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Патент USA US2123619

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July 12, 1938.
2,123,619
A. E. WIENHOLZ
STONE CUTTING WIRE SAW
Filed June 22, 1937
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2,123,619
Patented July 12, 1938
UNITED STATE?
I‘ ATENT‘ OFFIQE
2,123,619
STONE CUTTING WIRE SAW
Albert E. Wienholz, Long Island City, N. Y.
Application June 22, 1937, Serial No. 149,606
6 Claims. (Cl. 125-12)
My invention relates to stone cutting wire saws of the wires and to move the abrasive spirally
and has particular reference to multiple» strand with the wire. I also provide a secondary twist
wires used for cutting blocks. of stone or rock.
of a relatively long pitch by progressively ad
Twisted multiple strand wires have been found
" 5 very effective for cutting stone with suitable
‘abrasives, such as sand, emery, steel shot and
steel chips, depending on the hardness of the
rock. Usually three strands of steel round wire
are used, the wire being suf?ciently ?exible to
‘10 be wound on pulleys, and there being certain
space between the wires for the abrasive mate
rial.
The round wire, however, has also certain dis~
Cl
advantages. Each individual strand occupies a
relatively large space, leaving but little room for
the abrasive, and this disadvantage rapidly in
20
creases with the wear of the wire, when the lat
ter acquires a progressively larger rubbing sur
face at the expense of the spaces between the ad
J'acent wires, leaving correspondingly less room
for the abrasive. It is very important therefore
that the wire should have sharp edges not only
for actual cutting of the stone but also for effec
tive working of the abrasive along the out. One
121) solution of thisproblem is found in the rec
tangular sharp-edged wire with sharp transverse
grooves as described in my Patent No. 1,876,480.
I have found, however, that the best results are
obtained with a multiple strand wire cable, the
@s o individual wires being of an angular section and
having sharp edges.
The object of my invention is therefore to pro
vide a multiple strand stone cutting wire having
sharp edges and being of such a shape that the
maximum of space is provided for the abrasive.
Another object of my invention is to provide a
multiple strand cutting or sawing wire having
sharp edges and being of such a shape that the
edges retain their sharpness even when the wires
become considerably worn out in use. I have
found that triangular wires well answer this re
quirement, when the wires wound into a cable
of the wires.
‘
Another object of my invention is to provide
a stone cutting wire made of a magnetic mate-
‘I
rial so that it can be magnetized for entraining '10
steel shot and'chips into the cut, as described
in my Patent No. 1,743,057.
‘
Another object of my invention is to provide
a stone cutting wire having sharp edges and con-
I
sisting of a relatively soft core and cutting edges '15
welded on the core, the edges being ofv a hard
steel or an alloysuch as Stellite, carboloy etc.
Still another object of my invention is to pro
vide a stone cutting wire having a plurality of
relatively small inserts on its periphery, pref- ‘.20
erably arranged in spirals along the wire, the
insert providing cutting edges and being made of
a harder material than the core of the wire.
My invention‘is more fully described in the ac-'
companying speci?cation and drawing in which- 25
a Fig. 1 is a view of'a portion of my multiple
strand wire.
‘
-
Fig.- 2 is a sectional View of the same on a
larger scale.
'
Fig. 3 is a sectional view of a wire having weld- 30
ed cutting edges.
Fig. 4 is a similar view of a modi?ed wire with
‘welded cutting edges.‘
.
Fig. 5 is a similar view of a wire of a different
shape.
.
35
Fig. 6 is a sectional view of another modi?ca
tion.
'
Fig. 7 is a sectional view of still another modi
?cation.
_
Fig. 8 is a sectional view of a single strand with 40
cutting inserts.
by abutting their sharp edges in the center so
that each wire has two sharp edges on the pe
riphery of the cable.
The triangular wires have an added advantage
that the space between the wires for emery etc.
Fig. 9 is a view of a portion of the wire with
inserts.
Fig. 10 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a
cable formed of round wires.
45
My stone cutting wire represents a cable
twisted of several, preferably three strands of a
retains its relative volume or sectional area in
comparison to the sectional area of the wires
themselves even when the latter become more
use this wire of a triangular cross section, or
or less worn out.
The wires are twisted so that they abut each
Another object of my invention is to provide
a multiple strand stone cutting wire twisted into
a cable of a relatively steep pitch in order to
5
vancing the turns, thissecondary twist providing
‘further
and for means
progressively
for spirally
changing
moving
the cutting
the abrasive
edges
provide a substantially round projectional area
wire I having sharp cutting edges. I prefer to
formed of equilateral triangles as shown in Fig. 2. 50
other in the center of the cable by their sharp
edges so that their sides extend radially toward
the periphery of the cable. Spaces 2 between’
the radial sides form cavities for holding an55
2
2,123,619
abrasive material, such as sand, emery, steel shot
or steel chips.
With the wires having section in the shape of
equilateral triangles, the volume of the spaces 2
is approximately equal to the volume of the wires,
and this relation remains substantially unchanged
when the wires become more or less worn in use.
By comparing Figs. 2 and 10, the advantage of
having triangular wires becomes evident, cavities
4 being relatively small in comparison to the body
welding the corners 8 only to the cores 1 as shown
in Fig. 4.
Modi?ed sections of the wires are shown in
Figs. 5, 6, and '7. Wires 9 in Fig. 5 have concave
sides in order to render the cutting edges sharper
and to increase the volume of spaces between the
wires. Diamond shaped wires ID are shown in
Fig. 6, such wires providing but a single cutting
edge each, but spaces between the wires being
10
The wires may be also formed of ?at rectangu
of the wires Seven before any wear becomes '
noticeable, so that a relatively small quantity of lar strips ll shown in Fig. 7 in order to still
further increase the volume of the spaces be
an abrasive can be used with round wires. The
cavities 4 become still further reduced in volume tween the wires.
Another modi?cation is shown in Figs. 8 and 9. 15
15 when the wires begin to wear as shown by a A single strand of a round wire I2 made of a
smaller circle in Fig. 10. Moreover, the cutting
edges of the round wires remain very dull under relatively soft metal, is provided with a plurality
all conditions, while the cutting edges in Fig. 2 of inserts l3 made of a relatively hard steel or
alloy. ‘These inserts can be welded or brazed in
remain sharp even when the wires become more
their places and may be round or sharp-pointed. 20
20 or less Worn out.
The wires I are given a sharp twist of a more
or less steep or short pitch as shown in Fig. 1
in order to provide a substantially round projec
tional section for the wire and to have a large
v25 number of spirally extending cutting edges. ‘The
twist also helps to carry the abrasive material
along the wire into the cut in a stone.
In addition to this sharp twist, which may be
called primary twist, there is also a secondary
.30 twist of a very long pitch, this secondary twist
being formedby slightly advancing each turn of
the primary twist in relation to the preceding
turn. The secondary twist is shown in Fig. 1
and it improves still further the cutting proper
.35 ties of the wires, the latter resembling a twist
drill in their shape. The secondary twist also fa
cilitates the entraining of the abrasive along the
wires in the cut and continuous changing of the
cutting edges along the wires.
The wires I are preferably made of a carbon
40
steel so that they can be hardened to increase their
cutting action and to reduce their wear.
It is possible, however, to make the core 5 of
the wires of a relatively soft metal, welding cut
ting outer portions 6 made of a carbon steel
which is hardened while the core remains rela
,tively soft if it is made, for instance, of a low
carbonsteel. The edges 6 can be made of a
relatively large.
They are preferably arranged in spiral directions
in order to provide a more or less uniform cut
ting surface.
I claim as my invention:
I
l. A stone cutting wire saw consisting of sev
eral strands of a sharp-edged wire twisted to
gether into a cable and abutting by their sharp
edges in the central portion of the cable thereby
forming spaces between the sides of the strands
extending to the axis of the cable.
25
'30
2. A stone cutting wire saw consisting of
several strands of a sharp edged wire formed of
a relatively soft metal and having cutting edges
of a relatively hard material.
3. A stone cutting wire saw consisting of 35
several strands of a sharp edged wire forming a
cable and having a primary twist of arelatively
short pitch and a secondary twist of a relatively
long pitch.
4. A stone cutting wire saw consisting of
several strands of a sharp edged wire twisted into
a cable of a short primary twist, the turns of the
twist progressively advancing thereby forming a
secondary twist of a long‘pitch.
5. A stone cutting wire saw consisting of
three strands of a triangular wire twisted to
gether into a cable, the wires abutting by their
edges in the central portion of the cable.
6. A stone cutting wire saw consisting of
special alloy such as stellite or carboloy in order _
to increase their durability for cutting very hard three strands of wire twisted together to form a
cable, each strand having the cross-sectional form
rock or stones.
When expensive alloy is used for cutting edges, of an equilateral triangle.
ALBERT E. WIENHOLZ.
their volume may be still further reduced by
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