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Патент USA US2123176

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July 12, ‘I
ARCH ‘SUPPORTING
A. E. BLOCK
APPARATUS
’
Filed-Nov. 17, 1934
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s Sheets-Shggt 2 a
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VENTOR:
ALEXANDER E. BLOCK
BY
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A TTORNE Y5
July 12, 1938.
'A_ E, BLOCK
2,123,176
ARCH‘SUPPORTING APPARATUS
Filed Nov. 17, 1934
3 Sheets-Shoot I5
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INVENTOR;
ALEXANDER E. BLOC/f
'BYWJW
ATTORNEYS
Patented July 12, 1938
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,
2,123,176
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
’
2,123,176
_
ARCH SUPPORTING APPARATUS
Alexander E. Block, University City, Mo.
Application November 17, 1934, Serial No. 753,465
‘
17 Claims.
This invention relates to shoes of the type that
are equipped with removable or adjustable pads,
(01. 36-71)
suitable retaining means. The term “pad”, as
herein used, is intended to refer to and include
inserts or cushioning devices which are adapted
any kind of a device or element that is used to
to be arranged in various positions for correct-
cushion, support, treat, or provide comfort for
5 ing or assisting in the treatment of various foot
diseases or ailments.
‘
a part or portion of the human foot.
‘5
Brie?y described, my invention consists of a
One object of my invention is to provide a
shoe of the general type mentioned, that ‘is com-
shoe provided withapad carrier or holding means
connected to the‘ inner sole of the shoe, and con
pact, light in Weight, inexpensive to construct
structed from pieces of relatively thin, ?exible
10 and equipped with a plurality of metatarsal arch
pads and longitudinal arch pads that are positioned in pockets of ‘novel construction and ar‘rangement.
‘
‘
sheet material, such as leather or fabric; one or 10
more pockets at the forward end of said carrier
accessible from the top side of same and adapt
ed
Another object is to provide a shoe of the genl5 eral type mentioned, in which the holding means
or retaining means for the removable pads is
formed from pieces ‘of relatively thin,_ ?exible
sheet material, such as leather or fabric, connected together in such a way as to form meta20 tarsal arch pad pockets of novel arrangement
to
receive
one
or
more
metatarsal
arch
pads; one or more longitudinally-disposed pockets
accessible from the top side of said carrier and 15
adapted to receive one or more longitudinal arch
pads’; and a rear end pocket on said carrier ac
cessible from the top side of same and adapted
to receive a heel pad. Said carrier is preferably
provided with a plurality of metatarsal arch pad 20
whose rear ends are open, and longitudinal arch _ pockets arranged in overlapping relationship and
pad pockets having side openings,‘ thereby enabling the shoe to be worn comfortably without
the pads, due to the fact that the pad holding
25 means is thin enough or ?at enough to cause no
annoyance or discomfort to- the user when the
pads are not in operative position. ‘
having their rear ends open so as to permit the
metatarsal arch pads to be easily introduced into‘
their pockets, and the longitudinal arch pad
pockets have side openings through which the 9,5
longitudinal arch pads may be easily introduced
into said pockets. - Due to the fact that the var
Another object is to provide a shoe that is ious pockets above referred to are formed from
equipped with a metatarsal arch pad and a novel pieces of thin, ?exible sheet material, the carrier,
30 holding or retaining pocket for said pad, con- as an entirety, is relatively thin and will lie flat 30
structed so that the pad is accessible from the against the inner sole of the shoe without caus
rear end of the pocket and is capable of being ing annoyance or discomfort to the user, if no
adjusted in an extreme forward position, where- pads are mounted in the pockets of the carrier.
in the pocket acts as an abutment to limit the The metatarsal arch pads may be constructed in
35 forward movement of the pad and hold the pad ' various ways and made of various shapes, but I 35
so that a portion of same extends beyond the
prefer to use rubber or other soft material, and
front end of said pocket, thereby enabling the Construct each in the form Of a substantially
shoe to be used to cure, correct or relieve meta- feather-edged element of approximately disk
tarsal arch trouble that cannot be successfully shape, provided on one side with a flat face and
40 handled with shoes or arch supporting apparatus on its opposite side with a convex surface having 40
of conventional construction.
‘
And still another object of my invention is to
an eccentrically-disposed hump, a metatarsal
arch pad of this particular form being capable
provide a shoe that is equipped with a novel heel of a multitude of adjustments, owing to the fact
pad pocket and also with -a heel pad of novel that it may be turned end for end or turned up
45 construction. Other objects and desirable fea- side-down. The longitudinal arch pads may also 45
tures of my invention will be‘ hereinafter pointed be ‘of various shapes and constructed of various
out,
materials. In the preferred form of my inven
I have herein illustrated my invention embod- ' tion herein illustrated the shoe is provided with
ied in a shoe, but I wish it to be understood that a single outer longitudinal arch pad that is sub
50 my invention is applicable to arch supporting stantially wedge-shaped in transverse cross sec- 50
apparatus of the type that are adapted to be re- tion, and a plurality of inner longitudinal arch
movably mounted in a shoe and also arch sup- pads arranged end to end, in overlapping rela
porting apparatus of the type that are adapted
to be inserted in a shoe and held in position on
55 the inner sole of the shoe by an adhesive or‘other
tionship, and each being of substantially wedge
shape in cross section. The pockets for the
metatarsal pads, in addition to- being arranged in 55
2
2,123,176
overlapping relationship, are so disposed with re
lation to the pockets for the longitudinal arch
pads that one or more of the metatarsal arch
pads can be adjusted or arranged so as to‘ overlap
one or more of the longitudinal arch pads. The
pockets for the inner and outer longitudinal arch
designated as an entirety by the reference char
acter .r in Figure 3, provided with pockets in
which said various pads are positioned. As shown
in Figure 3, the carrier as is provided at its front
end with two overlapping pockets 2 and 2*1 that (.1
are adapted to receive the metatarsal arch pads
pads are also preferably arranged in overlapping
relationship, and the rear end portions of the
pockets for the outer longitudinal arch pad and.
one of the inner longitudinal arch. pads extend
over or are in overlapping relationship with the
pocket for the heel pad. In using the shoe one
A and A’, respectively, a longitudinally-disposed
pocket 3 that is adapted to receive the outer lon
gitudinal arch pad B, two pockets 4 and 4a (see
Figure 12) that are adapted to receive the inner 10
longitudinal arch pads C and C’, respectively,
ranged in the carrier or pad holding means, de
and 12, and as hereinafter more fully explained
and a rear end pocket 5 that is adapted to re
or more of the pads previously referred to is ar- - ceive the heel pad D. As shown in Figs. 3, 10
15 pending upon the particular kind of foot trouble ’ the heel pad pocket 5 extends unbrokenly across
of the user, and after the trouble has been cor
rected or remedied, the pads may be removed
from the carrier so that the carrier will lie flat
upon the inner sole of the shoe.
20
7
, i
. .
Figure 1 of the drawings is a top plan view,
partly broken away, of: a shoe ‘embodying my
present
invention.
'
‘
'
>
"
Figure 2 is a vertical longitudinal sectional
view, taken on the line 2--2 of Figure 1.
25
s
-
'
'
'
'
-
"
>:
Figure 4 is a top'plan view of'the outer longi
tudinal
30
arch
pad.
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‘
'
.
Figure 5 is a top plan view‘of one of the meta
tarsal
arch
pads.
'
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~
7
'
'
Figures 6 and 7 are top plan views of the tw
inner longitudinal arch pads.
' >
Figure 8 is a perspective view-of the heel pad,
Figure 9 is a perspective view of the removable’
ML
insert of the‘ heel pad.‘
'
a
>
is secured to the carrier by a transverse hinge or
joint so that when the rear end of said top piece
is~lifted or'swung upwardly, a space is formed
corresponding in width to the transverse width
of the heel portion of the inner sole, in which a
heel pad can be positioned.
Figure 3 is a perspective view of the carrier or
pad holding means with no pads, arranged'in
same.
the entire transverse width of the inner sole,
said pocket being formed by a stationary base
‘piece and a movable top piece whose front end
1
The carrier :1: is
preferably made from a’ plurality of shaped
pieces of thin, flexible sheet material such as
leather or fabric, connected together by stitches
y and permanently attached to the inner sole I
of the shoe, as, for example, by means of a
transversely-disposed curved row of stitches 2,
as shown in Figures 1 and 2", the portion at the
rearv end of said carrier which constitutes the
bottom of the heel pad pocket 5 being also pref
erably attached to the heel portion of the inner
sole I, as,‘v for example, by the clinched or turned
-
over upper ends of the nails 6 used to attach the
heel l of the shoe to the outer and inner soles
of the shoe. In order to protect the user’s hose
spectively, ofFigure 3.
‘
"
'»
"
‘— - from direct contact with the pads or pad carrier,
40
Figure 12 is another perspective view of the said carrier is provided with a sock liner or top
carrier ‘or pad holding means, showing the open- 7 piece '8 whose front end is secured by the trans
ings of the pockets in said carrier'which are verse row of stitches .2, previously mentioned, the
adapted to receive the vinner longitudinal arch rear end portion of said sock liner or top piece 8
Figures 10 and 11 are’ transverse sectional
views, taken on the lines l0—l0 and H--'I I, re
pads.
'
'
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"
‘
Figure 13 is a‘ vertical transverse ‘sectional
view, taken through the heel portionof the shoe,
showing the longitudinal arch pads removed
from the carrier and the heel ‘pads arranged in
operative
50
position.
'
'
‘
'
Figure 14 is a view similar to Figure'1’3, show
ing the heel pad removed and the outer longi
tudinal arch pad arranged in operative position
in
the
carrier.
'
‘
"
'
'
'
"
Figure 15 is a similar View, showing the heel
55 pad removed and one of the inner longitudinal
arch pads arranged in operative position.
Figure 16 is a vertical transverse sectional
view, taken ‘through the instep portion of' the
shoe, showing the ‘carrier equipped with only one
longitudinal arch pad, i. e.‘,‘ the inner longitudinal
arch pad that lies directly behind'the metatarsal
arch
pads.‘
‘
‘
‘
’
‘
'
Figure vl’l'is a fragmentary top plan view, il
lustrating another adjustment of the metatarsal
65
arch pads;
and
‘
‘
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'
Figure 18 is a transverse sectional view,‘ taken
on the line l8-l8 of Figure 17. '
’
In the drawings [designates the inner sole of
my improved shoe which is equipped with an
70
arch supporting apparatus, ‘preferably built into
being free or unattached, so that said top piece
may be lifted when it is desired to adjust or re
arrange one or more pads of the apparatus.
The metatarsal arch pads A and A’ are pref~
erably of the form shown in Figure 5, each of
said pads consisting of a feather-edged element,
constructed of rubber or other suitable material,
and provided with a ?at bottom face and a con
at the opposite end of said element is a tang or
reduced portion it‘ which isiused to hold the pad
in adjusted position in its pocket. Thus, shown
in Figures 3 and 12, the top piece of each meta
tarsal arch pad pocket is provided with a ?ap
or reduced extension having a plurality of trans 60
versely-disposed slits ll that are adapted to re
ceive the tang or reduced portion it! at the rear
end of thepad positioned in said pocket. To
position either of the metatarsal arch pads, the
pad is introduced into the rear end of its pocket, 65
and after it has been set in the correct position,
the tang ll] of the pad is inserted in one of the
slits H in the ?ap on the'top piece of the pocket,
thereby causing the pad to be interlocked with
the top piece of its pocket in such a way that 70
the shoeso as to form an integral part ‘or same.
it is effectively held'against accidental shifting.
Said apparatus comprises two metatarsal arch
In order to increase the range of adjustment of
the metatarsal arch pads'one or both of the
pockets at the forward end of the carrier :1: may
pads A_ and‘ A’, an outer longitudinal arch‘pad
B, two inner longitudinal varch pads 'C and C’, a
75 heel'pad'D, and a carrier or pad holding means,
50
vexed top face having an eccentrically-disposed
hump 9, as shown more clearly in Figures 5
and 18.‘ One end of saidelement is tapered, and
have its top piece cut away, as, for ‘example, at 76
‘2,123,176
l2, as shown in Figures 3. and 1. ‘This cut away
portion l2 of the top piece of the pocket is of
less length than the width of the opening at
the rear Vendof the pocket through which the
pad is introduced into the pocket thereby per
mitting the pad in said pocket, for example, the
pad A’ to be adjusted forwardly into a position
where the‘ front end of‘the pocket acts as an
3
without requiring the services of one skilled in
the treatment of foot trouble, makes the shoe
a decided improvement upon prior arch support
ing apparatus of the kind now on the market.
Also, as previously stated, the carrier or pad
holding means a: of the shoe is of such construc
tion that when it is not equipped with pads,
said carrier will lie flat against the inner sole
abutment to limit the forward movement of the . of the shoe, and thus not cause annoyance or
10 pad and the tapered front end of the pad pro
jects forwardly beyond the front end of the
pocket, as shown in Figure 1. By constructing
the shoe in this manner I am able to arrange
the metatarsal arch correcting means in a fur
ther forward position than would be possible if
the pocket 211' for the pad A’ were provided With
an imperforate or uncut front end, and I ob
tain a pocket in which the pad can be positioned
quickly and easily due to the fact that the pocket
is provided at its rear end with an entrance
opening of greater width than the extreme width
of the pad and is provided at its front end with
an opening (formed by the cut away portion 82)
that is of less width than the extreme width of
the pad. The metatarsal arch pad pockets 2
and 2a are arranged in overlappingrelationship,
as shown in Figure 18, and said pockets are also
preferably arranged in arcuate alignment, as
shown in Figure 1, so as to permit the user to
30 arrange the pads A and A’ so they will conform
accurately to the anterior metatarsal arch. The
portion of the carrier :0 that forms the base piece
of the pockets for the metatarsal arch pads pro
jects slightly beyond the front ends of‘ the top
pieces of said pockets, and the front end of the
sock liner 8 projects slightly beyond the terminal
end of ‘said base piece and is skived or feather“
edged, so that there will be'no transverse ridge
on the inner sole'of the shoe that might cause
annoyance to the user.
Although the rear end
portion of the carrier at that constitutes the base
piece of the heel pad pocket 5 is secured to the
inner sole of the shoe, as previously explained,
the top piece of said heel pad pocket is free to
move upwardly to facilitate the introduction,
removal, or adjustment of the heel pad, said heel
pad pocket top piece being stitched or secured in
the zone of the shank of the shoe at a point in
front of the heel. Moreover, when the top piece
of the heel pad pocket is raised, the pockets
for the longitudinal arch pads are brought into
a condition which makes it very easy to insert,
discomfort to the user.
If it is necessary or desirable to use a heel pad,
any‘ suitable type or kind of heel pad may be
arranged in the heel pad pocket at the rear
end of the carrier 1:. I prefer, however, to equip
the shoe with a heel pad that can be adjusted so 15
as to raise or lower the base of the user’s heel
bone or provide a hard or soft supporting surface
for said heel bone. In the form of my invention
herein illustrated, the heel pad D comprises a
body portion I3 made of rubber and provided at 20
its center with a socket or depression Eta in which
a removable insert I4 is adapted to be positioned.
The insert I4 is formed of material that is of a
different character or nature than the material
of which the body portion l3 of the heel pad is
constructed. For example, the insert Hl may be
formed of material that is denser or slightly hard
er than the body portion of the heel pad, so as to
form a support for the base of the heel bone that
will not yield or compress as readily as the body
portion of the heel pad. If a higher or lower
30
supporting surface for the base of the heel bone
is required, this adjustment can be made by re
moving the insert and substituting for same an
insert of proper height or thickness. As pre 35
viously explained, the pocket 5 in thecarrier that
is adapted to receive the heel pad D, is accessible
from the top side of the‘ carrier, it being possible
to introduce the heel pad into its pocket, simply
by raising the rear end portion of the carrier 40
which constitutes the top part of the pocket '5
and then position the heel pad D on the bottom
piece of said pocket that is attached to the heel
portion of the inner sole I of the shoe.
As previously stated, my invention is applicable 45
to a shoe having an arch supporting apparatus
of the kind above described, built into the shoe,
and it is also applicable to an arch supporting '
apparatus built in the form of a unit or structure
that is adapted to be removably mounted in a 50
shoe. In addition to being easy to adjust and
providing an exceptionally large number of ad
justments for the bones constituting the anterior
metatarsal arch, the longitudinal arches and the
remove or‘adjust the longitudinal arch pads,
this, of course, resulting from the fact that the
freely movable top piece of the heel pad pocket
heel, the apparatus is light in weight, inexpensive 55
carries or is attached to portions of the carrier 3:
to construct, and of such design that the carrier
which constitute parts of the pockets for the
or pad holding means of same Will cause no an
longitudinal arch pads.
noyance or discomfort to the user, in the event
The outer longitudinal arch pad B and the rear ’ said carrier remains in the shoe with no pads
positioned in same.
60
of cork, and as previously stated, are wedge~
Having thus described my invention, what I
shaped in transverse cross section. The other claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Pat
longitudinal arch pad C’ is preferably made of ent is:
rubber and consists of an elongated'member hav-‘
l. A shoe having an arch supporting apparatus,
ing one substantially semi-circular-shaped or seg
comprising a carrier provided with pockets for 65
mental-shaped edge, and also a convexed surface longitudinal arch pads and a plurality of individ
that has an eccentrically-disposed hump 9“, as ual metatarsal arch pads on said carrier arranged
shown in Figure '7. Due to the fact that the longi
in overlapping lateral relationship with one
60 inner longitudinal arch pad C are preferably made
tudinal arch pads and the metatarsal arch pads
may be arranged in overlapping relationship, and
some of said pads may also be reversed or turned
upside down, the apparatus may be adjusted so
as to adapt itself to practically any human foot.
This, coupled with the fact that the pads may
be adjusted, re-arranged or removed by the user
another and also disposed in overlapping relation~
ship with one or more of the longitudinal arch 70
pads, thereby enabling a metatarsal arch pad to
be arranged in various positions transversely of
the carrier without liability of shifting laterally
out of adjusted position.
2. A shoe of the kind described in claim 1, in 75
4
2,123,176
which the metatarsal arch pad pockets-of the
carrier are arranged in arcuate alignment.
3. A shoe of the kind described in claim 1, in
which the carrier is formed from pieces of thin,
?exible sheet material combined so as to form
pad receiving pockets accessible from the top side
of the carrier, the pockets for the metatarsal
pads having slitted ?aps that are used to hold the
metatarsal pads in adjusted position.
4. A shoe provided with a pad carrier, formed
from relatively thin, ?exible sheet material, a
pocket at the forward end of said carrier having
an entrance opening presented toward the heel
portion of the shoe, a longitudinally adjustable
15 metatarsal arch pad positioned in said pocket, a
slitted ?ap on the top wall of said. pocket, and a
part on the pad adjustably connected with said
slitted ?ap.
the base of the user’s heel bone and formed from
material that is of greater density or hardness
than said pad.
10. An arch supporting apparatus for shoes,
comprising a carrier, formed of relatively thin,
?exible sheet material, said carrier being adapted
to be permanently attached to the inner sole of
a shoe and provided with a plurality of pockets
accessible from the top side of said carrier, re 10
versible metatarsal arch pads arranged in over
lapping relationship at the front end of said
carrier, a removable heel pad at the rear end
of said carrier, provided with a central portion
that may be changed to vary the supporting sur 15
face for the user’s heel bone, and adjustable,
longitudinal arch pads of substantially wedge
shape in cross section mounted on said carrier
5. A shoe provided with a pad carrier, formed
from relatively thin, ?exible sheet material, a
pocket at the forward end of said carrier having
an entrance opening presented toward the heel
portion of the shoe, a longitudinally adjustable
metatarsal arch pad. positioned in said pocket,
25. with a portion of said pad engaging the front end
of said pocket and a portion of said pad project
ing forwardly through an opening in the front
end of the pocket, and an integral portion on said
pad adjustably interlocked with an integral por
30. tion of the top piece of said pocket.
6. A shoe provided with a pad carrier con
structed from relatively thin, ?exible sheet ma
terial, a plurality of individual metatarsal arch
pad pockets on the upper side of the front end
35 portion of said carrier arranged in overlapping
lateral relationship and in arcuate alignment, the
rear ends of said pockets being open and the top
pieces of said pockets having ?aps, and adjustable
metatarsal arch pads removably mounted in said
40 pockets and adjustably connected with said ?aps,
one of said pockets having an opening in its front
end so as to permit the pad in said pocket to be
adjusted into a position where ‘a portion of said
pad projects forwardly through said opening and
45 a'portion of said pad engages the front end of
the pocket.
'
'7. A shoe of the kind described in‘ claim 6, in
which said pads are provided with tangs and the
top piece of each of said pockets is provided with
50 a plurality of transversely-disposed slits in its
?ap located di?erent distances from the front
ends of said pockets and adapted to receive the
tangs on said pads.
sert in said'pad adapted to serve as a support for
'
8. A shoe provided with a pad carrier formed
55 from a plurality of pieces of relatively thin, ?ex
ible sheet material connected together in such
a way as to form a heel pad pocket at the rear
end of the ‘carrier, a plurality of individual meta
tarsal arch pad pockets arranged in overlapping
lateral relationship at the front end of the carrier,
and intermediate pockets for receiving inner and
outer longitudinal arch pads, said intermediate
pockets having side openings and said end pockets
having entrance openings at their rear ends, and
65 removable pads positioned in said pockets and
adapted to be arranged so that the metatarsal
arch pads may be arranged in overlapping rela~
tionship with one another and with two of the
longitudinal arch pads and two of said longi
70 tudinal arch pads may be arranged in overlap
ping relationship with the heel pad.
9. A shoe provided with a pad carrier, a remov
able heel pad in said carrier, and a removable in
in overlapping relationship.
11. A heel pad for shoes provided with a portion 20
adapted to serve as a support for the user’s heel
bone and being of greater density or hardness
than. the remainder of the pad.
12. A pad carrier for shoes, and a pad pocket
on said carrier, said pocket having an opening
at its forward end, the front portion of the bottom
of said pocket being stationary or immovable and
the rear end portion of said pocket being slotted
so as to hold inserts at various points with ref
erence to the length of said pocket.
30
13. A pad carrier for shoes, provided with a
base piece, a pad pocket on the anterior arch
portion of the carrier. and a separate pad pocket
on the rear portion of the carrier, the front end
of said rear pocket overlapping the rear end of
the anterior arch pocket.
14. An adjustable inner longitudinal arch pad
for shoes, consisting of an elongated member of
substantially ellipsoidal form in general outline,
that is adapted to be arranged with its long axis 40
extending longitudinally of the shoe, said mem
ber being provided on one of. its surfaces with a
hump disposed at one side of the longitudinal
axis of said member.
15. An arch supporting apparatus for shoes, 45
comprising a carrier adapted to lie upon the inner
sole of the shoe and provided at its forward end
with pockets for receiving metatarsal arch pads,
said pockets having provision for holding‘ the
pads in overlapping lateral relationship and in 50
arcuate alignment, the rear ends of said pockets
being open.
16. An arch supporting apparatus for shoes,
comprising a base piece adapted to be attached
to the inner sole of the shoe, a top piece adapted 65
to be raised or lifted, and an intermediate por
tion between said top piece and base piece hinged
at a point between the heel and the zone of the
rear transverse arch area.
17. A pad carrier for shoes, comprising a base 60
piece adapted to be anchored to the inner sole
of a shoe, and superimposed portions on the top
side of said base piece arranged in overlapping
relationship and hinged to said base piece at dif
ferent zones, said overlapping portions cooperat
ing with each other and with the base piece to
form pad pockets accessible from the top side of
65
the carrier and each comprising a ?ap or top
part whose rear end can be raised to facilitate
the insertion, removal or adjustment of the pads‘ 70
in said pockets.
ALEXANDER E. BLOCK.
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