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Патент USA US2123272

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July 12, 1938.
F. E. BERTRAND‘
'
2,123,272}
SOLE ROUNDING MACHINE
_
Filed Dec. 15, 1936
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
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|-_ E_ BERT-RAND
2,123,272
SOLE ROUNDING MACHINE
Filed Dec. 15, 1936
2 Shee‘ts-Shéet 2v
Patented July 12, 1938
2,123,272
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,123,272
SOLE ROUNDING MACHINE
Frederic E. Bertrand, Lynn, Mass, assignor to
United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Paterson,
N. J., a corporation of New Jersey
Application December 15, 1936, Serial No. 115,979
18 Claims. (01. 12525)
This invention relates to machines for rounding shown herein as mountedupon ‘posts, by (universal
shoe-soles by cutting through or incising sole
joints to permit their tilting. The action of ac
material. It is particularly applicable to appa
commodation of the clamps to departures of the
ratus whichsimultaneously performs operations
5, upon material for the production of both outsoles
and insoles.
In Letters Patent of the United States No.
2,057,665, Bertrand, October 20, 1936, is disclosed
a machine of the well-known Planet type, in
10 which there are two knives traveling under the
guidance of two separate‘ patterns, one of these
knives dividing sole-stock to form an outsole and
the other cutting partially through said stock
Within the area formed by the outsole-knife to
5 outline an insole, which may later be separated
from the outsole. It will be evident that the drag
of these two knives through the stock will apply
a very substantial force, tending to displace the
workbetween the members which clamp it. The
proper holding'of the work is rendered more di?i
cult by the fact that not only is the sole-material
irregular in thickness, so a pattern forced against
it Will contact with limited areas only, but also
that the patterns themselves, commonly of wood,
.25 become distorted, causing an uneven engagement
l ,30
with them of the clamping elements of the ma
chine and by them with the work. .Under such
conditions, and wherever the sole-material is sub-'
jected to heavy forces of a similar character, an
object of my invention is to so clamp the ‘work
that it will be securely held for the operations
upon it. Inaccomplishing this object, I associate
with each of opposite carriers forepart and heel
end clamping members arranged for engagement
.35
with one sideof an interposed sole-pattern, each
of these clamping members being mounted (upon
the carrier for a universal tilting movement. It
will be seen that the members thus arranged may
accommodate themselves to wide departures from
40 parallel planes of the surfaces of both the sole
material and the patterns. Consequently, there
is assured practically complete engagement of
the entire ‘clamping surfaces with the patterns,
while saidpatterns are forced into effective con
45 tact with the material in spite of'irregularities.
The work is thereby securely held against even
the displacing tendency of two knives when these
are used with ‘both outsole- and insole-patterns.
The clamping members, corresponding to the
50 Planet rounder, are arranged one above the other,
the lower and upper being in pairs for engagement
with the outsole- and insole-patterns, respective
ly. The members of each pair are spaced from
each other for engagement with the foreparts
‘1.55 ‘and heel-ends ‘of the soles‘ being cut. They ‘are
work- and pattern-surfaces from parallelism may
be increased by arranging a lever or other mem- ‘_
her by which one pair of said clamps is carried,
so it may rock. ‘ There is thus provided a bodily
movement of self-adjustment of the clamps in
addition to that about their universal mountings.
The upper posts may have yieldable means for
separably retaining the clamps against displace
ment. The carrier and each clamppreferably has
a pin and an opening receivingsaid pin to limit
the turning movement of the clamp upon the post,
and one of the pins may be provided with means 15
for separably retaining the pattern. By employ
ing in the clamps a plurality of the openings just
mentioned, said clamps may be differently posi
tioned upon the posts. By this arrangement, the
. clamps may be reversed, so opposite ends may be 20
utilized for, soles. of different sizes. Apart from
the use of the clamping members in opposite pairs,
there is believed to be patentable novelty in the
manner in which I mount the individual mem
bers for adjustment upon their supports or car 25
riers. In the support are ways along which a’
slide is movable. A screw may have its head situ
ated in the ways and extending through the slide
to receive a nut acting against the slide to ?x it
adjustably upon the support.
The outer end of l 30
the nut is engaged by the clamp, preferably
through ,a universal joint. An. extended end of
the screw may serve to retain a pattern in correct
relation to the clamp, and about this end, the
pattern is preferably reversible, being held in
either of two operating positions ‘by a pin extend
ing from the slide into one of two openings in the
‘clamp. This adapts the clamp for the previously
mentioned use in cutting soles of different sizes.
One of the several ‘possible embodiments of my 40
invention is illustrated in the accompanying
drawings.
Here,
‘
Fig. 1 shows my improved rounding machine in
side elevation;
Fig. 2 is an enlarged, top-plan view of the upper
pattern and ‘its contacting clamping members;
Fig. 3, an enlarged, broken, side elevation of the
patterns, clamps and elements more closely asso
ciated therewith, and
Fig. 4, a transverse section on the line IV—-IV of 50
Fig. 3.
Generally, the structure of the machine is as
that of the patent already referred to- A frame
Ill carries a stationary support or carrier l2, while
an overhanging
frame-arm
M
has movable 55
2.
2,123,272
through it a vertical plunger [6, upon the lower
extremity of which is mounted a pressure-head or
with the similarly formed upper clamp, is con
siderably reduced transversely to avoid interfer
carrier 25. The support I2 lies above a rotatable
table 2 l, which bears actuating mechanism for a
revoluble outsole-rounding knife 22 and a revolu
ence with the cutting mechanism of the ma
chine, as this passes along the inner side of a
ble insole-rounding knife 24.
The knives 22 and
24 are arranged under the control of two patterns,
to be later described, to out along two lines a
sheet of sole-material held between the patterns.
10 The knife 22 severs the sheet to produce an out
sole, while the knife 24 incises the upper side of
the sheet along the contour of an insole.
Taking up the elements more particularly in~
volved in the present invention, the support 12
15 has at its upper side horizontal ways 26, along
which may be shifted the heads, of two upwardly
extending screws 28, 28. Each screw passes
freely through a mounting-block or slide 3!]
guided in the upper portion of the ways. Upon
20 the threaded portion of each screw is a nut 32,
which, when tightened, draws both the screw
head and block toward the support. When the
nut is loosened, the block may be positioned as
desired along the support and be secured by
2.5 screwing down said nut. Each screw is shown as
provided with a reduced, upper, cylindrical ex
tremity 34, below which, about the upper end of
the nut, is a convex surface 36 having the form
of a portion of a sphere. From each block 30, at
39 the outer side of its screw 28 rises a pin or pro
jection 38 extending considerably higher than the
end 34 of the screw. Separately borne upon the
surfaces 36 of the respective nuts 32, 32 are a
forepart-clamp 40 and a heel-end-clamp 42. The
35 central portion of the work-engaging face of each
clamp is shown as depressed, leaving a rela
tively narrow rim or contact-face 43 which gives
more effective engagement with irregular work
surfaces than would a continuous face. In each
clamp is an opening 44 to receive the screw-end
34, and about this opening is a partly spherical
surface 46, complemental to the surface 36 upon‘
the‘nut. These co-operating surfaces furnish a
ball-joint about which each clamp may have a
shank-portion of the sole. The pins 38 are of
sufficient length to project substantially above
the clamps. Here, by entrance into openings 52,
they receive and hold in a substantially de?nite
position an outsole-pattern 54. This pattern is
commonly formed of ply-wood and at its periph~ 10
ery guides the knife 22 in the cutting of an out
sole. There is preferably a slight clearance be~
tween the pins 38 and the openings 52, this per
mitting the pattern to tilt somewhat with the
clamps to accommodate itself to the sole-ma 15
terial with which it contacts.
In most particulars, the upper clamping means
resembles the‘lower. A forepart-clamp 6B and a
heel-end-clamp 62 act against a sole-pattern 64,
employed to guide the insole-knife 24 and borne 20
by the head 28. This head is preferably in the
form of a lever, being pivotally mounted between
its ends at 66 upon the plunger IS. The work
engaging faces 43 of these clamps are normally
held in va substantially horizontal plane by 2.5
springs 68, 68 interposed between the head and
the plunger.
The 7 two clamps, considered to
gether, are thus capable of adapting themselves
by bodily oscillation to differences in thickness of
the stock and patterns longitudinally of the soles
being cut. The only other departures from the
arrangement of the lower portion of the clamp
ing mechanism involves the manner of retaining
the clamps 60 and B2 and the pattern 64 in place
against the force of gravity. The extended ends 35
34 of the screws 28 and the lower portion of the
pins 38 are longitudinally divided at T0 and have
rounded, ball-ends 12. The diameters of these
ends are such that their halves will be urged
toward each other when the openings in the 40
clamps and pattern are forced over them, they
expanding against the walls of the openings to
secure the engaged elements in place.
The operator, in using the machine, applies
universal tilting movement, permitted by an
the pairs of clamps 4U, 42, and 60, 62 about the -
excess in the diameter of the opening 44 over
that of the screw-end 34 but limited-in extent
retaining screw-portions 34, with the clamp-ends
and preventing lateral displacement of the clamp
upon the screw by contact of the wall of the open
ing with the screw-end. Each clamp is further
retained in position laterally and prevented from
turning horizontally upon its post through more
than a very limited amount by the pin 38, which
is received in either of two openings 48, 48 in the
clamp. About the pins, the openings give suffi
cient clearance to allow the desired tilting upon
the ends of the nuts. Reference to Fig. 3 of the
drawings will show that one end of the forepart
clamp 45} and of the heel-end-clamp 42 is farther
from the opening 44 than is the other, and that
the pin-openings 48, 48 are equally spaced from
each opening 44. In consequence of this, either
clamp may be applied to its support with either
extremity outward, so the clamping mechanism
is arranged to carry the area of contact with
sole-patterns of different sizes close to the ends
of such patterns without being outside the pe
ripheries. The extremity of each clamp may
generally correspond in form to the portion of the
sole-pattern with which it is to co-operate, but
the greater extension of one end beyond the
mounting than the other better adapts the clamp
for use with different widths of toes of the soles
being cut. The longer portion of the heel-end~
clamp at 50, as appears in Fig. 2 in connection
outward which'most closely'conform to the width
of sole being rounded, and places patterns 54
and 64 upon the lower and upper pairs of pins
38. ‘ The blocks 30 will have been adjusted upon 50
the‘ support l2 and the head 20 to' agree with
the length of the sole to be cut and to register
with each other in vertical pairs. The patterns
respectively correspond in contour to the outsole
periphery to be severed and the insole-periphery 55
to‘be incised. Then, a piece S of sole-stock is
laid upon the pattern 54, the head 2|] at that
time being elevated. 'Depression of an unillus
trated treadle lowers the plunger S6 to force the
pattern 64 against the upper face of the stock 60
and to ?x it in place upon the pattern 54. In
considering the application of pressure, it should
be remembered that in the elements which come
between the clamps, there may be many irregu
larities differing in character; the sole-stock is 65
not uniform in thickness, and the wood pat
terns become warped and distorted, so they wind
and differ in thickness between various portions
of their opposite faces. Obviously, the fact that
there are two patterns between the clamps as
well. as the stock, all subject to irregularities,
greatly increases the difficulty in obtaining ef
fectively ?rm retention. The capacity for self
adjustment of .the clamping members and pat
terns to such irregularities creates contact over
is
2,123,272
practically the entire area of their contact-sur
faces. For differences in thickness, either .of the
stock or of both patterns, tending to cause a
longitudinal inclination between the opposite‘ ex
tremities of the sole-area, the rocking of the
head 20 about the pivot 66 compensatesr For
more localized departures from longitudinal par
allelism and for transverse differences, the uni
versal tilting‘ of the clamps. about the ends 36
10 of the mounting-posts, furnished .by the nuts 32
with their ‘screws 28, causes them to arrange
themselves in the best relation to the pattern
surfaces with which they contact. ‘The trans
verse tilting of the clamps will also carry the
15 patterns with ‘them to some extent, thereby al
lowing said patterns to follow any lack of paral
lelism between the opposite faces of the stock.
The effect of all this will be to produce ‘over
practically’ the entire work-engaging pattern
a
surfaces a uniform pressure which will effectively
hold the work against heavy displacing forces.
Having described my invention, what I claim
as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent
of the United States is:
25
1. In a sole-rounding machine, opposite car- I
riers, and a forepart and a heel-end clamping
member upon each carrier arranged for engage
ment with one side of an interposed sole-pat
tern, each clamping member being mounted upon
30 the carrier for a universal tilting movement.
2. In a sole-rounding machine, opposite car
riers, one of the carriers being pivoted between
its ends to rock, and a forepart and a heel-end
clamping member upon each carrier arranged
35 for engagement with one side of an interposed
each clamping member being
mounted upon the carrier for universal tilting
, sole-pattern,
movement.
I
3. In a sole-rounding machine, opposite car
40 riers, two posts spaced from each other upon
each carrier, and forepart-clamps and heel-end
clamps mounted upon the posts» of each carrier,
there being a universal joint between each clamp
and its mounting-post.
4. In a sole-rounding machine, upper and
lower carriers, two posts spaced from each other
upon each carrier, and forepart-clamps and heel
end-clamps mounted upon the posts of each car-‘
rier, there being a universal joint between each
60 clamp and its mounting-post, each upper post
having yieldable means for separably' retaining
its clamp against downward displacement.
5. In a sole-rounding machine, opposite car
riers, two posts spaced from each other upon
55 each carrier, and forepart-clamps and heel-end
clamps mounted upon the posts of each carrier,
there being a universal joint between each clamp
and its mounting-post, each clamp and its car
there being a universal joint between each clamp
and its mounting-‘post, each carrier having‘ a
pin and each clamp an opening receiving said
pin, the pin upon one carrier having means for
separably retaining a pattern upon the clamps. 5
8. In a sole-rounding machine, a lower sup
port, an upper pressure-head including a rock
ing lever, a forepart-clamp and a heel-end
clamp spaced from each other upon the support,
a. forepart-clamp and a heel-end-clamp spaced 10
from each other upon the lever, all the clamps
being mounted to rock upon the support and
lever, and a pattern engaged by each pair of
clamps.
9. In a sole-rounding machine, a lower sup 15
port, an upper pressure-head, a forepart-clamp
and a heel-end-clamp spaced from each other
upon the support, a forepart-clamp and a heel
end-clamp spaced from each other upon ' the
head, all the clamps being mounted to rock upon
the support and head, a pattern engaged by each
pair of clamps, an outsole-knife guided by the
lower pattern, and an insole-knife guided by the
upper pattern.
10. In a sole-rounding machine, a lower sup 25
port, an upper pressure-head, a pair of posts
projecting from the support, a pair of posts pro
jecting from the head, each post being provided
with a rounded surface, and a clamp mounted
upon each post and having a complemental sur 30
face for engagement with the rounded surface
thereof.
'
.
11. In a sole-rounding machine, a lower sup
port, an upper pressureahead, a pair of posts pro
jecting from the support, a pair of posts project 35
ing from the head, each post being provided with
a rounded surface and the upper posts being
provided with enlarged divided ends, and a clamp
mounted upon each post and having a comple
mental surface for engagement with the rounded 4 D
surface thereof, the upper clamps being retained
against downward displacement by the ends of
the posts.
12. In a sole-rounding machine, a lower sup
port, an upper‘ pressure-head, a pair of posts 45
projecting from the support, a pair of posts pro
jecting from the head, each post being provided
with a rounded surface, a clamp mounted upon
each post and having a complemental surface for
engagement with the rounded surface thereof, 50
and pairs of pins projecting from the support
and head through openings in the respective
clamps, the openings giving clearance between
the pins and clamps.
13. In a sole-rounding machine, a lower sup 65
port, an upper pressure-head, a pair of posts
projecting from the support, a pair of posts pro
jecting from the head, each post being provided
rier having a pin and an opening receiving said “ with a rounded surface, a clamp mounted upon
60 pin to limit the turning movement of the clamp
upon its post while permitting it to tilt upon the
universal joint.
'
6. In a sole-rounding machine, opposite car
riers, two posts spaced from each other upon
each post and having a complemental surface for 60
engagement with the rounded surface thereof,
pairs of pins projecting from the support and
head through openings in the respective clamps,
each carrier, and forepart-clamps and heel-end
clamps mounted upon the posts of each carrier,
there being a universal joint between each clamp
and its mounting-post, each clamp and its car
a pin upon the head being provided with a ball
end divided longitudinally of the pin, and a pat 65
tern engaged by each pair of pins, the upper
rier having a pin and a plurality of openings to
pin.
receive said pin to differently position said
14. In a, sole-rounding machine, a support pro 70
vided with ways, a slide movable upon the sup
port and guided in the ways, a screw extending
clamp.
'7. In a sole-rounding machine, opposite car
riers, two posts spaced from each other upon
each carrier, forepart-clamps and heel-end
75 clamps mounted upon the posts of each carrier,
pattern being retained by the divided end of the
through the slide and having a head movable in
the ways, a nut movable upon the screw against
the slide to fix said slide .adjustably upon the 75
2,123,272
support, and a clamp engaging the outer end of
the nut.
15. In a sole-rounding machine, a support pro
vided with ways, a slide movable upon the sup
port, a screw extending through the slide and
having a head movable in the ways, a nut mov
port, a screw extending through the slide and
having a head movable in the ways, a nut movable
upon the screw against the slide to ?x said slide
adjustably upon the support, and a clamp engag
ing the outer end of the nut, said clamp extend
ing for different distances from the screw longi
able upon the screw against the slide to ?x said
tudinally of the sole and being reversible in posi
‘slide adjustably upon the support, and a clamp
tion upon said screw.
engaging the outer end of the nut, there being
18. In a sole-rounding machine, a support pro
vided with ways, a slide movable upon the sup
10 a universal joint between the nut and clamp.
16. In a sole~rounding machine, a support pro
vided with ways, a slide movable upon the sup
port and guided in the ways, a screw extending
through the slide and having a head movable in
15 the ways, the screw being provided with an end
extending beyond the thread, a nut movable upon
the screw against the slide to ?x said slide adjust
ably upon the support, and a clamp engaging the
outer end of the nut and retained by the extended
20 end of the screw.
17. In a sole-rounding machine, a support pro
vided with ways, a slide movable upon the sup
10
port, a screw extending through the slide and
having a head movable in the ways, a nut mov
able upon the screw against the slide to ?x said
slide adjustably upon the support, a clamp en
gaging the outer ,end of the nut, said clamp 15
extending for different distances from the screw
longitudinally of the sole and being reversible in
position upon said screw, there being openings in
the clamp equally spaced from the screw at its
opposite sides, and a pin projecting from the 20
slide and arranged to enter either clamp-opening.
FREDERIC E. BERTRAND.
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