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Патент USA US2121228

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.Fum 21, 1938.‘
W, H, HALL '
SAFETY ‘ RAZOR
Filed Feb. 6, 1936
mzmw
Patented June 21, 1938
2,121,228
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,121,228
SAFETY RAZOR
William H. .Hall, Cicero, Ill. ‘
Application February 6, ‘1936, [Serial No. 62,643
i 3 Claims.
This invention relates to safety razors of the
type comprising a face guard, a, handle and a
blade with means for clamping said blade on the
face guard and holding it longitudinally parallel
1.5. therewith.
The object of the invention is to provide an im
proved razor of the above type wherein the
handling of various parts is rendered more con
venient, and the act of shaving in a correct and
scientific way made easy of accomplishment.
In some razors of this type the parts must all
be separated to remove or replace a blade, and
in others the parts are held in assembled form
when removing or replacing a blade, but are
complicated in construction and expensive to
make.
.
In this invention a simple form of construc
tion is provided, more conveniently manipulated
and not so complicated in construction nor so
5,20 expensive to make.
The construction comprises a face guard, face
plate, and atwo part handle, with screw means
connection between the face plate and handle
for clamping the blade between the face plate
and face guard. But a novel co-operative means
between the face guard and handle is provided
whereby when the handle is disengaged from'con
nection with the face plate it is connected with
the face guard, so that the handle and face
guard may be removed in assembled form as a
3 O single unit, thus making it easy, quick and con
venient to remove or replace a blade, or to clean
the razor.
‘
To obtain best results when shaving the blade
‘ should be drawn against the beard at an ob
35 lique angle. In this invention an angle guide
is provided, to be mounted on the handle of the
razor, which will enable the user to hold the blade
at any desired angle to the face, without any
special effort on his part to do so.
34 O
An improved blade is provided embodying novel
means for holding it in parallel position to the
face guard, by which means, also, the blade may
be easily picked up from table or shelf, or re
moved from the face plate, without danger of
45 injuring the blade or cutting the ?ngers.
These and other objects and advantages of the
invention will be illustrated and explained in the
following drawing and speci?cation.
50
'
Fig. 1 is an elevation of a razor of this type
showing the angle guide mounted on the handle.
Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross sectional View of
(Cl. 30-72)
Fig. 7is a plan view of the face guard with
the member 4a, Figs. 2 and 2A, mounted thereon.
Fig. 8 is a plan View of the face plate.
When separating or assembling the partsv of
the razor it is desirable to have as few parts as
possible to handle, consistent with a practical '
mechanism easily manipulated. To this end
means are provided in this invention whereby
when the two part handle is detached from con
nection with the face plate it will be in connec
10
tion with the face guard, thus uniting these three
parts into a single unit and permitting said face
guard and united handle to be separated from
the face plate and blade, and be removed in as
sembled form.
15
In Fig. 2, l is the face guard having a central
ly located opening la, see also Fig. 7. 2 is the
face plate having rigidly mounted thereon a
threaded stem 2a, see also Fig. 8. Said threaded
stem isadapted to pass through the opening la
in the face guard. 3 is the blade, and 4 and 4a
constitute a two part handle. 41 is a rotatable
part of said handle and 4a is a stationary part
of said handle rigidly mounted on the face
guard. The rotatable part i has a centrally
located threaded aperture adapted to engage the 25
threaded stem 2a which is mounted on the face
plate.
Thus a detachable screw means connec
tion is provided between the rotatable part of the
handle and the face plate for the purpose of
clamping or releasing the blade as illustrated in
Figs. 1 and 2. The rotatable part of the handle
4 carries a threaded section to and the stationary
part of the handle 4a carries a threaded section
rib. It will be evident by reference to Figs. 2
and 2A that when the rotatable part of the 35
handle is detached from the threaded stem 2a
and thereby detached from connection, with the
face plate 2, that the threaded section 40 on the
rotatable part of the handle is adapted to be in
meshed with the threaded section 419 on the sta
tionary part of the handle, and thus the two
parts of the handle may be united as one and
would be connected with the face guard, permit
ting said handle and face guard to be separated 45
from the face plate and removed in assembled
form.
Reference to the drawing, Figs. 2 and 2A, will
show that the threaded section 40 on the rotat
able part of the handle may be screwed in either‘ 50
direction entirely through and out of connection
‘with the threaded section 4b on the stationary
Fig. 1.
Fig. 2A is a View of Fig. 2 with the handle inv part of the handle. This not only permits the
upper end of the rotatable part of the handle to
455 a different position.
1:55
Fig. 3 is a sectional view of Fig. 1 on the line be screwed up against the face guard for clamp- ' “
‘ing the blade, but facilitates the original as
a--a.
sembling of these two parts together and per
, Fig. 4 is a plan view of the blade.
_mits of their entire separation for cleaning or
Fig. 5 is an end view of the blade.
other purposes. It also permits the angle guide 60
Fig. ,6 is a side View of the blade.
.60
2
2,121,228
5 being entirely removed from the handle, if the
user should so desire.
To facilitate the separation of the face guard
and handle from the face plate and blade, the
ends of the face guard are concaved as illustrated
the thumb and ?nger to grasp the even ends of
the blade and face plate for holding the razor
while the face guard is being mounted on the
blade and removed therefrom.
When the face guard is being mounted on the
in Figs. 3 and 7. When unscrewing the handle blade, the notches in the concaves register with
from the threaded stem 2a for the purpose of V and are engaged by the lugs near the ends of
effecting this separation, the head of the razor the blade. This engagement of said lugs with said
is naturally held between the thumb and ?nger notches being so near the ends of the blade and
face guard, hold the blade in perfect and un 10
10 of one hand while the other hand unscrews the
handle. The blade and face guard ‘are of the movable alignment with the face guard.
When the razor is being assembled the face
same length as illustrated in Fig. 3, the face plate
is the same length, but is not shown in Fig. 3. plate is held in one hand while the thumb and
In this operation the thumb and ?nger have a ?nger of the other hand contacts with the up
standing lugs near the ends of the blade by which
15 ?rm grip on the ends of the blade and face plate,
but the ends of the face guard being concaved as the blade is lifted and placed in position on the
illustrated in Fig. 3, the thumb and ?nger press face plate. This is much more convenient than
only lightly on these concaved ends, but with picking a ?at blade from table or shelf and it
eliminates all danger of injuring the blade or
sufficient force to hold the face guard in posi
cutting the ?ngers. The thumb and ?nger then 20
20 tion while the handle is being unscrewed and
disengaged from connection with face plate. grasp the even ends of the blade and face plate
and hold them ?rmly while the face guard is
When this has been accomplished the slight pres
placed in position and the handle screwed up
sure on the concaved ends of the face guard is
tight- to clamp the blade. During these move
released and the face guard and handle are free
25 to be removed in assembled form as a single unit.
ments the concaved ends of the face guard pre
This construction provides a quick and convenient
means for separating the parts to remove the
blade, and leaves the face guard and handle in
one assembled unit more conveniently and quicker
30 handled than when they are in two parts to be
vent the thumb and ?nger interfering with the
placement of the face guard, and the short blade
handled separately.
The blades used in most razors of this type are
?at and somewhat longer than the face guard
and face plate. Their extended ends are for
35 convenience in placing the blade in position on
the face plate and removing it therefrom, and
for providing necessary clearance between the
thumb and ?nger and ends of the face guard
_ when the head of the razor is being held between
the thumb and ?nger for placing the face guard
in position on the blade and removing it there
from.
When the handle is being screwed up tight to
clamp the blade and being unscrewed to release
45 it, the extended ends of the longer blade are of
necessity held ?rmly between the thumb and ?n
ger with the ever present danger of cutting the
thumb or ?nger on the extended ends of a thin
50
blade.
The extended ends of the long blade are also
more or less troublesome when shaving close to
the nose and ears. But they do provide necessary
clearance between thumb and ?nger and the ends
of the face guard to facilitate placing and removal
55 of the face guard on and off the blade.
To eliminate the objections to the longer flat
blade referred to above, I use a short blade having
upstanding lugs near its ends and corresponding
in length to the face guard as shown in Fig. 3.
60 A plan view of the blade is shown in Fig. 4. The
face plate is also the same length as the blade
and face guard but being immediately under the
blade it does not show in Fig. 3. A plan View
_ of the face plate is shown in Fig. 8.
65
70
Referring now to Fig. 3. This shorter blade
to be practical and convenient in use, must be
the same length as the face guard, have up
standing lugs 32), 31) near its ends, and be used
in combination with a face guard having concaved
ends with notches lb, lb therein. When assem
bled the ends of the face guard and the open
sides of the concaves therein register even with
the ends of the blade. The concaves thus provide
necessary clearance between the thumb and ?n
ger and the ends of the face guard, permitting
25
eliminates all danger of cutting the thumb or
?nger on the extended end of a thin blade.
The lugs near the ends of the blade ?t the 30
notches in the concaved ends of the face guard
snugly, whereby the blade is held in perfect and
unmovable alignment with the face guard. This
snug ?t would frequently cause the blade to be
lifted away with the face guard when disassem
bling the parts were it not for the contact of the
thumb and ?nger holding the even ends of the
blade and face plate together while the face
guard is being removed. But the concaved ends
permit the face guard to be removed without 40
interference.
From the foregoing description of the co-op
eration between the blade and the lugs in the
blade, and the concaved ends and notches in the
face guard, it will be seen the blade without the
lugs and this co-operation would be impractical,
and the concaved ends and notches would serve
no useful purpose except in co-operation with
a short blade and the upstanding lugs near its
‘ ends.
To assemble the parts. The face plate and
blade are held between the thumb and ?nger of
50
one hand, with the blade mounted on the face
plate, while the other hand holding the handle,
which is connected with the face guard, places the 55
face guard in position. The concaved ends of
the face guard prevent the thumb and ?nger
which are holding the blade and face plate, from
hindering or interfering with the easy placement
of the face guard in position. The handle is then 60
screwed up tight on the threaded stem 2a, clamp
ing the blade between the face plate and face
guard, and the razor is ready for use.
When the handle is being screwed up tight on
the threaded stem 20,, it will be evident by refer
ence to Fig. 2, that before the end of the handle
contacts with the face guard and begins to draw
the face plate and face guard together, that the
threaded sections 4b and 4c‘ are out of mesh, or
out of engagement with each other, and there 70
fore do not interfere with nor prevent the face
plate and face guard being clamped together to
properly ?ex the blade. During this operation
the thumb and ?nger holding the ends of the
blade and face plate will exert su?icient pressure
3
amaze
on the concaved ends of the face guard to‘hold
itin ‘position until the end of the handle con
tacts with the face guard‘ and clamps the blade
as shown in Fig. 2.
By reference to Fig. 2 it will be evident that
the same results above enumerated will be ob
tained by co-operation of the same parts,‘ if the
threaded sections 4?)‘ and 40: be lengthened so that
. they will not disengage when the blade is clamped,
and the upper end of the handle be’ slightly short
ened so it will not contact ‘with 1 the face guard
‘ when the blade is clamped. The threads on' the
stem 2a and the threads in the aperture of the
handle which engage the stem as illustrated in
is Figs. 2 and 3, would be cut with a greater lead
than the threads on the sections 4b‘ and 40, so
at
that the engaged sections 4b and 4c‘ pulling
against the engagement of the stem 20!. with the
aperture in the handle, would exert the pressure
necessary to clamp the blade.
From the foregoing it will be seen the concaved
ends of the face guard greatly facilitate the as
sembling and disassembling of the face guard
with the face plate.
When the threaded sections 4b and 4c are not
engaged, the threaded connection between the
two parts of the handle is eliminated, and the
“it
each other. These sections may be positioned on
the handle at any ‘angle to the longitudinal‘ axis
of ‘the face guard desired, and retained in any
such position by‘ tightening up- the sunken set
screw 5w,‘ Figs. 1 and 3.
Formany years standard razors of this type
have been provided with round handles and when
shaving around the mouth this is admittedly the 10
most practical kind ‘of a handle, but it is‘ also
known and admitted that when ‘shaving the sides
of the face and around and under the chin, the
cutting edges of, the blade should be held at an
oblique angle to the stroke. My novel angles 15
guide enables the user, without any special effort
on his ‘part, to hold the cutting edges at any de
sired angle, at the same time leaving the greater
portion of the round handle unobstructed to be
grasped in any manner desired, as illustrated in 20
Fig. 1.
In Fig. 1 the angle guide is shown as mounted
on~ the member 4a. This is the stationary part
of the handle. If the angle guide be mounted on
the rotatable part of the handle, set to the dee
sired position and secured by the sunken set
screw 5a, it will aways bear the same relation
swivel-joint formed by the unthreaded section
to the longitudinal axis of the face'guard when
the handle is screwed up and the razor is ready
4d near the upper end of the rotatable part of the
for use.
two parts of the handle are then connected by a
as
sidesopposite each other, two flat corners oppo
site each other and‘ two round corners opposite
‘
'
‘
handle passing through the section 4b‘ in the
lower end of the stationary part of the handle,
this unthreaded section 4d of the handle being
the axis of the swivel. The diametrical clearance
It will be evident by reference to Fig. 3 in con
nection with Fig. 1, that whether the blade have
The threads in the sections 4b and 40 could if
desired, be eliminated, but as they are adapted
to screw entirely through each other and dis
connect, as heretofore described, they provide a
convenient means for mounting the angle guide
on the handle, and for the original assembling
of the parts.
To obtain best results when shaving the cutting
ample, in one of the concaved sections, he will "10
naturally hold one edge of the blade at a certain
.two cutting edges, or only one cutting edge, if the
user will carefully adjust the angle guide on the
in the section 4b is less than the diameter of the handle toubest suit hisown natural way of grasp— as
section to on the upper end of the rotatable part ' ing and holding his razor, he will, without ‘effort,
of the handle and also less than the diameter of always be able‘ to hold his ‘razor at the‘ same angle
the lower or main part of the rotatable part of to his face when shaving. If the blade have two
the handle 4. See Fig. 2.
cutting edges‘ and he placeshis thumb, for ex
edge of the razor should be drawn at an oblique
angle against the beard. It is the natural tend
“ to ency of most users, however, to draw the razor
at right angles to' the stroke, and with the‘usual
round handles provided for razors of this type it
is difficult to hold the blade at any particular
angle to the face without considerable effort to
do so.
i,
angle to his face. If he lays the razor down and
picks it up with the thumb in the opposite con
caved section he will naturally hold the opposite
edge of the blade to his face when shaving, and
naturally at the same angle. If the blade have
only one cutting edge, or if he alternately uses
both hands when shaving, it is only necessary
for him to properly adjust the angle guide and
‘become accustomed to the touch or feel of the l
different sections which enable him to naturally
hold the razor at the desired angle.
"Reference to Fig. lvshows the angle guide oc
cupies but a very small space on the round handle
and it is adapted to be used only in combination
To enable the user to hold the blade at any de
with theround handle. While the hand grasps
sired angle to the face without any special effort
the round handle for holding the razor the thumb
and ?nger may contact with the differential sec
tions of the angle guide for holding the razor at
any desired angle to the face. Or their contact
may be transferred to the round handle and back
again without removing the razor from the face.
on his part, I haveprovided what I term an
angle guide 5, Figs. 1, 2, 2A, and 3. This angle
60 guide is a distinct and separate member from
the handle by which the razor is held as illustrat
ed in Figs. 1, 2, 2A, and 3. It occupies but a very
small portion of said handle and is adapted to be
mounted on any part of the handle. One posi
tion is illustrated in Fig. 1. Said angle guide is
‘provided with differentially shaped sections
adapted to be contacted by thumb and ?nger
when grasping and holding the handle, for posi
tioning said blade at the proper angle to the face,
It is the thumb and finger that determines the 7
angle at which the blade is being held to the
stroke, and it is a great convenience to have an
angle guide so mounted. on the handle that the
thumb and ?nger contact may be easily trans
ferred from one to the other.
‘
- ‘
The combination constitutes a new and useful
and indicating by their feel to the ,user, the . improvement in the method and means for hold
"
angle atwhichhe is holding the razor. Said ing this type of razor when shaving.
In Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6, I have illustrated an im
shaped'sections may be of any design desired and
placed in any relation to each other desired. For
example in Fig. 3, the angle guide 5 has two con
75 caved sections opposite each other, two straight
proved blade 3, which embodies means for han
dling the blade, and for holding it in position
when assembled for use, more convenient and
2,121,223
easier of manipulation, than the usual ?at blade
provided for razors of this type.
In the center of the blade is a longitudinal
1.5
20
.25
30
35
opening 3a, Fig. .4. This opening is adapted to ?t
loosely over the stem 20. and the short ribs con
nected with it, on the face plate 2, Fig. 8, which
for use.
The blade and face plate are the same length
serves as a guide means for positioning the blade
and this prevents any danger of cutting the
thumb or ?nger on the extended end of a thin
and face guard on the face plate, and may be of
any desired form suitable for that purpose. In the
center of the face guard is a longitudinal open
ing Ia, Fig. '7, which is adapted to ?t snugly over
the said threaded stem 20. and the short ribs con
nected with it on the face plate. On the longi
tudinal axis of the face guard are narrow notches
lb-—Ib, Figs. 3 and 7. On the longitudinal axis
of the blade are upturned narrow lugs 3b-3b,
Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6. Said lugs on the blade are
adapted to ?t snugly in the notches lb-lb in the
face guard and thus hold the blade longitudinally
parallel with the face guard, see Fig. 3. Said lugs
are also adapted to be contacted by thumb and
?nger for lifting the blade from the face plate
after the face guard has been removed, or for
lifting the blade from table or shelf and placing it
in position on the face plate. These lugs are
preferablyrounded on the top as shown in Fig. 5,
which facilitates their sure and easy engagement
with the slots Ib—lb in the face guard when the
face guard is placed in position. Said lugs are
narrow at their base which permits the proper
flexing of the blade between the face plate and
face guard. These lugs being narrow as shown in
the drawing do not interfere with the proper
?exing of the blade, and being near the‘ends of
the blade and ?tting snugly in the notches lb—~lb
hold the cutting edges of the blade in perfect
alignment with the face guard and face plate. A
face guard to prevent the corners of the blade
spreading. Such corner lugs employed on many
standard razors of this type, are troublesome
when placing the blade in position, and if not
carefully placed will frequently cause the break
ing of the blade when it is clamped. A study of
my blade will show it to be a convenient, easily
handled and safe form of blade.
I
To assemble the parts for shaving, the thumb
and ?nger are placed on the upturned lugs 3b—3b,
6 of the blade. A slight pressure is exerted
5.0 Fig.
and the blade may be easily and conveniently
lifted from table or shelf, without danger of in
juring the blade or cutting the ?ngers, and placed
in position on the face plate, Fig. 8. The lugs
55 lib-3b are preferably slanted towards the ends of
the blade as shown in Fig. 6, which facilitates a
holding contact with the thumb and ?nger for
lifting the blade, and for nesting the blades in
a package. The face guard and handle are con
nected in assembled form, and it will be evident
by reference to Fig. 3, that whileone hand ?rmly
holds the ends of the blade and face plate be
tween the thumb and ?nger, the other hand may
grasp the handle, and lifting the face guard and
' 6,5
Fig. 3. This holds the blade in perfect alignment
with the face guard. The handle is now screwed
up on the threaded stem 2a and the razor is ready
blade made as this one is requires no guide pins
near its ends and no lugs on the corners of the
.45
in the concaved ends of the face guard, see
handle together, place the face guard in position.
The concaved ends of the face guard, shown in
Fig. 3, prevent the thumb and ?nger which are
holding the face plate and blade, from interfering
with thefree and easy placement of the face
70 guard. »\When the face guard is thus placed in
position the lugs 3b,—3b on the blade are adapted
to engage and ?t snugly in the notches lb-Ib
blade when holding the ends of the blade and
10
face plate to screw up or unscrew the handle.
I have herein illustrated and described the
preferred embodiment of my invention, but I do
not limit myself to the exact details of construc
tion herein shown, for obviously changes may be
made therein within the scope of the claims.
1,5
I claim:
1. In a safety razor, a face guard having a cen
trally located opening therein, a face plate having
a centrally located threaded stem thereon adapt
ed to pass through said central opening in said
face guard, a blade adapted to be clamped be
tween said face guard and face plate, a two piece
29
handle comprising a stationary part rigidly
mounted on said face guard and a rotatable part
having a centrally located threaded aperture 2,5
adapted to be screwed up on said threaded stem
for clamping the blade by contacting the upper
end of said rotatable part of the handle with the
face guard, a threaded section on the inner wall
of said stationary part of the handle and a 30
threaded section on the outer surface of said
rotatable part of said handle, said threaded sec
tions being adapted to engage with and be dis
engaged from each other in either direction, and
to be disengaged from each other when said 35
rotatable part of said handle is screwed up into
contact with said face guard, all substantially as
and for the purposes hereinbefore set forth.
2. A safety razor including in combination, a
face plate, a face guard having concaved ends 40
with notches therein, a blade corresponding in
length to said face guard and having upstanding
lugs near its ends, the open sides of said con
caved ends being adapted to register even with
the ends of said blade, said notches in said con
caved ends being adapted to register over and be
engaged by said upstanding lugs in said blade
whereby said blade is held in perfect and unmov
able alignment with said face guard, and means
for clamping said blade between said face plate 50
and face guard.
3. In a safety razor, a face guard having a cen
trally located opening therein, a face plate hav~
ing a centrally located threaded stem mounted
thereon adapted to pass through said central 55
opening in said face guard, a blade adapted to be
clamped between said face guard and face plate,
a two piece handle comprising a stationary part
rigidly mounted on said face guard and having a
threaded section on its inner wall and a rotatable 60
part of said handle having a threaded section on
its outer wall the said two threaded sections of the
handle being adapted to engage with and be dis
engaged from each other, and a centrally lo
cated threaded aperture in said rotatable part
of the handle adapted to screw up on said thread
ed stern into contact with said face guard for
clamping said blade, and a swivel-joint connec
tion between the two parts of said handle when
in assembled form with no threaded connection
between them.
WILLIAM H. HALL.’
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