close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

?

Патент USA US2121750

код для вставки
June 21, 1938.-
J. F. VAUGHAN
2,121,750
GAME AND PRACTICE APPARATUS
Filed Jan. 9, 1930
6 Sheets-Sheet l
June 21, 1938.,
J. F. VAUGHAN
2,121,750
GAME AND PRACTICE APPARATUS
Filed Jan. 9, 1930
6 Sheetsv-Sheet 2
June 2l, 1938.
`J_ F, VAUGHAN
’
2,_ì21,75()
GAME AND PRACTICE APPARATUS
Filed Jan. '9, 195o
e Sheets-sheet 3
June 21, 1938.
J, F, VAUGHAN
2,121,750
GAME AND PRACTICE APPARATUS
Filed Jan. 9,' 1930
6 Sheets-Sheet 4
_Fig/4,
A
_öz en or'
Íáíáüíämy
¿i
„W
„M
June 2l, 1.938."
-
J. F. VAUGHAN
'
'
`
GAME AND PRACTICE APPARATUS
Filed Jan. 9, 1950
2,121,750
`
6 Sheets-Sheet 5
V1.
D
Mu ’
w
,
„
"
,mi
June 2l, 1938. '
I
.J.’F. VAUGHAN
'2,121,750
GAME AND PRACTICE APPARATUS
Filed Jan. 9, 1930
6 Sheets-Sheet 6
314
321
y ,717'1
Rg. 2a
ì Jij/9a
196
¿5.23
w .
K/
2,121,750
Patented June 21, 1938
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE .
2,121,750
GAlWE AND PRACTICE APPARATUS
John F. Vaughan, Belmont, Mass.
Application January 9, 1930, Serial No. 419,564
61 Claims. (Cl. 273-32)
The present invention relates to game and
practice apparatus and to methods of operating
the same.
The objects of the present invention are to pro
5 vide a game and practice apparatus which shall
be of simple and inexpensive construction, which
will provide entertainment for and hold the in
terest of the participants, whichV will not only
require the exercise of the skill and strength of
10 the players but will develop and improve the
same, which will simulate well established games
and sports to such an extent as to become an
adjunct for the practice of the same or a substi
tute therefor, which by reason of the limited
amount of space required is adapted for home use,
both indoors and outdoors, and which on account
of its ability to record accurately the results of
the player’s efforts is particularly adapted for
instruction and demonstration uses.
20
With these objects in view the present inven
tion consists in the devices and combinations of
devices, and the mode of operation hereinafter
described and more particularly defined in the
claims.
V.25
All outdoor games and sports, as a rule, re
quire grounds or fields of considerable area.
This is particularly true of those games or sports
in which a ball or other article is driven or
thrown.
The game of golf, for example, is now
30 commonly played over a territory seldom less
than fifty acres in extent for small courses and
one hundred and iifty acres or more for the larger
courses. The average player frequently makes
shots of two hundred yards in length, and the
35 more skilful often reach three hundred yards
and over. Obviously the playing or even prac
ticing of such a sport in the average player’s
home grounds or within doors is impossible, and
although many previous attempts have been
40 made to provide apparatus which may be used
within the confines of private grounds or indoors,
either for the purpose of recreation, or exercise,
the iiight of the ball of only fifteen or twenty
feet.
No satisfactory method or apparatus has as
yet been devised whereby the player may deter
mine the distance his ball would have traveled
had he been in the- open, this being left entirely
to his own judgment and estimate which neces
sarily is most inexact. The attempt to simulate
or imitate a game of golf, or even the play of a
single hole, with such an apparatus is hopeless
since it necessarily lacks all the features which
make the game of golf interesting and fascinat
ing, such as the determination of the length of
the tee shot, the carrying of traps and bunkers
at definite distances, and the accurate gaging
of the shots to the green which vary in distance
from the short chip of a few yards to the full
shot of two hundred yards or more.
The present invention, on the other hand, pro
vides not only for the determination of the nor
mal distance the ball would have traveled in the
open, but may record such distance in a manner
which by reason of its analogy or resemblance to
the determination of such distance on the actual
playing field, >adds realism and interest to the 25
use of the apparatus.
v
Furthermore, the present invention contem
plates the determination of direction of flight
and also records this, in connection with the dis
tance, in a realistic and highly interesting man- _
ner.
Still further refinements of the present inven
tion are the providing for the effect of the wind,
of varying direction and velocity, so that con
ditions still further approximate those of actual
play and the player is compelled to adapt his
shots to such conditions or suffer the conse
3.5
quences in the same manner as upon the golf
course itself.
All of these features are combined in a simple, .40
inexpensive apparatus requiring no more space
than can ordinarily be found on the player’s own
or practice, none of these has thus far achieved _ ground, or in an attic or cellar, or in a club house,
and thus not only will enable one to play a game
any substantial commercial success on account of
in many features corresponding exactly to the , 45
45 the inability of the player to determine or meas
actual game, but will also permit him to secure
ure with reasonable accuracy the results accom
plished in terms of his skill and ability.
One form of golf practice apparatus comprises
an enclosure usually in the- form of top and side
50
nets with a back wall of netting or canvas, the
practice and instruction at times and under con
ditions which would itself render play upon the
course or practice out of doors impossible.
In the accompanying drawings is shown a form
of the present invention as adapted for a golf
player standing at the open end and driving the
game and practice apparatus.
ball against the back wall. Such an enclosure
or “cage” as it is called is usually installed indoors
briefly, a netting enclosure or cage, having a back
curtain of canvas or other suitable material
55 and is necessarily limited in size, often permitting
This comprises,
against which the ball is driven by the player,
'à
2,121,750
from the open end of the cage. By means of a
timing device controlled first by the ball’s leaving
the tee, and second, by its striking the curtain,.
the duration of time of night is actually deter
mined or measured, and from such determination
or measurement, the distance the ball would have
traveled normally in the open is determined. The
normal travel of the ball in distance and direc
tion is visually indicated by means of a spotlight
10 projected upon a plan or representation of the
fairway being played, the spotlight being caused
to travel by automatic mechanism from the tee
or lie on the fairway and toward'the hole a dis--.
tance corresponding to that indicated by the
15
of, while Figs. 26 and 27 are corresponding views
of the open curtain switches employed at each
side of the middle; Fig. 28 is a diagrammatic view
of the electric wiring for the apparatus, and Fig.
29 is an enlarged View of the back screen showing
at one side thereof the representation or plan
or” the fairway or hole being played.
The apparatus illustrated in the drawings com
prises fotu‘ major parts, the timer for measuring
or determining the distance the ball would have
traveled normally in the open, the projector for
indicating visually the distance and direction of
flight of the ball, the director for determining
and through the projector indicating the direc
tion of the ball Whether straight or to one side
'
The curtain is divided laterally into a number , or the other of the true or desired course, and
the wind deilection device for imparting and in
of narrow zones, and by means of suitable mecha
nism any deviation from the desired direction of dicating through the projector the effect of the
predetermined direction and velocity of the wind.
the ball so that the latter strikes one or another
timing mechanism.
20 of these zones causes a corresponding deviation
of the spotlight from the straight and correct
direction intended.
Mechanism has also been `provided which pro
duces on the length and direction of flight or
movement of the phantom ball or spotlight an
effect simulating that ordinarily carried by the
wind on the ball played in the open.
Fig. 1 ofthe drawings shows in isometric pro
jection the timing and projecting apparatus to
30 gether with the mechanism for indicating lateral
deflection or mis-direction due to failureof'the
player to drive his ball in the true or desired
course, many details being omitted for the sake
of clearness; Figs. 2 and 3 are side elevations
35 90° apart vof the actuating spring and dashpot
mechanism for the timing and projecting mecha
nism; Figs. fl and 5 are isometric views of the
wind deflection mechanism, and Fig. 6 is a ver
tical sectional view of the dashpot for use in
40 connection with the same; Fig. '7 is a side vieW,
largely in vertical section, showing the'pedestal
for supporting the timing and projecting mecha
nism and the connections for the wind deflection
devices; Figs. 8 and 9 aredetails on'çan'enlarged
scale of the slotted guides and cross-head-for
actuating the projector from Lthe timing mecha
nism; Fig. 10 is a fragmentary detail of the tim
ing quadrant showing the stop shoulder and in
clined face adjacent thereto; Fig. 11 -is a detail
The control devices for the timer, projector, di 20
rector, and wind deflection device are all electri
cally operated. The requisite power for actuat
ing the timer, projector, and wind deflection de
vice is supplied from springs. The power for the
25
director is electric.
In Fig. 1 is shown in perspective a tilting and
swiveling, flat base 3l upon which are mounted
the timing, projecting and directing mechanisms.
This base is supported on the vertical spindle 32,
30
see Figs. 4 and 7, mounted in the pedestal 33.
The timer comprises a quadrant 34 mounted to
rotate in an anti-clockwise manner, as viewed in
Fig. 1, under the influence of the coiled spring
35, the rate or speed of movement being con
trolled by the dashpot 36. This dashpot, see Figs. 35
2 and 3, is of the hydraulic type containing oil
or other suitable liquid, and comprises a piston
3'! ñxed to the end of piston rod 38 and having
a plurality of holes or apertures 39.
An im
perforate disk Il! ñtting loosely on the piston rod 40
normally rests upon the top of the piston 31 and
closes apertures 39. When the piston is descend
ing, however, the disk Il! lags behind, thereby
uncovering the openings 39 and facilitating the
downward movement of the piston and rod.
45
The piston rod projects through the closed top
of the dashpot and is connected at 42 to a strap
or other flexible connection 43, the opposite end
on an enlarged scale, largely in vertical section,
of the adjustable connections for the wind de
?lection device. and Fig. 12 is a top plan View of a
portion of the same With the top clamping nut
removed; Fig. 13 is a vertical longitudinal section
on an enlarged scale of the clutchmechanism for
of which is secured at M to the drum 45 fixed
upon one end of the shaft d1 which carries at its 50
opposite end the quadrant 3d. The inner end of
the spiral spring 35 is secured to the shaft while
the outer end is held in ñxed position by the pin
¿i8 mounted in the arm 49 on the cylindrical sleeve
or bearing 5| at the upper end of the support 52 55
rendering the projector actuating devices opera
mounted upon the base 3 I .
tive; Fig. 14 isa side elevation of the> tee switch
which is controlled by the ball at the tee; Fig. l5
Provision is made in the dashpot for the flow
of liquid from a point above to a point below
is a top plan and Fig. 16 an axial elevation of a
60 modiñed form of mechanism for indicating a
_
the piston during the operating or upward stroke
of the latter, and this is accomplished by means 60
varying extent of deilection of the ball from the
of a by-pass or pipe 54, the lower end of which
true course; Fig. 17 is a side elevation of the same;
Fig. 18 is a fragmentary detail ofthe mechanism
shown in Fig. 16; Fig. 19 is a vertical section on
enters the bottom of the dashpot below the piston,
while the` upper end enters the side of the dashpot
above the piston. The rate of flow through this
by-pass or pipe is regulated to control the rate
of movement of the piston within the dashpot
line IQ-IB of Fig. 16 on an‘enlarged scale; Fig.
20 is a top plan of the cage and other apparatus;
Fig. 21 is >a side view of the same on line- 2 I-Zl
of Fig. 20; Fig. 22 is an end View of the cage as
seen by the player; Fig. 23 is an enlarged side
elevation showing theY arrangement of the back
curtain, the supplementary curtain, and one of
the curtain switches; Figs. 24 and 25 are a top
plan and a vertical section respectively on en
larged scale >ofthe closed curtain switch used
behind the screen and opposite the'middle there
by means of the valve 55 adjustably mounted in
the lower end of the lever 56 pivoted within the
dashpot at 51. The valve 55 by means of its
threaded shank and knurled head may be ad
justed to give the desired opening and rate of
iiow.
The purpose of the lever upon which the valve
Vis mounted is to provide for they bodily movement
of the valve during the upward movement of the
3
2,121,750
piston so that a faster movement of the dash
pot can be secured during the earlier or timing
portion of its stroke, and a slower movement dur
ing the latter portion, for a purpose shortly to- be
explained. It is the movement of the quadrant
under the influence of the coiled spring, and
controlled by the dashpot, which is utilized to
measure o1' determine,l and thro-ugh the action
o-f the projector, to indicate the potential dis
10 tance of travel of the ball. This is accomplished
as follows.
`
Fixed in the quadrant is the crank pin 6i for
actuating the cross-head 52 upon the end of the
rod '63. The opposite end of this rod slides or
15 telescopes within the hollow end of shaft 5&1.
fitting loosely therein. The rod and shaft may,
however, be locked or clamped together by means
of clutch devices. As shown in Fig. i3, these
comprise the locking washer or disk (i5 having a
20 central opening slightly larger than the rod 63
upon which it is mounted and with squared in
ner edges or corners so that while the rod may
slide freely through the disk when the latter is
held at right angles to the rod, a tipping or tilting of the disk will cause it to bite and grip the
rod securely. The disk is held at its upper edge
by the shoulder 66 on the shaft 64 and is tilted
by coiled compression spring 6l' mounted in the
counter-bore in the end of the shaft 'Si
The
30 clutch disk 65 is held in inoperative position by
means of the collar 53 loosely mounted on rod 63
and provided with beveled faces. Collar Sii is
controlled by bell-crank lever 69 pivoted on pin
‘H mounted in a ñxed support which for clear
ness of illustration is omitted from the drawing.
When the lever t9 is moved in a clockwise direc«
tion, the beveled end of its short horizontal arm
engages the collar 68 and forces it to the left in
Fig. 13, compressing spring ‘6l and releasing rod
40 63 from the clutch disk 65 and permitting slid
ing movement of rod @3 within shaft 64.
On movement of lever 69 in the opposite di
rection, coiled spring Si causes clutch disk to
tilt and lock rod 63 and shaft ‘54 rigidly together.
In operationl lever 5S will be actuated to free the
rod 63 during the earlier or timing portion of the
stroke of the dashpot and quadrant, and to llock
or clamp the rod 63 to shaft 64 during the latter
or projecting portion of the stroke of dashpot
and quadrant.
The determination or measurement of the po
tential flight of the ball is based upon the time
interval which elapses between the ball’s leaving
the tee and striking the back curtain. Since the
higher the velocity of the ball the shorter is the
time interval and the longer is the night of the
ball. Accordingly it was necessary to devise some
means whereby the shorter intervals would in
dicate longer flights. rI‘his I have done by taking
a uniform or constant throw or movement of
the dashpot and quadrant and making the firstv
portion of such stroke, which corresponds in du
ration to the time interval of the ball’s flight from
the tee to the curtain, whatever that may be,
l'es
an idle or waste movement or stroke.
The re
mainder of the full stroke is then used to measure
and to indicate the length of flight of the ball.
Obviously, the harder the ball is struck and
the swifter its flight from the tee to the curtain,
the shorter will be the time interval and the cor
responding idle and waste portion of the stroke
of the dashpot, and the longer will be the measur
in traveling from the tee to the curtain, and a
similarly increased idle or waste portion of the
dashpot stroke will occur with a corresponding
reduction in the length of the measuring and in
dicating portion of such stroke.
It is the pivoted lever 69 and the clutch disk
65 for clamping the rod 'E3 to shaft 64 which con
trol the measuring and indicating action of the
apparatus. When the ball is struck the rod S3 is
unclamped and slides freely within the shaft $4 110
as the cross-head 62 begins its initial movement
under the action of spring 35 controlled by the
dashpot 36.
During this portion of the stroke
the shaft 64 remains stationary, but the instant
the ball strikes the back curtain lever 69 is actu
ated to release spring ‘6l which promptly causes
disk t5 to grip or clamp the rod 63, thereby
locking the rod and shaft together so that the
continued movement of the cross-head under
the action of the quadrant imparts a longer or
shorter axial movement to the shaft 64 in extent
corresponding to the speed of the ball, and there
fore adapted to indicate the distance or length of
normal flight.
.
In the apparatus illustrated in the acco1npany~
ing drawings, no provision has been made to in
dicate directly in yards the distance of travel,
but instead a spotlight or phantom ball has been
provided which, for each shot or stroke, will
move over a plan or map or other representation
of the fairway or hole being played from the
point on the map corresponding to the position
where the shot is played, whether at the tee or
along the fairway, stopping at the point or posi
tion corresponding to the place where the ball ¿35
would have come to rest in the open, the player
estimating the length of his drive or other shot
just as in the actual game by reference to land
marks or deñnitely positioned markers.
The projector mechanism for this spotlight or .40
phantom ball comprises the projector or cylinder
15 mounted upon trunnions or horizontal pivots
'iS in the yoke 'il at the top of hollow stem i8
free to turn upon the spindle 'i9 fixed in the base
or slide 8B. The cylinder 'l5 thus has provision 45
for universal movement. Within the cylinder at
its right hand end as viewed in Fig. 1 is mounted
a small incandescent lamp bulb 8l, supplied in
any suitable manner with electric current, while
at the opposite end is the lens 52 for projecting
the spot of light from the bulb upon the repre
sentation or plan of a fairway or hole as indicated
by the supplementary screen or curtain 83 cov
ering a portion of the main screen 811, as shown
in Fig. 29.
v
.
The mechanism for actuating the projector to
cause the spotlight or phantom ball to travel
along the picture or plan of the fairway, com
prises the yoke 85 secured to the end of the’shaft
54 and having the angularly disposed guides 85 60
forming the slots 81. Rigidly secured to the right
hand end of the projector cylinder is the hollow
stem 88 within which is slidingly mounted the
tail rod 89 carrying at its end the stud 90, and
check-nut 9|. Pivoted upon the stud and free to 65
turn is the block or cross~head 92 ñtting between
the guidesßß with a sliding ñt, and carrying upon
the opposite sides the pins 93 which enter and are
' guided by the slots 81 in the yoke 35.
~
The above described construction is such that>
when the shaft Sli and yoke 85 are moved axially,
ing and indicating portions of suchv stroke.' An
the pins 93 through engagement with the slots
8l produce a tipping movement of the projector
easily struck ball, on the other hand, with slower
flight will consume correspondingly greater time
over the screen.
to cause the spotlight or phantom ball to travel
Since the extent of movementr 75
4
2,121,750
of the shaft 64 varies with the velocity or speed
with which the ball travels the distance from the
tee to the screen, it follows that the extent of
movement of the phantom ball on the screen af
fords an accurate basis for comparison of the
different strokes and by a proper positioning and
adjustment of the apparatus parts, the extent of
movement of the phantom ball may be made to
indicate accurately the actual distance in yards
the ball would have traveled normally in the open.
Furthermore, since the latter portion of the
movement of the pin B! on the quadrant 34 is
utilized to cause this tipping of the projector, as
this pin approaches the limit of its rotational
15 movement, which limit is on center, the rectilinear
movement of the yoke 85 will be at a progressively
diminishing rate, until the parts come to a
gradual and easy stop. This motion transmitted
through the inclined guides 85 on the yoke 85
20 will result in a similar slowing down and gradual
stopping of the tipp-ing movement of the projec
tor, producing a most realistic eiïect on the
screen of the slowing down and final stopping of
the ball at the end of its flight and run.
25
In order to provide for variations in the dis
tance or travel of the ball in accordance with the
“loft” of the club which is used, the base 80 upon
of bell-crank lever 69 which controls the clutch
between the rod 63 and shaft 6d, the abutment
nuts |08 being adjustable to permit the proper
timing of the clutch. A coiled tension spring
|09, one end of which is connected to a ñxed pin
||| and the other to the lever 69, tends to hold
the solenoid rod |00 in such position that lever
69 will render the clutch operative and the rod 63
and shaft 64 will be connected and also so that
the latchV lever 98 will be in locking position with
the catch and shoulder |00 in engagement and the
quadrant held from movement.
When the ball is struck from the tee an elec
tric current is caused to flow through the timing
solenoid Iûê causing movement of the core |05 15
to the left and through the solenoid rod |06
actuating the latch lever 98 to release the quad
rant, and at the same time actuating lever 69
to throw the clutch out of operation. During the
flight of the ball from the tee to the screen the
current continues to flow through the timing
solenoid and since the rod Á63 remains discon
nected from the shaft 64, no movement of the
projector takes place. The instant the ball
strikes the screen, however, the circuit through ,25
the solenoid is broken and the spring |09 moves
the core and rod in the opposite direction to
which the projector is supported is made adjust
able, being movable in a guideway 9d on the base
throw theclutch into operation, whereupon the
rod 53 and shaft 64 are immediately connected
3|, a locking screw 95 securing the base in the
and the continued movement of the quadrant
sets the projector in motion and reproduces upon
the screen the flight or travel of the ball.
The quadrant is provided with a second shoul
der 306 which will be engaged by the catch 99
on the lever 98, the latter having been thrown 35
desired adjustment. The telescoping connection
between the stem 88 and the tail rod B9 is for the
purpose of allowing such longitudinal adjustment
of the projector.
35
1t is obvious that as the base and projector are
moved toward the left, as viewed in Fig. l, the
amount or extent of its angular tipping, due to
the increase in the distance from the trunnion 'i6
to pins 93, will be diminished and the same eX
£40 tent or range of longitudinal movement of the
shaft 61% and yoke 85 will now produce a shorter
flight or travel of the phantom ball on the screen.
Conversely, adjustment of the projector to the
right will result in greater distance indicated by
345 the phantom ball.
Accordingly, when tee shots are made with the
driver or oth-er wooden club, the projector will be
positioned at the limit of its movement to the
right so that the maximum distance will be ren
dered. For the various iron clubs, such as the
mid-iron, jigger and mashie, the projector will
be adjusted more and more to the left to diminish
the indicated travel of the ball in accordance
with the conditions and results in actual play.
A scale, as shown at 95, may be provided so that
the projector may be set accurately and invariably
at the proper distance for the club» then being
used.
`
The control of the timing and projecting mech
anisms through electrical devices is eifected as
follows: Pivoted upon the stud 91 carried by a
supporting bracket (not shown) at the right hand
end of base 3| as viewed in Fig. 1, is the latch
lever 93 provided at its upper end. with a catch 99
adapted to engage a shoulder |00 on the periphery
of quadrant 3d, when the latter is rotated in a
clockwise direction by the setting handle |0|
against the tension of coiled spring 35.
Mounted upon the base 3| is the timing solenoid
|04 within which is mounted the movable core
into operative position by the spring |09 when
the timing solenoid circuit was broken, and act
ing to stop movement of the quadrant and con
necting mechanism, including the projector.
The timing solenoid |01! also controls the by
40
pass valve 55 in dashpot 36 so that the valve will
be opened when the solenoid is energized, that is,
during the flight of the ball from the tee to the
curtain, and will be closed, partially or wholly,
when-the solenoid is de-energized, that is when 45
the ball strikes the back curtain. This timing
results, on the one hand, in a faster action of the
dashpot during the timing portion of the stroke
or movement of the quadrant, thereby securing
greater accuracy in timing, and, on the other
hand, in a slower action of the dashpot during
the projecting portion of the stroke of the quad
rant, thus accurately reproducing, so far as time
duration is concerned, the flight or travel of the
ball in actual play and thereby adding to the 55
realistic effects secured.
l
The actuating mechanism for the by-pass valve
comprises the vertical lever | I2 pivoted on the
ñxed pin ||3 mounted in a bracket (not shown)
on the machine. The upper end of this lever 60
is connected by means of the link IM and abut
ment nuts ||5 with the upper end of the valve
lever 56. rI‘he lower end of the lever | l2 is con
nected by the arm H6 and abutment nuts l Il
with solenoid rod |06. The adjustment of these; 65
parts is such that when the timing solenoid |04
is energized, the movement of the solenoid rod
opens the by-pass valve 55 and holds it open
until the ball strikes the curtain, whereupon the
timing solenoid is de-energized and the valve rod 70
knurled nuts |01. . Near the solenoid the rod |06
under the action of the spring |09 causes the
valve 55 to close.
The electrical connections which control the
flow of~ current to the timing solenoid |014 (indi
is connected to the lower end of the vertical arm
cated diagrammatically in Fig. 28) comprise the 75
|05 on the rod |06 the end of which is connected Y
with the lower end of the latch lever 98, being
adjustable with relation thereto by means of the
5.
2,121,750;
tee switch shown in Fig. 14, and the curtain
switch or switches, shown in Figs. 24 to 27. These
switches are actuated by the ball itself, the tee
switch by the ball’s leaving the tee, and the cur
ing solenoid |04 and connect the rod 63 and
shaft 64 to set the projector in motion is accom
tain switch by the ball’s striking the curtain.
The tee switch is provided with the solenoid | I8
proximity thereto are a number of flexible cords, 5.
the middle cord indicated at |33 and the cords
on each side at |39 (see Figs. 22 and 23). 'I'hese
cords are fastened at their top to some fixed sup
port and carry suspended at their bottom the
curtain switches. The middle cord |38 carries 10
'the normally closed switch shown in Figs. 24
and 25, while the side cords |39 carry the nor
mally open switches shown in Figs. 26 and 27.
The closed curtain switch indicated generally
at |Ll| comprises a rectangular block or weighted
member |42 of wood or other suitable material.
Fastened to the top of the block is the metal
plate |43 to which one of the leads |44 is con
nected. The block is provided with a central
bore Within which is mounted the insulated 20;
which is in circuit with the timing solenoid |04.
'I'he switch is so constructed that it is held open
While the ball is resting upon the tee, but the
10 instant the ball is struck and leaves the tee
the switch will be closed and held closed by the
tee switch solenoid | I8 until the circuit is broken
at some other point. The curtain switches are
also in circuit with the solenoid and tee switch.
.15. In the simplest form of apparatus, Where lateral
deflection from a straight course is not to be
indicated, the curtain switch or switches, if more
than one is employed, will be of the closed type,
that is, will remain normally closed but will be
20. opened by the impact of the ball on the curtain,
thereby breaking the circuit through the timing
solenoid |04 and starting the projector in oper
ation.
The tee switch, as shown in Fig. 14, comprises a
25. solenoid IIB having a movable core ||9 and rod
|2|, to the end of which is connected the spiral
spring |22 and liexible cord or string |23 carry
ing the light pad or disk |24. This pad Will be
placed upon the tee |25 and the ball |26 posi
30. tioned upon the pad the proper distance from the
tee switch to put tension on the spring |22 for a
purpose shortly to be explained.
Mounted at |21 on the frame |28 of the switch
but insulated therefrom is the spring contact
. member |29 to which one end of the solenoid
winding is connected. The solenoid rod |2| ex
tends rearwardly through the solenoid and
through the upper end of the contact member
|29, two stop members |3| and |32 being mounted
40 on the rod.
A contact screw |33 is mounted in
the frame and adapted to be engaged by the end
of the contact member |29. A second screw |34
is also mounted in the frame but insulated there
from, and is also adapted to be engaged by the
45 spring member |29 and to act as an adjustable
stop.
The position of the parts when the ball
is teed up and preparatory to being struck is
indicated in Fig, 14, in which the spring member
|29 is held by the tension of the spring |22 to
50 the left of the position it would normally tend
to take, and out of engagement with both> con
tact screw |33 and stop screw |34. When the
ball leaves the tee the light pad or disk |24 is
released, the tension of the spring |22 is re
55 moved, and the contact member |29 springs to
the right a suñicient distance to contact with
both screws |33 and |34. Instantly the circuit
is closed and the current flowing through the
wires |35 energizes the solenoid which tends to
60 draw the core still further to the right and to
hold the spring member firmly in engagement
with the contact screw |33, this condition con
plished through the following mechanism.`
ASuspended behind the curtain and in close
bushing |45. An insulated plate I 43 is secured
to the bottom of the block. Loosely fitting with
in the bushing is the screw |41 to which is con
nected the other lead |48 by means of the clamp
ing nuts |49. A leaf spring |5| is mounted un 25
der the head of the screw |41 and bears at its
ends upon the bottom of the block, acting nor
mally to hold the lower clamping nut |49 in con
tact with the plate|43 and the circuit through
the leads |44 and |48 closed.
The cord |38 is connected to the upper end- of
the screw |41 by means of the link |52, the
switch structure hanging suspended on the lower
end lof the cord and maintaining the latter
straight and tight in close proximity to the back
of the curtain. 'I'he tension on the leaf spring
I5! is adjusted by means of the clamping nuts
|49 so that when the switch is so suspended the
circuit will still be closed, and when a ball strikes
the screen' near the cord, the bulging of the
screen will -cause a corresponding deiiection of
the cord and the inertia of the switch, due to
its weight, will result in the momentary sepa.
ration of the contacts on the switch and the
opening of -the circuit.
Since the curtain switch |4| on the middle
cord |39 is in the circuit with the tee switch, the
instant the circuit is opened by the ball strik
ing the curtain, the tee solenoid ||8 is de-ener
gized and the spring member |29 leaves the con
tact screw |33, permanently opening the circuit.
When the curtain switch |4| again closes, as
it quickly will when the curtain and cord
straighten or iiatten out, the circuit will still re
main broken because the normal position of the
contact memberV |29 of the tee switch is out of
30
35
40
45
50
55
contact with the contact screw |33, as shown in
Fig.
14.
.
'
This breaking of the circuit when the ball
strikes the back curtain de-energizes the timer 60
solenoid |04, permitting the clutching together
of the rod 33 and shaft 64, so that continued
tinuing while the ball is in flight from the tee
movement of the quadrant operates the projector
to the screen.
to indicate the potential iiight of the ball.
Thus, the action of the ball in leaving the tee 65
sets the timer mechanism in operation, and the
striking of the ball against the back curtain sets
The closing of the circuit through the tee switch
completes the circuit through the timing sole
noid |94, releasing the quadrant and setting the
timer mechanism in operation and during the
time interval of the flight of the ball from the
tee to the screen this timing solenoid remains en
ergized, holding the rod 53 and shaft 64 discon
nected so that the movement of the quadrant is
without effect upon the projector mechanism.
The breaking of the circuit when the ball
’ strikes the back curtain to de-energize the tim
the projector mechanism in operation.
The
movement or stroke of the quadrant is constant
and continuous and comprises two portions, the 70
former or timing portion and the latter or pro
jecting portion, the point of division being ñxed
by the ball’s striking the back- curtain. Obvi
ously the harder the ball is hit and the swifter
its flight from the tee to the curtain, the shorter 75
6
2,121,750“
will be the timing interval and the longer will
be the projecting interval, with the resulting
indication of a correspondingly longer night or
distance of the shot.
If it is desired to indicate only the distance
of each shot without regard to the direction, the
mechanism thus far described is all that is re
quired, and comprises the timer, the projector,
the tee switch, and the closed curtain switch.
Preferably, however, the direction of flight of
the ball will also be indicated so that the player
will know whether he is driving the ball straight
and true or more or less to one side or the other.
The mechanism for indicating such deflection
15" comprises, briefly, the side curtain switches,
which control means for imparting a slight rota
tional movement in one direction or the other
to the shaft 64 and its yoke and inclined guides,
so that movement of these parts will impart a
20 slightly oblique tip to the projector mechanism
causing the spotlight or'phantom ball to be de
ñected slightly from the intended straight and
true path.
These side switches, shown generally at |53,
25 are normally open and are very similar to the
normally closed middle switch | 4| , comprising
the same block |42’ with central opening, and
insulated bushing |45', screw |41' loosely mount
ed therein carrying the leaf spring |5|’ at its
bottom, and connected by the link |52’ at its
top to the cord |39. The lead |48’ is similarly
connected to the screw by means of the clamp
ing nuts |49’. Instead, however, of the metal
plate on the topi of the block these side switches
lo 1,1.I are provided with an insulating top
|54 and
bridge contact |54’ to which is secured the lead
three diiferent degrees of deñection on each side
of the middle. With this construction the cur
tain is divided laterally into a series of zones,
each zone having its own drop cord, curtain
switch, and solenoid for indicating the direction
and extent of deñection corresponding to the
position of the Zone struck by the ball.
In this construction in place of the two sole
noids |95 and |66 for imparting angular move
ment through the toothed disk to the shaft, two 10
tension springs are used, the extent of movement
being controlled by means of the siX solenoids,
three for one side of the curtain and three for the
other.
In Fig. 15 is shown the deflection indicating 15
mechanism in top view; the same parts viewed in
end elevation from the >projector end are shown
in Fig. 16, and a side elevation in Fig. 17. The
main parts of this mechanism comprise the disk
| 1| for rotating the shaft, the actuating lever 20
|12 for the same, and the friction bar |13 and
connections for frictionally connecting the ac
tuating lever |12 and disk |1|.
The disk and levers are mounted as follows:
Splined upon the shaft 64 is the flanged'sleeve 25
|14, and the disk | 1| is screwed upon the threaded
end of this sleeve into engagement with a shoul
der, and is locked from rotational movement on
the sleeve by means of the nut |15. Pivoted
midway its ends upon the sleeve |14 is the hori 30
zontal actuating lever |12 provided with a ver
tical handle |16. A washer |11 spaces this
lever from the disk |1|. ’I‘he sleeve is itself plv-_
otally mounted in a bearing indicated at |18.
The lever |12 is Vactuated or tilted by means of 35
tensionsprings |19 and |86 secured at their lower
ends to the adjustable collar |8|, screwed upon
|44’.
In Fig. 1 this direction mechanism is shown
with parts omitted for the sake of clearness. In
d i) Figs. 15 to 19 a modification is illustrated.
Referring to Fig. 1, a ratchet wheel or disk |55
having the hub |56 is mounted upon the shaft 64,
the hub being grooved to receive the key or
feather |51, so that rotation of the disk will cause
rotation of the shaft 64, yet the shaft is free to
move through the disk. Pivoted upon the hub
|56 is the pawl carrying lever |58 having at its
lower end the pivoted double pawl |59 con
trolled by the springs |6|. The forked extension
|62 on the pawl 'is adapted to be engaged by one
or the other of the collars |63 on the rod |64
of the deflector solenoids |65 and |66. When the
solenoid |65 is actuated, double pawl |59 will
l first be turned on its pivotal support on lever |58
“ until the nearer pawl, as viewed in Fig. 1, en
gages the toothed periphery of ratchet disk |55,
whereupon continued movement of the solenoid
rod will move said pawl bodily, swinging pawl
lever |58 at the same time and imparting a ro
tational movement to the shaft 64 and its yoke
and guides. If the solenoid |66 be actuated, the
disk and shaft with its attached parts will be
rotated in the opposite direction.
The solenoids |65 and |66 will be each in circuit
(35 with its appropriate curtain switch, one on one
side of the curtain and one on the other, so that
if the ball is driven 01T direction and strikes to
either side of the middle of the curtain, the pro
the threaded lower portion |82 of the rod |83.
The upper end of the spring is secured to the
flanged sleeve |84, fitting loosely on the upper 40
portion of the rod |83, and connected at its upper
end to the actuating lever |12 near its end. A
vertical latch lever |86 pivotally mounted at its
lower end is provided with a catch or shoulder
|81 at its upper end, adapted to engage beneath
the flange |88 of the sleeve |84 to hold said sleeve
against the downward pull of the spring |19. The
latch lever is actuated by means of the link |69
connected at one end to the latch lever |86 and
at its opposite end to the U-shapedV lever 19|
pivoted on the base of the machine and having
its ends connected with the flat horizontal scle
noid bar |92. This bar |92 rests upon the rods
|94 extending from the cores |95 of the solenoids
|96, the ends of the rods being threaded to re
ceive the adjustable abutment nuts |91 which
engage the edge of the solenoid bar |92.
The above described construction is such that
if` either one of the three solenoids |96 be actu
ated, the solenoid bar |92 will in turn be actuated
and through the lever and link connection trip
the latch to release the flanged sleeve |84.
A similar and corresponding construction is
provided for the other end of the actuating lever,
whereby when any of the solenoids |98 are actu
ated the flanged sleeve |96 for spring |86 will be
unlatched.
An arm or lever |99 fixed upon the horizontal
jector actuating mechanism will be automatically
portion of the U-shaped levers |91 and carrying
adjusted to indicate deflection in the proper di
at its free end the adjustable abutment screw
rection.
| 99' controls switch 269, holding the switch closed
against the opening action of its spring arms
when the parts are set ready for operation as
shown in Fig. 17, all for a purpose hereinafter
'
Preferably this deñection indicating mecha
nismY will be constructed to indicate varying ex
tents or amounts in deflection, and in Figs. 15 to
19 is shown a modification designed to indicate
to be described,
75
2,121,750
When the apparatus is set ready for use, both
latches will be in action, anchoring both flanged
sleeves against the downward pull of their respec
tive springs. The upward pull of each spring
exerted through collars lßl and rods |83 then
balance _and the lever is held in neutral hori
zontal position. When the ball strikes the rear
curtain to one side of the middle, one of the sole
noids ißt or 598 will be energized, thereby trip
10 ping one of the latches and releasing its ilanged
sleeve which is instantly drawn downwardly by
its spring.
The other spring, now being relieved
of the balancing pull of the first spring, immedi
ately becomes operative and contracts. Since its
15 upper end is anchored to the flanged sleeve which
is held by its latch, the contracting of the spring
pulls collar iti upwardly, lifting the rod 183 and
tilting lever H2.
The devices for transmitting the tilting or
20 angular movement of the actuating lever |12 to
disk l'H to cause the desired angular movement
of shaft 64 include a friction bar or member H3
connected to the actuating lever and provided
with frictional surfaces which engage the face
25 of the disk. This bar extends across the face
of the disk on the projector side but out of con
tact, and is connected at each extremity with
the actuating lever which is on the opposite side
of the disk by means of pins Zûl on the actuating
30 lever adjacent each end and passing through the
ends of the friction bar. Clamp screws 202 on the
threaded ends of these pins are adjustable to
draw the friction bar towards the actuating lever
with greater or less pressure. Fixed upon the
35 disk side of the bar H3 are friction pads £93
adapted to engage the face of the disk near its
periphery with suiflcient friction so that when the
actuating lever is tilted by the springs |19 or 139,
the disk will also be tilted, yet providing a yield
40 ing connection between these parts to permit
their relative adjustment in setting the appara
tus.
The mechanism for controlling the extent of
tilt of the actuating lever and disk to produce
45 deíiection of the phantom ball corresponding in
extent to the deflection of the real ball, com
prises two sets of solenoids of three each, indi
cated in Fig. l5 at §96 and |98, solenoids i853
had been energized a greater tilting would have
resulted. By connecting the inner solenoid to the
curtain switch'controlling the extreme outside
zone, the middle solenoid to the switch for the
middle zone, and the outside solenoid to the
switch of the inner zone, all on one side of the
middle of the curtain, different degrees of tilt
ing of the actuating lever and disk will be pro
duced in accordance with different degrees of
actual deflection of the ball from the middle zone, lOl
and corresponding degrees of deflection will be
indicated by the phantom ball through the rota
tion or tipping of the shaft 64 and the inclined
guides for the projector.
A similar set of three solenoids is positioned 15
on the other side of the shaft and similarly con
nected up with their corresponding curtain
switches to indicate deflections of varying de
grees, but in the other direction.
v
While in the illustrated embodiment six of 20.
these deflection solenoids are employed, whereby
three diñerent degrees or extents of deflection
to one side or to the other may be indicated, a
greater or less number may be employed if de
sired, giving correspondingly finer or coarser 25
gradations in deflections indicated by the phan
tom ball.
~
It will be observed that a single solenoid con
trols not only the extent ofA tilting of the actu
ating lever, but also its release. While the time 30
interval between the actuation of the solenoid
and the spring’s coming into action to tilt the
actuating lever is almost infinitesimal, neverthe
less it is suflicient to insure the stem 205 on
the solenoid core being in position to be engaged 35
by the tilting lever when the latter is actuated
by the spring.The deflection mechanism is “set” for opera
tion by means of the handle 116 which is swung
iirst to one side and then to the other. The lift
ing movement of the end of the actuating lever
raises the actuating rod H83 until the intermedi
ate collar 209 engages the ñanged sleeve 18d.,
whereupon continued upward movement will lift
the sleeve and carry its flange above the latch so
that when the actuating lever is returned to nor
mal horizontal position the spring will be held’
under tension. First one spring and then the
other will be tensioned in this manner, the move
indicating deflections to the right while sole
ment of the actuating lever at this time being un
noids
§98
indicate
deflections
to
the
left.
The
50
cores of each of these solenoids carries at its k impeded by the stems on the cores of the deñec
end towards the disk a stem or pin 205 having tion solenoids because these stems all stand re
at its extremity a bevelled head or small disk 2&6. tracted, as shown in Fig. 15, under the action of
These heads normally stand, as shown in Fig. 15, the tension springs 2li).
The purpose of heads 2% on the stem 295 is to
55 out of the plane of movement of the actuating
prevent withdrawal from the stem from beneath
lever |12, but when one of the solenoids is ener
gized as a result of the ball striking the back the actuating lever |12 when the solenoid is de
curtain, the head 266 will be moved through such energized, which occurs almost instantly after
energization. If such withdrawal should occur at
plane to bring the stem 205 into the path of move
that time, the lever would be free to make fur CO
60 ment of the actuating lever so when the «latter
ther tilting movement in excess of the proper
is tilted by the action of one or the other of
the springs H9 or §80, the stem will serve as an
abutment or stop to limit the extent »of tilting
movement of the lever and disk lll.
The three solenoids on each side of the shaft
65
are so arranged and located that diiierent de
grees of tilting will be permitted by the different
solenoids, as illustrated in Fig. 18, which shows
the middle solenoid as energized and the stem
70 of its core in position to be engaged by the arm
of the actuating lever to stop the lever in the
position indicated in dot and dash line. It is
obvious that if the outside solenoid has been ener
gized a less tilting of the actuating lever would
75 have been permitted, while if the inner solenoid
amount.
The head on the stem engaging the
face of the actuating lever prevents such with
drawal of the stem and insures the lever being
stopped and held in the desired position while the
shot is being recorded by the phantom ball and
until the apparatus is reset for a succeeding shot.
Another function of the disks or heads 2M is
to prevent the full movement of any solenoid
core other than the one first aiîected.
For ex
ample, when a ball strikes between two of the
cords for the side switches, both switches will
be actuated, but the one on the core nearer the
point of impact of the ball will operate just
enough quicker than the other to cause the lever
8
2,121,750y
|92 to begin to trip before the solenoid of the
`other cord and switch can actuate its stern.V
When this does occur, the lever will be in posi
tion to be engaged by the head on that stem, thus
preventing the stem passing beneath the lever.
In order to simulate as closely as possible the
`conditions of actual play, and to test and develop
the skill of the player, mechanism has been pro
vided for imparting to the phantom ball a re
10 tarding or accelerating or deflecting effect cor
responding to the retarding or accelerating or
deñecting action of the wind, and provision has
been made for adjustment of the apparatus for
any desired wind direction and velocity.
15
This mechanism, which for convenience is re
ferred to generally as the wind deilection mech
anism or device, is illustrated in Figs. 4 to 7, 11
and 12. It is located beneath the board or base
3| carrying the timing and projecting mecha
20 nisrn, and operates to impart tilting and swinging
movements to the base and the mechanisms car
ried thereby. Such swinging and tilting move
ments take place at the same time that the pro
jector is being tilted by the movement of the in
25 clined cross-head and inclined guideways. Any
tilting of the base produces an increased or di
minished forward travel of the spotlight or phan
tom ball, according to whether the wind is favor
ing or opposed. A swinging movement of the
30 base, on the other hand, will cause a deñection of
the phantom ball to one side or the other in a
curved path of movement corresponding to the
eiïect of the cross component of the wind in a
most realistic manner, and calling upon the play
er to make due allowance therefor in exactly the
same manner as upon the outdoor course.
The base or board 3| is mounted to provide for
this tilting and swinging action in the following
manner: A hollow, vertical spindle 2|| is rotat
40 ably mounted upon the stem or standard 32 car
ried by the base 33, a ball 2|2 or other anti-fric
tion thrust bearing being provided to insure free
movement with minimum of friction. Fixed upon
the top of the hollow spindle is the fork 2|3 in
45 which the base 3| is mounted on the horizontal
pivots 2|4,
The pivotal point is such that the
base and the parts mounted thereon shall be as
nearly as possible in balance to give the freest and
50
easiest tilting movements.
The tilting action is produced through the ver
tical movement oî a sleeve 2| 5 loosely mounted
upon the hollow spindle 2l l, and provided at its
upper end with a sleeveV or collar 2H having a
groove 2|ß in which is received a roll 2|9 on pin
55 220, at the lower end of the link 22| passing
through guides 222 on the hollow spindle 2i I. A
rocking lever 223, pivoted upon the upstanding
arm of the bracket 224 extending laterally from
the yoke 2 I3, is connected at one end to the link
60 22| and at the other through the link 225 to a
bracket 226 ñxed upon the under side of the board
or base 3|.
Thus when the sleeve 2H is raised, the left
hand or projector end of the board or base will
65 be tilted downwardly to give a retarding effect to
the phantom ball corresponding to a head Wind.
Conversely, when the sleeve 2|? is lowered, the
left hand or projector end of the base is tilted up
wardly, increasing the movement of the spotlight
70 or phantom ball and giving the effect of a follow
ing or helping wind.
The devices for actuating the sleeve 2|6 to tilt
the base 3| comprise a spring, tensioned by the
operator when the apparatus is preliminarily set
75 and combined with a dashpot for controlling the
rate'of movement of the parts, and thrown into
operation by a solenoid which is itself controlled
by the timer. The actuating spring is shown in
Fig. 5 at 23|, the dashpot at 232 and the solenoid
at 233.
-
The connected mechanism between the spring
and the vertically movable sleeve 2|6 is as fol
lows: Pivoted to the lower end of the sleeve is the
link 234, the upper end of which is pivotally con
nected to the sector 235, guided by the ears or 10
guides'235 upon the sleeve. The sector is pivoted
at 231 in a ñxed support, (not shown), and its ar
cuate periphery 238 is engaged by the friction
shoe 239 at the end of the rod 24|. This shoe is
U-shape in cross-section, the side walls forming
guides for the sector, and in the bottom of the
channel is a strip of ñbre or other suitable fric
tion material so that longitudinal movement of
the shoe will actuate the sector. A spring 242 at
tached at its lower end to a pin on the shoe and at 20’
its upper end to the pivot 23T, holds the shoe in
contact with the quadrant under suiiicient pres
sure to prevent slippage between the parts in nor
mal operation.
The rear end of the actuating rod 24| is piv 25
otally connected to an adjustable crank pin
mounted in the slot 244 in the horizontal disk
245 axially pivoted in any suitable manner. The
crank pin shown in Figs. 5, 1l and 12, com
prises the pin 245 passing through the slot 244 30
and having the head 247 at its lower end held
by the undercut sides of the slot. The upper end
of the pin is threaded as at 248 and carries a
clamping nut 24S. Pivoted upon the pin is a
sleeve 252 the lower end of which has straight 35
sides to fit the slot 244 and be held from turn
ing, the middle portion of which is cylindrical
to form a bearing surface for the end of the
rod 24 l, and the upper portion of which is formed
with straight sides at an angle of 45° to those of 40
the other end to receive the slotted arm 253 and
hold it from turning and in ñxed angular posi
tion relatively to the slot 244 in disk 245.
Tightening of the clamp nut 249 locks the ad
justable crank pin and slotted arm in ñxed posi
tion on the disk, but permits free pivotal move
ment of the actuating rod 24|.
The mechanism for imparting rotational move
45
ment to the disk 225 to cause its crank arm to
actuate the rod 24| comprises the arm and rod 50
255 having at one end the strap 255 surround
ing the periphery of the disk, with the tightening
bolt 25? and wing nut 258 for adjusting the fric
tional engagement between the strap and the
disk. A spring 259 is provided between the head 55
of the bolt and the strap to permit adjustment
ci the friction. The purpose of this frictional
engagement is so that the disk will normally be
actuated by the swinging movement of the rod
255 and yet permit adjustment of the disk within 60
the strap in setting or adjusting the mechanism.
The arm 255 is actuated by the tension spring
23|, the speed of its movement being controlled
by the dashpot 232, see Fig. 4. This is accom
plished by means of the bell-crank lever 262 piv 65
oted at 263 upon a fixed portion of the machine,
(not shown). The lower end of the pivotal arm
of this bell-crank lever is bifurcated at 264 and
engages the extension .265 on the arm 255. The
end of the horizontal arm of the bell-crank lever 70
is connected to the piston rod 266 of the dashpot
by means of the strap or stirrup4 267, (see Fig. 6).
The piston rod 256 of the dashpot is hollow
and receives the valve stem 268, having the ta
pered lower end 263 and threaded upper end 27| 75
2,121,750
9
Ports 213 are formed in
from start to finish, which resembles in the most
the wall of the hollow piston rod 266 in position
realistic manner the travel of a ball in the open.
with knurled head 212.
to be opened and closed to a greater or less
'I‘he mechanism for imparting deflection to the
extent by. the tapered end 269 of the valve stem,
thereby controlling the rate of movement of the
piston in the dashpot. The loosely fitting pis
phantom ball, as in the case of a cross wind, is
generally similar to that for varying the extent
ton 2li is mounted upon the lower end of the
tion by the Wind. It comprises the arm 293
clamped upon the hollow spindle 2H and hav
hollow piston rod, which projects through the
piston, thus providing a passage from above
the piston to beneath it, through the ports 213
and hollow rod.
The piston is provided with the openings ‘.à‘lä
which are normally covered by the imperforate
disk â'lß fitting loosely on the piston rod. Dur
15 ing the operative or upward stroke of the piston,
the disk closes these openings and the speed
of movement of the piston is determined by the
ñow of the liquid from above to beneath the pis
ton through ports 273 and hollow piston rod and
f
20 around the piston.
By adjusting the valve rod by means of the
knurled head 212, the ports may be opened or
closed to secure the desired speed of movement
oi the dashpot. During the downward or idle
25 strokes of the piston, the disk is free to rise, un
ccvering the openings and permitting the reset
ting of the parts quickly and with little effort.
The arm 255 is restrained from lateral move
ment by means of the pin 218 having its face
shaped to engage one or another of the ratchet
teeth 2li) in the locking bar 28|. This bar is
pivoted at 282 and is normally held in locking
position by means of the tension spring 283, being
actuated to release the bar 255 by the sole
noid 233.
of its travel to indicate acceleration or retarda
ing the arcuate outer end 291i. This is engaged
by the friction shoe 295, similar in construction 10
to the friction shoe 239, and held in close fric
tional engagement with the arcuate end 294 of
the arm 293 by tension spring 296. The shoe 295
is mounted upon the actuating rod 298 pivoted at
its opposite end to the slotted arm 253.
arms 2id swings the b-ase 3| to the right or to 20
the left, according to the adjustment of the ac
tuating parts, to impart a deflection to the
phantom ball.
The control for rendering the wind deflection
mechanism operative is through the solenoid 233 25
which is in a circuit in turn controlled by a con
tact or switch at the lower end of the latch lever
98. The connections and arrangement are such
that the circuit is normally open at this point
but will be closed by the action of spring |09 when 30
the timer solenoid |043 is de-energized, and re
main closed until the quadrant has finished its
operative stroke. This switch comprises a Contact
point 39| on the end of the adjusting screw hav- Y
ing the knurled head 302`and mounted in the 35
and the slotted arm 253 on the crank pin to
bracket 303 on the base 3l. The lower end of
the latch lever 98 forms the other contact, a suit
radial distances from the disk center correspondn
ing to the wind velocity assumed, any desired
vided through such lever.
By adjusting the crank pin 246 in its slot 244
acceleration or retardation, and any desired de
flection, and any combination ,of such move
ments may be obtained andgreproduced in the
phantom ball.
In order to assist and guide the operator in ad
' justing thisI portion of the apparatus for the de
sired wind velocity, scales have been provided,
one adjacent the slot 2130 in the disk 245 and
the other on the slotted bar 253. These scales
are preferably so laid out that the parts will be
adjusted to the same reading 0n both scales,
which will be the predetermined wind velocity.
-The operator is further guided in setting these
parts for a predetermined direction of wind by
an arrow marked on the face of the disk N5 at
f’ right angles to slot 2116. This arrow points in
the direction toward which the wind is blowing.
For example', in Fig. 5 the wind is a head Wind
with a slight leftv to right component.
The frictional engagement between disk M5
and band 25€ permits the disk to be turned to
cause the arrow to point in the desired direction,
relatively to the general direction of the fairway
or hole being played, without interfering with
the 'velocity adjustments. Thus the conditions
'- of actual play may be easily reproduced with a
different wind direction, relatively, at each hole
but with the same velocity, the varying effects
on distance and directions being automatically
reproduced in the movements of the phantom
ball.
Since these wind deiiection effects will be pro
duced Ásimultaneously with the tilting of the pro
jector under the control of the timer mechanism,
the phantom ball is given a regular and even
jdeñection, accelerating or retarding movement
15
When the disk 2555 is actuated by the spring
23| under control of the dashpot 232, the actuat
ing rod 299 is given a longitudinal movement to
turn the hollow spindle 2li which through the
able electrical connection, not shown, being pro
In order to maintain the circuit open when the 4.0
apparatus is set and ready for use, and prior
tothe ball leaving the tee, the quadrant is formed
of slightly longer radius, as shown at 305, (Fig.
l0), adjacent the shoulder |00, so that when the
parts are in latched position, as shown in Fig. 1, 4,5
the upper end of the latch lever 99 will be forced
slightly to the right causing the lower end’ to
move in the opposite direction and out of contact
With the point 30 I.
Similarly the periphery of the quadrant adja
cent the face of the stop shoulder 306 is also of
50
slightly longer radius as shown at 301 in Fig. 10,
so that when the quadrant is completing its stroke
and the projector is reaching the end of its re
cording movement, such longer radius portion of 55
the quadrant will actuate the latch lever slightly
to break the contact with the point 30|, de-ener
gizing the solenoid 233 and throwing the latch
mechanism into action to stop further movement
of the wind deflection devices simultaneously with 69
the stopping ofthe tilting movement of the pro
jector under the action of the quadrant.
The electrical circuits for the timer, direction
and wind deflection devices are shown diagram
matically in Fig. 28. The source of electricity
may conveniently be the ordinary domestic alter 65
nating current through the leads 3H to the pri
mary 3|2 of a transformer where the secondary
3|3 reduces the voltage to any desired safe and
convenient amount.
The current is led from the secondary through
the conductor 3M having parallel connections
with each of the curtain switches, both the middle
closed switch 54| and the side open switches as
|05. Tracing the circuit through the closed mid
70
fi o
2,121,750
`dle switch |41, this leads through the conductor
'3| 5 to the timer solenoid |04, thence through the
-normally closed switches 200, which are arranged
-in series,V to the contact screw |33 of the tee
switch `where the circuit stands normally open.
The remainder of the circuit is through the switch
lever |23,- tee solenoid H8, and thence back to
the outer end of the secondary by the conductors
3|6 and 3|1.
The circuits through the open or side switches
|85 include the direction solenoids. |96 and |98,
and ready for the player to make his stroke, there
is no current in any of the circuits, and similar
ly, when the phantom ball has completed its re
cording movement, all the circuits are open.
In order to add another feature of realism to
the use of the above described apparatus, an
auxiliary curtain or screen may be provided ex
tending from the floor upwardly a short distance
across the front of the main screen, similar to Va
cross bunker or other obstruction. At the appro
each one in series with an open switch, and thence
by a common lead 3|9 and conductor 3|1 back to
priatetime this will be raised the proper height
and the player required to “carry” it on his next
stroke. If the ball is too low and is stopped by
'the secondary 3 I3.
this auxiliary or bunker screen, none of the cur
The circuit for the wind deflection 'device in
cludes the extension 32| from the lead 3|4, which
extension is connected to the latch lever 98, thence
through the contact 30|, which is open at all
tain switches will be actuated and the timer 15
stroke will be completed without movement of
the projector or travel of the phantom ball.
This bunker screen, as shown at 33| (Figs. T22
and 23) is conveniently mounted upon a roller
332 pivoted in the brackets 333. The screen may '20
be raised and held in position by cords 334 at
times Aexcept while the projector is being tilted
'20 by the ltimer quadrant, through conductor 322 to
the solenoid 233, and by the return 323 and con
ductor 3I1 back to the transformer secondary.
The operation of the circuits is as follows: The
ball being held on the tee and the timer, projector,
direction, and wind deflection devices being prop
erly set or adjusted with the phantom ball on
the tee or “lie” on the pictorial fairway, the parts
and’switches will be in the position shown in Fig.
28. 'The vinstant the ball leaves the tee, the lever
36 129 `contacts with the screw |33, closing the cir
cuit through the tee solenoid | i8, the middle cur
tain switch |4|, and the timer solenoid |04, there
by setting the -timer mechanism in operation by
the release of the quadrant. During the flight of
the ball from tee to curtain the tee solenoid holds
the Vtee switch closed, and the timer solenoid holds
the wind deflection switch 30| open.
If the ball strikes the curtain near the middle,
the middle closed switch |4I is momentarily
40 opened to break the circuit and .de-energize the
timer solenoid |04 and the tee solenoid ||8. The
tee switch instantly opens and remains open for
the balance of the stroke of the timer, so that
although the middle curtain switch |4| may im
45 mediately close, the circuit has been broken at
the tee switch and cannot be reestablished until
that switch is reset. The de-energizing of the
timer solenoid |04 throws the clutch mechanism
into action, and the tilting movement of the
so projector begins and continues during the re
mainder of the stroke of the timer quadrant. At
the same time the wind deflection circuit is
closed at 30|, the solenoid 233 is energized, and
the wind deflection devices set in operation.
6,5 This circuit remains closed until broken at the
end of the stroke of the timer quadrant and
movement of the projector.
If, on the other hand, the ball strikes to one
side of the middle of the curtain, so that instead
60 of opening the normally closed switch |4| it
closes one of the normally open side switches |85,
the effect of such closing is to actuate one or an
other of the direction solenoids |96, |98. The
resulting movement of its core projects its stem
65 205 into the path of lever |12, trips the latch
arm |86, and breaks the timer solenoid circuit at
200, all in rapid succession. The projector and
each end.
.
While the present apparatus may be employed
with the spotlight or phantom ball thrown upon
the back curtain or a plain screen ruled or ‘
marked to indicate distances, a greater realistic
effect may be obtained by providing a screen
such as is shown at 83 in Fig. 29, upon which will
be depicted in plan view a portion of a playing
ñeld, showing the position of the tee, the putting 30
green and hole, and the various topographical
features in connection therewith. If desired,
each of these auxiliary screens or fairway pic
tures may be provided, each one representing a
separate fairway or hole, one after another being 35
rolled off or hung up and the hole then displayed
being played by the contestants.
The home
course of the owner of the apparatus may be
shown on these picture screens, or one or an
other of the well known courses may be repro 40
duced. With severeal sets of such screens a host
may entertain his guests with matches over any
of the world’s famous courses. Preferably, how
ever, the picture will be reproduced on the back
curtain itself by means of lantern slides and a'
projector such as 336 in Fig. 20.
In the particular screen shown in Fig. 29, the
tee is indicated at 331 and the green at 338, with
the objective hole 339. Guarding the green are
the sand traps 34|, while in front of the tee is
the brook or stream 342. On each side of the
fairway 243 is the rough 344, with the trees 345.
Contour lines to indicate elevations and depres
sions could be added or arrows accompanied by
figures could be placed at the proper locations to
indicate the direction and distance vthe phantom
ball should move, in addition to its automatically
produced travel, to represent the effect of the
slope of the ground. For the sake of clearness,
however, these contour lines and arrows and flg 60
ures have been omitted from the drawings.
In operation, the tee switch and the timer and
projecting apparatus will be positioned in front
of the open end of the cage and to one side of
the mat or other teeing surface. In Fig. 20 is 65
shown in plan View the general arrangement, the
tee switch being indicated at 35| and the timer
wind deflection devices then function as above
apparatus at 352.
described.
Assuming the proper electrical connections
have been made, a convenient and satisfactory 70
order for the different steps in setting the ap
`
If the ball strikes the curtain at a point be
tween'two of the cords, so that two switches are
actuated, this causes no rdifficulty as the switch
which -is first actuated will control and the later
actuation of the other will be without effect.
It will be noted that when the parts are set
Y
paratus for use is the following:
_
(l) Adjust the wind deflection devices for the
predetermined velocity and direction of wind.
The >resetting is accomplished by pushing the end 75
11
2,121,750
of the actuating lever 255 back against the ten
sion of spring 23| to initial position where it
will be held by latch bar 28|. The devices are
then adjusted by loosening the clamping nut for
the crank pin and positioning the_latter in the
slot in the disk at a distance from the center
corresponding to the selected velocity. The slot
ted bar is similarly adjusted on the crank pin
and the clamping nut is tightened. The disk is
1.0 then turned by hand within its encircling band
or strap until the arrow points in the direction
toward which the wind is assumed to be blowing.
(2) The ball is teed upon the pad |24, the
tee switch being so positioned that the proper
tension will be put upon the switch parts to hold
the switch open.
(3) The timer mechanism is set by pulling
down on quadrant lever |0| against coiled spring
45, bringing the parts into the position shown in
Fig. 1.
(4) Still maintaining his hold upon handle
IUI, the player now tips the base vertically and
swings it horizontally as shown in Fig. 1 untilthe
spotlight or phantom ball rests upon the repre
25 sentation of the tee, 331 on the picture screen or
the desired spot on the fairway if the tee shot
has already been played.
(5) The projector is adjusted on the base 3|
in accordance with the type of club which is to
30 be used in making the next shot. This is done
by sliding the projector pedestal or base in its
guides to the position, as indicated by the scale,
which corresponds to that particular club.
(6) The direction actuating devices are quick
35 ly set by swinging handle |16 ñrst to one side
and then to the other to tension the actuating
springs |19 and |80 and latch the parts in opera
tive position.
('1) The projector actuating mechanism, i. e.,
the yoke with inclined slots, is adjusted for the
40
direction in which the ball should be driven,
either straight down the fairway or toward one
side or the other according to the wind. If the
tee shot has been made and the ball is off the line
from tee to hole, allowance must be made.
The apparatus is now all ready, and the player
takes his stance and with the proper club for
the shot to be made drives the ball against the
middle of the curtain or screen 84 or to one side
or the other, as the wind direction and velocity
may require or his skill will permit. The instant
the ball leaves the tee the timer is set in opera
tion as above described, but no visible effect is
yet produced. As soon, however, as the ball
, strikes the back curtain the projector begins its
movement and Athe phantom ball starts away
from the tee or “lie” on the fairway either di
rectly towards the hole, if the player has been
skilful, or to one side or the other if he is off
direction or is making some allowance for the
wind.
As the phantom ball continues its movement
under the control of the timer, the wind deñec
tion devices are also operating and the ball is
accelerated or retarded or deiiected, as the case
may be, ñnally slowing down and coming to rest
player now re-sets the apparatus and readjusts
the base until the spotlight is upon the point 354.
If desired, a hand operated projector spotlight,
sticker, or other device may be placed upon vthe
Stopping point of the phantom ball to aid in re~
setting the apparatus.
On the next shot the player has 1'75 yards to
make to the green and he plays it with the proper
iron, being careful not to overshoot the green.
Unfortunately he is short, stopping at 355 in l()
front of the bunker, leaving him a forty yard
pitch to the pin. He again resets the apparatus
and with the proper club, such as a mashie niblic,
pitches the ball against the back curtain, taking
care to use only the same force that he would 15
need in the open for this distance. When the
ball strikes the screen the projector will begin its
movement, and if the shot is accurately played,
the phantom ball will stop close to the hole at
356.
ì
20
If the player overshoots the green and has to
play back,` he simply turns the slotted yoke up
side down, so that the front end of the projector
will be tilted downwardly to cause the phantom
ball to move generally downwardly on the screen
instead of upwardly. Turning the yoke through
90° adjusts the projector for a pitch to the green
following a “hole-high” shot to one side thereof.
Thus the player by the use of this apparatus
may exercise his skill and ability and secure not
only valuable practicel in driving the ball a long
distance, but also in playing short shots or half
shots, quarter shots, etc., as they are sometimes
called.
~
If more than one player is to use the apparatus,
they mode of procedure is exactly the same, each
player, before making his shot, setting the phan
tom ball where his ball rested at the end of his
last previous stroke, as indicated by his sticker
or spotlight of which four may be provided as il~ 40
lustrated at 36| in Fig. 20. Thus one apparatus
may serve for two, three, or any number of
players.
If the fairway shown on the screen is provided
with slope arrows and numbers, each player,
when his phantom ball comes to rest, will give an 45
additional movement by hand to the phantom
ball in the direction indicated by the nearest ar
row and for a distance corresponding to the num
ber accompanying such arrow, this additional
movement of the phantom ball representing the 50
effect upon the “run” of the ball by the slope or
inclination of the fairway.
'
f
While the accompanying drawings show, and
the foregoing specification describes, what is
deemed at the present time to be the preferred 55
form of the invention, it is to be understood that
the invention is not limited thereto, but may be
embodied in other forms and constructions without departing from the spirit of the invention as
60
defined in the appended claims.
For example, for short or pitch shots the dif
ference in relation between the time of flight and
distance traveled may conveniently be compen
sated for by positioning the tee and timer appara
tus nearer the curtain.
In such case the teeing 65
at a point on the screen corresponding to the
mat, switch and projector may be moved vup to
the positions indicated in dotted line at 362 in
position the player’s ball would have reached
Fig. 20.
normally in the open on a level fairway.
Let us assume that the hole illustrated on the
screen is being played; the distance is 385 yards,
there is a slight cross wind from right to left,
and the ball has been driven 210 yards. This
first stroke is indicated by the broken line 353
75 and the stopping place of the ball is at 354. The
.
'
Again, a pond or other water hazard may be
represented by a cut away or transparentpor~ 70
tion in the screen, or by a mirror, and by means
of a photo-electric cell the projector mechanism
may be stopped in its operative stroke where
the phantom ball or spotlight passes over the
water hazard at low velocity, thereby reproduc
1,2
2,121,750
ing the trapping of a ball which lacks suiiicient
velocity or “distance” to carry the water hazard.
Also, instead of employing the pin and cross
head connection between the quadrant and actu
ating rod, a cam mechanism may be substituted
in order to give a different time characteristic to
the actuation of the rod. Similarly guides 85 on
`is controlled thereby to indicate the potential dis
tancev 'of travel of the object.
8. vIn an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance Vof travel oi an object, the combina
the yoke, instead of being straight may be curved
or cam-shaped, to produce the desired movement
tance, Yand connections between the movable
member and the indicator whereby the move
10 of the projector.
'
I-Iaving thus described the present invention,
what is claimed is:
l. In an apparatus for indicating the potential
distance of travel of an object, the combination
with means having a predetermined extent of
movement and set in operation when the object is
set in motion, of an indicator, and mechanism
operative when the object has traveled a` prede
termined portion of its potential travel to con
nect said indicator to said means whereby the
remaining portion of the movement of said
means will actuate the indicator to indicate the
distance of potential travel of the object.v
2. In an apparatus for indicating the potential
25 distance of travel of an object, the combination
with a timer comprising a movable member and
devices for imparting thereto a movement of pre
determined extent, of an indicator, and a clutch
for connecting the movable member and the in
dicator during the movement of the former.
3. In an apparatus for indicating the travel of
an object, the combination with a projector for
projecting a spot of light, of means Vfor impart
ing continuous movement to the projector , to
3.5 cause movement of the'spot of light in represen
tation of the travel of the object.
4. In an apparatus for indicating the travel
of an object, the combination with a projector
tion with an indicator, of a dash-pot having a
movable member, means for actuating the mov
able member an invariable predetermined dis
`ment of the indicator is controlled by the move
ment of said member.
9. In an apparatus for indicating the potential
distance of travel of an object, the combination
with an indicator, of a dash-pot having a mov
able member, means-for imparting to the movable f
member strokes of invariable predetermined eX
tent, and devices for varying the rate of move
ment of said member in different portions of its
stroke, and connections between the member and
the indicator.
10. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of an object, the combina
tion with an indicator, of a dash-pot having a
movable member and a port, said port having
diiîerent eiîective open areas for different portions
of the stroke of the member to vary thel rate
of movement of the'member, and connections be
tween the member and the indicator.
11. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of an object, the combina
tion with an indicator, of a dash-pot having a
movable member, connections between the mem
ber and the indicator including telescoping parts,
and a clutch between said parts.
»
12. In an apparatus for indicating the potential .35
distance of travel of an object, the combination
with an indicator, of mechanism for actuating
the indicator comprising a movable member,
for projecting a spot of light, of a screen bearing
a representation of a playing field, and means for
means for actuating said'member in accordance
actuating the projector to cause lthe spot of light
ject, and connections including a cam between
the member and the indicator.
13. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of an object, the combina
tion with an indicator, of a longitudinally mov 45
to travel over the screen.
5. In an apparatus for indicating the potential
distance of travel of anobject, the combination
La"xii with means for indicating the potential distance
of travel of the object, of a curtain, devices adja
cent the curtain and set in operation by the im
pact of the object on the curtain for actuating
the indicating means to indicate both distance
as) and varying extents of deviation from the pre
determined direction of flight of the object, and
mechanism set in operation before the object
strikes the curtain for controlling said actuating
devices.
6. In an apparatus for indicating the ñight
with the potential distance of travel of the ob
40
able member, means for actuating the'member,
a cam surface carried by the member, and con
nections for actuating the indicator from the
cam surface.
14. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of an object, the combina
tion with an indicator, of a longitudinally mov
able member, an inclined slotted guide carried by
the member, a cross-head in said guide, and con
nections between the cross-head and the indi
of an object, the combination with an indicator,
cator.
of a’single continuous curtain, a series of spaced
flexible cords immediately behind the curtain, a
15. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of an object, an indicator
comprising a member pivoted to turn about axes
at right angles to each other to indicate the cc
potential distance and direction of travel of the
object, and means independent of the object for
curtain switch connected with each cord and
60 adapted to be actuated thereby when the cord is
deflected by the impact of the object on the cur
tain, a solenoid connected to each switch, and
devices controlled by the solenoids foractuating
the indicator to indicate a deñection of the object
~ from the intended direction of ilight.
7. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of an object, the combina
tion with a dash-pot having a movable member
and means for imparting thereto a stroke of uni
form extent, of an indicator, connections in
cluding a clutch between the member and the in
dicator, and devices for actuating the clutch dur
ing the movement of the member whereby the
indicator is connected to the'member during a
portion only of the movement of the latter and
p
actuating the member.
16. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of an object, an indicator
comprising a member pivoted to turn about axes
at right angles to each. other to indicate the po
tential distance and direction of travel of the
object, and longitudinally movable and rotatable
means independent of the object for actuating 70
the member.
17. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of an object, an indicator
comprising a member pivoted to turn about axes
at right angles to each other to indicate the rpof 7.5.
13
2,121,750
tential distance and direction of travel of the
object, and means independent of the object for
actuating the member said means comprising a
longitudinally movable and rotatable element,
a slotted guide carried by said element, and a
cross-head carried by the member and rotatable
immediately adjacent and disconnected from one
face of the curtain, and a switch adapted to be
actuated by the distortion of the member caused
by the impact of the object on the opposite face
with the guide for actuating the member about
tial distance of travel of an object, a iiexible cur
tain, .a vertically hanging cord adjacent one face
of the curtain, a switch supported by the cord
having a movable member attached to the cord 10
and supporting the switch, and a spring normally
the axes.
18. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
10 tial distance of travel of an object, an indicator
comprising a projector mounted to turn about
vertical and horizontal axes for indicating by a
movable spot of light the potential distance and
direction of travel of the object, and means con
15 trolled by the velocity and direction of travel of
the object through a predetermined distance for
moving the projector about said axes.
19. In an apparatus for indicating the potential
distance of travel of an object, an indicator com
20 prising a projector mounted to turn about ver
tical and horizontal axes for indicating by a mov
able spot of light the potential distance and di
rection of travel of the object, means for moving
the projector about said axes, and a support for
25 the projector movable at right angles to said axes
to vary the extent of movements imparted by said
means.
20. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of a free object, the com
30 bination with an indicator, of devices having a
predetermined extent of movement and set in
operation when the travel of the object is initi
ated, and means controlled by the time duration
of travel of the object to a predetermined point
35 for utilizing a portion only of the movement of
said devices to actuate the indicator.
21. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of flight of a golf ball, the combina
tion with an indicator, of electrically controlled
40 devices for controlling the same including a tee
switch comprising a contact, a spring contact
member, a pad to support the ball, and a flexible
connection between the pad and the spring con
tact whereby the weight of the ball will hold the
45 spring contact out of engagement with the con
tact.
,
`
22. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of flight of a golf ball, the combi
nation with an indicator, of a tee switch com-l
50 prising a fixed contact, a spring contact member,
a pad to support the ball, and a ñexible connec
tion including an extensible spring between the
pad and the spring contact member.
23. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
56 tial distance of flight of a golf ball, of a tee switch
comprising a fixed contact, a second fixed con
tact insulated therefrom, a spring contact mem
ber insulated from said contacts and adapted to
engage therewith, a solenoid having a movable
of the curtain.
26. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
holding the switch inoperatively and yielding to
permit actuation of the switch upon the impact
of the object on the opposite face of the curtain.
27. In an apparatus for indicating the direc 15
tion of travel of an object, the combination with
a single indicator, of a plurality of solenoids
each corresponding to a predetermined direction,
means responsive to the direction of the initial
travel of the object for energizating the appro 20.
priate solenoid, and connections between the sole
noids and said indicator.
28. In an apparatus for indicating the direc
tion of travel of an object, the combination with
a single indicator, of a plurality of solenoids each 25.
corresponding to a predetermined direction, of
means responsive to the direction of the initial
travel of the object for energizing the appropriate
solenoid, and devices controlled by the solenoids
for controlling said indicator.
-
30
29. In an apparatus for indicating the directio
of travel of an object, the combination with’a
single indicator, of a plurality of solenoids each
corresponding to a predetermined direction and
each provided with a movable core, means for 35
actuating the indicator, and stop devices con
trolled by the cores to limit the extent of move
ment of the indicator actuating mechanism to in
dicate the direction of travel.
30. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of ñight of an object, the combina
tion with an indicator, of means for indicating
the normal distance of travel, and supplemental
devices adjustable in advance by the operator in
accordance with the predetermined wind velocity 45
for varying the action of said means.
31. In an apparatus for indicating the direction
of flight of an object, the combination with means
for indicating the normal direction of ñight, and
supplemental devices adjustable in advance by the 50
operator to a predetermined wind direction for
the varying of the action of said means.
32. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance and direction of flight of an object,
the combination with an indicator, of means con
55
trolled by the velocity and direction of a pre
determined portion of the night of the object for
actuating the indicator to indicate the normal
contact member, a pad for supporting the ball,
distance and direction of such flight, and supple
mentary devices adjustable in advance by the op 60
erator to a predetermined velocity and direction
and a flexible connection between theV pad and
core, and electrical connections for energizing the
solenoid to hold the spring contact in engagement
65 with the two fixed contacts.
the indicator.
33. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance and direction of flight of an object, 65
60 core, connections between the core and the spring
24. In an apparatus'for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of an object, the combina
tion with a curtain, of a series of spaced curtain
switches suspended independently of the curtain
70 and adapted one or another to be actuated by
the localized distortion of the curtain produced by
the impact of the object.
25. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of travel of an object, the combina
tion with a flexible curtain, of a flexible member
of Wind for imparting supplemental movement to
the combination with a projector for indicating
by a movable spot of light the distance and di
rection of such ñight, a rotatable and tipping sup
port for the projector, and means for tipping and
rotating said support to simulate the effect of the 70
velocity and direction of the wind on the flight
of the object.
f
34. In an apparatus for indicating the po
tential travel of an object, the combination with
a` screen, of means for projecting on the screen the 75
1,4
2,121,750,
representation ofV a playing field, a projector for
indicating by a spot of light the travel of the ob
ject over the. projected field, and meansv responsive
to` the. initial portion of> travel of> the object for
controlling the spot light projector.
35. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distanceof travel of an object, the combina
tion Vwith the» representation of a playing field, of a
pivoted projector for causing a spotlight to travel
over said representation to indicate the travelv of
the obj ect, means. responsive to the initial velocity
of the object for tipping the projector in one di
rection to indicate the normal travel> of the object,
andV reversing devices for causing said means to
. tip, the projector in the opposite` direction to
represent the travel of the object in the opposite
direction..
36. In an apparatus for indicating the poten--`
tial travel of a golf, ball, the combination with a
representation of a fairway, of a projector for
projecting a spot of light onV such representation,
and means for actuatingy the projector to cause
the spot of light to travel over the fairway both
longitudinally and laterally of such fairway in
1 . representation of the distance and direction of
travel of the golf ball.
37. In an apparatus for indicating the .potential
travel, of a free' golf ball, the combination with a
representation of a fairway, of an indicator, and
30: means controlled by the starting and stopping of
the free ball for actuating said indicator to indi
cate on such representation the extent of po
tential movement ofV a golf ball both longitudinally
and laterally of such fairway.
38. In an apparatus for indicating the potential
travel of a golf ball, the combination with a cur
tain to receive the impact of a driven golf ball,
of a projector for throwing upon. the curtain a
pictorial representation of a fairway, a second
40. projector for throwing a spot ofV light on such
projectedV representation, and means for actuat
ing the second projector to cause the spot of light
to travel over the representation of the fairway
in simulation of the movement of the golf ball'
with aJ projector for indicating by a movable spotv
of. light the potential distance of travel of the
object, of means for actuating the projector, and
devices operating in accordance with the dura
tion of time required by the object to travel a
predetermined distance for controlling the opera
tion of said actuating means.
43. In an apparatus for indicating the potential
distance of travel of a golf ball from the tee,
the combination with an indicator, of actuating
means therefor, and devices set in operation when
the ball leaves the tee for controlling the opera
tion of said actuating means.
44. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial distance of flight of an object, the combina 1.5L
tion with a curtain, of an indicator, means for
actuating the indicator, and controlling devices
thrown into operation before the object strikes
the curtain for throwing the actuating means
into operation when the object strikes the cur
tain.
45. In an apparatus for indicating the potential
distance of travel of a golf ball from the tee,
the combination with indicating means, of a tee
switch, a curtain switch, and actuating mechanism 25
for the indicator, connections between the tee
switch and the actuating mechanism for setting
said mechanism in operation when the ball leaves
the tee, and connections between the curtain
switch and the actuating mechanism for render 30
ing said mechanism operative to .actuate the
indicating means.
ì
46. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial travel of a golf ball, the combination with a
common indicator for indicating both the poten
tial distance of travel of the ball and the lateral
deflections from the intended direction of travel,
ofra curtain, and actuating means for the indi
cator, said means operating in accordance with
the duration of time required by the ball to travel rou
from tee to curtain to cause the indicator to indi
cate the distance of travel, and also operating
in accordance with the position of impact of the
ball on the curtain> to cause the indicator to indi
over the same.
cate the direction of travel.
39. In an apparatus for indicatingl the potential
travel of a golf ball, the combination with a representation of a fairway, of a projector for project
ing a spot of light on such representation, and
47. In an apparatus for indicating the potential>
distance of flight of an object, the combination
f , means for actuating the projector to cause the
spot of light to travel over the fairway’ in any
direction in representation of the distance and
direction of travel of the golf ball.
40. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tialV distance of travel of an object, the combina
tion with means for stopping the object after a
travel of predetermined length, of Vdevices and
actuating mechanism for imparting movement to
said devices, said stopping means initiating the
movement of the devices, and means operating in
accordance with the duration of time required
by the object to travel the predetermined dis
tance for controlling the movement imparted to
said devices by the actuating mechanism to indi
65 cate'the potential distance of travel of the object.
41. In an apparatus for indicating the potential
distance of travel of an object, the combination
with an indicator, of means operating in accord
ance with` the time duration of travel of the object
from the initiation thereof to a predetermined
point for actuating the indicator in accordance
with such time duration to indicate theV potential
distance of travel of the object.
42; In an apparatus for indicating the potential
75. distance of travel of an object, the combination
Y
with an indicator, actuating mechanism therefor,
and devices affecting the operation of said mecha
nism to vary the actuation of the indicator in -'
simulation of the accelerating, retarding, and
deñecting effects of wind on the flight ofthe
object.
Y
Y
48. In an apparatus for indicating the distance
of travel of a free object, the combination with a
pivotally mounted device, of means for moving
the device about its pivot to indicate the distance
of potential travel of the object', mechanism for
actuating said means, said mechanism being con
trolled by the initial portion of travel of the free
object, and means for energizing the mechanism
independently of the movement of the object.
49. In an apparatus for indicating the distance
of travel off a free object, the combination with a
device mounted to turn, of actuating mechanism 65:
for turning the device to indicate the direction of
travel of the free object, said means being con
trolled in accordance with the direction of initialtravel'of the free object and means for energizing
the mechanism independently of the movement of
the object.
50. In an apparatus for indicating the poten
tial travel of a golf ball, the combination with a
curtain to receive a free ball driven from a tee,
ofy a representation of a playing field, indicating
7.5 ,
Документ
Категория
Без категории
Просмотров
0
Размер файла
3 082 Кб
Теги
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа