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Патент USA US2122041

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June 2a, 1938.
M. MARASCO
' -
2,122,041
METHOD AND PRODUCT OF SHOE CONSTRUCTION '
Filed Jan. 31, ‘1956
_
_
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
Zr
A? ITOENEY
June 28, 1938'.
2,122,041
M. MARASCO
METHOD AND PRODUCT 0F SHOE CONSTRUCTION
Filed Jan. 31, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
IN VEN TOP
Mars ha // Marasco.
EYQEWQW
Patented June 28, 1938
'7 n >
2,122,041
UNITED; STATES‘- PATENT‘ ol-‘rice
METHOD ‘ AND raonoor or SHOE-CON
Y smoonon
Marshall Mai-mo, University at, Mo.
Application‘January 81, 1936, Serial No. 61,682
'
7 Claims.
This invention relates generally to the manu
lecture or shoes and, more‘ particularly to a
method and product of shoe-construction, refer
(01. 12-142)
ished shoe, so that the shank of the shoe is
constructed of transversely? over-lapping plies
Likewise, the upper, (and
~ of the lining material.
ence being had vto my co-pending application [its doubler, if one is used) has‘ its respective
lower side margins widened or increased in width 5
which this present application is a continuation
so that the edges of said upper margins abut ‘at
Serial No. 745,874, filed ‘September 28, 1934, of
in-part.
'
My invention has for its prime object
the provision of a method of shoe'manufacture,
v10
especially for the making of a shoe of the oc
inented or so-called “compo” type, in which an
the center line, and under the arch, of 'the
_ ?nished shoe.
In the usual manner, the lining and the upper
are mounted on and pulled over on the last, with 10
a heel-piece temporarily attached to the last, i
economy is effected in parts, material, and labor and the customary counter disposed around‘ the
involved in the manufacture of the shoe, and in heel between the upper and the lining; a suit
the provision of a resulting shoe product which, able adhesive is then applied to and between the
15 in an unique manner, is highly adapted to snugly “ respective bottom margins of the lining and the 15
and neatly engage and conform itself to the foot upper, and the two are side-lasted for marginally
of the wearer.
‘
bounding the ball of, and are also temporarily
And with the above and other objects ‘in view, tacked to, the last, with the lining in non-ad
my invention resides in the uniquemethod, and herent relation to the last, and the lower edge
20 in the novel features of form, construction, ar
of the ‘upper in adherent relation to the lower- 20
‘ rangement, and combination of parts of the re-‘
sulting product ‘of shoe-manufacture presently
described and pointed out in 'the claims.
edge of the lining.
_
Next, the lining and upper at the toe are ce
mented together, and at the heel also, the lining, _
In the accompanying drawings (two sheets) ,— ‘counter, and upper are cemented together, and
Figure 1 is an inverted perspective view of a the shoe-material at both the toe and the heel is 25
' shoe-structure embodying my invention, mounted
?tted on the last, temporary holding tacks being
re aration for the‘ ?rst ste of
' applied at the toe, and permanent tacks being
p p
‘
p
my ' applied at the heel, which most conveniently
' method of n
shoe-construction;
‘on a lasti
‘ Figure 2 isa similar view, representing van in
termediate stage of the shoe-construction; ,
Figure 3 is likewise a similar view. showing the
shoe-structure in readiness to receive the sole
of‘ the shoe, ‘the latter being ‘shown in inverted
perspective?in parted relationship to the shoe
struc'turej?f'
'
>
'
l
'
‘
Figure _4' is a sectional view through the instep
of the last and its enveloping shoe-structure, the
view corresponding approximately to the stage
of manufacture shown in Figure 2;
40
Figure 5 is a similar view, showing a stage of
the process succeeding that of the stage of
I
Figure 4;
'
Figure 6 is a sectional view through the instep
of the last and its supported shoe-structure'as
appearing after the outer sole is applied; and
may be done by means of a bed-lasting machine.
Then the widened marginal portion of the re- 30
spective sides of the lining'is, by hand or machine
and while the shoe-structure is in the grip of the
bed-lasting machine, side-lasted along the shank
by ?rst stretching one side margin of the lining
over the shank of the last in non-adherent rela- 35
tion thereto, then applying a very rapidly drying
adhesive to the exposed surface of said margin,
andv then stretching the other side margin of‘ the
lining over the ?rst mentioned margin, such two
marginal portions of the lining then becoming 40
quickly ?rmly adherent one to the other. _
As the next step, the upper is side-lasted at
both sides of the shoe, so that the edges of the
widened lower side margins of' the upper abut
approximately at the center-line of the shank 45
Figure 7 is a ‘similar sectional view‘ ‘ taken
of the shoe, a suitable adhesive or cement being
‘ through the ball of the last and shoe-structure.
applied between theexposed surface ofvthe outer
overlapping lining margin and the respective
upper side margins, which are then temporarily
Brie?y, my new method of shoe construction
'50
consists in providing, in an assembly of shoema
terial to be made into a ?nished shoe, and as a tacked through the lining to the last pending the 50
part of the other elements of the shoe-structure, hardening of the cement or adhesive.
a lining having its opposing lower side margins
Meanwhile, I have provided an outer sole
respectively widened or increased in width at the ‘characterized by having an interior raised face
shank, each for extending substantially across for presenting to the ‘ball of the foot of the wearer
55 and to the opposite side of the shank'of ‘the ?n
of the ?nished shoe a surface ?ush with the ad- 55
2
2,122,041
joining marginal boundaries of the lining and a
marginal ?ange for attachment to the margin
of the upper, and, the shank sti?'ener having been
. mounted on the shank portion of the shoebottom,
10
the last C during the operation of the bed-lasting
machine, as will be understood by those skilled
in the shoe-making art, and as best seen in Fig
ure 2.
the temporary tacks are removed and the sole
Then, most conveniently while the shoe-struc
applied, preferably with the aid of a. suitable
ture is in the grip of the bed-lasting machine, the
machine, to the shoe material, a suitable adhesive
lining ?aps I, I’, are side-lasted over the shank
being disposed between the upper and the sole for
I3 of the last C. This is preferably, though not
unifying the same into a strong and sturdy shoe
necessarily, accomplished by hand and is car
ried out by ?rst drawing one of the ?aps, as I, 10
structure. V
‘I'hereaftenlthe shoe is ?nished in the usual
manner, well known to those skilled in the art
and not deemed necessary of further elabora
tion.
.
Referring now more in detail and by reference
characters to the drawings, which illustrate one
embodiment of my invention, I provide, as a part
of the shoe-structure, a lining A, which in its
general contour will, of course, be suitable for the
20 style and size of the shoe to be constructed, but
15
snugly over and across the shank I3 of the last,
so that the free edge of the flap I resides sub
stantially at the opposite side of the shank I3.
Still ?rmly holding the ?ap I in place, a rap
idly drying‘adhesive or cement I8 is applied to
the exposed face of the ?ap I, and the other ?ap
I' is quickly drawn in overlapping relationship
onto the ?ap I , the adhesive I8 being selected of
such nature that but a very small intervalof
in one particular will, so far as I am aware, de
time is required for the-?aps I,. I’. to become
?rmly andsecurely adherent to each other, the
part from the conventional construction in the
respect that, in patterning the lining, each side
best seen in __Figure 4.
of the' lining A is fashioned or 'cut with an vin
creased width, forming shank lining ?aps I,‘ I',
shoe-structure at the shank then appearing as
>
-
As the ‘next step, a suitable adhesive, as [9, is
applied to the upper ?aps 2, 2', and the same are
respectively ‘side-lasted over the exposed lining
for extending substantially across and to the op
posite side of the shank of the ?nished shoe.
Likewise, the upper B of the shoe-structure,
(and its doubler, if one is used), is patterned with
an increased width opposite the shank of the
?ap I', so that the respective -edges 3, 3', of the
flaps 2, 2', meet or substantially abut at the cen
ter line of the shank of the shoe,v temporarily
holding tacks 20 being also applied, as will be
shoe, so that each side of the upper forms an
understood from Figures 2 and 5.
upper-shank ?ap 2, 2', as it may be said, which
will so extend across the shank of the ?nished
shoe that the opposing edge 3, 3’, of each upper
35 shank ?ap 2, 2’, will be in approximate meeting
juxtaposition at the center line of the shank.
In the usual manner, the lining A and upper
B are mounted on and pulled over the appro
priate last C, together with the customary count
er D disposed around the heel 4 of the last be
tween the lining A and upper B, the last C, prior
to such operation, having had a heel-piece 5
temporarily positioned on theheel 4 of the last,
as by a suitable securing member or tack 6.
With the shoe-structure so disposed on the last
45
C, it will be seen that the bottom heel-enveloping
margin ‘I of the lining A, and the similar margin
8 of the upper B, extend substantially beyond
the heel 4 of the last C; likewise, the bottom side
50 margin 9 of the lining A, and the bottom side
margin I0 of the upper B, extend substantially
beyond the ball I I and toe I2 of the last C; while
the lining ?aps I, I’, and upper ?aps 2, 2', ex
tend from the shank I3 of the last C, as best
55 seen in Figure 1.
Then,‘ in accordance with my method of shoe
However, it will be understood that it may’
sometimes be found desirable to‘ pull the lining
and upper-?aps over the shank after the shoe
structure is taken from the bed-lasting machine,
and this may be readily done, if such departure
from the foregoing procedure will best serve the
intended purpose.
After the shoe-structure is removed from the ,
bed-lasting machine, and while the adhesive is 40
drying, the customary shank stiffener 2| is
mounted on the shank of the shoe bottom, pref
erably with the aid of a securing member or nail
22 driven into and clinched within the heel-piece
5; and, as a step preparatory to attaching the 45
out-sole to the shoe, the temporary securing
members or tacks I5, I6,» and 20, are removed,
the shoe-structure then appearing as best seen in
Figure 3.
Meanwhile, I have provided an outer sole E’ 50
for the shoe. The sole E has the usual heel-?ap
23 at its heel 24 and is given a bevel skiving 25
along the sides of the heel-portion 24 and shank
26 substantially to a point adjacent the forward
end of the shank region, as is customary in the 55
art.
construction, a suitableadhesive or cement I4 is
However, the sole E departs from customary
applied to and, it may be especially pointed out,
practice, so far as I am aware, in that .the sole
only between, the side margin 9 of the lining A
E, around the ball'2'l and toe 28 thereof, is skived
to form a marginal ?ange 29 for attachment to 60
the margin 9 of the upper B, the depth of the
60 and the side margin II] of the upper B, and the
' two are 'then, preferably by means of a side-last
ing machine, side-lasted over the ball II of the
last and temporarily tacked thereto as by suit
able'fastening elements or tacks I5, as best seen
65 in Figure 2.
-
skiving being substantially equal to the thickness
of the cemented margins 9, III, of the lining A
and upper B, respectively, for providing a raised
face or integral ?ller 30 having a height for neatly 65
?tting into the recess 3| which exists between the
Next, a suitable adhesive is applied between the
lining A and upper B at the toe I2 of the shoe, edges of the margins 9, I0, and the exposed ball
and likewise adhesive material is applied in the .portion II of the last C, as best seen in Figures
proper places at the heel 4‘ of the shoe, and the 3 and 7.
70 last C with the enveloping shoe-structure there
The sole E is now applied to the shoe-structure 70
on is vpreferably now mounted in a bed-lasting with the aid of a ‘suitable adhesive, this work
machine, which ?ts the shoe-structure to the last being done preferably by means of a suitable
at both the heel and toe thereof, temporary hold
machine, which presses the sole E ?rmly onto the
ing tacks I6 being applied at the toe I2, and per
shoe-structure, the skived margins 25 of the sole
75 m'anent tacks I'I being applied at the heel 4, of neatly engaging the heel margin 8 and instep 75
2,122,041
?aps 2,‘ 52', of the upper B, and so as also to cover
vand enclose the shank stiffener II in a sightly
3 .
struction eifectuates a substantial economy in the '
cost of manufacture of the shoe and provides a -
shoe-product possessed of strong and sturdy char
,However, at thelball of the shoe, the adhesive _ acteristics highly conducive to the pleasurable
is applied merely to the marginal ?ange 29 of wear of the shoe.
'
the sole E, for adherence thereof to the margin
It will be understood that changes and modi
ll of the upper B, the raised face 30 of the sole ?cations inv the particulars of the several steps
E being pressed ?rmly into and substantially ?ll
of manufacture, and in the form, construction,
ing the cavity 3!, forpresenting to the ball‘ of arrangement, and combination of the several
manner, as best seen in Figure 6.
‘10 the foot of the wearer a smooth surface flush with
the marginal boundaries 9 of the lining A, as best
i
" seen in Figure 7.
,
The shoe is then ?nished in the usual manner
according to such‘ requirements as may best serve
15, the purpose, which are not here deemed necessary
of further description.
Several economies and improvements in the
I shoe-manufacture are eifectuated by employing
my described method of shoe manufacture.
' In such respect, it may be pointed out that the
upper of the shoe is, in the class of shoes here
under contemplation, of relatively stretchable
material, whereas the lining, or at least that por
tion of it which extends around the shank and
25 ball of the shoe, is, in my construction, composed
of relatively unstretchable material, and this is
done so that when, during the later stages of the
. process, the temporary tacks are removed for sub-v
sequentiy permitting the application of the outer
30 sole of the shoe, the relatively stiff lining, caused
to be ?rmly adherentlto the upper by the set of
the cement, will so stiffen and reinforce the whole
marginal material, which overlaps the sides of the
I ball of the shoe, as to substantially retain the
35 same in snugly ?tting or hugging relationshipmn
and with the last.
>
parts of the ?nished shoe may be made and sub 10
stituted for those herein shown and described
without departing from the nature and principle ‘
of my invention.
’
Having thus described my ‘invention, what I
claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is, 15
1. Those steps in the manufacture of a‘ shoe
which consist in ?rst providing an upper-struc
ture including a lining having its respective lower
side margins widened at the shank, then mount
ing the upper-structure on a last, then laying one
margin over the shank of the last in non-adherent
relation thereto, and then laying the other mar
gin over the ?rst mentioned margin in adherent
relation thereto.
‘
2. Those steps in the manufacture of a shoe 25
which consist in ?rst providing an upper struc
ture including a lining having its respective lower
side margins widened at the shank, then mount
ing the upper-structure on a last, then laying one
margin over the shank of the last in non-adher 30
ent relation thereto, then applying an adhesive
to the exposed surface thereof, and then laying
the other margin over the ?rst mentioned mar
gin in adherent relation thereto.
3. In, a shoe, a lining having opposed side 35
margins widened at the shank and extending in
In this manner, I avoid the need of an inner
overlapping relationship substantially from one
sole, which is- wholly absent in my improved shoe,
and it will be understood, therefore, that no ad-'
40 hesive is applied to the inner face of the lining, the
side to the other of the shank of the shoe, an
last being wholly naked and bare, except, of
course, for the heel-piece 5.
An economy is thus effected by the elimination
of the cost of the material required for an inner
45 sole, as well as the cost of performing the extra
step of incorporating an inner sole in the shoe.
‘The resulting shoe construction is possessed of
,a number of important and unique features and
advantages, which promote both the wearability
50 or durability and comfortableness of the shoe to
a marked degree.
- Thus, by the unique construction of the shank I
of the shoe, the usual ?ller is eliminated,’ its
place being taken by the overlapping plies of the
55 lining material, which not only effects an addi
tional economy in the cost of the shoe, but, most
importantly, the adherent overlapping plies of
the lining stiil’en and reinforce the shoe at its
instep and provide a smoothly ?tting pliable
60 cradle, as it may be said, for snugly and sup
portingly engaging and readily conforming to the
instep of the wearer of the shoe, as will be un
derstood from Figure 6.
Again, a high degree of comfort in the wear of
65 the shoe is effected by, the unique construction at
the ball of the shoe. As will be seen from Fig
ure 7, the elimination of an inner sole from ‘the
shoe and the provision of the ?ller 30 on the sole
E of the shoe present to the ball of the foot of
the wearer of the shoe a surface which smoothly
merges into the side walls of the upper, so that
the upper is thus adapted to neatly and effectively
conform itself to, and most comfortably engage
and support, the foot of the wearer of the shoe.
75
Thus, as will be seen, my method of shoe-con
upper whose. opposed lower margins substan
tially abut centrally of the shank, and an outer 40
sole ?xed to the upper and concealing the said
abutting margins thereof.
4. In a shoe, a lining having oposed side mar
gins widened at the shank and extending in over
lapping, relationship substantially from one side 45
to the other of the shank of the shoe, an upper
whose opposed lower margins substantially abut
centrally of the shank, an outer sole ?xed to the
upper, and a shank-stiffener disposed interme
diate the abutting margins of the upper and said 50
outer sole.
5. The method of making a shoe comprising the
steps of providing upper materials including an
upper and a lining, said lining having its respec
tive lower side margins widened at the shank, 55
mounting the upper materials on a last, laying
one margin over the instep of the last in non-ad
herent relation thereto, laying the other margin
over the ?rst mentioned margin in adherent re
lation thereto, bringing and securing the lower 60
margins of the upper across the shank portion
into flatwise respective abutting relationship, and
positioning and securing a shank stiffener longi
tudinally of the shank in superposed relationship
to the line of abutment between the margins of 65
the upper.
-
6. A shoe comprising an upper and lining lasted
into shoe-forming shape, said upper and lining
being cemented together and turned inwardly
along their lower margins thereby providing a 70
stiffened sole-engaging ?ange marginally bound
ing the forepart of the shoe, said ?ange being lat
erally widened on both sides of the shoe along
the shank portion thereof for extending in over
lapping relationship transversely across said
4
2,122,041
shank and thereby providing a sole-receiving
opening in the forepart of the shoe completely
lapping ‘relationship transversely across said
bounded by the margin of said ?ange, and an
outer sole secured to the upper and having its
upper surface marginally reduced at the top sur
face of its forepart thereby providing an up
shank and thereby providing a sole-receiving
opening in the forepart of the shoe completely
bounded by the margin of said ?ange, and an 5
outer sole secured to the upper and having its
the shank portion thereof for extending in over
standing portion shaped to ?t within said sole
upper surface marginally reduced at the top sur
receiving opening in snug ?tting abutment with
face of its forepart thereby providing an up
the margin of the upper ?ange.
standing portion shaped to ?t within said sole
receiving opening in snug ?tting abutment with 10
the margin of the upper ?ange, said upstanding
portion along its upwardly presented ?at face
being ?ush with the upwardly presented face of
7. A shoe comprising an upper and lining last
ed into shoe-forming shape, said upper and lining
being cemented together and turned inwardly
along their lower margins thereby providing a
sti?ened sole-engaging ?ange marginally bound
ing theiorepart of the shoe, said ?ange being
laterally widened on both sides of the shoe along
the upper ?ange.
MARSHALL MARASCO.
15
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