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Патент USA US2122457

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July 5, 1938.
E. M. DONS El‘ AL
2,122,457
METHOD OF SEPARATING CONSTITUENTS OF MINERAL ‘OILS
Filed July 10, 1936
PA RA FFM/IC
MIXER
5 0 L (/77 cm
/0
4 PA PA FFM/IC'
.5 0 A u 770M
I
IVAPHTHE/V/C
SOLUTION
CM L m
SOLUTION
Patented July 5, 1938
2,122,457
‘UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,122,457
METHOD OF SEPARATING CONSTITUENTS
OF MENERAL OILS
Eddie M. Dons, Oswald G. Mauro and Dwight B.
Mapes, Tulsa, Okla., assignors to Mid-Conti
nent Petroleum Corporation, Tulsa, Okla., a
corporation of Delaware
Application July 10, 1936, Serial No. 89,922
4 Claims.
This invention relates to methods of separat
ing constituents of mineral oils, and more par
ticularly to the separation of para?inic portions
7 from more naphthenic portions of the oils.
The
‘5 invention is especially adapted for use with selec
tive solvents in the separation of light and heavy
constituents of the oils. The main object is to
very effectively and economically separate such
light and heavy constituents.
is
With the foregoing and other objects in view,
the invention comprises the novel method here
inafter more speci?cally described‘ and shown in
the accompanying drawing, which illustrates one
’ form of the invention.
11-5
However, it is to be un
derstood that the invention comprehends changes,
variations and modi?cations within the scope of
the claims hereuntoappended.
Fig. 1 is a‘ diagrammatical view of a system em
bodying features of this invention.
20
Fig. 2 is an enlarged sectionon the line 2-—2
in Fig. 1.
To illustrate one form of the invention we have
shown a tank I for the oil stock to be separated,
and a tank 2 for the selective solvent. Assum
25 ing that the oil is a lubricating oil stock to be
separated into para?inic and naphthenic frac
tions, the selective solvent may be of any suitable
type. Excellent results can be obtained by using
dichlorethyl ether as an extracting solvent, but
30 any other desired solvent may be employed. Ex
amples of such solvents are cresylic acid, nitro
(Cl. 196-13)
tling chamber l l in the form of an upright cylin
drical column, having an inlet pipe l2 near the
middle, a discharge pipe l3 at the top for the
light constituents, and a discharge pipe M at the
bottom for the relatively heavy constituents.
The settling chamber may be provided with a
circulating device including a pipe I5 leading to
a pump l6 which discharges through a cooler IT
to the inlet pipe 12. A mixer l2’ may be located
in the pipe l2. The pipe l0 may be connected to
the pipe l2, so as to transmit the naphthenic
solution to the circulating system. This stream
of naphthenic solution merges into the cooled
circulating stream, and the mixture passes into
the settling chamber II.
To illustrate a suitable means for whirling the
solution in the settling chamber II', we have
shown the inlet pipe i2 at a tangent to said cham
ber.
The whirling action is suggested by arrows
in Fig. 2. It has a centrifugal action which sepa 20
rates the incoming solution into a relatively heavy
naphthenic portion near the periphery of the
chamber, and a lighter, more para?inic portion
near the center of said chamber. This separa
tion is improved by cooling the incoming solution, 25
and by circulating relatively naphthenic portions
from the plane of the pipe l5 to the higher inlet
pipe l2.
The whirling motion gradually decreases as
the solution moves upwardly or downwardly from 30
the plane of the inlet nozzle, so the advantage of
a pipe 10, and it is to be understood that this
settling is combined with the forcible separation
due to the centrifugal action.
The relatively para?inic portions of the solu
tion gradually rise to the top of the settling 35
chamber H and pass out through the pipe I3,
while the more naphthenic portions gradually
fall to the bottom and escape through the dis
charge pipe [4.
In the separation of wax-containing lubricating 40
oil stocks, the relatively low temperature due to
the cooler H, which may be about 60° F. to 7 0° F.,
will tend to solidify high melting point wax.
Therefore, the upper portion of the settling cham
ber II is provided with a heating coil I8, which 45
increases the temperature of the outgoing paraf
?nic solution. Another advantage of this heat
ing operation lies in the fact that the para?inic
solution contains more or less of the valuable
50 parai?nic fraction that can not be readily sepa
solution can be conveniently returned in a rela
tively warm condition through a pipe l9 to the 50
benzene, furfural, etc.
A stream of oil stock is discharged from the
tank I through a pipe 3 leading to a pipe 4, where
35 the oil unites with a stream of solvent from a pipe
5. The mixed streams pass through a heater or
cooler 6 to provide the desired temperature, and
then to a mixer ‘l which discharges into a sepa
40
rator 8 of any suitable type. In this separator
the relatively heavy naphthenic portions of the oil
settle to the bottom, while the lighter paraf?nic
portions rise to the top. A stream of paramnic
solution is discharged through a pipe 9 and it
may be distilled to recover the solvent, and other
45 wise treated in accordance with well understood
methods.
The naphthenic solution is discharged through
rated by the ordinary methods of settling. An
object of the invention is to recover a substantial
amount of the para?inc oil that is ordinarily dis
charged in the naphthenic solution.
55
To illustrate this feature we have shown a set
pipe 4, which leads to the separator 8. The
para?inic solution from the settling chamber II
is thus subjected to further extraction which re
moves additional naphthenic compounds there
from. However, if desired, said para?inic solu
55
2,122,457
tion from the top of settling chamber ll may be
discharged through a pipe 20, and then subjected,
to the usual re?ning operations.
We claim:
1. In the art of extracting constituents of
mineral oils, the method of separting a solution
of para?inic and naphthenic compounds which
comprises permitting the solution to settle in a
chamber having an upper para?inic settling zone
10 and a lower naphthenic settling zone, discharg
ing the resultant para?inic liquid from the upper
portion of the parai?nic settling zone, discharg
ing more naphthenic liquid from the lower por
tion of the naphthenic zone, and introducing said
15 solution into the liquid between said settling zones
while forcibly whirling the incoming solution so
as to centrifugally separate it into a relatively
heavy liquid portion near the periphery of said
settling chamber and a lighter more para?'inic
20 liquid portion near the center of said settling
chamber.
a
2. In the art of extracting constituents of wax
containing mineral oils, the method of separating
a solution of paraf?nic and naphthenic com
2.5 pounds which comprises permitting the solution
to settle in a chamber having an upper para?‘lnic
settling zone and a lower naphthenic: settling zone,
30
discharging the resultant wax-containing paraf
finic liquid from the upper‘ portion of the paraf
?nic settling zone, discharging more naphthenic
liquid from the lower portion of the naphthenie
zone, and introducing said solution into the liquid
between said settling zones While forcibly whirling
the incoming solution so .as to centrifugally sepa
35 rate it into a relatively heavy liquid portion near
the periphery of said settling chamber and a
lighter wax-containing para?inic liquid portion
near the center of said settling chamber.
3. In the art of extracting constituents of wax
containing mineral oils, the method of separating
a solution. of para?inic and naphthenic com
pounds which comprises cooling said solution,
permitting the cooled solution to settle in a cham 5
ber having an upper para?inic settling zone and
a lower naphthenic settling zone, discharging the
relatively paraffinic liquid from said para?inic
settling zone, discharging more naphthenic liquid
from the lower portion of the naphthenic zone, 10
and introducing said solution into the liquid be
tween said settling zones while forcibly whirling
the incoming solution so as to centrifugally sepa
rate it into a relatively heavy liquid portion near
the periphery of said settling chamber and a 15
lighter wax-containing liquid portion near the
center of said settling chamber.
4. In. the art of extracting constituents of
mineral oils, the method of separating a solu
tion of para?‘inic and naphthenic compounds 20
which comprises permitting the solution to settle
in a chamber having an upper paraf?nic settling
zone and a lower naphthenic settling zone, dis
charging the resultant parai?nic liquid from the
upper portion of the para?inic settling zone, dis 25
charging more naphthenic liquid from the lower
portion of the naphthenic zone, withdrawing
liquid from said naphthenic settling zone and
forcibly discharging the withdrawn liquid into
the liquid between said settling zones, in a tan 30
gential direction, so as to centrifugally separate
it into a relatively heavy liquid portion near the
periphery of said settling chamber and a lighter
more paract?nic liquid portion near the center of
said settling chamber.
»
EDDIE M. DONS.
35
.
OSWALD G. MAURO.
DWIGHT B. MAPES‘.
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