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Патент USA US2121369

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June 21, 1938.
_
>
R. D. ToUToN
METHOD FOR` TREATING TOBACCO
original Filed Feb. 15, 1930
2,121,359
ì
2 sheets-sheet 2
Panarea June 21, 193s
2,121,369
_ UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE -
2,121,369
METHOD FOR TREATING TOBACCO
Rush D. Tonton, Philadelphia, Pa., assignor, by
mesne assignments, to “Wm'ton Machine Com
pany, Philadelphia., Pa., a corporation oi'
l’ennsylvania
Original ‘application February 13, 1930, Serial
Divided and this application
June 21, 1933, Serial No. 676,969
39 Claims.
This application is a division of a joint :applica
tion filed by the applicant herein jointly with
Harry P. Wurman, February 13, 1930, Serial No.
428,022, which said application inadvertently
5 contained claims for the sole inventions of the
applicants.
This invention relates to a method for treating
tobacco and more particularly for conditioning
tobacco in connection with the manufacture of
cigars, cigarettes, etc.
As is well known tobacco is harvested, formed
into hands or bunches, air dried and baled for
convenience in shipment and storage. The baled.
tobacco as received by manufacturers, for ex
ample, of cigars, is in a dry and brittle condition,
in which it cannot be fabricated. The `dry tobac
co has been heretofore'generally conditioned for
fabrication by dipping it into water, permitting
the water to be absorbed by the tobacco and then
20 fabricating the tobacco while in a moist state,
w1. 131-55)
lower than that obtaining in the work room where
the tobacco is fabricated. Further, in accord
ance ‘with this invention motion is imparted to
the tobacco in its conditioning. Desirably the
tobacco is conditioned in air substantially satu
rated With moisture at the temperature obtaining
`and is fabricated in air containing moisture sub
stantially below the saturation point at the tem
perature obtaining, which is higher than that of
the conditioning atmosphere.
10
In accordance with this invention motion is de
sirably imparted to thetobacco and` humid air is
circulated about the tobacco.
The tobacco may
be continuously or intermittently moved and sub
jected to streams of humid air during the condi 15
tioning period. When, as is desirable, the to
bacco is in the form of hands during the condi
tioning the hands are opened up either manually,
or as a result of the movement impartedto the
tobacco, or by air circulation, or currents, or as a 20
under atmospheric conditions such that the
major part of the moisture; derived from the con
result of the combined eifect of movement and
ditioning is retained.
11n carrying the method embodying this in
vention into practice there is desirably main
'
In the conditioning of tobacco, it is desirable
25 that the tobacco be given the optimum moisture
content, since its workability and subsequent
flavor depends largely upon avoidance of a de
iiciency or excess of moisture. However, tobacco
is known to be of hygroscopic nature, though dif
430 ferent types will vary in hygroscopicity, hence it
air circulation or currents.
tained a differential between the temperature of 25
the conditioning room and that of the work room
of within about the range 0.5° F.-25° F. In the
conditioning room the air will desirably contain
moisture within about the range 90%--100% rel
ative humidity and the temperature will desira
30
bly be within about the range 40° F.--80° F. within
is necessary for optimum results to carefully con
trol the conditioning of tobacco and the atmos ‘ which range the formation on the tobacco leaves
of water globules such as would tend to spot the
pheric conditions under which it is fabricated.
'I'he methods heretofore used for conditioning leaves will be substantially retarded or avoided.
35 tobacco, and especially the method generally The desired relative humidity in the condi 35
used and involving dipping of the tobacco in tioning room will be maintained through the
water, are substantially unsatisfactory, since they :admission thereto of suitably conditioned humid
air. The VWork room will desirably be main
do not operate to provide the tobacco with the op
timum moisture content, are diiìcult to control, tained at a temperature within about the range
65° lik-85° F., depending upon the tempera 40
40 and deleteriously affect the tobacco in connection
ture obtaining in the conditioning room, and
with its flavor, color, etc.
the I air will desirably carry - moisture within
Now, it is the object of this invention to pro
about the range 60 %-80% relative humidity.
vide a method by which tobacco may be condi
tioned with accuracy and assurance so `that the
45 tobacco, of whatever type, when conditioned will
contain the optimum moisture content for fabri
cation and for the maintenance of its flavor and
color, and at the same time to provide a method
which may be readily carried out and controlled
and an apparatus which will be simple and eco
nomical in construction and operation.
'In accordance with the method `embodying this
invention, the conditioning of tobacco is effected,
Without preliminary wetting, in a moisture con
55 taining, or humid, atmosphere at a temperature
`lis illustrative of the practical adaptation of
the method embodying this invention, for exam 45
ple, tobacco in hands is moved continuously or
intermittently, the hands'being opened up, in a
closed room, the air in which is maintained at a
temperature of about 65° F. and contains mois
ture to about its saturation point at the tempera
ture obtaining. The moisture content of the
room is maintained by introducing suitably con
ditioned air; i. e. air at suitable temperature and
relative humidity, the air being introduced, as byv
va. blower, so as to cause circulation about the to
55
2
bacco, or the air may be introduced in streams '_ uf tobacco and which comprise lengths or helical
adjacent the tobacco and through which the to
wire springs o secured at their ends to the sides
bacco passes in its movement. The air introduced of the strip beneath supports p,which comprise4
will maintain the air in the conditioning room in circular members supported from legs. formed of
motion as will the movement of the tobacco. ,The
wire, or embodied in a casting, secured to the
conditions of moisture 'and temperature in the
side> of the strip beyond the ends-*ofthe springs o.
Adjacent to one side‘of the conveyor formed
conditioning room'may be maintained by pro
viding, in addition to the introduction of suitably
conditioned humid air, a ilow of water over a wall,
or walls, of the room, which may be of porous ma
by the chains a and strips i is positioned an air
terlal, and by providing a heating means, as a
steam radiator, if necessary. The conditioning
of the tobacco under’ the conditions outlined
above. depending upon the type of tobacco
treated, will require from'about 4 hours to about
48 hours, though it will be appreciated that un
der variation of the conditions, which it will be
by means of a conduit r iltted with a butterfly
valve s. The air box is also connected by con
duits Vt with air distributors u of a length and
understood are contemplated as variable within
wide limits, the time required for conditioning
will vary over that given by way of example, de-V
pendingupontheparticulartypeoftobacco
treated.
v
When the tobacco has reached the proper con
dition under the conditions outlined above, that
is, has absorbed the requisite amount of moisture,
itisfabricatedinaworkroominwhichtheair
isatatemperatureofabout'lû’ F. andhasa
moistln'e content of about 70% relative humidity,
at the temperature obtaining.
The practical adaptation of the method em
bodying this invention will appear in greater de
tail from the following description, with >refer
box or manifold q connected to the conditioning
apparatus C, which may be of any efllcient type, 10
though it is preferred that it be of the type in
which the fan forces rathery than draws the air,
width desirably, though not necessarily, about
equal to the length and width of the conveyor
and positioned respectively above and below the
upper and lower reaches of the conveyor and be
tween the conveyor, as shown in Figure 3. The
air distributors are provided with outlets v in the
line of travel of the tobacco holding and sup
porting means carried by the conveyor, the out
lets in the distributors positioned above and be
low the upper and lower reaches of the conveyor
being provided in their lower and upper sides
respectively and the distributor positioned be
tween the reaches being provided with outlets v
inbothsldes,allasshowninFigure 3.
A pipe or conduit w is led from the air box q
and extended transversely of the conveyor adja
cent to its line of passage over sprockets f, the
-encetotheaccompanyingdrawingaofapre _pipe being provided with nozzles :r directed to
ferred embodiment of apparatus for carrying out ward and in line with the line of travel of the
this invention.
tobacco holding and supporting means on the
In the drawings:
conveyor, as illustrated in Figures 1 and 3.
Figure lisadiagrammaticviewofan appara
It will be understood that the purpose of the
tm for conditioning fabricating tobacco for car
conditioning apparatus is‘ to supply suitably con
rying out this inveni:lon._v '
Figure 2 is a side elwation showing details of
construction of the apparatus.
'll'igureiiisacrosssectional-viewofthesubiect:
of Pigurez.
Flgure4isaperspectiveview,partlyinsection, showing tobacco carrying means.
Figures 5 and 6 are diagrammatic views show
ing means for automatically terminating the con
ditioning treatment.
-
In the drawings. Figure 1, A indicates a closed
room provided with a door B, adjacent to which
is positioned air conditioning apparatus as a hu
midiiier or dehumidifier C, and within _which is
positioned apparatus D embodying this inven
tion. Associated with the conditioning room A
.is a fabricating room F, which may be connected
with the conditioner, or may be remote therefrom.
In the several figures e, e' indicate a pair of
ditioned air at the' temperature desired and hence
that the apparatus may supply or extract mois
ture to or from air supplied to it. Likewise, under
certain conditions the available air supply may
be required to be cooled, while under other condi
tions it may be required to be heated to obtain
the desired temperature.
' The apparatus described may, if desired, be
provided with means for varying the relative hu
midity of the air supplied to the tobacco, or the
amount of humid air, when the tobacco has been
fully conditioned. As illustrative. for example,
the butteriiy valve s in the conduit r leading from
the humidifier to the air box is provided with an
arm y to which is connected a wire z passed over
a pair of pulleys 2 and connected to a frame 3
by which, for example, the smaller guide rolls 1n' 55
are carried beneath the upper reaches of chains g.
The weight of the frame 3 and rolls m' is counter
y suitably mounted shafts, spaced at a distance
balanced by a weight 4 ~attached to arm y, so
sprockets f over which pass chains o, from which
that normally the arm is positioned with the
butterily valve open to the desired extent. As
lugs h. extend laterally at intervals and to which
the tobacco takes up moisture, the weight tending
in turn are connected strips i, as shown in Fig
ure 4. The chains g and connected strips i form
to operate arm y will increase and the counter~
weight is so regulated that when the requisite
`fromeachotherandeachcarryingapairof
an endless carrier or conveyor which is driven by
means of a motor i connected to the shaft e
through a reduction gearing k. The upper reach
of the conveyor is depressed toward the lower
reach adjacent to the shaft e by passage of the
chains under pulleys I carried by a suitably
70 mounted idle shaft. while beyond the pulleys l
the upper reach is raised away from the lower
reach and supported by suitably supported idle
pulleys 1n. m'.
Y
The strips i are each provided at intervals with
resilient means for holding and supporting hands
moisture has been absorbed by the tobacco, the
additional weight thereof will cause frame 3 to
fall against the action of the counterwelght and
shut ofi the butterfly valve, thus shutting oif the
supply of moisture to the tobacco and suspending
the conditioning. Alternatively, a valve 5 provid
ed in the water supply pipe i to the humidifier is 70
provided with an arm ‘l connected to a pair of
solenolds I and 9 connected to a source of power,
as» a battery il and respectively to terminals il
and I2 of a two way switch, the movable element
I3 of which is connected to the source of power u
3
2,121,369
and which supports a container Il »adapted to
hold tobacco I6. The element I3 may, for exam
ple, be a lever fulcrumed at a point i5 and bal
anced so that it will contact with the contact l2
and cause the solenoid 9 _to be energized when
the tobacco in container I4 is unconditioned and
the upper air distributor u, while at the same
time humid air is projected against the butts of
the leaves from the outlets on the `'upper side of
the central distributor u. As the conveyor passes
around the pulleys l', the leaves are again
treated, as though they were gently shaken and in
so that under the increased weight of moisture ' the travel of the conveyor the leaves are again
.absorbed by the tobacco when it is conditioned, it subjected to humid air issuing from the loutlets
will contact with contact Il and cause solenoid l v of the lower air >distributor u, while the butts
10 to be energized. The solenoid 9, when energized, are again subjected to humid air issuing from l0
positions‘valve 5 to permit the passage of water the outlets in the lower side of the central air
distributor.
~
to the humidiñer while the solenoid 8, when» ener
The travel of the conveyor thus carries the to
gized, positions the valves to decrease thefwater
supply. Hence the supply of moisture to the bacco through streams of humid air directed
15 tobacco Ion the carrier or conveyor will be shut against the leaves and butts and, at the same 15
oil when the tobacco is fully conditioned, since time, gives the hands of tobacco a motion like
the condition of the sample in> container Il is gentle shaking, which operates to spread the
leaves forming the hands. The hands, the butts
typical of that of the tobacco on the carrier.
The carrying out of the method embodying this of which are secured by means of the resilient,
20 invention will, it is believed, be understood in helical springs, are not injured and the helical 20
connectionwith the description of the operation springs adapt themselves to the holding of hands
of different sizes, while the supporting means
of the apparatus above described. `
The room A, containing the apparatus above serve to support the separated leaves, holding
described, as has been indicated, is maintained the hands without injury to the leaves, which in
25 at a temperature within about the range the initial stage of the conditioning treatment 25
40° F.-80° F., and preferably at about 65° F., it are in a dry and brittle state. During the treat
being contemplated that the tobacco contained ment of the tobacco the humid air,_as will‘be
in the room A will be fabricated in a work room, understood, is supplied to the distributors
as the room F the temperature of which is from through the conduit r, air box q and conduit t,
30 0.5° F. to about 25° F., higher than that in the while the pipe w also receives humid air from the
room A. Desirably the temperature in the work air box. 'I'he air conditioner, which is desirably
of the type having a fan for forcing humid air
` room is maintained about 5° F. above that main
taining in the room A. Hence, if the temperature into and through the apparatus rather than for
in the room A is 65° F.. the temperature in the drawing it therethrough, is adjusted to maintain
work room should be about 70° F. The relative ` the desired relative humidity and dew-point, of 35
humidity of the air in room A, containing the the air directed against the tobacco and within
conditioning'appar'atus is desirably within about thev room A. The intake of the conditioner is
the range 90%-100% and the relative humidity desirably fromthe room A, >as indicated at i0,
is maintained, desirably at about saturation point, Figure 1, and under the conditions above given as
through the continuous introduction of humid desirable, the conditioner is adjusted to effect
air to compensate for the loss of `moisture due to complete change 'of the air in the room A about
` the absorption of moisture from the air by the three times per minute, though under varying
tobacco under treatment, radiation losses, etc. conditions complete change of air in room A may
The air in the'work room will have a higher tem
perature and a relative humidity substantially
below the saturation point, say for example,
labout 70% relative humidity.
Assuming now that the conditions of tempera
ture and relative humidity of the air in the room
A is as described above, say relatively saturated
with moisture at a tànperature of 65° F. and that
hands of dry tobacco I1 have been applied to the
carrier or conveyor, as illustrated in Figure 4,
from an inspection of which it will be noted that
be desirably at the rate of one to four times or
more per minute.
~
-
It will be understood that the tobacco in mo
tion in the air in room A and subjected to the
streams of air directed at it from the air distrib
utors absorbs moisture. Under the limitations
of conditions of temperature and hence of quan
titative moisture content of the air, the tobacco
will gradually absorb the requisite moisture with
in a period of from about 4 to about 48 hours,
depending upon the type and hygroscopicity of
the tobacco under treatment. When the tobacco
has acquired the desired moisture contentl or, in 55
55 the butts of the leaves are engaged by the springs
other words, has been properly conditioned. it is
o, while the leaves are supported by the support
ing means p, the carrier is set in motion by start - removed from the conveyor, prepared for fabri
ing motor 9', which acts to drive the conveyor cation as by the removal of the stems, etc. and
slowly in the direction of the arrows, Figure 2. then fabricated under the conditions indicated,
vAs the conveyor passes over the sprockets j, it that is, in air at a temperature desirably about
will be noted that humid air is projected into the 5° F, higher than that obtaining in the condition
‘
hands from the pipe u, acting to open the hands ing room.
vIt will be understood that air may be forced
or spread the leaves, at the same time passage of
the conveyor about sprockets f and down under into the conditioning room in such a manner as
the roll l causes the hands to be opened up as to cause circulation of air therein and about the 06
though they were gently shaken. In the passage tobacco in the carrier and that the streams of air
of the tobacco around the roll f, the tobacco hands from the air distributors may be> omitted, also
it will be understood that the conveyor may be
are subjected to a stream of conditioned air, is
suing from the nozzles :c extending from the pipe driven intermittently rather than continuously.
In connection with the method in accordance 70
70 w, and directed'to strike the hands of tobacco
with- this invention, I contemplate the use of
laterally on one side of the hands. In the con
tinued travel of the conveyor, the leaves or the means for automatically regulating theksupply of
hands of tobacco on -the upper reach of the moisture to the air supplied to the tobacco or of
conveyor are subjected to humid air projected controlling the quantity of humid air and hence
'Il against or into them through the outlets v from the quantity of moisture made available to the to
4
>annoso
bacco when the tobacco has' become fully condi
tioned. Means embodying such detail of this in
as outlined herein for its conditioning until
transferred for fabrication.
'I'he various novel and inventive features of the
vention are illustrated by and have been described
with reference to Figures 5 and 6, from an inspec
apparatus described herein are not claimed here
tion oi'> which it will be noted that the cuttingl in. Such, however, form the subject-matter of
of! of thesupply of humid air to the air box q an application for patent filed by me October 12,
and hence to the conditioning room A is effected 1933, serial No. 693,320.
`
through the medium of a butterfly valve s, which
What I claim and desire to protect by Letters
controla conduit r. the valve being normally open Patent is:
l
io to' `permit the passage of a desired amount of
1. The method for conditioning of tobacco 10
humid air and being closed to cut down the air which includes moving hands of tobaccov through
supply through the action of the increased weight a humid atmosphere and periodically- inverting
of the moisture absorbed by the tobacco when the hands.
,
fully conditioned upon the rolls m' carried by the
2. The method for conditioning of tobacco
frame l, as shown in Figure 6. Alternatively, which includes moving hands of tobacco through 15
the supply of humid air may be> shut oil' through
control of the water supply to the conditioner, as
shown in Figure 5. in which a valve on the water
a circulating humid atmosphere and periodically
inverting the hansb.
'
3. The method for- conditioning of tobacco
supply line is adapted to be 'shut oi! through the
increased weight of a sample of tobacco placed
in the conditioning room acting to throw the two
which includes moving hands of tobacco through
a plurality of streams of conditioned air, periodi 20
cally inverting the hands and directing streams
way switch to energize a solenoid operably con
of conditioned air into the hands during a pe
nected with the water valve.
Y
' The method in accordance with this invention
riodic inversion.
will be found to be highly advantageous in con
nection with the conditioning of tobacco, since
.
y
4. 'I'he method for conditioning of tobacco
which includes moving hands of tobacco through
iz's
a conditioned atmosphere, periodically inverting
colnplete‘control of the conditions under which . the hands and directing streams of conditioned
conditioningis carried out is enabled and at the `air into the hands during a periodic inversion.
same time. due to motion. continuous or inter
'lnittent imparted to the tobacco during condi
5. 'I‘he method of conditioning tobacco which
includes subjecting hands of tobacco to a humid 30
tioning the conditioning is effected with uni
atmosphere and repeatedly inverting the hands
formity.
as the leaves become moistened.
-
_
When conditioning of the tobacco is eifected as
above outlined, the tobacco will be found to be
in an optimum condition for fabrication and may
be fabricated without material loss of moisture.
since the tobacco during the time required for
fabrication is generally- cooler than the air in
which it is fabricated so that rapid evaporation
doel not take place, with the result that the fab
ricated tobacco will be found to have retained
to a maximum degree its natural color, iiavor
and elasticity.
.
It will be understood that the method embody-4
ing thisinvention involves from the broad stand
point the‘treatment of tobacco for its condition
ing under regulated conditions of temperature
` and relative humidity, which bear a relationship
to the conditions of temperature and, more par
ticularly, of temperature and secondarily of rel
ative humidity" under which the conditioned to
bacco is fabricated. Generally, the tobacco will
be conditioned in air the wet bulb temperature
of which is lower than that of the air in which
the tobacco is fabricated, and under various con
ditions within the differential range specified, the
dew-point in the conditioning room will be be
low that in the fabricating room F. More par
tlcularly, in accordance with the method the to
bacco will be conditioned in an atmosphere hav
ing high relative humidity, or saturated with
moisture at the temperature obtaining, which air
will be at a temperature within about the range
0.5’ 1".-35’ F. lower than the air in which the
tobacco is fabricated. 'I‘he method according to
this invention involves the relative conditions
above outlined and, at _the same time, the irn
parting of movement to the tobacco, which may
be continuous or intermittent, during the condi
tioning, which may be elfected under the condi
tions above outlined. or otherwise.
6. The method for conditioning of tobacco
which includes moving hands of tobacco through
a conditioned atmosphere, inverting the hands 35
and directing streams of conditioned air into the
hands during inversion.
i
7. 'I'he method for conditioning of tobacco I
which includes moving hands of tobacco through
a humid atmosphere, periodically inverting the 40
hands and spreading the leaves in. the hands
as the hands are inverted.
8. The method for conditioning of tobacco
which includes moving hands of tobacco through
a humid atmosphere and inverting the hands.
45
9. The method for conditioning tobacco which `
includes subjecting hands of tobacco in move
ment in a circuitous path to a humid atmosphere
at a temperature below that of the atmosphere
to which the conditioned tobacco is subsequently 50
subjected. the hands of tobacco being supported
from their butts only and variously in their path
of movement extending in a direction such that
the leaves as they become moistened will iiex
and separate under the influence of gravity.
55
l0. 'Ihe method for conditioning tobacco which ' '
includes moving hands of tobacco secured from
their butts only through a humid atmosphere in
a circuitous path such that the leaves as they
become moistened will flex and separate under
the influence of gravity.
l1. The method for conditioning of tobacco
which includes moving hands of tobacco through
a conditioned atmosphere, periodically inverting
the hands and spreading the leaves in the hands
as the hands are inverted.`
12. The method for conditioning tobacco which
includes subjecting hands of tobacco in move
ment in a circuitous path to a conditioned atmos
phere at a temperature below that of the atmos- l
phere in which the conditioned tobacco _is subse- "
“ It will be understood that in accordance with quently treated. the hands of tobacco being sup
this invention if the tobacco is not fabricated ' ported 'from their butts only and variously in
immediately on completion of its conditioning,
it will be maintained in storage under' conditions
.60
their movement extending in a direction such
that the leaves as they become moistened will
5
2,121,369
flex and separate under the inñuence of gravity.
13. The method for conditioning and fabricat
conditioned and maintained after completion of
ing tobacco which includes subjecting tobacco
in hands, comprising a plurality of tobacco leaves.
the conditioning treatment are within about the
range 40° lit-80.“ F. and that the temperature o!
the atmosphere in which the tobacco is ,fabricated
to a conditioned atmosphere at a temperature
is within about the range 65° F.-85° F. `
below that of the atmosphere in which the treat
ed tobacco is subsequently fabricated until the
conditioning >of the tobacco is completed and
when the conditioning of the tobacco is com
19. The method for conditioning and fabricat
ing tobacco in accordance with claim 14, charac
terized by the fact that the tobacco is conditioned
and maintained after completion of the condi
pleted maintaining the conditioned tobacco in an
atmosphere at a temperature below that of the
atmosphere in which the conditioned tobacco is
subsequently fabricated and then fabricating the
conditioned tobacco in a conditioned atmosphere
at a temperature above that of the atmosphere
in which the tobacco was maintained after com
pletion of the conditioning treatment.
14. The method for conditioning and fabri
eating tobacco which includes subjecting tobacco
20 in hands, comprising a plurality of tobacco leaves,
on a moving carrier,` to a conditioned atmosphere
at a temperature below that of the atmosphere
in which the treated tobacco is subsequently
fabricated until the conditioning of the tobacco
25 is completed, agitating the hands to promote
separation of the leaves as they absorb moisture
in the conditioning treatment and when the con
ditioning of‘the tobacco is completed maintain
ing the conditioned tobacco in an atmosphere at
30 a. temperature below that of the atmosphere in
which the conditioned tobacco is subsequently
fabricated and then fabricating the conditioned
tobacco in a conditioned atmosphere at a tem.
perature above that of the atmosphere in which
the tobacco was maintained after completion of
the conditioning treatment.
l5. The method for conditioning and fabricat
ing tobacco which includes subjecting the tobacco
in hands, comprising a plurality of tobacco leaves,
40 to an atmosphere the temperature of which is
lower and the relative huminity of which is high
er than the temperature and relative humidity of
the atmosphere in which the treated tobacco is
subsequently fabricated until the conditioning`
of the tobacco is completed, agitating the hands
to promote- separation of the leaves as they absorb
moisture in the conditioning treatment and when
the conditioning of the tobacco is completed
maintaining the'conditioned tobacco in an atmos
phere at a temperature below that ofthe atmos
phere in which the conditioned tobacco is sub
sequently fabricated and then fabricating the
conditioned tobacco in a conditioned atmosphere
at a temperature above that of the atmosphere
in which the tobacco was maintained after com
pletion of the conditioning treatment.
'
16. The method for conditioning and fabricat
ing tobacco in accordance with claim 14, char
acterized by the fact that the dew points of` the
atmospheres in which the tobacco is conditioned
and maintained after the completion of the con
ditioning treatment are lower than that of the
atmosphere in which the tobacco is fabricated.
17. 'I'he method for conditioning and fabricat
ing tobacco in accordance with claim 13, charac
terized by the fact that the temperatures of the
atmospheres in which the tobacco is conditioned
and maintained after completion of the condi
tioning treatment are within about the range
0.5" F.--25° F. below that ‘of the atmosphere in
which the tobacco is fabricated.
18. The method for conditioning and fabricat
ing tobacco in accordance with claim 14, charac
terized by the fact that the temperatures of the
conditioned atmospheres in which the tobacco is
tioning treatment in a conditioned atmosphere 10
at a. temperature below about 70°` F. and that
the tobacco is fabricated at a temperature above
about '10° F. and having a lower humidity than
that at which the tobacco was treated and main
tained.
,
’
`
,
20. The method for conditioning and fabricat
lng‘ tobacco in accordance with claim 14, charac
terized by the fact that the atmosphere in which
the tobacco is conditioned is maintained substan
tially saturated with moisture at the tempera
ture obtaining.
.
v
21. The method for conditioning and fabricat
ing tobacco in accordance with claim 13, charac
terized by the fact that during the conditioning
treatment the hands of tobacco are on a mov
ing carrier and that the hands of tobacco are
peliodically subjected to an opening action until
the leaves` of the hands are substantially uni
formly moistened.
`
'
`
22. The method for conditioning and fabricat
ing tobacco in accordance with claim 13, charac
terlzed by the fact that the hands of tobacco are
periodically inverted during the conditioning
treatment.`
23. The method for conditioning and fabricat
ing tobacco in accordance with claim 13, charac
terized by the fact that in the conditioning treat
ment the hands of tobacco are subjected to force
ful jets of conditioned air so positioned rela
tive tothe hands of tobacco that the full force
of the jets will be received by the hands when
the hands are directly in line with the jets.
24. The method for conditioning tobacco which I
includes.: passing hands lof tobacco leaves slowly
through an atmosphere of conditioned air, the
said atmosphere having a moisture content with
in about the range gil-100% and being at a tem- :
perature such as to substantially retard the for
mation of water globules such as would tend t0
spot the leaves, and periodically passing the
hands into line with forceful jets of conditioned
air, the hands being positioned relative to the
jets so` that substantially the full force of the
jets will be received by the hands when they are
directly in line with the jets.
25. The method for conditioning tobacco in ac
cordance with claim 23, characterizedI by the fact
that the atmosphere of the conditioned air in the
conditioning treatment has a temperature be
low ’70° C.
26. The method of treating tobacco which in
cludes moving a hand of tobacco through a forci
ble jet of conditioned air in a chamber, the hand
being positioned relative to the jet so that sub
stantially the full force of the jet will be received
by the hand when it is directly in line with the let.
27. The method of treating tobacco in accord
ance with claim 26, characterized by the fact thatr
the hand of tobacco is on a moving carrier and
that it is agitated independentlyÍ of the jet of 70
conditioned air.
>
28. The method of treating tobacco in accord
ance with claim 26, characterized by the factthat
the size of the jet of conditioned air is regulated
to effect an even distribution of air over the 75
6
-
e
¿umso
tobaccoandbythefactthatthetobaccoispe
riodically shaken independently of the jet.
mamofcàndiuoneamßreœivedbymenmo
39.1‘hemethodoftreatingtobaccoinaccord
ance withclaim 26,charactex_-izedbythefaet that
l thehand of tobacco is agitated independently of
thejetofconditionedairwhilethehandofto
baccoisinlinewiththejetoi'oonditionedalr.
x 30.1‘hemethodoftreatingtobaccoinlceœd
ceivedbythehandsfromthetipsof
amewlthclnim26,characterizedbythei’aetthat. whenthehnndsaredirectlyinlinewiththejets
IOthejetofconditionedlirisdirectedintothe andalsothatthehandswillreceivesubstantially l0lmndfromthetipsoftheleaves.
'
.
31. Themethodoftreatingtobaceoinlœord
ancewithèlaim26,characterinedbyihc_factthnt
thefullforceoi'thejetsatananglelateraliyon
asidethereoi'.
v
thehandoi’tobaccoisina'pendantpœitlonwhen
)l itreceivestheietofconditionednir.
32. Themethodoftreatingtoboccoinaœord
anoewithclaim26,characterinedbythefactthat
the let of conditioned air is received
butt
of the hand of tobacco.
n sa. The method or mung tobacco in‘ woonl
ance withclaim26,characterinedhythefactthat
the condition oftheairformingsaid jetis auto
matically varied as the moistnre'content of the
tobacco approximatœ a predetermined amount.
g5
34. Themethodoftreatingtohaccoinaccord
ancewith ciaim26,characterisedbythe factthat
thehandoftobaccoreoeives thesaidietofcon
ditioned air progressively along its length.
35.V The method of treating tobacco in accord
ao ance with claim/26, characterized by the fact that
the tobaccoismovedinacurvedpethandthat
andnlsothatthehandswill receive substantially N
thefullforce oftheietsatananglelaterallyon
a side thereof and from their butt ends.
39. The methodfortreatingtobaccowhichim
cludes subjecting tobacco in hands to a condi
tioned atmosphere at .a temperature below that ß
ofthetohoccoatwhichthetreatedtobaccois
subsequently treated and periodically subjecting
'the hands of tobacco to forceful jets of condi
tioned air, the hands being positioned relntiv'e
tothejetssotbatsubstantiallythefull forceof I0
the jets will be received by the hands when they
the hand oftobaccoreceivesthesnidjetof e011-,V -aredirectlyinlinewiththejetssndsubsequent
ditioned air progressively along its length.
ly treatingtbe tobacco in an atmosphere at a
36. The method of treating tobacco in scoord
higher temperature.
.35 ancewith claim 26, characterised bythe fectthat _ Y
L
,
RUSH D. TOU'IDN.
35
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