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Патент USA US2123926

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July 19, 1938.
2 1’ 2 3 9, 2 6
L, J. BAZZONI
HEEL ATTACHING AND FLAP LAYING MACHINE
Filed June 2, 1956
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July 19, 1938.
2,123,926
|_. J. BAZZONI
HEEL ATTACHING AND FLAP LAYING MAQHINE
Filed June 2, 1936
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July 19, 1938.
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L. J. BAZZONI
HEEL ATTACHING AND FLAP LAYING ‘MACHINE
Filed June 2, 1936
5 Sheets-Sheet 3
[July 19, 1938.
L,
BAZZON]
( 2,123,926
HEEL ATTACHING AND FLAP LAYING MACHINE
Filed June 2, 1936
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HEEL ATTACHING AND FLAP LAYING MACHINE
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Patented July 19, 1938
* 2,123,926
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE ‘
2,123,926
HEEL-ATTACHING AND‘ FLAP -LAYING
MACHINE
Lewis J. Bazzoni, Swampscott, Mass, assignor to
United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Paterson,
N. J., a corporation of New Jersey
Application June 2, 1936, Serial No. 83,116
23 Claims.
A single station machine which may be ad
vantageously used for attaching heels to shoes
and applying covering flaps to the breasts of the
attached heels of the shoes is disclosed in United
5' States Letters Patent No. 2,076,537, granted April
13, 1937 on an application ?led in my name. It
is desirable that the work remain in the machine
for a short period in order to insure that the heel
seat of the shoe shall be permanently deformed
10 under attaching pressure of the heel, and in order
to insure that the adhesives used to attach the
heel to the shoe and the covering flap to the
breast of the heel shall have time to set before
relieving the clamping pressure of the heel
15 against the heel seat of the shoe and the clamp
ing pressure of a deformable flap-applying pad
against the heel. With the above considerations
in view it will be clear that the production of a
single station machine is somewhat limited.
It is an object of this invention to provide a
machine by the use of which an operator may
attach heels to shoes and apply covering flaps to
the breasts of attached heels of shoes quicker and
more eifectively than has heretofore been pos
sible. The illustrated machine comprises a tur
ret upon which are mounted six circumferentially
spaced heel-attaching and ?ap-laying units.
After interposing an adhesive between the: heel
and the heel seat of the shoe, the operator posi
tions the heel upon the heel seat and places the
last upon which the shoe is mounted, against a
rubber pad of a jack of one of the units. The
jack is then raised by treadle-operated mecha
nism until the tread and rear faces, respectively,
35 of the heel are forced with initial pressure against
abutments which are initially positioned in ac
cordance with the shape of the heel. A one-revo
lution clutch is then tripped to actuate mecha
nism which causes the jack to force the shoe
40 against the heel in engagement with the abut
ments with heavy molding pressure whereby to
attach the heel to the shoe. The jack of the
unit is held against movement away from the
abutments by a lock. The one-revolution clutch
45 is then tripped a second time to actuate mecha
nism for indexing the turret and for causing a
resilient pad of the unit to apply a covering flap
to the breast of the heel and to remain in clamped
relation with the heel breast. After the heel
50 attaching and flap-applying unit has been in
dexed to a discharge station the flap-applying pad
is permitted to move away from the heel, after
which the operator releases the jack to permit
the shoe to move away from the abutments. The
55 cost’ of the heel-attaching and ?ap-laying opera
(Cl. 12-125)
tion is materially reduced when performed by the
use of the above machine.
The invention will be better understood and
appreciated from reading the following detailed
description thereof in connection with the draw
ings, in which
Fig. 1 is a side view of the illustrated heel
attaching and flap-laying machine;
Fig. 2 is a plan view of the machine, portions
10
of which have been broken away;
Fig. 3 is a front view of the machine, a con
siderable portion of the mechanism of which has
been removed and the turret of which is shown
in vertical section;
Figs. 4 and 5 are front and side views respec
15
tively of heel-gaging mechanism of the machine;
Figs. 6 and '7 are illustrative views showing the
?ap-applying mechanism during two stages of
the operation of the machine; and
Fig. 8 is an enlarged plan view of a pair of 20
cams, one of which operates the ?ap-applying
mechanism and the other of which releases the
?ap-applying pad from its clamped relation with
the covered breast of the heel.
The machine is illustrated with reference to 25
attaching a Louis heel 20 (Figs. 6 and '7) to a
shoe 22 mounted upon a last 23 and applying a
covering ?ap 24 (Fig. 6) to the breast of the
heel. The machine comprises six heel-attaching
and ?ap-laying units 26 (Figs. 1 and '7) which
are mounted upon and carried by a turret 28.
The turret 28 is automatically indexed through
mechanism which will be later described, whereby
to move the heel-attaching and the ?ap-laying
units 26 successively past a loading station 30 35
(Figs. 1 and 2) in front of which the operator
stands.
The heel-attaching and ?ap-laying units 26
are identical and it will therefore be necessary to
describe only one of the units in detail. Each 40
of the units comprises a jack 32 (Figs. 1 and 7)
mounted for movement in a vertical guideway 34
of a bracket 36 fastened to a post 38 which is
secured by screws 40 to a boss 42 of the turret 28.
The jack 32 is raised to force the shoe 22 and the 45
heel ‘20 positioned upon the shoe, in clamped rela
tion, the heel being moved into engagement with
tread and rear abutments 44, 46, respectively,
through the provision of an elevating rod 48
(Figs. 1 and 3) which is mounted for vertical 50
movement in a projection 50 of the frame of the
machine and is shaped and arranged to engage
the lower end of the jack 32. It is desirable that
the shoe be forced against the abutments 44,
46 with initial pressure, which may be relieved at 5,5
2
2,123,926
the will of the operator, in order to permit the
shoe to be properly positioned in the machine.
Accordingly, the elevating rod 48 is provided with
a ?ange 52 (Fig. 1) engaged by a rod 54 which
is mounted for sliding movement in the machine
frame and may be conveniently raised by depress
ing a treadle 56.
Since each of the heel-attaching and ?ap-lay
ing units 26 is indexed with the turret 28 it is
10 desirable that the jack 32, which is raised to
cause the heel 22 positioned upon the shoe 24
to be forced against the abutments 44, 46 with
clamping pressure, shall remain in its elevated
position until released by the operator. Accord
15 ingly, a face 58 (Figs. 1 and '7) of the jack 32 is
disposed at approximately 7° to the path of move
ment of the jack and is engaged by a cam 60
secured to a pin 62 which is pivotally mounted
upon‘ the bracket 36.
The operative face 64
20 (Fig. '7) of the cam 60 has the general form of a
logarithmic spiral, the arrangement being such
that different portions of the face 64 and the face
58 of the jack 32 are in engagement for different
heightwise positions of the jack. The cam 60 is
25 normally forced against the face 58 of the jack
32 through the provision of a coil spring 66
(Fig. 1) one end of which engages the bracket 36
and the other end of which is secured to a handle
68. The handle 68 which is secured to the pin
30 62, is depressed against the action of the spring
‘' 66 by the operator preparatory to removing the
shoe which has been operated upon, from the
machine. With the above arrangement the cam
60 and the face 58 of the jack 32 together operate
35 somewhat as a toggle, the jack being prevented
from sliding downwardly from its elevated posi
tion after the work has been clamped in the ma
chine and until the operator depresses the handle
68. When the cam 60 is swung in a clockwise
direction (Fig. 7) by pressing the handle 68 down.
wardly, the jack 32 normally drops under its own
weight until a flange thereof engages the brack
et 36.
When the operator has depressed the treadle 56
to force the heel positioned upon the shoe against
the tread and back abutments 44, 46, respectively,
and has ascertained that the shoe has been prop
erly positioned in the machine, he pushes a hand
lever ‘I0 (Figs. 1 and 2) rearwardly, thereby trip
50 ping a one-revolution clutch ‘I2 (Fig. 1) and thus
causing, through mechanism which will now be
described, the shoe and the heel to be clamped to
gether with ?nal pressure.
Secured to a drive shaft 14 (Figs. 1 and 3) is
55 a worm ‘I6 which is in meshing engagement with
a large gear 18 keyed to a shaft 80 rotatably
mounted in the frame of the machine. A small
gear 82 is ?xed to the rear end of the shaft 80
and is in meshing engagement with a large gear
60 84 keyed to a shaft 86 rotatably supported in a
bearing 88 of the machine frame. Formed in_
tegral with the gear 84 are a pair of cams 90, 92,
the cam 90 being engaged by a roll 94 rotatably
mounted at one end of a lever 96 secured to one
65 end of a shaft 98 swiveled on a pedestal I00 bolted
to the main frame. Secured to the other end of
the shaft 98 is a lever IOI the forward end of
which is bifurcated and is hinged through links
I02 to a block I04 (Fig. 3) which is bored to re
70 ceive a rod I 06, a nut I 0‘! being in threaded rela~
tion with the lower end of the rod. A housing
I08 is in threaded engagement with the upper
end of the rod I06 and may be adjusted rela
tively thereto through the provision of a nut I I0.
The housing I08 is provided with a guideway (not
shown) constructed and arranged to receive the
lower end of the elevating rod 48. The housing
I08 and the rod I06 are normally held in raised
positions with relation to the block I04 (Fig. 3)
by a spring II2 the lower end of which engages
the block and the upper end of which forces a
washer I I4 against a nut I I6 which is in threaded
engagement with the rod.
In order to impart upward movement to the
elevating rod 48 through the housing I 08, the 10
elevating rod has a serrated face I I8 which, when
the housing is raised, is engaged by a pawl I20
pivotally secured to the housing. The pawl I20
is swung into engagement with the serrated face
I I8 of the elevating rod 48 by a spring I22 which 15
is mounted upon a rod I24, the upper and lower
ends, respectively, of the spring I22 engaging an
arm I26 secured to the pawl I20 and a collar
I28 secured to the rod. The rod I24 is initially
secured in adjusted position with relation to a 20
boss I30 of the main frame by a screw I32, the
lower end of the rod passing through an enlarged
opening (not shown) formed in the arm I28.
As above stated, the heel of the shoe positioned
upon the jack 32 is forced with initial pressure 25
against the abutments 44, 46 by depressing the
treadle 56, after which the handle 10 is pushed
rearwardly, thereby causing the shoe through the
above-described mechanism to be forced against
the heel in engagement with the abutments with 30
?nal clamping pressure. The spring II2 may be
changed in accordance with the amount of heel
attaching pressure desired.
The treadle-operated rod 54 is normally urged
into a lowered position by a lever I34 (Figs."1
and 3) the rear end of which is secured to a pin
I36 pivotally mounted upon an extension I38 of
3.5,
the pedestal I00, the forward end of the lever en
gaging a collar I40 (Fig. 1) adjustably secured
to the rod 54. A spring I42 has its upper end 40
secured to the lever I34 and its lower end secured
to the frame of the machine and serves normally
to urge the rod 54 into a lowered position. After
the jack 32 has been forced upwardly with ?nal
pressure the lever IOI is moved in a clockwise 45
direction (Fig. 1), the block I04 (Fig. 3) engaging
the nut I0'I carried by the lower end of the rod
I06 to cause the housing I 08 to move down
wardly. As the housing I08 is lowered, the ele
vating rod 48, the lower end of which is slidingly
mounted in the housing, is moved to a lowered
position under the action of a‘ spring I44 the
lower end of which is secured to the treadle-op
erating rod 54 and the upper end of which is se
cured to the elevating rod 48.
55
It is important that the operator shall be pre
vented from accidentally raising the elevating rod
48 by stepping upon the treadle 58 during the
indexing of the turret 28, thereby insuring that
the elevating rod 48 shall not be engaged by one
of the jacks as it swings toward the loading sta 60
tion. Accordingly, an arm I46 (Figs. 1 and 3)
which is secured to the right-hand end of shaft
I36 to which the lever I34 is secured, carries a
roll I48 which, while the turret 28 is being in 65
dexed, is in engagement with the cam 92. Should
the operator accidentally step upon the treadle 56
while the turret 28 is being indexed, pressure of
the lever I36 against the collar I40 prevents up
ward movement of the rod 54 and thus prevents 70
the elevating rod 48 from being raised into the
path of rotation of one of the jacks 32 of the
turret.
The mechanism for indexing the turret 28 will
now be described. An indexing- arm I50 (Figs. 1
3
2,123,926
and 3) is secured to the rear end of the shaft
86 and is constructed and arranged successively
to engage within radial guideways I52 of a Gen
comprises a post 206 the lower square end of
which is inserted within a correspondingly
shaped recess of the bracket 36, the heel being
eva cam I54 which is rotatably mounted upon a
placed attaching-face downwardly upon the ta
shaft I56 supported by the main frame. A por
ble 202. The heel is positioned lengthwise upon the table 202 by a bar 208 which is pivotally
tion of the rotation of the arm I50 causes the
Geneva cam I54 to rotate through one-sixth of a
revolution. The Geneva cam I54 is in meshing
engagement with a pinion I58 (Fig. 3) mounted
10 upon the lower end of a vertical shaft I60 which
is rotatably mounted in the main frame and has
secured to its upper end a pinion I62 which
meshes with a circular rack I64 of the turret 28.
The circular rack I64 is secured to the turret 28
15 through the provision of a screw I66 and a stud
and-screw connection I68. The gearing ratio of
the mechanism is such that for every one-sixth
of a revolution of the Geneva cam I54 the turret
rotates one-sixth of a revolution successively to
move the heel-attaching and ?ap-laying units to
the loading station 30.
In order to insure against rotation of the tur
ret 28 after it has been indexed to the loading
station 30, there is provided an arm I10 (Fig. l)
25 which is pivotally mounted upon a pin I12 sup
ported by the machine frame and is normally
' urged in a clockwise direction by a spring I14
30
arranged to force a roll I16 carried by the arm
I10 into engagement with the Geneva cam I54.
When the arm I50 which rotates in a clockwise
direction (Fig. 1) leaves one of the guideways I52
the roll I16 carried by the arm I10, under the ac
tion of the spring I14, enters another guideway
3.5
and prevents the Geneva cam I54 from being
rotated. As the indexing arm I50 enters one
of the guideways I52 a lug I18 carried by the in
2 I2 of the gage'and is shaped to engage the for
ward end of the projecting lip of the heel. A
VV-shapedgage 2I4 which is constructed and ar 10
ranged to engage the rear end of the heel is
mounted for sliding movement over the table 202
and is-normally urged toward the bar 208 by a
spring 2I6, one end of which engages‘ a ?ange
2 I8 of a rod 220 secured to the V-shaped gage 2I4 15
and the other end of which spring engages the
end of a recess through which the rod 220 passes.
The bar 208 may be swung about the pin 2I0 by
turning a screw 222 which is in threaded ven
gagement with the table 202 and is surrounded 20.
by a spring 224 which forces the bar 268 into en-
gagement ‘with the head of the screw 222 and
which is housed within. a recess 226 through
which the screw passes. In order to position'the
heel in the machine the same is placed upon the 25.
table 202 of the heel gage, as illustrated in Figs.
4 and 5, the V-shaped gage 2I4 centralizing the
heel and forcing the lip of the same against the
bar 208.
‘
In order initially to position the abutments 44, 3(1
46 the operator places the lower end of the post
266 in a correspondingly shaped recess of the
bracket 36 and tightens a set screw 228 which
rigidly secures the post to the turret 28.. After
dexing arm engages an extension I80 of the arm
the heel has been placed upon the table 202 the
pad 280 is lowered and the screw 222 is turned
until the pad comes down against the central
I10, whereby the roll I16 is withdrawn from the
part of the end of the lip portion of the heel.
guideway in which it is registered and the Geneva
40 cam I54 is permitted to be indexed by the con
tinued rotation of the arm I50.
The turret 28 comprises a hollow depending
stem I82 (Fig. 3) the lower portion of which ?ts
upon a bearing shaft I84, a boss I86 of the tur
45 ret 28 being in threaded relation with the upper
end of the shaft I84. The shaft I84 is locked
with relation to the turret 28 through the provi—
sion of a nut I81. The enlarged lower end I88
of the shaft I84 ?ts within a cylindrical recess
50 of the machine frame, roller bearings I90 being
interposed between the machine frame and a
flange I92 of the bearing shaft I84 in order rotat
ably tousupport the turret 28. It is desirable that
the turret 28 shall turn freely but not too freely,
55 and in order that there may be a slight drag on
the turret controllable at the will of the opera
tor, one or more friction blocks I94 are provided.
The friction blocks I94 engage a ?ange I96 of
the turret and are secured to the frame of the
60 machine by bolt and nut connections I98.
It is highly desirable that the abutments 44,
46 be accurately positioned with relation to the
path of movement of a flap-applying pad 260
(Figs. 4 and 5) in order that the pad shall effec
65 tively apply the covering ?ap 24 (Fig. 6) to the
rear end of the shank of the shoe and to the
breast of the heel progressively toward the tread
end of the heel. The mechanism for applying
the ?ap 24 to the heel will later be described in
70 detail. The abutments 44, 46 are initially ad
justed for different styles and heights of heels.
In order to adjust the abutments 44, 46 in ac
cordance with the shape of the heel of the shoe
to be operated upon, the heel is placed upon a
w
mounted upon a pin 2I0 carried by a projection
table 202 (Figs. 4 and 5) of a heel gage 204 which
The tread abutment 44 (Fig. 4) comprises a
swiveled block 230 and a carrier 232 therefor ad
justable in directions indicated by reference nu
meral 234 with relation to a slide 236 upon turn
ing a screw 238 which is rotatably mounted in
the carrier and is in threaded relation with the
slide. The rear abutment 46 comprises a block 452
240 which is pivoted to an angular lug 242, and
a piece of heavy leather 244 secured by a screw
246 to a slide 248, the leather being interposed
between the heel and the block. Opposing faces
of the lug 242 and the slide 248 are serrated, the 516.1
lug being adjustable with relation to the slide
in directions indicated by reference numeral 250
through a screw-and-slot connection 252. The
block 240 slides upon the leather cover 244 which
remains stationary with relation to the heel dur
ing the heel-attaching operation, thereby insur
ing that the cover of the heel is not scarred.
The slides 236, 248. are mounted for movement
in guideways, respectively, of a housing 254. The
slides 236, 248 are provided with racks 256. 258, 603
respectively, which are in meshing engagement
with a pinion 260 (Fig. 4) rotatably mounted in
the housing 254. Upward movement of one of
the abutments 44, 46 causes equal and opposite
downward movement of the other abutment,
thereby providing an equalizing pressure between
the abutments. The housing 254 is provided with
rearwardly extending ?anges 262 (Figs. 1 and 5)
constructed and arranged to receive a guide bar 70.
264 which is rigidly secured to a bracket 266
clamped to the post 38.
Rotatably supported in
the bracket 266 is a screw 268 which is in
threaded engagement with the housing 254, the
housing being raised and lowered byturning a,
2,123,926
hand wheel 210 which is rotatably mounted in
a slight follow-up pressure of the shoe against the
the bracket and is secured to the screw.
In order initially to position the abutments 44,
46 after the heel has been properly positioned
upon the heel gage as above described and the
heel so that the shoe shall be effectively forced
abutments have been properly adjusted in direc
tions 234 and 250 (Fig. 4), respectively, so that
they effectively engage the tread and rear faces of
a heel of a predetermined shape, the hand wheel
against the heel even though the shoe materials
yield after the application of the ?nal clamping
pressure above noted. Accordingly, the jack 32
comprises a rubber block 290 (Figs. 1 and 5)
which is positioned in a head 292 of the jack 32,
the block being compressed during the heel-at
taching operation. The head 292 of the jack
10 210 is turned until the abutments'are effectively
32 is secured by a screw 294 to the shank portion
forced against the heel. Heels of the same style
are commonly of the same height regardless of
the length of the shoe and under such circum
stances the above adjustment need be effected
15 only when changing from one style of shoe to
another. After adjusting the abutments 44. 46
the operator notes the position of a pointer 212
secured to the bracket 266, along ‘a scale 2'14
carried by the housing 254 and also notes the
position of an arrow 2'16 (Fig. 4) on the slide
236 with reference to a scale 2'18 upon the car
rier 232. It is therefore possible to reset the
abutments 44, 46 without actually measuring the
heel as above described after the machine has
25, once been set up for a particular style of heel.
The block 246 of the rear abutment 46 need only
of the jack which is engaged by the elevating rod
48.
As above stated, the operator forces the shoe
with preliminary pressure against the heel by
be adjusted relatively to the lug 242 when chang
ing from Louis to Cuban heels.
In order to cooperate with the abutments 44,
30v 46 for the purpose of locating the shoe in a pre
determined position in the machine there is pro
vided a sole gage 280 constructed and arranged
to engage the forepart of the sole of the shoe in
the vicinity of the break line of the shoe. The
351 gage 280 is formed integral with a band 282 which
is secured to the post 38, the gage being initially
adjusted heightwise of the machine. The break
line of the forepart of the sole of the shoe is prac
tically the same for different lengths of shoes
' having a heel of a uniform height and it is there
fore desirable that the gage engage only portions
of the sole located in the vicinity of the break
line thereon, as illustrated.
V
In order that while initially positioning the
45 gage 280 the same may be forced against the
sole of the shoe without tilting the shoe clamped
between the jack 32 and the abutments 44 and
46, it is desirable that the abutments be tem
porarily ?xed with relation to each other. It
‘will be noted that if the abutments 44, 46 were
relatively movable during the setting-up opera
tion, any substantial downward pressure against
the forepart of the shoe by the gage 280 would
cause'the abutments to move from their adjusted
positions. Accordingly, there is provided a screw
284 which is in threaded relation with the hous
ing 254 and which is forced against the slide 236,
thereby preventing any movement of the slides
,236, 248 when the gage 280 is being adjusted.
The operator may readily determine the height
wise position of the forepart gage 280 by the
provision of an indicator 286 (Fig. 1) secured to
the band 282 and arranged to slide over a scale
288 which is secured to the post 38. Although
the abutments 44, 46 have been described as be
ing movable with relation to each other it will
be noted that the same may be ?xed with rela
tion to each other as above described and form in
70'. effect a single abutment. Such a combined abut
ment may be referred to in the singular.
It has been found that the heel seat of the shoe
occasionally yields substantially after the elevat
ing rod 48 has been lowered away from the jack
75 $32. It is therefore desirable that there shall be
depressing the treadle 56 and after the shoe has 15
been positioned in the machine, pushes the
handle 13 rearwardly to cause the shoe to be
forced with ?nal clamping pressure against the
heel through the above-described power-operated
mechanism. In order to index the turret 28
through one-sixth of a revolution the operator
again pushes the handle ‘10 rearwardly to trip
the one-revolution clutch 72. While the shoe
positioned and clamped in the machine moves
from the loading station 33 (Figs. 1 and 5) to the 25
next indexed position, the heel-breast covering
flag 24 (Fig. 6) is applied to the breast of the
Louis heel 20 by the pad 200.
The mechanism for applying the covering ?apv
24 to the breast of the heel will now be described.
A carrier 296 is rotatably mounted upon a shaft
298 which is pivoted in recesses of a pair of
bosses 339 of the turret 23. A. lever 332 com
prising several arms is secured to the shaft 298
by a screw 304 between the bosses 305 of the
carrier 296, and a lever 335 is secured to the
inner end of the shaft 238 by a screw 308.
Pivotally secured by screws 310 to the leading
end of the carrier 296 is a pad holder 312 which
is bifurcated to receive the pad 230 and is pro
vided with a recess for receiving a shank 314
(Fig. 2) of a metal reenforcement of the pad.
The pad 260 is retained in the holder 312 by a
plunger 316 which is normally urged into engage
ment with a notch 318 of the shank 314 of the 45
metal reenforcement of the pad by a leaf spring
320. When the pad 26!] is positioned in the
holder 312 its leading portion 322 (Fig. 1) which
?rst contacts the Work is substantially in aline
ment with the axes of the screws 310. The rea~ 50
son. for such an arrangement will be explained
later.
'“
One arm of the lever 302 is hinged to a tube
324 (Figs. 6 and 7) constructed and arranged
telescopically to receive a rod 326 which is hinged
to the upper end of the pad holder 312. Sur
rounding the tube 324 and the rod 326 is a spring
328 the respective ends of which engage a ?ange
333 of the tube and a. nut 332 secured to- the rod.
In order that the tube 324 and the rod 326 shall
be held in alinement the rod carries a pin 334
which engages within a slot 336 of the tube.
Pivotally secured to a bifurcated portion of
the lever 332 is a stirrup 338 comprising a block
340 provided with an opening 342 (Fig. 7)
through which extends a rod 344. An enlarged
threaded portion 343 of the rod 344 is in threaded
engagement with a trunnioned block 348 mounted
in a rearward extension of the carrier 296. A
spring 353 surrounds the rod 344 and has its
upper and lower ends, respectively, in engage
ment with the enlarged threaded portion 346
of the rod. and the block 343.
A link 352, which is pivotally connected to the
rear end of the arm 306, has its lower end hinged
55
2,123,926
to an arm 354, the forward end. of which is ro
tatably mounted upon a screw 358 secured to the
machine frame. A cam roll 358 which is car
ried by the arm 354 is constructed and arranged
to engage a cam 360 (Fig. l) ?xed to the ma
chine frame as the turret is indexed, thereby
actuating the above-described mechanism to
cause the pad 200 to apply the covering ?ap to
the breast of the heel.
Each of the carriers 2% is normally held in
10
a raised position. through the provision of a
spring 362 the forward and rear ends of which
are secured to the carrier and to the machine
frame, respectively. In order to limit movement
15 of the carrier 296 in a clockwise direction (Figs.
6 and '7) when the unit is operated without any
shoe positioned therein, there is provided a bar
364 which has a slot 303 (Fig. 1) shaped to re
ceive a screw 368 secured to the boss. 42 and
20 which has its forward end hinged to the carrier.
A handle: 310 is secured to each of the carriers
296 in order to assist the operator in. moving
the pad 200 into engagement with the heel when
initially positioning the abutments 44, 4%.
25
As above stated, after the shoe has been forced
upwardly against the heel in engagement with
the abutments 44, 46 with ?nal attaching pres
sure and the elevating rod 48 has moved into a
. lowered position, the operator again pushes the
30 handle 10 rearwardly to index the turret 28.
Rotation of the turret 28 causes the roll 353 to
ride up the cam track 360. As the arm 354 is
swung in a clockwise direction (Fig. 1) it rotates
. the lever 302 in a clockwise direction through
.
5
ret 28. A spring 318 surrounding a rod 300 which
is pivoted to the leading portion of the latch 312
and the upper portion of which extends through
an opening in the turret 28 forces the trailing end
of the latch behind a shoulder 332 of the lever
302, the ?ap-applying mechanism being held in
the position illustrated in Fig. 7 by the latch 312
until the turret approaches a discharge station
384 (Fig. 2). As the turret 23 approaches the dis- .
charge station 383 the roll 350 carried by the 10
arm 354 engages a cam 386 to move the shoulder
382 of the lever 302 slightly away from the latch
and simultaneously therewith a lever 388
which is pivoted upon the screw 353 and carries
a pin £390 shaped and arranged to engage within
15
a slot 392 of an extension of the latch 3112, en
gages a roll 334 secured to the cam 386. When
the latch 3'22 is rotated in a clockwise direction
(Figs. 6 and 7) against the action of the spring '
318 by the above-described mechanism the car 20
rier 206 is permitted to swing away from the shoe
under the action of the spring 382,'the springs
328 and 350 expanding and causing the various
members of the ?ap-applying mechanism to‘ re
turn to their original positions illustrated in 25
Fig. l.
.
'
It is preferable to have one operator remove
the shoe from the machine and trimthe laterally
projecting margins of the flap 24 while another
operator, after clamping the shoe in‘ the machine 30
and interposing cement or other adhesive between
the flap and the breast of the heel, indexes the
machine. Accordingly, the cam 386 which trips
the lever 308 to permit the pad to swing away *
the above-described mechanism. As the stirrup
338 which is. pivoted to the bifurcated portion of
the lever 302 is raised it rotates the carrier 206
with it through the spring-and-rod connection
above described. When the carrier 2% and the
from the shoe, may be slid through an arc of 35
approximately sixty degrees. It will thus be
clear that when there are two operators on the
lever 302 have been swung as a unit about the
axis of the shaft 298 through an arc su?icient to
cause the pad to force the ?ap against the rear
the fourth and ?fth index positions, the ?ap 40
trimming operator removing the shoe from the
machine when it arrives at the discharge station‘
end of the shank of the shoe, continued rotation
of the lever 302 in a clockwise direction (Fig.
45 7) with relation to the carrier causes the pad
200 to be rotated in a clockwise direction (Fig.
'7) about the screws 310 with relation to the car
rier which swings slightly toward the shoe as.
the pad is compressed against the shoe. The pad
50 200 is so shaped and mounted that it applies
the flap to the shank of the sole of the shoe
and to the breast of the heel starting at the
point of initial contact of the pad with the shoe,
. which is located .at the base of the ?ap, and
progressing toward the tread end of the heel.
By mounting the pad 200 for rotation about
the axis of the screws 3l0, which axis is substan
tially in alinement with the leading portion 322
I of the pad, the ?ap is applied to the major por
60 tion of the breast of the heel by the rolling action
of the pad. The application of excessive pres
sure against the shoe by the» pad 200 is prevented
by providing the yielding connections between
the lever 302 and the carrier 296 and by provid
at
, .,
ing the spring 320 and the telescopic connec
tions such as above described between the lever
302 and the pad holder 312. The carrier 296
may be described .as ?oating since it is yield
ingly connected to various members of the ?ap
applying unit.
It is desirable that the pad 200 be held in com
pressed relation with the ?ap 24 after it has ap
machine the earn 386 is so positioned that the
carrier 295 is moved away from the heel between
384 (Fig. 2).
' '
'
The cam 380 may be readily moved toward the
cam 360 in order that the shoe shall be released 45
between the ?fth index position and the loading
station 30. The cam 386 comprises a horizontal
?ange 396 (Fig. 8) which is slidingly mounted.
upon a horizontal ?ange 39B of the cam 360. ‘In
threaded relation with the ?ange 398 area pair 50
of screws 400which are shaped and arranged to
engage within arcuate slots 402 of the ?ange 39B
and which may be loosened preparatory to mov
ing the cam 386 from one operating position to
another.
_
55
In order rigidly to hold together the posts 38
of the turret 28 a header 404 is secured within
the upper end of each of the posts, the headers
being rigidly secured to a brace 406 through the
60
provision of screws 400.
The ?ap-applying pads 200 may be changed
from time to time in accordance with the shape
of the heel and accordingly a plurality of pads
are conveniently supported upon a rack 4 I 0 which
is secured to the brace 406, openings 412‘ (Fig. 2) 65
being provided to receive the shanks 314 of the
metal reenforcements of the pads 200, respec
tively.
In order to perform the heel-covering and
breast-?ap-laying operation the operator, after
interposing suitable adhesive between the ate
taching face of the heel and the heel seat of the.
shoe positions the heel upon the ?tted heel seat
plied the ?ap .to the heel and accordingly there is .
provided a latch 312 which is pivoted upon a shaft
and engages the cone of the last 23 with the rub
314 carried by a depending boss 316 of the tur
ber block 230 of the jack 32. The operator then
75
6
2,123,926
steps upon the treadle 56 to force the heel against
the abutments 44, 46, the shoe being accurately
located before too much pressure has been exert
ed against the treadle. When the shoe has been
positioned the handle 10 is pushed rearwardly to
trip .the one-revolution clutch 12 thereby causing
theelevating rod 48 to raise the jack under power
in order to move the shoe and the heel upwardly
with ?nal attaching pressure against the abut
10 ments 44, 46. When the shoe has been properly
clamped in the machine and adhesive has been
interposedibetween'the ?ap and the breast of the
heel, the handle 10 is again pushed rearwardly
to .trip the clutch 12 thereby indexing the ma
15 chine and automaticallylapplying the flap 24 to
the ‘breast of the heel as above described.
Having thus described the invention, what I
claim as new and desire to secure by Letters
other portions of the shoe after the pad has en
gaged the shoe.
6. In a covering machine, means for clamping
a shoe, a carrier movable in a predetermined path
with relation to the shoe, and a pad movable with
the carrier in said path for applying the base por
tion of a heel-breast covering flap to the shoe,
said pad being mounted for pivotal movement
with relation to the carrier about an axis which
extends substantially along the leading portion 1,0
of the pad whereby to apply other portions of the
flap to the shoe.
7. In a covering machine, a support for a shoe,
a carrier mounted for translatory movement, and
a pad movable with said carrier to apply a cov
ering flap to a portion of the shoe, said pad also ‘
being mounted for movement with relation to
said carrier about an axis which extends trans
Patent of the United States is:
1. In a machine for operating upon shoes, a
20
jack for a shoe, an abutment, means for moving
the jack in a predetermined path to force the
versely of the shoe and substantially along the
leading portion of the pad to apply the covering
?ap to other portions of the shoe.
shoe against said abutment, said jack comprising
a shoe, a carrier movable about an axis, and a
a face which is inclined to said path of move
ment, and a cam provided with a spiral face con
structed and arranged to engage said face of the
pad movable with the carrier about said axis for
applying the base portion of a heel-breast cover 2,5
ing flap to the shoe, said pad being mounted for *
pivotal movement with relation to the carrier
about an axis which is substantially parallel to
the ?rst-named axis and passes substantially
jack and to prevent movement of the jack away
from said abutment but to permit movement of
the jack toward said abutment.
30
v2. In a machine for operating upon shoes, an
' abutment, a jack for a shoe movable in a prede
termined path with relation to said abutment,
said jack comprising a face which is inclined at
a slight angle to said pathlof movement, and a
pivotally mounted cam having a face which has
; the general form of a logarithmic spiral arranged
to engage said face of the jack.
3. In a machine vfor operating upon shoes, a
jack for ashoe, anabutment, means for moving
40 the jack vin a predetermined path to force the
shoe against the abutment, said jack comprising
a face which is inclined to said path of move
ment, a ‘cam provided with a spiral face con
structed and arranged to engage said face of the
45 jackand to prevent movement vof the jack away
from said abutment but to permit movement of
the jack toward said abutment, a spring for ‘nor
mally forcing the cam against said face of the
jack, and a handle connected to the cam for
50 swinging the same away from the jack to permit
- the jackto move away from the abutment.
4. In a covering machine, a carrier mounted
for movement about an axis, a pad pivotally
mounted upon the carrier, a lever mounted for
55 pivotal movement about said ‘axis, a cam, mech
anism for operating the lever, a support for a
shoe, yieldable connections between the'lever and
the pad on the one hand and between'the carrier
and the lever on the other hand, and means for
60 effecting relative movement of said mechanism
and said cam to cause the pad toapply a covering
flap to the breast of the heel of the shoe.
.5. ‘In a covering machine, a turret, a carrier
pivotally secured to the turret, a pad pivotally
65 secured to the carrier, a shoe support mounted
upon the turret, mechanism comprising a mem
ber pivotally secured to the turret, a cam con
structed and arranged to be engaged by said
mechanism, yieldable connections between the
70 member and the carrier, yieldable connections
between the member and "the pad, and means for
rotating the turret to cause thelca-m to be engaged
by said mechanism whereby to move the pad as a
unit against a portion of the shoe and then to
76 swing the pad with relation to the carrier against
2.9.
8. In a covering machine, means for clamping
through the leading portion of the pad whereby
to apply other portions of the flap to the shoe.
9. In a machine for applying covering flaps to
the breasts of heels of shoes, means for clamping
a shoe, a carrier mounted for pivotal movement
aboutan axis, a pad mounted for movement with
the carrier and also mounted for pivotal move
ment with relation to the carrier, an operating
lever mounted for pivotal movement about said
axis, yieldable connections between the leverand
the pad, and mechanism constructed and ar
ranged ?rst to swing the ‘carrier and the pad
about said axis for moving the pad ‘into engage
ment with the shoe and then to swing the lever
with relation to the carrier whereby to swing the
pad with relation to the carrier.
10. In a ‘machine for applying covering ?aps
to the breasts of heels of shoes, a turret, a plu
30.
3.5.
49
rality of shoe-positioning and clamping units
mounted upon the turret, a plurality of pads each
of which is mounted for movement about two
spaced axes and is constructed and arranged to
apply a covering flap to the breast of a heel of a
shoe mounted in a corresponding shoe~position~
5,0
ing and clamping unit, a stationary cam, and
mechanism operatively connected to each of the 5.5
pads constructed and arranged to be actuated by
said cam upon movement of the turret whereby
to apply the ?ap ‘to the breast of said heel.
11. In a ?ap-applying machine, a support for
a shoe, a carrier mounted for swinging movement
and having a pair of spaced arms, a ?ap-apply
ing pad, a holder pivotally secured to the carrier
and having a bifurcated portion which is posi
tioned between the arms and is shaped to receive
60
the pad, means for interchangeably securing pads
of different shapes to the holder, means for swing
ing the carrier relatively to the support, and
means for swinging the holder relatively to the
support and to the carrier.
70
12. In a ?ap-applying machine, a turret, means
for positioning and clamping a shoe upon the tur~
ret, a cam, and a pad movable with the turret and
also movable about two axes. with relation to said
means under the action of said cam as the turret 15
2,123,926
is rotated whereby to apply a heel-breast covering
flap to the breast of the heel.
13. In a ?ap-applying machine, a turret, a
stationary cam, means for positioning and clamp
ing upon the turret a shoe the sole of which has
a breast ?ap split therefrom, a carrier pivotally
mounted upon the turret, a pad pivotally mounted
upon the carrier, and mechanism which is opera
tively connected to the carrier and to the pad
10 constructed and arranged to engage the cam as
the turret is indexed whereby to swing the pad
to apply the base portion of the ?ap to the pro
J'ecting portion of the breast of a Louis heel at
tached to the shoe and then to swing the pad with
15 relation to the carrier to apply other portions- of
the ?ap to the remaining portion of the heel
breast.
14. In a ?ap-applying machine, a member, a
plurality of supports for shoes respectively mount
20 ed upon said member, a plurality of flap-applying
units mounted upon the member adjacent to the
respective supports, a cam, and means for effecting relative movement of the member and the
cam, said units being constructed and arranged
25 successively to apply flaps to the breasts of the
heels upon the supports upon relative movement
of said member and said cam.
15. In a flap-applying machine, a turret, means
for indexing the turret, means for positioning and
30, clamping a shoe upon the turret, a cam, a pad
movable with the turret, means actuated by the
cam When the turret is indexed to cause the pad
to apply a covering ?ap to the breast of the heel
of the shoe and then to lock the pad in forced
35 relation with the applied flap, and mechanism
for releasing the pad from engagement with the
shoe when the shoe has been indexed to a prede
40
7
and means for tripping said last-named mecha
nism when the shoe upon the turret has been in
dexed to a predetermined position preparatory
to removing the shoe from the machine.
I
18. In a ?ap-applying machine, a turret, means
for positioning and clamping a shoe upon the
turret, a cam, a carrier pivotally mounted upon
the turret, a pad pivotally mounted upon the car
rier, mechanism constructed and arranged to be
actuated by the cam when the turret is indexed, 10
yieldable means connecting said mechanism and
said carrier on the one hand and said mechanism
and said pad on the other hand, means for in
dexing the turret to cause said mechanism to
engage the ‘cam whereby to swing the carrier and 15
the pad with relation to the shoe-positioning and
clamping means to move the pad into engage
ment with the shoe and then to swing the pad
relatively to the carrier as the pad is forced
against the shoe in order to apply the ?ap to the 20
breast of the heel of the shoe progressively toward
the tread end of the heel, mechanism for locking
the pad against the breast of the heel after it has
applied the flap to the same, and means for trip
ping said last-named mechanism when the shoe
upon the turret has been indexed to a predeter
mined position preparatory to removing the
shoe from the machine, said last-named means
being adjustable with relation to the turret to
vary the position at which said last-named mech
anism is tripped.
30'
19. In a machine for operating upon shoes, a
turret comprising a plurality of jacks and cor
responding abutments, means for indexing the
turret, an elevating rod, manually operated mech 35
anism for actuating the elevating rod successive
ly to force shoes mounted upon the respective
termined position preparatory to removing the
jacks against corresponding abutments with ini
shoe from the machine.
16. In a flap-applying machine, a turret, means
for indexing the turret, means for positioning and
venting retractive movement of the respective 4:0
jacks away from the abutments, power-operated
clamping a shoe upon the turret, a earn, a carrier
pivotally mounted upon the turret, a pad pivotal
ly mounted upon the carrier, mechanism con
45 structed and arranged to be actuated by the cam
when the turret is indexed, yieldable means oper
atively connecting said mechanism and said car
rier on the one hand and said mechanism and said
pad on the other hand, and means for indexing
50 the turret to cause said mechanism to engage the
cam whereby to swing the carrier and the pad
with relation to the shoe-positioning and clamp
ing means without swinging the pad with relation
to the carrier until the pad engages the shoe, and
55 then to swing the pad with relation to the carrier
as the pad is forced against the shoe.
17. In a ?ap-applying machine, a turret, means
for positioning and clamping a shoe upon the
turret, a cam, a carrier pivotally mounted upon
60 the turret, a pad mounted upon the carrier, mech
anism constructed and arranged to be actuated
by the cam when the turret is rotated, yieldable
means connecting said mechanism and said car
rier on the one hand and said mechanism and
65 said pad on the other hand, means for indexing
the turret to cause said mechanism to engage the
cam whereby to swing the carrier and the pad
with relation to the shoe-positioning and clamp
ing means until the pad engages the shoe and
70 then to swing the pad with relation to the car
rier as the pad is forced against the shoe whereby
to apply a flap to the breast of the heel pro
gressively toward the tread end of the heel, mech
anism for locking the pad against the breast of
75 the heel after it has applied the flap to the same,
tial pressure, locks carried by the turret for pre
means for successively actuating the elevating
rod to force said shoes with ?nal pressure against
corresponding abutments, means for causing the
elevating rod to move to a predetermined posi
tion away from the turret after the shoes have
been clamped with ?nal pressure between the
respective jacks and abutments, and a stop con
structed and arranged to prevent the manually
operative mechanism from raising the elevating
rod during a predetermined portion of the cycle
of operation of the machine whereby to insure
that said rod shall not be engaged by one of the
jacks during the indexing of the turret.
20. In a machine for operating upon shoes, a. 55
turret comprising a plurality of jacks and cor
responding abutments, power-operated means for
indexing the turret, an elevating rod for suc
cessively raising the jacks which have been in
dexed to an operating station to force shoes 60
mounted upon the respective jacks against corre
sponding abutments, said elevating rod having a
serrated face, manually operated mechanism con
structed and arranged positively to raise the jack
at the operating station until the shoe is forced 65
with initial pressure against the abutment, a lock
for preventing retractive movement of the jack
away from the abutment, a connecting member
constructed and arranged to receive an end por
tion of the elevating rod, a pawl pivotally secured 70
to the connecting member, means for normally
retaining the pawl out of engagement with the
serrated face of the elevating rod to permit the
elevating rod to be raised without raising the
connecting member, yieldable power-operated
8
2,123,926
means for raising 'the‘connecting member, means
for causing the pawl to engage the serrated face
of the elevating rod when the connecting member
is raised thereby causing the connecting member
and the elevating rod to ‘be secured together to
force the shoe against the abutment with ?nal
pressure, said power-operated means being con
structed and arranged to lower the connecting
member after the shoe has been ?nally clamped
10 between the jack and the abutment whereby to
permit the elevating rod to move to a lowered po
sition, and safety mechanism operative in timed
relation with the turret indexing mechanism for
preventing said manually operated mechanism
15 from accidentally moving the elevating rod into
the path of movement .of one of the jacks during
the indexing of the turret.
21. In a heel-attaching machine, a jack for
supporting a shoe, equalizing abutments con
20 structed and arranged to be engaged by the
tread and rear faces respectively of a heel to be
attached to the shoe, a gage constructed and ar
ranged to engage the break line portion only of
the sole of the shoe, and means for moving the
25 jack toward the abutments to clamp the heel
which is positioned upon the shoe and between
the attaching face of which and the heel seat of
the shoe adhesive has been interposed, to the
abutments constructed and arranged to be en
gaged by the tread and rear faces of a heel, a
flap-applying pad movable in a predetermined
path, and means comprising a table for support
ing the heel and positioning the same in the 5
machine with relation to the path of movement
of the pad preparatory to adjusting the abut
ments in accordance with the position of the ma
chine, said means being constructed and arranged
to be readily incorporated in the machine and
removed therefrom.
23. In a flap-applying machine, a pair of
abutments constructed and arranged to be en
gaged by the tread and rear faces of a heel, a
housing, said abutments being geared together 15
for equal and opposite movement in the housing
whereby to equalize pressure against the heel, a
?ap-applying pad movable in a predetermined
path, means comprising a table for supporting the
heel and positioning the same in the machine 20
with relation to the path of movement of the
pad preparatory to adjusting the abutments in
accordance with the position of the heel, a gage
constructed and arranged to position a. shoe by
engagement with the break line portion only of 25
the sole of the shoe, and means for preventing
relative movement of the abutments to facilitate
the initial positioning of said gage.
shoe.
30
v22. In a flap-applying machine, a pair of
LEWIS J. BAZZONI.
30
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