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Патент USA US2121370

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Junë 21, 1938. `
2,121,370
R. D. .TOUTON
APPARATUS FOR TBEATING TOBACCO
Original Filed Feb. 15, 1930
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2 Sheets-Sheet 1
June 21, 193s. `
R, D, TOUTCN '
2,121,370
APPARATUS FOR TREATING TOBACCO
Original Filed Feb„ 15, 1953
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2 Shee’cS-Shee’f. 2
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»7770
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2,121,370
`Patented WJune 21, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,121,370
APPARATUS , FOR TREATING TOBACCO
Rush D. Tonton, Philadelphia, Pa., assignor, by
`mesne assignments, to Wurton Machine Com
pany, Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of
Pennsylvania
Original application January 6, 1931, Serial No.
506,886, which in turn is a division of Serial
No. 428,022, February 13,- 1930. Divided and
this application October l2, 1933, Serial No.
693,320
19 Claims.
(cl. .Tsi-55)
This invention relates to apparatus for treat
ing tobacco and more particularly for condition
ing tobacco in connection with the manufacture
of cigars, cigarettes, etc.
As is well known tobacco is harvested, formed
into hands or bunches, air dried and baled for
convenience in shipment and storage. The baled
tobacco as received by manufacturers, for ex
ample, of cigars, is in a dry and brittle condition,
in which it cannot be fabricated. The dry to \
rated with moisture at the temperature obtain->
ing and is fabricated in air containing moisture
substantially below the saturation point at the
temperature obtaining, which is higher than that
of_ the conditioning atmosphere.
bacco has been heretofore generally conditioned '
conditioning period. When, as is desirable, the
for fabrication by dipping it into water, permit
tobacco is in the form of hands during the con
ditioning the hands are opened up either manu
ally, or as a result of the movement imparted to
the tobacco, or by air circulation, or currents, 15
ting the water to be absorbed by the tobacco and
then fabricating the tobacco while in a moist
state, under atmospheric conditions such that the
major part of the moisture derived from the con
{ditioning is retained.
.
In the conditioning of tobacco, it is desirable
that the tobacco be given the optimum moisture
20 content, since its workability and subsequent
ñavor depends largely upon avoidance of a de
ficiency or excess of moisture. However, tobacco
is‘known to be of hygroscopic nature, though
diñerent types will vary in hygroscopicity, hence
25 it is necessary for optimum `results to carefully
control the conditioning of tobacco and the at
In accordance with this invention motion is
desirably imparted to the tobacco and humid air
is circulated about the tobacco. The tobacco
may be continuously or intermittently moved
and subjected to streams of humid air during the 10
or as a result of the combined eifect of movement
and air circulation or currents.
‘
\
In carrying the method embodying this inven
tion into practice there is desirably maintained
a differential between the temperature of the 20
conditioning room and that of the work room of
within about the range 0.5° F.--25° F. In the
conditioning room the air will desirably contain
moisture within about the range 90%-100% rel
ative humidity and the temperature will desirably 25
be within about the range 40° F.-80° F. The
mospheric conditions under which it is fabri „ desired relative humidity in the conditioning
cated.
_
.
room will be maintained through the admission
The methods heretofore used for conditioning theretov of suitably conditioned humid air. The
30 tobacco, and especially the method generally used Work room will desirably be maintained at a tem 30
and involving dipping of the tobacco in water, perature within about the range 65° lit-85° F.,
are substantially unsatisfactory, since they do
not operate to provide the tobacco with the
optimum moisture content, are diñicult to con
35 trol, and deleteriously affect the tobacco in con
nection with its flavor, color, etc.
Now,it is the object of this invention to pro
vide an apparatus by which tobacco may be
\ conditioned with accuracy and assurance so that
depending upon the temperature obtaining in
the conditioning room, and the air will desirably
carry moisture within about 'the range 50%
80% relative humidity.
s
As illustrative of the practical adaptation of
the method embodying this invention, for ex
ample, tobacco in hands ismoved continuously
or intermittently, the hands being opened up, in
the tobacco, of whatever type, when conditioned
will contain the optimum moisture content for
fabrication and for the maintenance of its flavor,
a closed room, the air in which is maintained at 40
a temperature of about `65" F. and contains mois
ture to about its saturation point at the tempera
color, etc. and at the same time to provide a
method which may be| readily carried out and
45 controlled and an apparatus which will be simple
and economical in construction and operation.
In _accordance with the method embodying this
invention, the conditioning of tobacco is effected,
`without preliminary wetting, in a moisture con
50 taining, or humid, atmosphere at a temperature
vture obtaining. The moisture content of the
room is maintained by introducing suitably con
ditioned air; i. e. air at suitable temperature 45
and relative humidity, the air being introduced,
_ lower than that obtaining in the Work room
where the tobacco is fabricated. Further, in ac
cordance with my invention motion is imparted'>
to the tobacco in its conditioning. Desirably the
55 tobacco is conditioned in air substantially satu
as by a blower, so as to cause circulation about
the tobacco, or the air may be introduced in
streams adjacent the tobacco and through which
the tobacco passes in `its movement. The air 50
introduced will maintain the air in the condition
ing room in motion as will the movement of the
tobacco. The conditions of moisture and tem
perature in the conditioning room may be main
tained by providing, in addition to the introduc
r
A
. »
`.
.2,191,37o'
tion of suitably' conditioned humid air, a ilowof .Í whichfthe fan forces rather than draws the air,
' water over a wall, or walls, oi‘the room, which
by means of a .conduit r iltted vwith'a butterily
may be of porous material, and by- providing a valve s. The'air box is also connected 'by con
heatingmeans, as a steam radiator,.if necessary. -duits t with air distributors 'u oi _a length and
The conditioning of the tobacco under the con 4width desirably, though not necessarily, about
ditions outlined above, depending upon the type _ equal to the lengthand width or the conveyor and
y ot tobacco treated, will require from about 4
hours to about 48 hours, though it will be appre
ciated that under variation of the conditions,
positioned respectively above and below the up
_per and lower reaches 4of the conveyorv and be
tweentheconveyor, as shown in Figure 3. The
'10 which it will be understood we contemplate as ' air distributors are provided with outlets v in the
variable within wide limits, the time required for
conditioning will yvary over that given by way'of
line oi' travel of the tobacco holding and sup
example, depending upon the particular type of
tobacco treated.
porting means carried- by the conveyor, the out
lets in the‘distributors positioned above and be
low the upper` and lower reaches ofthe conveyor
“When the tobacco has reached the proper con
` dition under the conditions outlined above, that
is, has absorbed 'the requisite amount of mois
spectively andthe distributor positioned between
being provided 11i-.theirl lower and upper sides re- `
the reaches being provided with outlets v in both
' ture, it is fabricated in a work room in which‘ sides, all as shown in Figure 3.
the air is Aat a temperature of about 7_0" F. and,
A pipe or conduit w is led from the'air box q
20 has a moisture -content of about 70% relative hu
. midity, at the temperature obtaining. ‘
'I'he practical adaptation of the method em
bodying'my invention will appear in greater detail
from the following description, with reference
25- to the accompanying drawings, of a preferred
1 embodiment of the apparatus embodying my in
vention.
'
In the drawings: e
_
Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of an appara
30
tus for conditioning tobacco embodying my in
vention';
Figure 2-is a side elevation showing details of
construction of the apparatus;
„
Figure 3 is a cross sectional view of the subject
35 `oi? Figure 2; '
Figure 4 is a perspective view, partly in section,
showing tobacco carrying means;
Figures 5 and 6 are diagrammatic views show
ing means for automatically terminating the con
40
ditioning treatment.
In the' drawings, Figure 1, A indicates a closed
and extended transversely of the conveyor ad 20
jacent toits line of passage' over sprockets f»,
the pipe being'provided with nozzles œ directed
toward and in line with the line of Atravel of the
tobacco holding and supporting means on the>
conveyor, as illustrated .in Figures 1 and 3.
25
It will be understood that the purpose of the
conditioning- apparatus is to supply'suitably con
ditioned air at the temperature desired and hence
that the apparatus may supply or extract mois
ture to or from air supplied to it. Likewise, un 30
der certain conditions the available vair supply
may be required to be cooled, while under other
conditions it may be required> to be heated to
obtain the desired temperature. _
'I'l1e'«apparatus described may, it desired, be
provided with means for varying the relative hu
midity _of the air supplied tothe tobacco, or the
amount of humid air, when the tobacco has been
Gi
fully conditioned. As illustrative, for example,
the butterfly valve s in the conduit r leading from 40
the humidiñer to the air box is provided with
room provided with a door B, adjacent to which
an arm y to which is connected a wire z passed
_, is positioned air conditioning apparatus as a hu
over a pairof pulleys 2 and'connected to a frame ,
midifier or dehumidiiler C, and within which is ' 3 by which, for example, the smaller guide rolls
m are carried beneath the upper reaches 'of chains
45 positioned apparatus D embodying my invention.
>In the several- ilgures e, e’ indicateA a pair of y. The weight of the frame 3 andv rolls g is coun
suitably mounted shafts, spaced ata distance terbalanced by a weight ‘attached to arm y, so
from each other and each carrying a pair of
sprockets f overpwhich pass chains g, from which
50 lugs h extend laterally at >intervals and to which
in turn are connected strips i, as shown in Fig
ure 4. The chains a and connected strips‘iiorm
an endless carrier or conveyor which is driven
by means of a motor :i connected tothe shaft e
55 through a reduction gearing k.- 'I'he upper reach
of the conveyor is depressed toward the lower
reach adjacent to the shaft e by passage of the
chains under pulleys l carried by a suitably
mounted idle shaft, while beyond the pulleys l
60 the upper reach is raised away from the lower
reach and supported by suitably supported idle
pulleys m, m'.
The stripsi are each provided at intervals with
that normally the arm is positioned with the but
terfiy valve open to the desired extent. As the
tobacco takes up moisture, the weight tending to
operate arm y will increase and the counterweight
is so regulated that when the requisite moisture
has been absorbed by the tobacco; the >additional
weight thereof‘wlll cause frame 3 to fall against
the action of the counterweight and shut oil' the
butterfly valve, thus shutting oft the supply of
moisture to the tobacco and suspending the con
ditioning. Alternatively, a valve 5 provided in
the water supply pipe 6 to the'humidiñer is pro
vided with an arm l connected to a pair of solle
noids 8 and 9 connected to a source of power, as
a battery I0 and respectively toterminals Il and
I2 of a two way switch, the movable element I3
resilient means for holding and supporting hands
of which -is connected to the source of power and
65 of tobacco and which comprise lengths oi.' helical
which supports 'a container I4 adapted to hold
tobacco I6. The element i3 may, for example,
be a lever fulcrumed at apoint i5 and balanced
wire springs o secured at their ends to the sides
of the strip beneath supports p which comprise
circular members supported from legs, formed of
wire, or embodied in a casting, secured to the
70 side of the strip beyond the ends of the springs '0.
Adjacent to one side of the conveyor formed
so that it will Contact with the contact i2 and
cause the solenoid 9 to be energized when the
tobacco in container I4 is unconditioned and so
that under ‘the increased weight of moisture ab
by the chains g and strips i is positioned' an air . sorbed by the4 tobacco when it is conditioned, it
box or'manifold q connected to the conditioning
apparatus C, which may be of any eilicient type,
75 though it is preferred that it be oi the type in
will contact with'contact il and cause solenoid
I to be energized.4 'I'he solenoid 9, when ener
gized, positionswalve 5 to permit the passage of 75
l
3
2,121,310
l c watery to the humidifier while the solenoids 8,
_
when energized, position the valves _to decrease
’ . -the water supply.- VHence the supply of moisture
`-to.the tobacco on the carrier or conveyor will be
_shut 'oiî _when the_tobacco is fully conditioned,
since the condition of the sample in container I4
`
.. is' typical of that of the tobacco on the carrier. '
The/ travel of the conveyorthus :carries the
" tobacco -througlijstreams of humid air directed
against >ih_e leaves'and butts and,‘at the same
~time, <gives the handsy of tobacco a motion like
¿gentle shaking, which'operates to spread the
leaves forming -the'hands. 'I'he hands, the butts
_
of which Vare secured -by means oi? the resilient,
The carrying-.out of the method embodying this
_helical springs, are not injured and the helical
invention will, it is believed, be understood in ‘springs adapt themselves tothe holding of hands
connection with the description ofthe operation - of `diiil'erent sizes, while- the supporting means
of the apparatus above described.>
serve to `,support theseparated leaves, holding
A The froom' A, containing the apparatus‘above
the hands-_without injury4 to the leaves, which
in theinitial; stage of the conditioning treatment
are in a dry and brittle` state. -During the treat
described, as has~ `been indicated, is maintained
-at a'temperature within about the range 40° F.
80" F., and preferably at about 65° F., it being
'contemplated that the tobacco contained in the
p room A will be fabricated in a work room, the
ment of the’ tobaccol the humid air, as will be -
understood, 'is supplied to ,the distributors
through the conduit r, air box q and conduit t,
" temperature 6i.’ which is from 0.5° F. to about while thepipe w also receives humid air from the
25° F., higher than that in the room A. Desir
20
air box. The air- conditioner, which is desirably
ably the temperature in the work roomyis main-' ofthe type having a fan for forcing humid air
tained about 5° F. above that maintaining in the
. room A.
Hence, if the temperature in the room
A is 65°' F., the temperature in the work room
should be about 70° F. The -,relative humidity
'of the air in Vroom A, containing the condition
ing apparatus is desirablywithin about the range
90%-100% and the relative humidity is main
tained, `desirably at about saturation point,
through the continuous introduction of humid
30 air to compensate ior the loss of moisture d_ue
to the‘absorption of moisture from the air by
' -the tobacco under treatment, radiation losses,
etc. - The air in the work room will have a higher
vtemperature anda relative humidity substan
_tially below the saturation point, say for exam
ple, about ’70% relative humidity.
Assuming now that the conditions of tempera
ture and relative humidity of the air in the room
into and through the apparatus rather than for
drawing it therethrough, is adjusted to' maintain
the desired relative humidity and dew-point, of
the air directed against the tobacco and within
the room A. ~The intake of the conditioner is 25
desirably from the room A, as indicated at I8,
Figure l, and under the conditions above given
as desirable, the conditioner is adjusted to eifect
complete change of the airin- the room A -about
three times per minute, though under »varying 30
conditions complete change of air in room A may
be desirably at the rate of one‘to _four times or
more per minute.
'
'
'
It will be understood that the tobacco in mo
tion inthe air in room A and subjected to the 35
streams of air directed at it from lthe air dis
tributors absorbs moisture.V Under the limita
tions of conditions of temperature and hence of
A is as described above, say relatively saturated quantitative moisture content of the air, the
with moisture at a. temperature of 65° F. and _tobacco will gradually absorb 'the requisite mois
that hands of dry tobacco l1 have been applied ture within a period of from about 4 to about 48
hours, depending upon the~ type and hygrosco
to the carrier or conveyor, as illustrated in Fig
, ure 4, from an inspection of which it will be picity of the tobacco under treatment.v When the
noted that the butts of the leaves are engaged; tobacco has acquired the desired moisture con
by the 4springs o, while the leaves are supported tent, or, in other words„has been properly con 45.
by the supporting means p, the carrier is set in ditioned, it is removed from the'4 conveyor, pre
motion by starting motor j, which acts to drive pared for fabrication as by the removal of the
stems, etc'. and then fabricated under the condi~
the conveyor slowly in the direction of the ar
rows, Figure 2.‘ As the conveyor passes over the tions indicated, that is, in air at a_ temperature
desirably about 5° Ffvhigher thanthat obtaining 50
50 sprockets f, it will be noted that humid air is
,
projected into the` hands from the pipe u, acting in the conditioning room.
It will be understood that air may be forced
to open the hands or spread the leaves, at _the
same time passage of the conveyor about sprock
ets f and down under the roll l causes the hands
Cil Cil to be opened up as though .they were gently
shaken. In the passage of the tobacco around
the roll f, the tobacco hands are subjected to a
stream ofconditioned air, issuing from the noz
zles :n extending from the pipe w, and directed to
strike the hands of tobacco laterally on one side l
of the hands. In the continued travel of the con~
veyor, the leaves or the hands of tobacco on the
upper reach of the conveyor are subjected to
humid air projected against or into~ them through
the outlets v from the upper air distributor `u,
while at the same time humid air is projected
against the butts of the leaves from the outlets
on the upper side of the central distributor in.
As the conveyor passes around the pulleys f',
the leaves are again treated, as though they were
gently shaken and in the travel of the conveyor
the leaves are again subjected to humid air is
suing from the -outlets 'u of the lower air dis
tributor u, whilethe butts are again subjected
to humid air issuing from the outlets in the lower
side of the central air distributor.
into the conditioning room in such a manner as ,
to cause circulation of air therein 'and about
the tobacco in the carrier and that the streams
of air from the air distributors may be omitted,
also it will be understood that the conveyor may
be driven intermittently rather than continu
ously.
.
,
’
In connection with the apparatus in accord
60
ance with my invention, I contemplate the use
of means for automatically regulating the sup
ply of moisture to the air supplied to the tobacco
or of controlling the quantity of humid air and
hence the quantity of moisture made available
to the tobacco when the tobacco has become iully `
conditioned. Means embodying such detail of
`my invention are illustrated by and _have been
described with reference to Figures 5 and 6, from
an inspection of which it will be notedthat the
cutting off of the supply of humid air to the air
box q and `hence to the conditioning room A is
effected through the medium of a butterfly valve
s, which controls conduit 1', the valve being nor
mally open to' permit the passage of a desired
amount of humid air and being closed to cut
4
9.191,:470
down the air supply through the action of the my application, Serial No. 676,969, filed June 21,
increased weight of the moisture absorbed by the 1933.» 'I‘he present application is a division of a
tobacco when fully conditioned upon the rolls a Joint application of myself and Harry P. Wur
carried by the frame l, as shown in Figure 6. lman, Serial No. 506,886, i'iled January 6, 1931, as
Alternatively, the supply of humid air may be a division of a lioint application with Wurman,
shut oil' through control of the water supply to Serial No. 428,022, filed February 13, 1930, both
the conditioner, as shown in Figure 5, in which of whichljoint applications contained claims for
a valve on the water supply line is adapted to be the sole inventions of the applicants. These Joint
shut on' through the increased weight of a sam
applications were subsequently converted to sole,
10 ple of tobacco placed in the conditioning room applications of Wurman and the claims defining
acting to throw the two way switch to energize
a solenoid operably connected with the water
valvio.l
'I'he apparatus in accordance with this inven
15 tion will be found to be highly advantageous in
connection with the conditioning of tobacco, since
complete control of the conditions under which
conditioning is carried out is enabled. and at the
same time, due to motion, continuous or inter
20 mittent, imparted to the tobacco during condi
the sole inventions of Toutou were cancelled from
said applications without prejudice.
'
What I claim and desire to protect by Letters
Patent is:
v
f
1. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco 15
which includes means for flxedly supporting
hands of tobacco by their butts only, means for
supplying humid air to the tobacco and means
for periodically inverting the hands of tobacco.
2. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco 20
tioning the conditioning is effected with uni
which includes a conditioning chamber and an
formity.
»
endless carrier entirely within said chamber,
when conditioning of’ the tobacco is eirecœd , means for imparting movement to the carrier,
as above outlined, the tobacco will be found to means on the carrier for securing hands of to
be in an optimum condition for fabrication and bacco thereto and means for diverting a reach of 25
may be fabricated without material loss of mois
the carrier out of its normal plane in its move
ture, since the tobacco during the time required ment in one direction whereby a swingingmotion
_for fabrication is generally cooler than the air will be given to the tobacco leaves forming the
in which it is fabricated so that rapid evapora
hands.
30 tion does not take place, with the result that the
3. Apparatus- for the conditioning of tobacco 30
fabricated tobacco will be found to have retained lwhich includes an endless carrier, means for
to a maximum degree its natural color, flavor imparting movement to the carrier, means on
and elasticity.
the carrier for flxedly securing hands of tobacco
It will be understood that the method embody
thereto by their butts only with the leaves nor
35 ing my invention involves from the broad stand
mally extending at an angle to said endless car 35
.point the treatment of tobacco for its condi
rler, means for diverting the hands from the
tioning under regulated conditions of temperature normal direction of extension, and air distribu
and relative humidity, which bear a relationship tors positioned respectively between the reaches
to the conditions of temperature and, more par
ticularly, of temperature and secondarily of rela
tive humidity under which they conditioned to
bacco is fabricated. Generally, the tobacco will
be conditioned in air the wet bulb .tempera
ture of which is lower than that of the air in
which the tobacco is fabricated, and under vari
ous conditions within the differential range speci
fied, the dew-point in the conditioning room will
be below that in the fabricating room. ~ More
particularly, in accordance with the method the
tobacco will `be conditioned in an atmosphere
having high relative humidity, or saturated .with
moisture at the temperature obtaining, which air
_ will be at a temperature within about the range
0.5'I lik-25° F. lower than the air in which the
tobacco is fabricated. The method according to
my invention involves .the relative conditions
of the carrier and adjacent to one of the reaches,
said distributors being provided with means for 40
directing Jets of air into the paths oi' travel of
hands of tobacco on the carrier at the place of
diversion of _the hands.
`
4. Apparatus for the _conditioning of tobacco
which includes a moving carrier for tobacco, 45
means for projecting liets of humid air into the
path of movement of tobacco on the carrier, and
means operable by a predetermined weight of
moisture absorbed by’the tobacco for varying the
amount of moisture supplied to the tobacco 50
through’the medium of said jets of humid air
when the tobacco has absorbed the desired
amount of moisture.
5. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco,
which includes a support for tobacco, means'for
supplying moisture to the tobacco through the
above outlined and, at the same time, the impart
medium of humid air and means for automati
ing of movement to the tobacco, which may be V *cally varying the amount of moisture supplied
.continuous or intermittent, during the condition -to the tobacco operable by a predetermined
ing, which may be eifected under the conditions weight of moisture absorbed by the tobacco.
60
above outlined, or otherwise.
6. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco
It will be understood that in accordance with `
my invention if the tobacco is not fabricated im
which includes means for flxedly supporting
hands of tobacco by their butts only with the
mediately ,on completion of its conditioning, it leaves normally extending at an angle to said
will be maintained in storage under conditions as Vmeans, endless carrier means for periodically
65
_ outlined herein for its conditioning until trans
diverting the leaves of the hands from their nor
ferred for fabrication.
A
-mal direction of extension and means locatedin
The various novel features of the apparatus` _close proximity to the hands for projecting force
embodying this invention will appear from the ful jets of air into the hands during diversion of
70 claims, from which it will appear that various the leaves from their normal direction of ex
70
modiilcations may be made from the particular
tension.
~apparatus described by way'of illustration with
7. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco
out departing from the invention.
\
which includes an endless moving carrier for to
I have not herein claimed the method embody
bacco, means for flxedly supporting hands of
lpg my invention as such method is claimed in tobacco
on the carrier by their butts only with 75
,2,121,370
the leaves normally extending at an angle to the
carrier, means for diverting the hands ofv tobacco
from their normal direction of extension in the
5
movement of the carrier and means located in
which includes a carrier, means for moving the
carrier, means for securing a hand of tobacco to
the carrier by its butt and means for projecting
a forceful jet of conditioned gas into the path of
.close proximity to the path of travel of the hands
for projecting jets of humid air into the hands of
Vmovement of the hand of tobacco on the carrier, Ul
>the said means for projecting a forceful jet of
tobacco on the carrier while the hands are beingl
'conditioned gas being so positioned with respect
diverted.
to the carrier that the hand will receive sub
8. In apparatus of the class described, a cham
stantially the full force of the jet when the hand,
10 ber, an endless conveyor positioned entirely with
in the movement of thecarrier, is directly in line
in the chamber, means carried by the conveyor Awith said means for projecting said jet.
for carrying suspended hands of tobacco leaves,
14. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco
means for imparting movements to the conveyor in accordance with claim 13, characterized by the
to cause the hands of leaves to swing from their fact that the carrier travels in a circuitous path.
15 secured butt ends, and means for introducing>
1,5. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco
humid air into the chamber.
'
`
in accordance with claim 13, characterized by the
9. In apparatus of the class described, a con
ditioning chamber, a pair of endless chains mov
ing in the chamber, transverse bars carried by
20 the chains, means carried by the bars for engag
ing and holding the butt ends of hands of tobacco
for supporting them in suspended position, means
for imparting movements to the chains for caus
ing swinging movements to be imparted to the
25 suspended hands of leaves, and means for caus
10
fact »that the means for projecting a forceful jet
‘of- conditioned gas into the path of movement of
the hand of tobacco on the 'carrier is so positioned
that the jet will strike the hand of tobacco lateral
ly againsta side thereof.16. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco in
accordance with claim 13, characterized by the
fact that the means for projecting a forceful jet
of conditioned gas into the path of movement of
ing humid air to flow through the chamber and the hand of tobacco on the carrier is so positioned
into contact with the swinging suspended leaves. , that the jet will strike the hand of tobacco at
10. Apparatus for conditioning tobacco which the tips» of the leaves.
includes means for moving tobacco in hands
17. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco
30 through a conditioned atmosphere, means for ef
in accordance with claim 13, characterized by 30
fecting inversion of the hands and means for
spreading the leaves of the hands as the hands
the fact that the means for projecting a force
are inverted.
ment of the hand of tobacco on the carrier is
"
ful jet of conditioned gas into the path of move
11. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco so positioned that the jet will strike the hand of
35 which includes means for ilxedly supporting hands
"
of tobacco by their butts only with the leaves
normally extending at an angle to said means,
conveyor means for periodically diverting said
leaves from their normal direction of extension
40 and means for periodically projecting forceful
jets ofl air into the hands during the period of
diversion from the normal direction of extension,
said last mentioned means being positioned in
close proximity to the hands so thatthe jets of
45 air strike the hands with suñicient force to eifect
separation of the tobacco leaves in the hands.
12. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco,
which includes means for supporting a hand of
tobacco by its butt and means for projecting a
forceful jet of conditioned gas at the tobacco, the
hand of tobacco being positioned relative to the
s said means for projecting a forceful jet of con
ditioned gas so that substantially the full force
ofthe jet will be received by the hand when it
55 is directly in line with said means for projecting
said jet.
“
\
i
»tobacco at its butt end.
18. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco
in accordance with claim 13, characterized by
the fact that the means for projecting a forceful
jet of conditioned gas into the path of move
ment of the hand of tobacco on the carrier is so
positioned that the jet will strike the hand of
tobacco against a side thereof progressively along
its length.
19. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco,
which includes a carrier, means for moving the 45
carrier, means for supporting hands of tobacco
on the carrier by their butts only, means for di
verting the hands of tobacco from their normal
direction of extension and means adapted to pro
ject forceful jets of ‘conditioned air into the path 50
of movement of the carrier, said means being
positioned relative to- the carrier so that the
hands of tobacco on the carrier will receive the
full force of the jets when they are directly in
line with the means for projecting the jets.
55
f
_18. Apparatus for the conditioning of tobacco,
RUSH D. TOUTON.
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