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Патент USA US2122764

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July 5, 1938.
J. s. WALLIS ET‘ AL
-
PRODUCTION OF BLOWN ASPHALT
2,122,764
Filed Jan. 31, 1950
INVENTORS
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Patented July 5, 1938
, 2,122,754
I UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,122,764
'
PRODUCTION OF BLOWN ASPHALT
John Samuel Wallis, New York, and Harry R.
Swanson, White Plains, N. Y., assignors to
Foster Wheeler Corporation, New York, N. Y., a
corporation of New York
>
Application January 31, 1930, Serial No. 424,918
8 Claims. (01. 196-74)
Our invention relates to treatment of hydro
Referring to the drawing:
carbon for the production of asphalt.
The practice in the past in treating heavy hyr
drocarbons for the production of asphalt has been
5 to treat hydrocarbons in a suitable process as
a result of which a component derived will be
suitable for further treatment to produce asphalt.
This asphalt component, or we might say, the
residual flux oil from crude distillation, is then
.10 conducted to a horizontal cylindrical member
which we may term a still, but which is hollow
inside and without any internal constructions for
?ow of liquids so that the liquid all exists in one
body as a large pool in such horizontal still. This
15 liquid is then treated by blowing into it an oxidiz
ing material such as air or superheated steam, and
after this process has gone on for a while, the
supply of air or superheated steam is shut off
and the batch is withdrawn and another batch
20 introduced. We may term this a batch process.
Indistinction to the batch process, we propose
a continuous process for the production of blown
asphalt, and to that end we propose to utilize a
different type of structure in which a different
25 process takes place. The structure may be of
various forms and may be described by saying
that it is similar to a fractionating tower. The
purpose of using a tower similar to a fractionating
tower is to obtain continuous ?ow of the hydro
30 carbon liquid downwardly overv a series of trays
and to have continuous up?ow of the oxidizing gas
in contact intermittently with liquid bodies of the
hydrocarbon.
As a further feature of our novel process, we
.35 utilize the heat developed due to the exothermic
character of the reaction to carry on the process.
The hydrocarbon used for this purpose is a hydro
carbon of high seci?v gravity, for example, greater
The supply of oxidizing ?uid
. than 20° Baumé.
40 _ is regulated in such a manner as to give a tem
perature such that the process takes place below
the vaporizing point of the hydrocarbon, but
above the point wher reaction begins to take
place so that the p
cess is one of reaction as
.45 distinguished from the mere formation of a physi
cal mixture as by absorption.
The invention will become apparent and the
nature and advantages thereof will be readily
understood by reference to the following speci
50 ?cation which describes the process, in conjunc
tion with the diagrammatic showing of an appa
ratus on the accompanying drawing, it being
understood, however, that the diagrammatic
. drawing is for illustrated purposes only in an
55 aid to understanding the invention.
Reference character [0 designates a heater
comprising tubes ll through which the hydro
carbon may be passed for the purpose of its .be
ing heated. This is on the assumption that the
process begins with a cold hydrocarbon. The
hydrocarbon is passed through the pipe [2 and
pipe l3 and enters the tower 14. Tower II con
tains a series of bubble trays l5 which may be
of any various known constructions. The oil is 10
shown as introduced on the top tray, but may
be introduced at various points in the tower.
The oil cascades downwardly from tray to tray
in the tower in known manner.
Reference character i6 designates a separately 15
?red heater containing tubes il in which the
oxidizing ?uid is heated. The oxidizing ?uid may
be air or steam. The oxidizing ?uid enters
through the pipe l8, passes through the sepa
rately ?red heater and through pipe l9 into the 20
lower part of the tower, where it may be intro
duced through a perforated pipe arrangement 20.
The oxidizing gas passes upwardly through the
tower and successively through the ports of the
bubble, trays, thus ?owing in intimate contact 25
with the continuously downwardly cascading hy
drocarbon.
.
If the temperature is too low in the tower, re
action will not take place. Our process contem
plates the existence‘ in the tower of so high a 30
temperature that reaction takes place and the
oxygen chemically unites with the hydrocarbon
as distinguished from mere absorption. Further
more, the temperature must not be so high that
the hydrocarbon vaporizes to any material extent 35
since the purpose of the process is to maintain
the hydrocarbon of suitable constituency to pro
duce desired quality of asphalt. Consequently,
we maintain the temperature between the limits
indicated, which may be, for example, between 40
300 degrees Fahrenheitand ‘700 degrees Fahren
heit, depending upon the nature of the hydro
carbon used.
,
Gases, principally non-condensible gases de
rived from the oxidizing medium, are removed 45
from the top of the tower through pipe 2| and
pass to a cooler 9 in which any condensible gases
may be lique?ed.
The finished product is withdrawn from the
bottom of the tower through the pipe 23 and 50
passes through a heat exchanger 24 and to a
point of storage. The incoming hydrocarbon may
be pumped by a pump 25 through the heat ex
changer 24 and thence to the tubes ll of the
heater.
2
2,122,764
It will be seen that the process depends to a I
great extent upon the nature of the ?uids used.
To illustrate, in event that the hydrocarbon is
received from_ the previous distillation process,
it may ‘be necessary to cool the hydrocarbon
rather than to heat it, and in such case the heater
l0 may be replaced by a cooler. Also, the tem
perature of the oxidizing gas is important, and
’in order to obtain a regulation of this factor we
10 provide a by-pass pipe 22 around the heater I6.
The nature vof our process, within the limits
of temperature indicated, is such that the re
action is exothermic, and we utilize the heat in
ternally developed to maintain the temperature.
15 Assuming that the oil has ?rst been heated in a
heater Ill, the temperature will rise in the tower
to the point where it is necessary to diminish
the heating. Also, we provide a by-pass 21
around the heater and the process may go on in
20 such manner that no heat is supplied, the exo
2. The process of oxidizing an asphalt compo- .
nent of a hydrocarbon ?uid ior the production
of blown asphalt which consists in continuously
cascading the asphalt component downwardly
through a reaction zone‘, continuously passing an
oxidizing gas upwardly through the reaction zone
in intermittent and direct contact with the down
wardly cascading asphalt component to thereby
. oxidize the asphalt component and automatically
regulating the temperature at an intermediate
point in the reaction zone to maintain the tem
perature within limits below temperature of sub
stantial vaporization of the asphalt component 15
and sufficiently high to eifect chemical reaction
between the asphalt component and the oxidizing
gas.
'
3. The process of oxidizing an asphalt compo
nent of a hydrocarbon ?uid for the production
thermic heat supplying all the heat that is nec
of blown asphalt which consists in continuously
essary. Suitable valves are obviously provided
cascading the asphalt component downwardly
to take care of the flow through the various
pipes so that when, for example, the by-pass 21
through a reaction zone, continuously passing an
oxidizing gas upwardly through the reaction zone
in intermittent and direct contact with the down 25
is being used, ?ow is cut off through the heater
Ill. Obviously, the ?ow may be proportioned as
between the by-pass pipe and the heater I0.
wardly cascading asphalt component to thereby
oxidize the asphalt component, utilizing the heat
We may further control the process by insert
produced in the reaction zone as a result of the
ing a temperature-regulating coil at one or more
30 points in the tower as indicated at 28. We may
control the ?ow of a cooling ?uid or a heating
' ?uid through such cooling coil in order to main
tain the temperature within desired limits.
Ob
viously, it is possible toautomatically control the
?ow of cooling ?uid, such as water, through the
cooling coil 28 in response to temperature at one
or a number of points in the tower so as to main
tain a desired temperature automatically. To
illustrate this, we have indicated diagrammati
cally a temperature-responsive element 29 within
the tower as controlling a valve 30 regulating
the ?ow of- ?uid through the coil 28.
Obviously, the quality of the product obtained
£15
high to eiiect chemical reaction between the
asphalt component and the oxidizing gas.
can be governed by the relative proportions of
hydrocarbon and oxidizing ?uid supplied to the
tower. Furthermore, this may be regulated by
adjusting the ?ow on the trays. For a higher
degree of oxidation, either the time of ?ow of the
hydrocarbon through the tower may be extended
over a greater period of time or the amount of
oxidizing ?uid may be increased to give the de
sired product.
We prefer to carry out our process at substan
tially atmospheric pressure and regulate the
product by control of the temperature. It is ob
viously possible, however, to~vary the pressure
within the tower, and variations of pressure will
effect temperature values in manner depending
upon known laws of ?uids.
,
It will be seen from the above that we may
term the inside of the tower a reaction zone.
What we claim is:
1. The process of oxidizing an asphalt compo
nent of a hydrocarbon ?uid for the production
65 of blown asphalt which consists in continuously
cascading the asphalt component downwardly
through a reaction zone, continuously passing an
oxidizing gas upwardly through the reaction zone
in intermittent and direct contact with the down- ‘
70 wardly cascading asphalt component to thereby
oxidize the asphalt component and regulating the
temperature at an intermediate point in the re
action zone to maintain thetemperature within
limits below temperature of substantial vaporiza
78 tion of the asphalt component and sui?ciently
oxidation for carrying on the process and regu
lating the temperature at an intermediate point 30
in the reaction zone to maintain the temperature
within limits below temperature of substantial
vaporization of the asphalt component and sum
ciently high to eifect chemical reaction between
the asphalt component and the oxidizing gas.
4. The process of oxidizing an asphalt com
ponent of a hydrocarbon ?uid for the produc
tion of blown asphalt which consists in contin
35
uously cascading the asphalt component down
wardly through a reaction zone, continuously 40
passing an oxidizing gas upwardly through the
reaction zone in intermittent and direct contact
with the downwardly cascading asphalt com
ponent to thereby oxidize the asphalt component,
utilizing the heat produced in the reaction zone 45
as a result of the oxidation for carrying on the
process and automatically regulating the tem
perature at an intermediate point in the reac
tion zone to maintain the temperature within
limits below the temperature of substantial va
porization of the asphalt component arid su?i
ciently high to e?ect chemical reaction between
the asphalt component and the oxidizing gas.
5. The process of oxidizing an asphalt com
ponent of a hydrocarbon ?uid for the production 55
of blown asphalt which consists in continuously
cascading the asphalt component downwardly
over bubble trays in a tower, continuously pass
ing an oxidizing gas upwardly through said tower
in direct contact with the downwardly cascading
asphalt component to thereby oxidize the asphalt
component and regulating the temperature at an
intermediate point in the tower between bubble
trays to maintain the temperature within limits
below temperature of substantial vaporization of
the asphalt component and su?iciently high to
effect chemical reaction between the asphalt
component and the oxidizing gas.
6. The process of oxidizing an asphalt com
ponent of a hydrocarbon ?uid for the production 70
of blown asphalt which consists in continuously
cascading the asphalt component downwardly
over bubble trays in a tower, continuously pass
ing an oxidizing gas upwardly through said tower
in direct contact with the downwardly cascading
2,122,764
3 .
asphalt component to thereby oxidize the asphalt , means for supplying a cooling medium to said
component, utilizing the heat produced in the conduit ‘and means responsive to temperature
tower as a result of the oxidation for carrying between bubble trays in said tower for regulating
on the process and regulating thetemperature ?ow or cooling medium through said conduit.
at an intermediate point in the tower between
8. Apparatus for treating an asphalt compo :21
bubble traysto maintain the temperature within nent of a hydrocarbon ?uid to produce blown
limits below temperature of substantial vapori
asphalt comprising a tower, bubble trays in said
zation of the asphalt component and suiliciently tower, means for supplying asphalt component
high to effect chemical reaction between the to said tower to cascade downwardly over the
10 asphalt component and the oxidizing gas.
bubble trays, means for regulating the tempera 10
7. Apparatus for treating an asphalt compo
ture of the asphalt component comprising a ?rst
nent of a hydrocarbon ?uid to produce blown heater and a by-pass around said heater, means
asphalt comprising a tower, bubble trays in said for supplying a gaseous oxidizing agent to said
tower, means for supplying asphalt component tower to ?ow upwardly in direct contact with
15 to 'said tower to cascade downwardly over the the downwardly cascading asphalt component,
bubble trays, means for regulating the tempera,
means for regulating the temperature of the gas
ture of the asphalt component comprising a eous oxidizing agent comprising a second heater
?rst heater and a by-pass around said heater, and a by-pass around said second heater, cool
means for supplying a gaseous oxidizing agent
20
to said tower ‘to ?ow upwardly in direct contact
with the downwardlycascading asphalt compo
nent, means for regulating the temperature of
the gaseous oxidizing agent comprising a second
heater and a by-pass around said second heater,
25 a conduit in said tower between bubble trays.
ing means in the intermediate portion of said
tower and means responsive to temperature in
the intermediate portion 01 said tower for con
trolling said cooling means.
0
JOHN SAIMUEL WALLIS.
HARRY R. SWANSON.
25
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