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Патент USA US2122592

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July 5, 1938.
H. G. sPEcHT’
2,122,592
WOVEN WIRE BELT FOR PAPER MAKING MACHINES
Filed June 4, 1956
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INVENTOR
HQE’RY
BY
SPEfHT
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M WM
ATTORN EY
July'5, 1938.
H_ G, SPECHT
2,122,592
WOVEN WIRE BELT FOR PAPER MAKING MACHINES
Filed June 4, 1936
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ATTORNEY
‘2,122,592
Patentedv July 5, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,122,592
FOR PAPER MAKING
WOVEN WIRE BELT
moms
Harry G. Specht, Montclair, N. J., assignor, by
mesne assignments, to Encor Corporation,
Belleville, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey
Application June 4, 1936, Serial No. 83,519
3 ' Claims.
The present invention relates to woven wire
belts particularly for paper making machines of
the Fourdrinier type. These belts are in the form
of a continuous band of fine wire mesh which
5 moves over spaced supporting rolls and in con
tact with suction boxes and rolls, and it is de
sirable to provide a wire which will have a rela
(01. 139-425)
the usual wire having circular cross-section warp
wires.
'
_
"
'
Fig. 5 is a plan view of a portion of a wire belt,
having a twill weave according to a modi?ed form
of the invention.
Fig. 6 is a longitudinal sectional view, taken
tively long wearing life. These wires are rela
along the line 6-6 of Fig. 5.
Fig. 7 is a transverse sectional view, taken
tively expensive and in normal usehave an aver
along the line ‘l--'l of Fig. 5.
_
10 age life of about twenty days. The cost of chang
ing a wire is ‘great due to lost time in production,
so that any increase in the wearing life of the
Figs. 8 to 17 are'longitudinalsectional views of
further modi?cations in which modi?ed form of
weft wires are employed.
wire is worth a great deal to the paper mills.
Another desirable object is to provide a wire hav
15 ing a relatively smooth top surface for the for
Fig. 18 isv an elevation of a piece of\, twisted
cable type weft wire as used in the modi?cations
ma'tion of the paper, so as to reduce wire marks
as much .as possible, while at the ‘same time pro‘
viding the necessary porosity to permit the water
to drain through.
'20 The usual Fourdrinier wire is woven with circu
lar cross-section warp and weft wires, and these
not only provide a very small wearing surface at
the under side but produce a noticeable ‘mark in
the paper. It is proposed in ‘the present inven
25 tion to provide the warp wires of square cross
section, to thelend that a larger wearing surface
is provided which will remain uniform through
out a longer wearing life, and there is also pro
vided a relatively smooth top surface, while at
30 the same time maintaining equal porosity for a
given mesh and wire gauge as the usual type of
woven wire having circular cross-section warp
~
wires.
.
~
It is further proposed to utilize the sharp. cor
35 ners of the square cross-section warp wires to
cause the same‘ to embed into the weft wires
through the beating action of the reed, whereby
the-tops of the weft knuckles are brought nearer
to the top surface of the fabric, and the knuckles
40
are more tightly interlocked to prevent sleazi
ness.
.
With the above and other objects in view, em
illustrated in Figs. 12 and 17. .
1
Similar ~reference characters indicate corre
sponding parts throughout the several ?gures of
the drawings.
.
Referringto the drawings, and more particu
larly to Figs. 1 to 4, the Fourdrinier wire, accord 20
ing to the exemplary illustrated embodiment
shown therein, comprises warp wires ll of square
cross-section, and weft wires _ll of circular cross
section, the upwardly bent knuckles of the warp
wires providing the upper paper-formation sur
face and downwardly bent knuckles ‘forming the 25
lower wearing-surface.
- In the weaving operation the reed hits the weft
wires between the warp wires and through the
square cross-section of the warp wires the edge 30
of the latter bite into the weft wires, as at Ill,
producing a ridge-like knuckle at-the underside,
as at ill‘, the reed marks being indicated at
lie-I I“. ’ In practice the reed mark is produced
at a point about 60° to 90° removed from that 35
shown in Fig. 4, the tension applied to the warp,
which is greater at one side of the shed than at
the other side, causing the weft wire to turn
about 60" to 90° bringing the reed mark to the
underside of the fabric. It will be seen that the 40
top weft knuckles II‘1 are thus brought closer to
the paper formation surface, and the bottom
weft knuckles II" are brought closer to the wear
bodiments of the invention are shown in the ac
surface, thus making for better paper'formation
oompanying drawings, and these embodiments .
‘5 will be hereinafter more fully described with ref
erence thereto, and the- invention will be ?nally
pointed ‘out in the claims.
In the drawings:
a
'
_
Fig. 1 is an enlarged plan view of a portion of
a wire belt, according to one embodiment of the
invention.
Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view, taken
along the line 2-2 of Hg. 1.
'55 - Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional
the line 3-3 ofFis. 1.
-
view taken along
Fig. 4 is a greatly enlarged transverse section
of a small section of the wire showing diagram
matically the comparative wearing surfaces of
go the wire according to' the present invention and
and longer life. Also the biting in of the warp
wires with the weft wires interlocks them and
prevents sleaziness. In the weaving of- a nor
mally loose weave fabric, as for instance twill
weave, this interlocking action is particularly‘ ef
fective in preventing the sleaziness which has
heretofore been an objection to these weaves.
As seen in Fig. 4 the plane A--A represents the
paper formation surface and the plane B—,B the
lower wearing surface. The dot-and-dash ep
resentation of round cross-section warp wir at
I! illustrates the comparative cross-sectional area
of round warp wires as compared to the square
warp wires of the present invention. The wear
ing surface is increased to a very great extent at
the beginning of wear, the wearing surface being
60
.
2 Y
2,122,592
_
equal to the diameter of the round warp wire when
This makes for a ?at weave and increased wear=
ring surface in the weft wires.
In Fig. 12 I have shown the use of twisted cable
warp wires will wear very rapidly at the beginning '
half worn through. As is well knownthe round
of wear and when worn to a point where a rela
tively large wearing surface is provided are so
thin that breakage is apt to occur. With the
weft wires I9 the cable being preferably twisted
from four strands. This type of weft lends it
square warp wires of the present invention the
at the knuckles, has better drainage character
wearing surface is not only uniform during the
istics as it can be brought closer to the paper
formation surface it produces less wire mark.
In Figs. 13,14,‘ 15, 16 and 17 I have respectively 10
shown the square cross-section weft wires 1 5, the
" life of the wire but a large wearing surface is
.10 provided at the beginning of wear so that the
thickness and strength of the warp wires is main
tained for a relatively longer. period and break
age due to thinning of the knuckles is greatly re
duced. Even when half worn through the
15 knuckles have greater strength than the half
worn through knuckles of the round cross-section
warp wires vdue to their increased cross sectional
area, so that breakage dueto excessive wear is
practically eliminated.’ The depressed knuckles
20 of the weft wire prevent wear upon' the warp
knuckles to a point where the latter are actually
worn through; whereas straight weft wires would
permit the warp wires to wear through‘com
pletely.
25
‘
.
It has been estimated that the cross-sectional‘
area of the square warp wires is approximately
28% greaterthan the round wires of the same
gauge, and the increase in wearing life c-ver round
wires is from 25% to 100%.
30
-
Considering the paper-formation side of the
wire it will be seen that the distance between the
centers of the round cross-section wires repre
sented by the line I3 is considerably greater than
the distance between the adjacent sides'of the
square cross-section warp wires, represented by
the line If, so that while the same porosity is
rectangular cross-section weft wires IS, the oval
cross-section weft wires H, the double weft wires
Ill-l8, and the twisted cable weft wires l9 woven
into twill weave wire cloth, the warp wires going 15
over one and under two of the weft wires.
It will be understood that the paper-making
wire, according to my invention, may be employed
either in the form of a belt en Fourdrinier ma
chines, or as cylinder on cylinder machines, or
in any other suitable manner.
I have illustrated and described preferred and
satisfactory embodiments of the invention, but it
will be obvious that changes may be made therein,
within the spirit and scope thereof, as de?ned in 25
the appended claims.
Having thus described my invention what I
claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:-—'
1. Woven wire fabric for paper making ma
chines. comprising interwoven warp and weft
wires with knuckles produced in both the warp
and weft .wires, the warp wires throughout their
length being of substantially square cross-section,
the weft wires being of circular cross-section, the
warp wires being embedded at their corners-in 35
said weft wires by reed-produced blows on said
maintained, a smoother and ?atter paper-for
weft wiresi'whereby the weft knuckles extend be
mation surface is provided, upon which the ?bres
of the paper stock will form better, due to their
tendency to span the spaces between the wires
tween the side surfaces of said warp wires to
bring said weft knuckles closer to the surface of
the fabric and to lock the weft wires against
twisting relatively to the warp wires, the lower
_ rather than to be drawn down into them.
In Figs-5 and 6 I have shown a modi?cation in
which the wcven wire is of twill weave, the square '
cross-sectional warp’ wire l0 being _ woven every
45 one and under two of the circular cross-section
v weft wires.v This type of weave provides a cloth.
in which there are long knuckles at the under or
wear side, and/according to my invention the
~50
self te ?atness of weave as it will be compressed
square cross-section warp wires provide these
long knuckles with a ?at wearing surface which
will have a-_>.very mach longerwearing life than
twill weave wires employing circular cross-sec~
tion warp wires. ' As above pointed out the inter
locking action produced by the biting of the warp
55 wires into the weft wires- prevents the sleaziness‘
usually present in twill weave wires.
.
. -.In Fig. 8 I have showna modi?cationin which
both the warp wires l0 and the weft wires l 5 are
of square cross-section, the warp wires being
60 woven with the ordinary type of weave going
warp'knuckles projecting substantially below the.
plane of the weft knuckles.
_
2. Woven wire fabric for paper making ma
chines comprising interwoven warp and weft
wires with knuckles produced in both the warp
and weft wires, the warp wires throughout their
length being of substantially square cross-section,
and being embedded at their corners in said weft
wires-by reed-produced blows on said weft wires,
whereby theweft knuckles extend between the)
side surfaces of said warp wires to bring said weft
knuckles closer to the surface of the fabric and
to lock the weft wires against twisting‘ relatively
to the warp wires, the lower warp knuckles pro
jecting substantially below the plane of the weft
knuckles.
-
_
55
.
3.'Woven wire fabric for paper making ma
chines eoinprising interwoven warp and weft
wires with knuckles produced in both the warp 30
and were wires, the warp wires being car
over one and under one ‘weft wire. This ‘makes
for increased wearing surface in the weft wires. I ried over fine and under a plurality of weft wires,
In Fig. 9 I have shown a modi?cation in which ' the weftywires [6 are of rectangular cross-sec
65 tion, the longer dimension extending longitudi
the warp wires throughout their length being of
substantially square cross-section and being em
bedded at their corners in said weft wires by 65
nally of the cloth.’ This makes for a flatter‘ weave
and also increased wearing surface in theweft
~~ wires. In Fig. 16 I have shown the'weft wires
reed-produced blows on said weft wires, whereby
. ? vof oval cross-section, the'long dimension ex
knuckles closer to the surface of the fabric and to
7.0 tending ‘longitudinally of the cloth. This also
_ :makes for ?atter weave and increased wearing
. ; surface in the weft wires.
-
.
._ In Fig. 11 I have shown instead of single weft
‘- wires weft wires “ll-I8 of relatively small diam- ,
eters, each pair being woven as a single weft.
the weft knuckles extend between the side sur
faces of said warp wires to' bring said weft -
lock the weft wires against twisting relatively to 70
the warp wires, the lower ‘warp knuckles‘ project
ing substantially below the plane of the weft
knuckles.
.
HARRY GESPECHT. ‘
75
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