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Патент USA US2123294

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July 12, 1938.
2,123,294
E. L. WIEGAND
ELECTRIC HEATING APPARATUS
Filed Aug. 27, 1936
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ATTORNEYS
July 12, 1938._
E‘ |__ wlEGAND
2,123,294
ELECTR I C HEATING APPARATUS
Filed Aug. 27, 1936
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Patented July 12, 1938
2,123,294
UNITED ‘ STATES
PATENT orrlcs
2.123.294
ELECTRIC HEATING APPARATUS
Edwin L. Wiegand. Pittsburgh. Pa.
Application August 2'1, 1936, Serial No. 98,123
19 Claims.
My invention relates to electric heating appa
ratus, and more particularly to so-called “shoes"
for applying heat and pressure to textiles and
the like, ‘as for example in ironing and pressing
5 machines and similar apparatus, and the prin
cipal object of my invention is to provide new
and improved constructions of these types. In
the drawings accompanying this speci?cation,
and forming a part of this application, I have
10 shown, for purposes of illustration, certain forms
which my invention may assume.
In these
drawings:
'
-
Figure 1 is a cross-section, on the line l—| of
Figure 2, of an ironing machine shoe unit, em
15 bodying my invention, certain accessory parts
Figure 2 is a plan view of the shoe unit shown
Figure 3 is a cross-section, on the line 3—3 of
20 Figure 4, looking in the direction of the arrows,
of an ironing machine shoe unit, such as shown
in Figure 1, but with certain accessory parts
'
‘
Figure 4 is a plan view of the apparatus shown
25 in Figure 3, a part of the supporting means of
the shoe being omitted for the sake of clear
Figure 5 is a side elevation of the
apparatus 7
_
Figure 6 is a fragmentary sectional view taken
on the line 6—6 of Figure 3, looking in the direc
tion of the arrows, and
Figure 7 is a cross-section of another embodi
ment of an ironing shoe unit, embodying my in
vention.
'
.
Referring more particularly to the embodi
ment of my invention shown in Figures 1 and 2,
there is here shown an ironing machine shoe
unit which includes a relatively heavy metallic
40
portions (not visible) in like manner bent around
the longitudinal end margins of the insulating
material, so that, as shown, the upper surface
of the heating element I2 is free of any sheath
means.
The heating element I2 is also of ob- 15
and desirably approximately as long as the back
constructed that its cross-sectional form is gen- ~
erally arcuate, and of such arcuate radius that 20
it may be disposed concentric with the backing
plate II. The heating element I2 is here shown
as of less transverse width than the backing
plate II, and so disposed that one of its longi
tudinal margins approximately registers with one 25
of the longitudinal margins, |9,_of the backing
plate ll.
ness,
shown in Figure 4,
more or less of the outside surface of the re-.
fractory insulating material M, as may be de- 5
sired. In the instance shown, the sheath means
l5 has a portion l6 covering the entire under
side of the refractory insulating material It, and
also has portions l1, l8 bent around the longi
tudinal margins of the insulating material, and 1°
ing plate II, and, like the backing plate, is so
in Figure 1,
30
be of any othersuitable form. The heating ele
ment l2 also desirably includes sheath means l6,
of sheet metal, the sheath means l5 covering
long rectangular shape when viewed in plan
which may be provided, being omitted,
included,
(CL 219-49) .
backing plate ll, desirably but not necessarily
made of rolled steel. The backing plate II is
here shown as of oblong rectangular shape, when
viewed in ‘plan. and as bent to arcuate form in
transverse cross-section, so that, as here shown,
the outer and inner surfaces thereof de?ne parts
.
Interposed between the backing plate II and
the heating element I2 is a layer of heatinsu
lating material 26 which is desirably made of a 30
sheet of material comprising felted asbestos
fibres, but may be made of any other suitable
material.
The heating element I2 is here shown as in
cluding a plurality of terminals, here shown as 35
two, 2|, 22, having heads 23, 24 to which termi
nals the resistor I3 is connected. The heads 23,
24 are embedded in the refractory insulating ma
terial Hi. The shanks of the terminals 2|, 22
have threaded ends 25, 26, and the shanks extend 40
in a generally radial outward direction through
openings 21, 23 in the heat insulating layer 20,
and through openings in electrically insulating
bushings 29, 33 disposed in openings 3|, 32 in
the backing plate II. ‘ Threaded onto the ends 45
of concentric cylindrical surfaces. Disposed at
of the terminals 2|, 22 are nuts 33, 34, each of
one side of the backing plate II, in this instance which may be set up against a respective pair of
at the concave side, is an electrical resistance metallic washers 35, 36, the upper one, 35, being
heating element l2. The heating element I 2 . smaller than the lower one, 36, and the lower one
may be of any suitable form but for best results being insulated from the backing plate vll by 50
means of an insulating washer 31. The nuts 33,
is desirably of the form which includes a re
34 need not be set up very tight against the
sistor I3 embedded in compacted granular re
fractory heat conducting electrical insulating washers 35, 36 for the reason that the terminals
material It. The resistor is here shown as made 2|, 22 are‘not relied on to hold the heating ele
in the form of a helically coiled wire, but may
ment l2 to the backing plate II, as will appear.
55
' 9,128,294
The heat-applying or ironing surface of the
ironing shoe I I is provided by the under face of
a metallic member 38. The member 88 may be
made of steel _suitably plated, or it may be made
of steel with a facing provided by a sheet of stain
.les steel, ‘nickel; or any other metal .especially'
adapted to ironing machine shoes and capable of
receiving and retaining a highly polished smooth
finish, or it may bemade entirely of stainless steel
38 is here shown as defining a curve of ogee'
and the other part, 40, of which extends from the
would be cooperable with a plane pressure re
oeiving part instead of a roll I00.
‘
shoe requires no heavy part between the ironing
surface of the shoe and the heating element, but,
‘on the contrary,. only. a thin face vmember 38,
high speed heating, and more e?icient utilization
of heat is attained. The speed of heating is still
suitable for such service. 'The face member _28,
whether made of plated metal, laminated metal,
or entirely of suitable facing metal, may be made
relatively ‘thin. The face portion of the member
left hand margin of the heating element I2 to
and beyond the longitudinal margin 4| of the
backing'plate vII. The blank from which the
face member 38 is made has its corners suitably
a
may be of generally plane form, in which case it
Since with my invention an ironing machine
10 or other non-corrodible alloy metal or other metal
form, one part, 39, of .which fits the portion ii of
the sheath means I5 of the heating element I2,
34 in contact with the roll IIIO. Obviously the
face member 35 is kept in good contact with the
heating element I2, and the face member is ap
plicable, in good uniform contact with the roll
I". It will of course be evident that the shoe Ill
further enhanced by the use of a heating element
such as hereinbefore described. Moreover, heat _
distribution may be efi'ectively controlled in. any '
desired manner, by suitable distribution of the
resistor It. For example, the coils I3a in the
leading or toe portion of the heating element I2, 20
and the coils l3b in the trailing or heel portion '
of 'the element may be disposed closer to each
cut away and is of sufficient size, so that a por
other than the other coils of the resistor.
tion 42 of the face member 35 may be _bent to Furthermore, coils may be'omitted at one sec
-form a rear wall for the heel of the shoe II, the ' tion of the heating element and included at an
free upper marginal portion 43 of ‘this rearwall
42 being clinched over the top face of the backing
other.- For example, at'the section shown in
Figure 1 coils which would occupy the positions
plate ‘II. The longitudinal free ends 44,. 45 of . I30 are omitted, and this omission may extend
the face member are similarly bent and clinched from the center line l--I to a. desired section line '
over the longitudinal ends of the backing plate I I
(see Figure 2). The free end of the toe portion
of the face member 34 is made sufficiently‘ long
so that a portion, 45, thereof may be doubled
back on the left hand end of the portion 40, and
.a. Li
the free end of the portion 46 is so bent that it
IIII, here shown as halfway between the line I-I ,
and the left hand end of the shoe. Between the
line "II and the left-hand end of the shoe still
more coils may be omitted, such for example as
coils which would occupy the position Kid. On
the other hand, between the line I--I and the '
bears against the top surface of the backing plate ' right hand end of the shoe all coils may be in
II. The bending of the face member, somewhat cluded. It will be evident that, with this dis
in box fashion, as hereinbefore described, has the tribution of coils, the part of the shoe between
effect of stiffening the construction.
.
Tedious clamping operations, as with screws
and bolts, are avoided, since the parts need only
be laid together and the margins of the face
member crimped over the backing plate, as described, by means of a punch press.
It will now be. apparent that further among the
advantages of my invention is the elimination of
the lines I-I and IIII will be ?anked on the left
and right by sections having respectively lower 40
and higher general temperatures, with re
spectively lower and higher temperatures cen
' . trally of a cross-section from toe to heel of the
shoe. This illustration is given merely by way of
example of one desirable form of distribution.
It will of course be evident to those skilled in
any necessity for the fasteningof clamping bolts the art that the resistor may be divided into any
to the face member 38, and as a result of that ~ desired number of parts with suitable terminals,
the member 38 may be made relatively thin. In for connection of the parts either in series or
the prior art much di?lculty has been experienced parallel, or in series parallel.
.
'
50
in attempts to fasten clamping bolts to the face‘
One way to provide for the mounting or sup
member of‘ the shoe.- When that was done the porting of the shoe is to provide the backing plate
face member had to be ‘thicker than was other
with threaded holes for cooperation with any
wise feasible or desirable, and even with a suf
suitable mounting means. Another way is to
?ciently thick face member to justify the fasten
weld brackets to the backing plate. Other ways 55
_ ing of_ clamping bolts by welding, the ironing or ‘will readily suggest themselves.
active face'of the. shoe usually became badly
The'threaded holes 41, 48 are here shown as
warped. or buckled from the local heat of the‘ made in bosses 49, 50 pressed up from the metal
welding operations. . This risk is entirely‘ ob
_of the backing plate I]. An illustrative mount
viated with my present invention.
‘
ing.means cooperating with- the threaded holes 00
_ It will be evidentfr'om the foregoing that the ' 41, 45, is shown in the drawings, .in Figures 3
face member 38 serves various functions, among through 6. There are shown a pair of generally
others; it provides a toe. for the shoe III; it pro
vides the ironing surface of the shoe; it serves to
hold itself and the backing [plate mutually as
sembled; and, in cooperation with the backing
plate, it serves to hold the heating element in
assembled relation with the otherparts.
It will be evident that the shoe I0 is adapted
to cooperate with ‘a drum or roll, of an ironing
machine, indicated fragmentarily by the dot-and
dash _line Ilill. When pressure is applied to the
backing plate II, this pressure is uniformly dis
tributed through the layer 20, through the heat
ing element I2, to that part of the face-member
triangularbrackets 5_I, '52, together forming, a.
clevis mounting, each bracket, 5|, 52, having a
laterally enlarged portion 53 provided with an 65
opening through which passes a threaded stud
54 into cooperative relation with‘ the threads in
the openings 41, 48 in the backing plate. The
brackets are here shown‘as provided with open
ings 55 above the lateral. enlargements 53, to 70
provide for the application of a wrench to the
heads of the studs 54. It will of course be evi
dent'that if desired the brackets 5|, 52 may be
welded to the backing plate,.and that the bosses
4!, 50 with their threaded openings 41, 48 may 75
3
2,128,994
in such case be omitted. Welding‘ of suitable
freely disposed. Furthermore. the face member
180, instead of being extended materially beyond
ing plate I] is permissible in view of the relatively the left hand longitudinal margin of the backing
heavy character of the backing plate, and also in plate Ila, is bent immediately around that mar
brackets ‘or other supporting means to the back
gin and clinched over the top of the backing plate
shoe is constructed, whereby any warping due to ' so that the bight I‘ of the bend comes at that
longitudinal , margin. Otherwise the shoe Illa
welding will not aifect the face member 38.v
In order to raise and lower the shoe a shaft may be constructed in the same manner as the
shoe I0.
1
56, extending through apertures 50 in the brack
10 ets BI, 52, may be provided, this shaft having
It will be apparent that my invention provides
reduced threadedends 51, and being held in place an ironing machine ‘shoe which though light in
view of the manner in which my ironing machine
by means of nuts Ii! on the threaded ends. The
shaft 56 extends through a pair of arms ill, 6!,
shown fragmentarily, and these arms may be
15 used to raise and lower the shoe III. It w?l be
understood that the manner in which the shoe is
supported and raised and lowered may be varied
weight is very durable. At the same time it is
simply constructed, ‘requiring, few parts, which
are readily and inexpensively assembled. Other
features and advantages have either already been
pointed out or will be apparent to those skilled in
the art.
,
From the foregoing description it will be appar
to suit the designs and needs of any particular
ironing machine or the like.
20
The shoe III may be provided with a suitably
ent to those skilled in the art that each of the
enameled, or otherwise ?nished, metallic cover of
any suitable form. -In the instance illustrated,
and accordingly, each accomplishes the principal
' this cover comprises a main part 62, the longitudi
nal end-walls 83, 64 of which have lower margins
25 generally complementary to, and adapted to rest
on the top of the shoe III, the longitudinal mar
gins 65, 66 being hereshown as free of the shoe.
illustrated embodiments of my invention provides
a new and improved electric heating apparatus,
object of my invention. 0n the other hand, it
also will be obvious to those skilled in the art that
the illustrated embodiments of my invention may 25
be variously changed and modified, or features
thereof, singly or collectively, embodied in other
The main part 62 of the cover has a generally rec
combinations than those illustrated, without de
tangular opening 61, adjacent the margin of
parting from the spirit of my invention, or sacri
?cing all of the advantages thereof, and that ac 30
cordingly, the disclosure herein is illustrative only,
and my invention is not limited thereto.
30 _which the metal is depressed to form a channel
68 ‘bounding the margin. In this channel, 68,
rests the lower margin of an auxiliary cover 69,
the top of which is here shown as immediately
below the lower margins of the arms 60, ii.
35
The auxiliary cover 69 is provided with open
ings ‘Hi, ‘II through which the brackets SI, ‘52
extend, and with a bushed opening through which
- a ?exible cable 12 is adapted to pass. One of the
conductors 13 of the cable is here shown as con
40 nected to one of the shoe terminals, 22, and
fastened thereto by means of a nut 14. Another
I claim:
1. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
a sheet metal member having a face providing 35
the heat and pressure applying surface of said
shoe, said sheet metal member being so con
structed and arranged as to be by itself incapable
of withstanding deformation by normal pressure
applied to said heat and pressure applying sur
face; a heating unit, including a resistor em
conductor ‘I5, of the cable, is here shown (see ' bedded in a compact mass of refractory electri
Figure 4) as connected to an auxiliary terminal cal insulating material, so constructed and ar
ranged that said unit heats said member and re
16 not connected to the resistor. Interposed be
45 tween the other terminal, 2I, of the shoe is here sists deformation of said member by normal
shown a thermostat or thermostatic switch 11, pressure applied to said heat and pressure apply
ing surface; and means, including an integral
having terminals 18, 19, one of which, 18, is con
nected by a conductor 80 to the terminal 2| of the‘ portion of said member, constructed and ar
shoe, and the other of which, 19, is connected by ranged to hold said heating means in assembled
relation with said member.
50 a conductor 15a to the auxiliary connection ter
2. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
minal 16. It will be obvious that: the auxiliary
connection terminal 16, as far as the electrical a sheet metal member having a face providing
nature of the circuit is concerned, may be the heat and pressure applying surface of said
shoe; said member being constructed from non
omitted. An operating handle 8| of the thermo
55 static switch 11 may be disposed at the outside corrodible metal and being by itself incapable of 55
withstanding deformation by normal pressure
of the cover 62 and the cover may have a down
wardly extending local recess 82, to accommodate applied to said heat and pressure applying sur
f the boss of the operating handle. It will of course face; and means for sustaining said member
be apparent that if a thermostatic switch, such against such deformation, said means including
60 as", is provided, a suitable opening (not shown heating means comprising a resistor embedded in 60
in Figure 2) will be provided in the backing plate a compact mass of refractory electrical insulating
II, and in the insulating layer 20, so- that the material and being so constructed and arranged
that such deformation is resisted by said heating
‘thermostat may be accommodated in these open
ings, desirably to reach to the inside surface of means.
3. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
65 the face member 38, as shown in Figure 3. The
thermostat will be desirably located in that part a-sheet metal member having a face providing the
of the shoe having the highest temperature.
heat and pressure applying surface of said shoe;
Referring now to Figure '7, the ironing ma
a relatively heavy metal plate disposed at the
chine shoe Ilia here shown in ‘cross-section, dif
side of said sheet metal member opposite from
70 fers from the shoe I 0 in that the heating element said heat and pressure applying surface; a heat 70
I2a ‘is so constructed that the sheath I5a has its ing unit, including a resistor embedded in a com
open side at the face member 38a. Thus the pact mass of refractory electrical insulating ma
face member 38a contacts the vrefractory mate
rial Ila. The sheath I5a is provided with open
75 ings 83 through which the terminals ZIa, 22a are
terial, disposed between said sheet metal mem-‘
her and said plate, said heating unit being so con
structed and arranged that it heats said sheet
4
a,1as,aa4
v
metal member and sustains said- sheet metal ‘insulating material; and means, including an in
member against deformation by normal pressure
tegral portion of said member bent around said
applied to said heat and pressure applying sur
face; and means for holding-assembled with each
heating means, so constructed and arranged that
said heating means is held in assembled relation
other said sheet metal member and said plate
with said member. -
and said heating unit.
>
4. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
a metal plate member; a heating unit positioned
at one side of said plate member; _ a metallic
'
21
a
9. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
a sheet metal member having a face providing
the heat-applying surface‘ of said shoe, said sheet
metal member being made from non-corrodible
10 member, providing the heat and pressure apply- metal; means vfor heating said member, said 10
ing surface of said shoe, disposed against said ‘heating means including a separate 'unit com
heating unit and so constructed and arranged
that pressure applied against said surface is
transmitted therethrough to said heating.‘ unit;
16 holding means whereby said metallic member
holds said heating unit in said position; and aux
iliary holding means, including electric termi
nals carried by said heating unit, constructed
and arranged to hold said'heating unit in said _
position independently of said metallic member
prior to application of said metallic member.
v5. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
a metal plate member; a heating unit. positioned
at one side of said plate member; a sheet metal
prising an electrical resistor embedded in a com
pact mass of granular refractory electrical insu
lating heat conducting material; and means, in
cluding an integral portionof said member but
around said heating means, so constructed and
arranged that said heating means is held in as
sembled relation with said member.
10. A heat-applyingmachine shoe, comprising:
a sheet metal member having a face providing 20
the heat and pressure applying surface of said
shoe, said sheet metal member being by itself
incapable ‘of withstanding deformation by normal
pressure applied to said heat and pressure apply
in'g surface; a relatively heavy metal plate dis—‘ 25
member, providing the heat and pressure apply-'
ing ‘surface of said shoe, disposed against said posed at the side'of said sheet metal member -.
heating unit and so constructed'and arranged opposite from said heat and pressure applying
that pressure applied against said surface is surface; a heating unit disposed between said
transmitted therethrou'gh to said heating unit;
‘sheet. metal member and plate, said heating unit '.
holding means, including an integral portion of being so constructed and arranged that it heats 30_.
said sheet metal member bent around said plate _ said sheetmetal member and sustains said sheet
member, so constructed and arranged that said metal member against deformation by normal
heating unit is held in-said position; and auxil
pressure applied to said heat and pressure apply-l
iary holding means for holding said heating unit ing surface; and means for holding assembled
in said position independently of said sheet met
with each other said sheet metal members and ‘
al member prior to application of said sheet met
said plate and said heating unit.
al'member.
‘
r’
v
-
_
_
6. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
11. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
a metal plate member; a heating unit positioned
a metal plate member; a heating unit positioned at one side of said plate member; a metallic mem
at one side of said plate member; a sheet metal ber, providing the heat and pressure applying
member, providing the heat and pressure apply surface of said shoe, disposed against said heat
ing surface of said shoe, disposed against said ' ing unit and so constructed and arranged that
heating unit and so constructed and arranged , pressure applied against said surface is trans
that pressure applied against said surface is - mitted therethrough to said heating unit; hold
transmitted therethrough toosaid heating unit; ing means whereby said metallic member holds
holding means, including an integral portion of said heating unit in said position; and auxiliary
said sheet metal member bent around said plate holding means so constructed and arranged that
member, so constructed and arranged that said it holds said heating unit in said position inde
heating unit is held in said position; and aux-~ pendently of said metallic member prior to appli
iliary holding means, including at least- one stud cation of said metallic member.
carried by said heating unit, constructed and ar
12. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
ranged to hold said heating unit in said position a metal plate member having at least one aper
independently of said sheet metal member prior ture; a heating unit positioned at one side of said
to application of said sheet metal member.
~ plate member; vholding means for holding said
7. A heat-applying ma'chi'ne shoe, comprising: heating unit in said position, said holdingmeans
a metal member having ajface providing the. ‘including at least one stud carried by said heating
heat-applying surface of said shoe; means for unit and disposed through an'aperture' intsaid
a heating said member, said heating means in
cluding a separate unit comprising an electrical
resistor embedded in a’compact mass of granular
refractory electrical insulating heat conducting
material; and means, including an integral por
tion of said member, bent around said heating
means,‘ soconstructed and arranged that said
heating 'means is held in assembled relation with
plate member; a metallic member, providing the
heat-applying surface of said shoe, disposed
against said heating unit; and means fastening
said metallic member to said plate member.
13. A heat-applying'machine shoe, comprising
a sheet metal member having a face providing
the heat and pressure applying surface of said
40
45
- 50
as
.00
shoe, said member being so constructed and
arranged as to be by itself incapable 'of with
8. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising: ' standing deformation by normal pressure applied
a metal member having a face providing the to said heat applying surface; a separate heat
heat-applying surface of said ‘shoe; means for ing unit having a surface of predetermined ?xed
70 heating said member,‘ said heating means includ 'form disposed at the side of. said sheet metal
70
ing a unit comprising an ‘electrical resistor em
member opposite from said heat and pressure ,
said member.
'
'
bedded in compacted granular refractory electri~
cal insulating heat conducting material and a
metallic cover; forming a part of said heating
applying surface, said heating unit being secon
structed and arranged that when said sheet metal
member and said heating unit are pressed toward
unit, forat-least a portion of ‘the surface of said ' each other said surface of said heating unit deter~
75
'
.
5
2,123,294
mines the form of said heat and pressure apply-_
ing surface.
14. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
a sheet metal member having a face providing
the heat and pressure applying surface of said
shoe, said member being‘ so constructed and ar
ranged as to be by itself incapable of. withstand
ing deformation by normal pressure applied to
said heat applying surface; a separate heating
10 unit having a surface of predetermined ?xed
form disposed at the side of-said sheet metal
member opposite from said heat and pressure
applying surface, said heating unit including a
resistor embedded in a compact mass of ,refrac15 tory electrical insulating material'and being so
constructed and arranged that when said sheet
metal member and said heating unit are pressed
toward each other said surface of. said heating
unit determines'the form of said heat and pres
sure applying surface.
‘
-
15. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
a sheet metal member having a face providing
the heat and pressure applying surface of said
shoe, said member being so constructed and
arranged as to be by itself incapable of with
standing deformation by normal pressure applied
arranged that said heating unit is held in said
position independently of said metallic member
prior to application of .said metallic member.
17. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
a metal plate member having at least one aper
ture; a heating unit positioned at one side of said
plate member; holding means so constructed and
arranged that it holds said heating unit in said
position, \said holding means including at least
one threaded stud carried by said heating unit 10
and disposed through an aperture in said plate
member, and a nut on said threaded stud; a me
tallic member, providing the heat-applying sur
face of said shoe, disposed against said heating
unit; and means fastening said metallic member 15
to said plate member.
18. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
a sheet metal member having a face providing
the heat and pressure applying surface of said
shoe; a relatively heavy metal plate disposedv at 20
the side of said sheet metal member opposite
from said heat and pressure applying surface;
a heating unit, including a resistor embedded in
a compact mass of refractory electrical insulating
material, disposed between said sheet metal mem
her and said plate, said heating unit being so
to said heat applying surface; a separate heating _ constructed and arranged that it heats said sheet
f unit having a surface of. predetermined ?xed metal member and sustains said sheet metal
> form disposed at the side of said sheet metal member against defamation by normal pressure
member , opposite from said heat and pressure
applying surface, said heating unit being so con
structed and arranged that when said sheet metal
member and said heating unit are pressed toward
each other said surface of said heating .unit deter
35 mines the form of said heat and pressure applying
surface; and means, including an integral portion
of said sheet metal member, so constructed and
arranged that said heating unit and said member
are held in assembled relation.
16. A heat-applying machine shoe, comprising:
a metal plate member; a heating unit positioned
at one side of said plate member; a metallic
member, providing the heat and pressure apply
ing surface of said shoe, disposed against said
heating unit and so constructed and arranged
that pressure applied against said surface is
transmitted therethrough to said heating unit;
holding means whereby said metallic ‘member
holds said heating unit in said position; and
auxiliary holding meansrincluding a portion car
ried by said heating unit, so constructed and
applied to said heat and pressure applying sur
face; and means, including an integral portion
of said sheet metal member, so constructed and
arranged that said sheet metal member and said
plate and said heating unit are held assembled
30
with each other.
19. A heat-applying machine shoe, compris 3,5
ing: a metal plate member; a heating unit posi
tioned at one side of said plate member; a metal
lic member, providing the heat and pressure
applying surface of said shoe, disposed against 40
said heating ‘unit and so constructed and ar
ranged that pressure applied against said surface
is transmitted therethrough to said heating unit;
holding means‘ whereby said metallic member
holds said heating unit in said position; and aux 45
iliary holding means, including at least one stud
carried by said heating unit, constructed and
arranged to hold said heating unit in said posi
tion independently of said metallic member prior
to application of said metallic member.
'
EDWIN L. WIEGAND.
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