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Патент USA US2123269

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July 12, 1938-
A. F. BALL ET AL
2,123,269
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR OPERATING 0N HEELS
Filed March 3, 1937
5 Sheets-Sheet-l
July 12, 1938.
2,123,269
A. F‘. BALL ET AL
METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR OPERATING ON HEELS
Filed March 3, 1937
5 Sheets—Sheet 2
4
| 14rnl‘
July 12, 1933-
A. F. BALL El‘ AL
2,123,269
METHOD AND APPARATUS’ FOR OPERATING ON HEELS
Filed March 3, 1957
40
5 Sheets-Sheet 5
#2775‘. 3
4'2
363426
Jiiweni’ors
July 12, 1938.
A_ F_ BALL Er AL
2,123,269
METHOD‘ AND APPARATUS FOR OPERATING ON HEELS
Filed March 5, 1937
'
5 $heets~Sheet 5
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Patented July 12, 1938
2,123,269
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,123,269
'
METHOD AND APSQRATIIEIS
FOR OPERATING
HELS
Arthur F. Ball, Haverliill, and George A. Craig,
Maiden, Masa, assignors to Gregory & Read
Wood Heel Company, Maiden, Mass, a corpo
ration of Massachusetts
‘
Application March 3, 1937, Serial No. 128,784
12 Claims. (Cl. 51-145)
The present invention relates to a method and
apparatus for shaping the sides and back of a
curved heel such as a Cuban or French heel which
has a convex heel shaped contour with a some
5 what concave surface from ‘top to bottom of the
heel.
organized apparatus which comprises essentially
.
It is the purpose and object of the present in
vention to finish the extended side and rear sur
faces of such heels in a single operation, and in a
10 manner to insure the proper contour and ?nish
of the resulting surface.
block to the extent necessary to cause engage- '
ment with the back and opposite sides of the
block in the arc of oscillation. Referring to the
illustrated embodiment of the invention, it will
be observed that this method is carried on in an
1
For the accomplishment of this object it is pro
posed that the heel block shall be held in a pre
determined position and oscillated in a manner
' to bring both sides and back of the heel into the
cutting region which may lie generally midway
between the limits of the oscillating are which‘
coincides approximately with the center of the
heel. During this oscillatory ‘movement of the
20 heel the surface is engaged by an endless abra
sive belt or its equivalent, which is traveling past
the surface of the oscillating heel in a direction
lengthwise of the belt, which is generally convex
across its width and from top to bottom of the
b3 heel, and which angles lengthwise with respect to
1
the length of the heel in such a manner that as
a revolving turret to which a series of heel blocks
are clamped, a partially crossed endless belt
mounted adjacent the turret and designed to en
gage heel blocks successively as they are presented 10
to the run of the belt, and. means for imparting
an oscillation of desired amplitude‘ to- succes
sive heel blocks so long as they remain in abrasive
or cutting contact with the belt.
~
-
The machine may be mounted upon a baselll 15
having a hollow boss or standard I 2 projecting
upwardly therefrom. Within this standard is
mounted a stationary post It which rotatably sup
ports a turret table l6, having mounted about
its periphery a series of lower and driving clamps 20
i8. Above the turret table Nils supported a
rotary head 20 which is driven from and caused to
rotate with the table 16 through a series of posts
22, each mounted in the lower table-through a
boss 24, and each sliding at its upper end in a boss 25
26. Each post is surrounded by a coil supporting
spring 28', the springs being interposed between
the heel progresses lengthwise oi’ the belt the cut
ting region shifts its position with relation to
the width of the belt.
Still further features of the invention consist
in certain novel features of construction, combi
nations and arrangements of parts hereinafter
the driving clamps and holding or driven clamps
more fully described and claimed.
30. These driven clamps are mounted above the
In the accompanying drawings illustrating the
-5 preferred form of the invention, Fig. 1 is a side
3
C.
elevation of the machine designed for carrying
out the new method; Fig. 2 is a plan view of the
machine shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a‘ detail illus
trating an elevation partly in section of the
means for predetermining the location of the heel
with respect to the holding mechanism; Fig. 4 is
a detail illustrating the means for adjusting the
position of the abrasive belt and the relative lo
cation of the belt with respect to the heel; Fig.
5 is a detail illust ating the belt in engagement
with the heel and the supporting brush there
behind; and Fig. 6 is a plan “view of a somewhat
modi?ed form of mechanism employing two belts
to divide the shaping and ?nishing operation into
two steps.
As hereinbefore stated, the method contem
plates holding the bacl; or rear face of a heel
block in contact ‘with a moving belt surface which
is convex and traveling at an angle to the heel
block, .and while thus engaged oscillating the heel
the table and upper head, and serving topermit
vertical adjustment of the upper head ‘with re
spect to the table while the posts cause the two 30
to rotate in unison. The heels are held between
periphery of the upper table, and'are ‘normally
caused to engage with the heel blocks through 35
compression springs 32. They are elevated out
of engagement with the heel blocks by levers 34
pivoted at 36 to the head and connected to the
stem 38 of the clamping member by virtue of a
head 40.
The rear ends or tails of these levers 40
34 extend inwardly and are engaged by a sta- .
tionary face cam 42 which is mounted upon the
post It, and which serves as the head is rotated
therebeneath to successively elevate the holding
clamps and then suddenly permit the springs to
drive these clamps into holding engagement with
successive heels. The upper end of the post ‘It is
threaded at 44, and provided‘with an adjusting
nut or its equivalent 446, which permits adjust
ment of the stationary cam vertically, and at the 50
same time produces a like adjustment of the
rotary table 20, which is maintained in engage
ment with the under face ‘of the cam by the
springs 28, these springs preserving a, definite
relationship of the cam and rotary head, but
2
2,123,269
permitting combined adjustment of the two with
table I8.
respect to the turret table I8.
?xed sleeve bearing I04, which is mounted at
-.
_
Upon reference to Fig. 3, ‘the detailed con
struction of these features, together with the
mechanism for locating the heel properly be
tween _the clamps, will be seen. As will be ob
served, the turret table l8‘ carries at spaced
intervals on its periphery the driving clamps
which have been indicated generally at I8. ' Each
of these clamps consists of a rotary member 80
having a double pronged point 82, as seen in Fig.
l, for the purpose of driving and rotating the
heel blank. This surmounts a spindle 54 which
is provided at its lower end with a gear 58. This
gear is connected with an oscillating gear seg
ment 88 mounted on an arm 80, which is pivoted
for rotation about a stem 82, supported in the
table l8. The upper or holding clamp, as indi
cated, is connected at the outer end of the
elevating member 34, and is normally depressed
by the coiled spring 02 supported in a casing 84.
This clamp is merely provided with a dead center
80, and is intended through the action of the
spring to engage the upper end of the heel block
25
so
and through its pressure and impact force it into
a ?rm driving engagement with the lower clamp.
For the purpose of accurately positioning the
heel block with respect ‘to the holding clamps
and insure that the center of oscillation shall
properly coincide with the block and that it shall
be held in the proper vertical relationship the
front of the machine has attached to the base
I0 a supporting bracket 88 upon which is ad
justably mounted an arc-shaped slide 88 held
in adiustedposition by a holding screw 10. This
slide pivotally supports at ‘I2 a work support
14 which is provided with a floor ‘I8 over which
the heel slides in inverted position, a single side
guide 18. and a breast gauge 80. Both the side
40 guide and breast gauge have capacity for adjust
ment to properly locate the heel and center it'with
respect to the upper and lower clamps. Through
‘ the provision of this adjustment and the change
in angularity by.adjusting the arc slide 88, the
heel may be properly located.
-
In addition, the work support ‘I4 is resiliently
supported by a spring 82, which normally holds
it in a de?nite position predetermined by the
limiting stud 84 slotted at its lower end for the
reception of a pin mounted in the block 88 and
passing therethrough. The ?oor of the work sup
port is recessed at 88 to permit the lower clamp
to pass thereacross, and as the heel is inserted
in the work support manually and the turret con
tinuously revolves, the clamps are brought into
a central position at opposite ends of the heel
block and the upper clamp is suddenly released
by an abrupt step 90 upon the ?xed cam 42,
which allows the upper- clamp to be suddenly
depressed into contact with the block through
the compression spring 32. Due to the resilient
mounting of the work support 14, this motion
carries the heel block into holding and driving
engagement with the lower clamp, and the latter
65 is then carried oil! the work support between the
clamps, held thereby in a definite and predeter
mined relation.
'
‘
The lower turret, as shown in Fig. 2, is actu
ated from a driving motor 92 mounted upon the
70 base and driving a worm shaft 84 through a dou
This elongated hub rotates about a
its lower end upon the base I0. The table during
the rotary movement rests upon and is supported
at the upper end of the member I04.
As will be evident from an inspection of Figs. 1
to 3, inclusive, the lower or driving heel clamps
are oscillated during a portion of the revolving
movement ‘of the table, and to this end the lever
.or arm 80 carrying the gear segment 58 is formed
as part of a bell crank pivoted about the shaft
82 and having a second arm I08 provided with
a roll I08 in each case which rides in a ?xed
cam track IIO mounted on the base below the
rotary table I8, as indicated more particularly
in Figs. 2 and 3. During the major portion of the
rotation of the table, the cam track is inoperative
and causes no oscillation of the heel blank. When
that portion of the cam track is reached, however,
which governs the heel during the cutting opera 20
tion, a separate section of cam track H2 is piv
oted at H4 to the main section and is‘ oscillated
at its free end “8- through an arm II8 connected
to a crank I20. This crank,‘ as shown in Fig. 1,
is mounted at the upper end of a crank shaft I22 25
having a beveled driving gear I24 engaged by a
beveled gear I28'mounted on the worm shaft 94
(see Fig. 1). By virtue of this construction the
oscillation of the cam track about the center
II4 imparts oscillatory movement to the lower 30
heel clamp through the bell crank having the
arms“ and I08 and the cooperating gears, this
oscillation increasing in amplitude as the free end
of the swinging cam track is approached, and
reaching its maximum amplitude at approximate 35
ly the point of maximum engagement with the
cuttingbelt.
_
~
It will be observed from an inspection of Fig. 2
that beginning in the region indicated at I30
the oscillating cam track is distorted by employ‘ 40
ing an arc of the same radius with a different
center for the purpose of altering the path of
oscillation of the heel clamp. The purpose of
this construction is to insure that the heel shape
is presented at right angles to the belt at the 45
center of oscillation. To accomplish this result
and to compensate for the are through which the
heel moves, the cam track throughout the work
ing region consists of three arcs of the same radii
with differently located centers.
50
The description thus far has dealt with the
mounting and handling of the heel blank to be
operated upon. ' The actual cutting of the heel
blank is accomplished by an endless abrasive belt
which is constrained to move in a predetermined 65
path and‘ to present a cutting surface to the
blank designed to produce the proper curvature
thereon.
For this purpose, as indicated more
particularly in Figs. 2, 4 and 5, an endless belt
I40 having an abrasive or cutting surface is 60
mounted for rotation at opposite ends over a
driving pulley I42 and a driven pulley I44, the
axis of rotation of these pulleys being at right
angles to one another to produce a partially
crossed belt. The driving pulley I42 is directly
connected with a motor or prime mover I48,
whereas the driven pulley I44 is merely an idle
pulley. As indicated more particularly in Fig.
4, the motor, belt and pulleys are mounted upon
upon reference to Fig. 1, will be seen as mounted
upon the lower end of an elongated cylindrical
a supporting stand I48 as a unit. This stand 70
is in turn adjustably supported upon a base I50.
This base is capable of adjustment upon a fixed
base I52 through adjusting screws I54 to move
the belt unit bodily to and from the periphery of
78 hub I02 attached at its upper end to the turret
the rotary table. In addition, the support I48 76
ble belt 88. The shaft 94 is provided with a worm
88, which meshs with a worm gear I00, which
3
2,123,269
is connected to the under support I50 through a
diagonal link I56 connected to the lower and
upper supports respectively at I50 and I60. An
adjustable post I62 extends through the link
and upper support, and bears upon the lower
support to vary the elevation of the support I 48
with respect to the support I50, whereas a sec
ond adjustable post I64 is threaded in the upper
support and bears upon the link I56 to vary, as
ll) will be evident, the inclination of the upper sup
port with respect to the lower support.
The
driven pulley I44 is mounted on a shaft I66, and
-may be adjusted toward and from the driving
end to maintain proper belt tension through the
slide I60. The working run of the belt after
leaving the driving pulley I42 is engaged by an
idler pulley I10 having a ?at periphery, whereas
the periphery of the driven pulley I44 is convex.
In addition to this construction for supporting
the belt, the belt is engaged immediately behind
the working region by a stiff supporting brush
I12, convex in width to maintain the convexity of
,the belt, and mounted in a head I14 which is
supported at the upper end of a bracket I16 piv
oted at I18 and normally forced against‘ the run
of the belt by a spring I80 to preserve a constant
resilient pressure upon this portion of the belt.
As indicated more particularly in Figs. 2 and.
4, the oscillating heel blank is presented to the
30 belt in such a manner that the latter slightly
angles thereacross rather than moving in a path
normal to the length of the heel from top to
bottom. As the area of engagement between the
abrasive belt and the heel blank during which
oscillation occurs occupies some portion of the
turret revolution, it will be evident that as the
heel blank progresses throughout the working
region due to turret revolution the cutting re
gion in a like manner progresses upwardly
40 throughout the surface of the heel or from top
to bottom of the inverted heel. During this
time the abrasive belt is maintained with the
necessary convex contour, and the heel is oscil
lated with an amplitude sufficient to properly
45 surface-?nish the rear and sides of the blank.
The combination of these movements results in
an accurately and well ?nished heel blank with
a surface free from ribs or lines.
In the modi?cation, a plan view of which is
50 indicated in Fig. 6, the operation of the machine
is identical, the heels being successively mounted
60
70
76
the case with the main operation.
In all other
respects both the operation and the mechanism
are the same.
What is claimed is: Y
>
.
l. The method of shaping heels, which com 10
prises the presentation of a heel shape with the
rear portion in contact with a moving abrasive
belt surface and traversing the heel shape
lengthwise of the belt while passing the belt,
from one plane into a second plane disposed
angularly thereto, and while so traversed oscil
lating the heel about an axis.
2. The method of shaping hceis. which con
sists in presenting the heel with the rearmost ‘
portion in contact with a'moving abrasive belt
surface and traversing the heel shape length
wise of the surface, causing the surface to pre
sent a generally convex cross-section to the heel
and a twist lengthwise during the working re
gion'by passing from one plane into another
angularly disposed thereto, and while so trav~
ersed oscillating the heel. shape about an axis
to engage diilerent portions transversely of the
belt.
\
3. The method of shaping heels,‘ which com- :‘
prises presenting a heel blank to a moving abra
sive belt surface and traversing the heel shape
lengthwise thereof, the belt supported to make a
partial turn in passing between two planes dis
posed at a 90° angle, and while so traversed oscil- ‘
lating the heel blank about an axis to progres
sively engage different portions along the width
of the belt.
4. Apparatus for shaping heels, comprising an
abrasive belt, means for supporting the belt to 40
cause the working portion to make a partial turn,
means for supporting a heel blank in a prede
termined position with the rearmost portion in
contact with the working portion of the belt,
means for traversing the heel-supporting means 45
lengthwise of the belt the heel-supporting means
having capacity for oscillation about an axis.
5. Apparatus for shaping heels, comprising an
abrasive belt, means for supporting the‘belt to
cause the working portion to make a partial turn, U
means for supporting a heel blank in a predeter
mined position with the rearmost portion in con
tact with the working portion of the belt, means
for traversing the heel-supporting means length
of operation, however, the actual cutting action wise of the belt and means for oscillating the heel
is divided into two steps in order that a greater supporting means through an arc of predeter
cutting action may be produced at the back of mined extent.
6. Apparatus for shaping heels, comprising an
the heel if this be necessary because of the
grain or other factors. From an inspection of abrasive belt, means for supporting the belt to
cause the working portion to make a partial turn, 60
this modi?cation it will be evident that two cut
ting belts are provided instead of one, these means for supporting a heel blank in a predeter
mined position with the rearmost portion in con
belts being arranged at 90° to produce a two
step cutting operation upon successive heels. tact with the working portion of the belt, means
The structural arrangement and the type of belt, for traversing the heel-supporting means length
may be identical with that already described. wise of the belt means for oscillating the heel 65
The heel may also be oscillated through the same supporting means through an arc of predeter
crank I20 engaging with the swinging cam mined extent, and ?exible means for causing the
track II2 pivoted at II4. In addition to this working portion of the belt to present a convex
section of cam track a second and preceding contour in cross-section to the heel blank.
'1. Apparatus for shaping heels, comprising an 70
section of swinging track I82 is pivoted at I04,
and‘ is preferably operated through a driving endless abrasive belt, a prime mover for driving
tooth engagement I06 with the short tail of the the belt, a support for the belt and prime mover, .
means for adjusting the support together with
cam track II2. Due to this method the amplithe belt and prime mover both vertically and an
tude of oscillation of the preceding or addi
tional track I02 is much less than that of the gularly, and a heel-supporting member designed 75
upon the rotating turret table and moved into
engagement with an operating belt, during which
time the heel blank is oscillated. In this type
55
main track, and will serve to impart a slight
preliminary oscillation to the heel blanks, the
amplitude of which will cause the cutting to
be done at the back of the heel rather than
throughout the back and sides of the heel, as is
4
2,123,269
to present a heel blank in predetermined relation
to the working portion of the belt.
8. Apparatus for shaping heels, comprising a
rotary table, a series of heel supports positioned
tation of the table, means for causing the belts
during the working range to pass through
on the table, means for rotating the table, an
endless abrasive belt, means for supporting and
by an abrasive belt.
operating the belt adjacent the periphery of the
heel support, means for clamping a heel blank to
table with a changing plane of movement to en
gage and operate upon successive heels presented
thereto by the table, and means for successively
oscillating heels when in contact with the abrasive
the support in predetermined position, an endless
abrasive belt engaging with the rear portion of
a heel clamped to the work support, means for 10
causing the belt to change its plane oi! move
belt in the region of changing plane.
9. Apparatus for shaping heels, comprising a
rotary table, a series of heel supports positioned
ment while in contact with the heel means for
15 on the table, means for rotating the table, an
endless abrasive belt, means for supporting and
operating the belt adjacent the periphery of the
table to engage and operate upon successive heels
presented thereto by the table, means for suc
cessively oscillating the heels when in contact with
the abrasive belt, and means for automatically
modifying the path of oscillation of the heels
during the travel thereof.
10. Apparatus for shaping heels, comprising a
rotary table, a series of heel supports on the table,
means for clamping individual heel blanks to the
supports, a plurality of endless abrasive belts
positioned adjacent the table and designed to
successively engage a heel blank during the ro
changing planes oi’ movement and means for os
cillating each heel blank during its engagement
11. Apparatus for shaping heels, comprising a
oscillating the work support while in contact with
the belt, and a convex brush supporting the abra
sive belt and designed to cause the belt to present
a convex surface to the heel when in engagement
therewith.
_
' 12. Apparatus for shaping heels, comprising a
rotary table, a series of heel supports on the table,
means for clamping heel blanks to the individual 20
supports, a stationary cam track and cam lever
connected with each support and operating in the
track, means for oscillating a portion of the cam
track to impart oscillation to the heel support,
and an abrasive belt designed to engage a heel
blank while so oscillated.
ARTHUR F. BALL.
GEORGE A. CRAIG.
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