of Continental heels, the heel blank tion of the outsole before the same is attached
having a ?at upper face 46, a substantially ?at _ to the shoe, thereby to provide the sole with bev
upper breast portion, and a forwardly projecting eled margins 13. The outsole 24 is of substan
lip 48 which extends from one side of the blank to tially uniform width from its breast line 10 rear
the other. Before forming the sole-receiving wardly. The width of the rear portion of the out
channel 22 it is preferable to trim material from sole 24 of the shoe may be varied in accordance
the sides of the lip 48 by the use, for example, with the length of the channel 22 of the heel to be
attached to the shoe, the proportions being such
of a pair of spaced milling cutters (not shown)
whereby to form a heel blank 50 having a lip 52, that the edges of the outsole of the finished shoe
as shown in Fig. 2. In reducing the lip 48 to the extend laterally approximately to, but not be
yond, the breast corners 14 of the heel.
form shown in Fig. 2 it is desirable that the cut
In order to provide a shoe having a heel seat
ting strokes of the teeth of the milling cutters
shall progress toward the under side of the lip, which is substantially complemental to the at
that is, away from the flat surface 46. The taching face of the heel to be attached to the
shoe the heel seat 15 (Fig. 8) of the shoe 26 (Fig.
heel blank 50 is then presented to a rotating tu
bular saw 54 (Fig. 3) of a channeling machine 8) may be built up by means of either a suitably
to form the heel blank 55 illustrated in Fig. 4. shaped piece of sheet material or by using a mix
ture 18 of plastic material (Fig. 11) , for example.
The heel blank 50 may be supported in the chan
neling machine upon a table 58 carried by a slide cement andsawdust, which may be applied to
60 which is movable in directions 62 lengthwise the shoe by a machine such as that disclosed in
application for United States Letters Patent Seri
of the tubular saw 54'. The heel blank 50 is cen
tralized in the channeling machine by suitable al No. 81,299, ?led May 22, 1936 in the name of
.
mechanism (not shown) with the breast edges John T. Lancaster.
In order to position the covered heel 1i upon
64 of the heel in engagement with a bar 66 which
is used to locate the‘heel blank properly in the the shoe 2B preparatory to attaching the same to
machine. After- the heel blank 50 has been po ‘ the shoe, the heel is' moved toward and forwardly
sitioned upon the table 58, the blank vand the of the prepared heel seat of the inverted shoe
with its lip 32 tilted slightly downwardly, caus
table are moved to the right (Fig. 3) a predeter
mined distance controlled by a stop (not shown) ing the lip to enter a cavity 16, between the rear
thereby removing material from the under side of end of the outsole 24 and the shoe bottom, and
the lip 52 and to form the channel 22. ‘The causing the rear portion of the outsole 24 to be
channel 22 formed by'the rotating tubular saw 54 engaged within the channel 22. When the heel
has been moved to its proper position upon the
may be referred to as a cylindrical kerf the ele
ments of which extend generally lengthwise of shoe it is attached in any suitable way. If de
the heel. It may alsovbe described as being of sired, a small quantity of the above-mentioned
mixture of pyroxylin cement and sawdust in a
arcuate shape transversely of the heel and ex
tending depthwise in a direction approximately moldable condition may be inserted‘ in the cav
forms the bottom of the channel 22.
20
N) in
30
40
45
50
parallel to the plane of the rim of the attaching
face. The top face 48"of the heel blank 55 is
60 then presented to a concaving machine (not
shown) slightly vto concave the attaching face 30
v of the heel and to remove material from and con
cave the upper face of the lip 69 of the heel blank
> 55.
The upper face of the lip 32 (Figs. 4 and 5) is
20
25
30
40
45
55
ity 16, just before the heel is positioned upon the
shoe.
‘
The width of the channel 22 may be varied to 60
accommodate outsoles 24 of different thicknesses,
and the curvature of the channel and therefore
the under surface 36 of the lip 32 also may be
varied in accordance with the transverse curva
65
ture of the shank portion of the outsole.
In order to insure a strong and durable joint
between the heel 'H (Fig. 7) and the outsole 24
(Fig. 8) it is desirable that the lip of the heel be
fairly rigid with relation to the remaining por
tion of the heel and that the channel 22 be nar
from the sides of the projecting lip 48 (Fig. 1) row enough to be completely ?lled by the end of
of the heel blank 44 by the tubular saw 54 during » the sole 24, or even better that the sole be com
therefore continuous with the attaching face 30
of the heel. By practicing the above method the
heels 20 can be quickly and effectively formed
‘from the heel blanks 44 without danger of split
ting the heels in the vicinity of their upper breast
70 corners. If desired material _may be removed
the channeling operation without the prior per
formance of the milling operation already re
75
ferred to.
'
pressed somewhat by the channel, thereby form
ing a tight joint between the heel and the out
sole. Since the channel 22 terminates inwardly 75
.)
2,121,173
from the sides 28 of the heel, no portion of the
outsole is visible‘ back of the heel-breast line 10
of the ?nished shoe.
Although the channel 22 is illustrated as ex
tending only a short distance ‘rearwardly of the
breast of the~heel, it is contemplated to increase
the depth of the channel, if desired, and to drive
one or more heel-attaching nails through the
portion of the outsole engaging within'the chan
10 nel. The rear face ‘I2, (Fig. 11) of the outsole
24 usually does not engage the bottom 42 of the
channel 22 since the outsole is usually cut slight
ly shorter than. necessary in order to insure that
the‘ heel can be moved forwardly to its‘proper
15 position upon the shoe.
I
.
The short outsole 24>(Fig; 8) may be quickly
and effectively formed in the stock ?tting room
and does not have to be trimmed for the recep
tion of the covered heel ‘II after attachment to
the shoe upper.. By providing the new heel it is
therefore possible to utilize short‘ outsoles which
cost considerably less than outsoles of the stand
ard length, and which may be ?nally prepared
for the reception of heels at a low cost before
By securing the rear“ end
~ attachment to shoes.
of the outsole 24 in the channel 22 and interpos
ing the lip 32 of the heel between the outsole
and the shoe upper for a substantial distance for
ward of the heel-breast line 10 of the sole, the
30, slight but constant relative ?exing of the heel
and the sole of the shoe in the vicinity of its heel
breast line is'avoided:
,
Although it is, I believe, generally satisfactory
v
_
.
'
3
In the manufacture of shoes having Louis heels
it is common practice to use extra long outsoles
in order to split heel-breast covering ?aps there
from. My invention makes it unnecessary to
cover the breast offthe heel with a ?ap split from
the outsole, thus ‘permitting the use of short out
solesin the“ manufacture of. shoes having Louis
heels, with a, consequent saving even greater‘
‘than when Cuban heels are used. '
Having described the invention, what I claim as 10
new and desire ‘to secure by Letters Patent of the
United States is:
_
_
.
_ 1. A shoe having a short outsole, and a heel
having at the v‘upper portion of its breast a lip
which is of considerably less width than the breast 15
of the heel and which extends a substantial dis-‘
tance forward of said breast and is located be
tween the rear end portion ‘of the short outsole
and the shoe'bottom, said heel also having _in the
upper portion of its breast-a channel within which 20.
the rear end portion of said outsole is received,
one wall of said channel being formed by said lip
and the other wall of the channel extending from
one side of the attaching face of the heel to the
otherand providing a ?rm support for the rear
end portion of the short outsole.
2. A shoe having a short outsole,.and a heel
having a projecting lip which is of less width than
the upper portion of the breast'of the heel, pro-_
jects forward of the breast of the heel‘ and‘ is 30.
positioned between the outsole and the shoe bot
tom, said heel being provided with a channel in
which the rear end of the short-outsole engages
to trim‘ the outsole to the- shape illustrated in. and which channel extends around the under
Fig. 8 in the stock ?tting room, it will be under
face 'of the lip and terminates inwardly from
stood that theoperator may further reduce the the side faces of the heel.
>
rear lateral portions of a sole 80 (Fig. 10) by
3.‘ A shoe having a short outsole provided with ~
beveling cuts after the same has been attached shoulders, and a heel having in the upper end ~
to the shoe','in order to form tapered slot-engag , of its breast a channel within which the rear end
40 ing portions 02 and heel-breast receiving shoul
portion of the outsole engages. and having a re
ders 84. _Such an operation is desirable whenthe enforcing lip which forms one wall of ‘the channel, 40
', lateral margins of the shank portion of the sole said lip being positioned between the outsole and
attached to the shoe have not been skived to any the shoe bottom and extending forward of the
considerable degree and are therefore relatively breast corners of the heel which, are in engage
45 thick. ‘
ment with the shoulders formed upon said outIn Fig. 12 there is illustrated axlacquered or sole.
painted heel 86 of the Louis type having in‘ the . , 4. A shoe having a short outsole provided with
upper portion of its breast a channel 88 con-. a pair of heel-breast receiving shoulders, and a
structed and arranged to receive the rear end heel of the Louis type having at the upper por
60 of the short outsole.’ The channel 80 may be tion of its breast a sole-receiving channel within _
formed by presenting the Louis heel to the slot
which the rear end‘ of said outsole engages, said
ting machine indicated in Fig. 3. The heel 06 ‘heel also having a projecting lip which is posi
may be described as having a cylindrical sole-en.
tioned between the rear end portion of the out
gaging ledge 90 which extends substantially‘from
sole and the shoe bottom, the middle portion
of the wall of the channel which is opposite the
lip overriding the sole and the upper breast cor-,
55 one of ‘the forward portions of the rim of the
attachingface 94 of the heel to the other. It
will be noted that the marginal portions of the
ledge are wider than the central portion of the
ledge‘. The upper wall 96 of the channel 80 is
60 formed by the under side of a thin, narrow reen
forcing lip 98 which extends a substantial dis
tance forwardly of the upper breast corners I00
of the heel. However, if the lateral margins of
the shank portion of the sole have been reduced
65 by skiving cuts to produce an outsole, as shown 'at
24 in Fig. 8, the forward edge I02 ofthe ledge
90 will override the entire width of the sole with
out the necessity of trimming the sole by hand
after the sole has been applied to the shoe. If
70 the margins of the shank portion of an outsole
I04‘ attached to a shoe I05 are relatively thick, as
' illustrated in Figs. 13 and 14, the rear. marginal
.portions of the outsole preferably should be
skived to provide slot-engaging portions I06 and
heel-breast receiving shoulders_l00'.
‘
ner portions of the heel. abutting the shoulders.
‘ 5. That improvement in methods of making
heels which comprises, forming at the upper por-v
tion of the breast of ,a heel blank a forwardly 60
projecting lip disposed at an angle to the breast
and extending from one side of the heel blank
to the other, "reducing the lip widthwise by re
moving material from the sides of the same, and
removing material from the under side of the lip 65
and forming in the breast of the heel blank 2.
sole-receiving channel and a rearward extension
of the lip which overlies the channel.
6. That improvement in methods of making
heels which comprises, providing 'a heel blank 70
‘having at the upper end of its breast a forwardly
projecting lip extending from one side of the
heel blank to the other, rem°oving material from
the sides of the lip‘ by a plurality oflcutting
strokes which progress toward the under side of
75 ..
4
2,121,172
the lip, and forming in the breast of the heel
blank beneath the reduced lip a sole-receiving
channel which intersects the top face of the heel
blank at opposite sides of the reduced lip and
' increases the length of said reduced lip.
7. A heel adapted for interengagement with
the rear end of a short outsole having no heel
breast ?ap attached to a shoe, said heel having
a substantially ?at upper breast portion provided
with a lip the base of which is a substantial dis
tance back of the subjacent portion of the breast,
said lip extending a substantial distance forward
of said subjacent portion and being su?iciently
‘thin and narrow to lie for substantially its full
1 5 length between said outsole and the shoe bottom
after the outsole has been attached, said heel also
having a ledge below said lip so shaped and spaced
from the lip as to form with the lip a sole receiv
ing channel of a width substantially equal to the
full, unreduced thickness of said outsole, and
with the terminals of said channel in the attach
ing face of the heel adjacent to the breast cor
ners, said channel being of arcuate shape trans
versely of the heel and extending depthwise in
a direction approximately parallel to‘ the plane
‘of the rim of the attaching face.
8. A heel adapted for interengagement with
the rear end of a short outsole having no heel
breast ?ap attached to a shoe, said heel’ having
a substantially ?at upper breast portion provided
with a lip‘the base of which is a substantial dis
‘ tance back of the subjacent portion of the breast,
(said lip extending a substantial distance forward
of said subjacent portion and being su?lciently
thin and narrow to lie for substantially its full
length'between said outsole and the shoe bottom
after the outsole has been attached, said heel
also having a ledge below said lip so shaped and
spaced from the lip as to form with the lip a sole
receiving channel of a width substantially equal
to the thickness of a normal outsole, and with
the terminals of said channel in the attaching
face of the, heel adjacent to the breast corners,
said channel being of arcuate shape transversely 10
of the heel and extending depthwise in a direc
tion approximately parallel to the plane of the
rim of the attaching face.
9. A heel adapted for interengagement with
the rear end of a short outsole having no heel 15
breast ?ap attached to a shoe, said heel having
a substantially flat upper breast portion pro
vided with a lip the base of which is a substan
tial distance back of the subjacent portion of the
breast, said lip being su?iciently thin and narrow 20
to lie for substantially its full length between said
outsole and the shoe bottom after the outsole
has been attached, said heel also having a ledge
below said lip so shaped and spaced from the lip
as to form with the lip a sole receiving channel
of a width substantially equal to the thickness)
of a normal outsole, and with the terminals of
said channel in the attaching face- of the heel
adjacent to the breast corners, said channel being
of arcuate shape transversely of the heel and 30
extending depthwise in a direction approximately '
parallel to the plane of the rim of the attaching
face.
'
FRED C. LOVEJOY.
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