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Патент USA US2123958

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July 19, 1938.
R. A. PACKARD
2,123,958
PAPER MANUFACTURE
Filed Jan. 2, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet l
ON.
OÈ @E
.El wom
ow
m:
lNVENTOR
Roland A. Pocko Vd
BY
ATTORNEYS
July 19, 1938.
2 l’ 2 3 9., 5 8
R. A. PACKARD>
Pfäf’ìëlïî. MANUFACTURE
Fiîfed Jan. 2, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
INVENTOR
Roìond A. Packard
BY
»L M
ATTORNEYS
2,123,958
Patented July 19, 193s
UNITED STATES
PATENT GFFICE
2,123,958
- PAPER MANUFACTURE
Roland A. Packard, Lee, Mass., asslgnor to Smith
Paper, Inc., Lee, Mass., a corporation of Dela‘
Application January 2, 1935, Serial No. 115
20 Claims. (Cl. 92-20)
Considering Vthe arrangement in greater de
This invention relates to the manufacture of
paper, and more particularly to the treatment of tail, the bleacher B may be of conventional type <
comprising a tank- I2 provided with a paddle I4
half stock, especially rag half stock.
In accordance with prior practice, bleached mounted on a shaft I6 driven by appropriate
Tank I24 is 5
5 unbeaten- rag stock or rag half stock is dropped , means not shown in the drawings.
provided
with
a
central
wall
or
partitlonJß
which
into a drainer which ordinarily takes the form
of a bin having perforated brick at the bottom.
After the stock remains 'in the drainer for a con
siderable period, it must be dug out manually
10 and conveyed to the beater. The drainage is not
thorough, and retained bleaching agent has a
weakening effect on the fibre.
The object of my invention is to generally im
prove the handlingand drainage ofI rag half
15 stock, that is, unbeaten rag stock, and to avoid the
delay and labor heretofore necessary, as well as
to improve the strength of the product by thor
ough drainage.
To the accomplishment of the foregoing gen
20 eral objects and numerous more specific objects
which will hereinafter appear, my invention con
sists in the method steps and apparatus elements
and their relation one to the other, as are herein
after more particularly described in the speci
25 ñcation and sought to be defined in the claims.
\
The specification is accompanied by drawings in
which:
-
Fig. 1 is a side elevation of apparatus embody
ing features of. my invention;
30
Fig. 2 is a plan view of the same;
Fig; 3 is a detail of the table lowering mecha
nism;
Fig. 4 is a section taken in elevation through
the screen or wringer apparatus; '
35
Fig. 5 is a section .taken in the plane of the
line 5-5 of Fig. 4; and
~
Fig. 6 is a section taken in the plane of the line
6--6 of Fig. 4.
_
Referring to the drawing and more particu
' 40 larly to Figs. 1 and 2, the complete apparatus
comprises a bleacher B, a centrifugal pump P
for delivering the stock to a spout S located over
the moving screen of drainage and lmat-forming
apparatus W which, for convenience, may be re
insures thorough circulation of the stock upon
rotation of. paddle I4. The contents of the tank
are drained. through pipe 20 the upper end of
which may be stopped by an appropriate valve or 10
cover plate 22. It will be understood that with
the cover plate in place, the stock may be treated
in the paddle bleacher until properly bleached, at
which time the cover plate is removed by a suit
able hook.
y
l
15
In accordance with prior practice, the bleached
rag half stock is drained in this manner directly -
into simple drainage bins-from which the stock
must later be dug out. I have discovered that
it is possible to handle the rag half stock by 20
flowing the samev in its liquid or bleaching vehicle,
even at a consistency of, say, 4% (4 pounds of
dry stock to 96 pounds of water) .
This was
heretofore thought impossible because unbeaten
rag stock or rag half stock is heavy, long-fibered, 25
stringy, and easily tangled and snarled. Despite
the difficult nature of the material, I find-it pos
sible to elevate the same by means of a suitable
centrifugal pump 24 which is preferably provided
with Stellite cutting blades cooperating with the 30
impeller blades of the pump, and which is further
provided at its inlet- end with a screw conveyor
or feed 26.
'
The stock ascends through conduit 28 having a
horizontal section 30 extending over the bleacher 35
B and terminating at spout S located directly
above the end of wringer W. It should be noted
that the spout is large, fully open, and preferably
expanded or “be1l-mouthed”., Also, that conduit
28, 30 ‘is preferably devoid of fittings or obstruc- 40
tions which might discriminate between the liq
uid and solid parts of the stock. I have accord
ingly devised special means for controlling the
rate of flow of stock to the wringer, it being unde
The rate of feedof stock
sirable to use ordinary valve or gatemeans which 45
formed into a mat or web by the wringer, and this
is piled or lapped on a suitable table T by means
55 of an apron A.
cut-"away at 32.` Troughs 34 arehsecured to the
sides of conduit 30 far below the top of the conduit
'and preferably near the bottom thereof, and said 55
45 ferred to as a wringer.
to the Wringer is controlled by bleeding a part tend to dam the solid parts of the stock. Instead
of the stock back `into the bleacher B, as by the > of obstructing _the flow of material, I bleed a. part
of the ñow back into the bleacher B and control
use of overflow sluices O. From another view
the feed to the wringer by modifying the amount
point, it may be said that the bleached stock is
50 continuously circulated by the pump P, and that of stock bled back to the bleacher. For this pur- 50
a. desired amount ofthe circulating stock is sup- l pose, I provide overflow sluices O, best shown in
plied by spout S to the wringer W. The stock is Figs. 1,2, and 6 of the drawings. The conduit 30 is
2
2,128,958
troughs lead rearwardly and downwardly to a
and operates to wring any remaining free liquid
point over the bin B. 'I'he forward ends of troughs
84 are preferably closed by a wall or partition 36.
It is possible to pivot the troughs 34, thereby regu
lating the overflow by changing the tilt or angle
from the mat or web of stock.
of the troughs, but I‘flnd that satisfactory results
are obtainable while ñxing the troughs rigidly to
the conduit in the manner shown, the feed being
regulated by varying the height of the mouth of
10 discharge spout S above the wire screen of the
It should be noted that the rolls are mounted
on arms 80 (see Fig. l) pivoted at 82 and provided
with stop bolts 84 for limiting the permissible
downward movement of the rolls. Stop bolts 84
wringer W. For this purpose, the conduit is
are threaded in arms 80 and are provided with 10
lock nuts 86 to hold the same at any desired ad
counter-balanced by weight 38 connected to the
justment. 'I'he adjustment is made such that
conduit by means of an appropriate cord 40 pass
ing over pulleys 42. The position of the conduit
15 may be adjusted by a screw 44 threaded in block
46 mounted on the frame of wringer W. The
movement of the spout is small and is accommo
there is a space of, say, one inch or more between
the first roll and the screen, _which is reduced,
however, to a matter of o_nly, say, one-sixteenth 15
of an inch at the last roll. The mass of the rolls
is relied upon for downward pressure, there being
dated by elasticity of the conduit leading to the
nothing to positively prevent upward movement
spout.
of the rolls.
The yreaction of the forming rolls 'l0 and 12 is 20
taken by the maple boards 62 and 64 which are
provided with lateral grooves 88 and drain holes
90 to insure free discharge of liquid. The reac
tion of press rolls 14 and 16 is taken by the con
tinuous series of carrier rolls heretofore referred 25
to, while the reaction of the final pressure roller
18 is, of course, taken by couch roll 58. The upper
rolls are all provided with appropriate doctor
means to prevent any stockf clinging to the roll
from traveling up around the roll. For this pur
pose, the rolls 10, 12, 14, and 16, which may be
made of brass, are fitted with doctor blades 82
-
20
Spout S terminates in a large open and prefer
ably expanded mouth 48 the bottom edge of whichl
is disposed parallel to the wire screen 50 of wringer
W, as is best shown in Fig. .4 of the drawings. It
will be understood/that much of the stock flowing
25 through conduit 30 is at a level higher than the
overflow troughs, and is simply circulated, with
the stock kept constantly in motion to prevent
settling and accumulation, and that the part of
the stock flowing from spout S spreads out on the
30. traveling screen. The stock is at all timeskept in
motion or dynamic, and is not allowed to dwell or
become static, for it _then promptly settles. There
is an automatic regulation of the rate of feed
because the stock builds up on the wire at the
35 spout and automatically checks the feed of stock
when the supply is excessive. This, of course,
encourages overflow at the sluices and increased
bleeding of stock back into the bleacher. In
practice it is seldom necessary to change the posi
tion or adjustment of the spout. It will be evi
dent, however, that the elevation of the spout
above the screen determines the thickness of the
mat of material deposited on the screen before the
checking or automatic regulation takes` effect.
This in turn is a measure of the rate of feed of
stock to the wringer.
,
The wringer W comprises a frame 52 mounted
on posts 54 and supporting at one end a breast
roll 56 and at the other end a couch roll 58. The
wire screen 50 is in _the form of an endless band
passing around the breast roll 56 and couch roll
58. It will be noted that the couch roll 58 is at a
higher elevation than breast roll 56, so that the
screen is given a slight> upward inclination. 'I'he
upper or useful part of the screen is supported on
a large number of closely adjacent carrier rolls
'60 and also upon maple boards 62 and 64, as is
best‘shown in Fig. 4. 'I'he screen may be four
feet or more in width and is preferably of fine
00 mesh, say 40 x 40. The lower part of the screen
is supported on idlersl 86, while the screen is kept
taut by a tensioning roll 68.
Above the screen, I ‘provide a series of rolls
spaced progressively nearer the screen for com
‘
I do not mean
that the stock is absolutely dry, but it is nearly
dry and much more eifectively so than was the
case when using drainage bins as in the prior art.
preferably made of bakelite. The rubber covered
roll 18 is provided with a flapper 94 having rubber
blades 96 and rotated against the roll by means of
a chain and sprocket drive 08.
- The stock is confined to the screen at the side
edges of the screen by deckle boards |00, best
shown in Figs. 4 and 5, and anend board |0|
located at the breast; roll. These deckle boards 40
are preferably fitted with rubber deckle strips
|02 which bear directly against the screen- 50.
The rubber strips may be terminated before the
end, say, between the press rolls 14 and 16 be
cause from that point on, the mat is already 45
fairly solid and controllable. The wash water
expressed from the stock is caught by an appro
priate save-all pan |04 which is preferably made
co-extensive with the screen. Because of the in
clination of the screen and the corresponding in 50
clination of the save-all pan, the liquid drains to
ward the inlet end of the wringer where it may be
discharged at one side by an outlet |08. 'I‘he
floor beneath the wringer is preferably walled-in
by curbs |08, and the enclosed space is provided 55
with a suitable drain ||0. .
The wringer W strengthens the fibre because it
greatly shortens the drainage time, and more im
portantly, because it provides thorough drainage
of the bleaching agent. The screen alonel with 80
the stock spread well out on its surface, is a good
drainage medium, while the rolls afford a positive
compression and wringing of the stock. The
absence of a breast box, reservoir or pond, is
important because of the stringy tangled con 65
dition of the rag half stock, and the impossibility
pressing the stock into a mat or- web-and for
wringing substantially all of the wash water out
of the same. In the present example, I employ , of suspending the same, the stock' being in gobs
first and second rolls 10 and 12 which act pri
or clumps like handfuls of machinists’ waste.
marily as forming rolls to level and form the stock
70 into a relatively thick mat. I also provide rolls
14 and 16 which act as press rolls to compress the
mat and to eliminate most of' the liquid. The
wringer terminates with a preferably rubber cov
ered couch roll 18 which bears against couch roll
75 58. The -upper couch roll is made extra-heavy
The screen is upwardly inclined to help retard
the stock and to thereby forin a better mat. The 70
mat formation is convenient for transfer to the
beater, and wholly eliminates tedious manual
digging out of stock from a pit or bin.
`
The wringer is driven by a motor ||2 connected
through a speed reducing gear box ||4 to the
3
2,128,958
shaft ||6 of couch roll 58, which, of course, drives
the s'creen 50. Shaft | I6 is provided with a gear
H8 which meshes through a direction reversing
idler |20 with a gear |22 for driving the apron
A, the operation of which will be described in de
tail later. With respect to the wringer W, the
gear ||0_ meshes with a direction reversing idler
|24, which is connected to press roll 16 by a chain
and sprocket connection |26. Similarly, rolls 14,
10 12, and 10 are connected by chain and sprocket
connections |28, |30, and |32. The linear >speed
of the wire may be varied, but I ñnd a speed of 140
feet per minute to be satisfactory. I also find it
helpful to so gear the earlier rolls, preferably the
rolls 10, 12, and 14, that they run at a surface
speed slightly greater than the speed of the wire.
The mat or web leaving the wringer is ready
to be delivered to a beater. A convenient and pre
ferred way to handle the web is to load the same
20 in lapped formation on a loading table. Re
ferring to Figs. l, 2, and` 3, I provide a loading
table T on which the stock is lapped" by a load#
ing apron A. Apron A may be made of fabric
and passes over drive roll |40 which moves at
the same surface speed as the screen ‘50 and is
geared to the couch roll of screen 50 to insure
synchronous operation. As previously mentioned,
this gearing comprises gear ||8, idler |20, and a
gear |22 mounted on the shaft of drive roll |40.
30 The apron passes over a carrierroll |42 and then
between twin guide rolls |44 mounted on a car
“ria’ge 4|48 which is horizontally reciprocable on
rails |48. 'The apron is led back over carrier roll
|60, and slack of the apron is preferably taken .up
by weighted tensioning rolls- |52 located von op
posite sides of a support roll |54.
Carriage |46 is reciprocated by a motor |60
connected through reduction gear box |82 to a
shaft ‘|64 coupled by gears |64’ and |66 to crank
-shaft |68 having at opposite ends the crank discs
|10. <7The crank pins are connected through links
i12-‘to the lower ends of levers |14. Thesev levers
arey pivoted at |16 and are 'connected at' their
upper ends to carriage |46 by means of links |18.
' It' will be understood that reciprocation ofthe
carriage |46 over table T will cause the mat or
web of stock supported on yapron A to be >deposited
on the table in lapped formation, as shown in
Fig. 1 of the drawings.
'
n
Although I have indicated the use of a sepa
rate motor |80, it will be understood that this
mechanism may, if desired, be-operated from mo
tor ||2, as by .extending the shaft of the motor
from gear box ||4 to gear box |62. In fact, the
55 usey of a single motor is preferable for maintain
ing exact synchronisrlbetween the linear speed
of the web and the speed `at which the apron
guide |46 is reciprocated.
'
Table T is preferably made vertically recipro
cable inlorder to maintain the top of the stock
at a substantially constant level. For this pur
pose, I mount table T on supports |80 threaded
` on posts |82 which are geared for simultaneous
rotation by a chain and sprocket system |84.
65 One of the posts is provided with a worm gear |86
meshing with a worm |88 mounted on a -shaft
|90. Shaft |90 carries a ratchet wheel |92 best
shown in Fig. 3. The ratchet wheel is operated
by a pawl |94 carried by an arm |96 oscillated
70 by a link |98 connected to the crank pin of crank
disc |10. The rate at which the table is lowered
may be regulated by adjusting the point of con
nection of link |08 and pawl arm |96, thisl ad
l
justable connection being indicated at 200. The
outer end of shaft |90 is also ypreferably pro
vided with a manually operable crank 202. This
crank facilitates restoration of the table to‘ele
vated position, the pawl |94 being released while
the crank is operated.
,
‘
-
The operation of _the apparatus may be sum
marized as follows. The stock, which is unbeat
en rag stock, is preliminarily bleached in paddle
bleacher B. The cover plate 22 is then removed,
and the bleached stock is mechanically pumped
directly from the bleacher to the moving screen 10
50 of the wringer W. The supply of stock is reg
ulated by bleeding or bypassing part of the stock
directly back to the bleacher.
The resulting con
tinuous circulation of the stock helps maintain
the same in an active condition and at a uniform
consistency. No breast box is employed, and
every effort is made to prevent damming or
dwelling of the stock, with consequent settling
of the solid matter. The large open-mouthed
spout S and overflow O form a combination prac
tically automatic in operation. The stock is im
20
pelled outwardly from the spout and ñoods out
on the wire screen and undergoes preliminary ~
drainage through the screen. It is restrained
at the edges by the deckle boards |00. Former
rolls 10 and 12 level off the stock and causead
ditional drainage. Bress rolls 14 and 16 compress
and _further drain the stock to form a compacted
mat. This is given a final wringing between
couch'roll 58 and rubber covered pressure roll 18. 30
The discharged web, of material is fed upon and
supported by apron A the discharge point of which
is reciprocated over >table T by carriage |46. This
causes a. lapping of the web on table T. The
table is lowered as stock is loaded thereon, by
rotation of the supporting screws |82.
as
~
It is believed that the mode of practicing m
invention, as well as the many advantages there
of, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed
description. It will also be apparent that while 40
I have shown and described my invention in pre
ferred form, many changes and modifications
may be made without departing from the spirit
of the invention, defined in the following claims.
I claim:
46
l. In the manufacture of paper, the method
which includes bleaching rag half stock, feeding
the bleached stock to moving wringer means, and
bleeding or bypassing a part of the stock being
fed to the wringer means in order to regulate the 50
rate of fiow of stock thereto, the stock being han
dled in a continuous active state of movement,
and being given no opportunity to dwell and `
settle.
2. In the manufacture of paper, the method 55
which includes bleaching rag half stock in a con
ventional paddle bleacher, feeding the stock to a
pump,~ thereby pumping the stock to wringer
means located at an elevation higher than the
paddle bleacher, and Without damming the stock 80
being pumped to the wringer’means bleeding a
part of the same back into the paddle bleacher
in order to regulate the rate ’of fiow of'stock to
the wringer means.
3. In the manufacture of paper,_the method 65
which includes bleaching rag half stock, feeding
the stock in its bleaching vehicle and in a dy
namic condition to a traveling screen, bleeding
a part of the feed in order to regulate the -rate
of flow of stock to the screen, and pressing the 70
stock on the screen.
4. In the manufacture of paper, the method
which includes bleaching unbeaten rag half stock
in a bleacher, feeding Ithe unbeaten stock to a
pump and thereby elevating the _stock to a travel
4
2,123,958
ing screen located higher than the bleacher,
bleeding a part of the unbeaten stock being
pumped to the screen back into the bleacher in
order to regulate the rate of flow of stock to the
-the screen, a bypass path for bleeding away part
of the stock being fed from the bleacher in order
to regulate the rate of feed of stock reaching the
screen, and means to automatically vary the
5 screen, and pressing the unbeaten stock on the 1 bleeding .of stock in response to variation in the
screen.
.
.
5. Apparatus for treating unbeaten'rag half
stock. comprising a bleacher and a. centrifugal
quantity of stock on the screen.
'
12. Apparatus for treating unbeaten rag half `
stock, said apparatus comprising a bleacher, a
pump connected to form a circulating system for
centrifugal pump connected thereto, a traveling
wire wringer screen located at an elevation high 10
wringer means, and means to feed a desired part r er than said bleacher, a conduit extending from
only of the circulating unbeaten stock to said the pump outlet directly to the screen without
wringer means.
‘
intermediate breast box or the like, said conduit,
6. Apparatus for treating unbeaten rag half being provided with means to bleed excess stock
15 stock, comprising a paddle bleacher and a pump back into the bleacher and thence to the pump, 15
connected to form a closed circulating system for in order to regulate the rate of feed of stock to
10 continuously circulating the unbeaten stock,
continuously circulating the unbeaten stock,
means to feed a‘desired part of the circulating
unbeaten stock to a traveling drainage and
20 wringer screen, and cooperating rolls for pressing
‘the unbeaten stock on the screen and
»the same into a mat.
forming
,
7. Apparatus for treating unbeaten rag half
stock, comprising a bleacher and a centrifugal
25 pump connected to form a closed circulating sys
tem for continuously circulating the unbeaten
stock, means to feed a desired part only of the
circulating unbeaten stock to a traveling drain
age and wringer screen, -cooperating rolls for
30 wringing and forming the unbeaten stock into a.
mat, and means at the end of the wringer screen
for piling the unbeaten stock in lapped formation
on a suitable table.
,
8. Apparatus for drying bleached rag half
35' stock, said apparatus comprising a frame, a
breast roll at one end of said frame, a couch roll
at the other end of’ said frame and higher than
said breast roll, an endless wire screen passing
the screen.
13. Apparatus for treating unbeaten rag half
stock, said apparatus comprising a bleacher, a
centrifugal pump connected thereto, a traveling
wringer screen located- at an elevation higher
than said bleacher, a conduit extending from the
pump outlet to a spout located above the screen,
overflow sluiceways located directly in the con- duit and leading back to the bleacher, and means 25
to vary the bleeding effect of the overflow sluice
ways.
14. Apparatus for treating unbeaten'rag half
stock, said apparatus comprising a bleacher, a
centrifugal pump located therebeneath, a trav 30
eling wringer screen located at an elevation high
er than said bleacher, a valved conduit connect
ing the bleacher and the pump inlet, another
conduit extending from the pump outlet to a
spout located above the screen, said spout being
provided with overflow sluiceways extending to a
point over the bleacher, and means to adjust the
height of the spout above the screen in order -to
regulate the rate of feed- of stock to the screen,
the excess stock being returned to the bleacher
around said breast roll and couch roll, a plurality
40 of carrier rolls located beneath and supporting
said screen, a plurality of rolls located above and - and thence to the pump.
spaced-along said screen, a roll located above the
15. Apparatus for drying bleached half stock,
aforesaid couch roll, the rolls being arranged suc
said apparatus comprising a wringer screen to
cessively progressively nearer the screen,A means form the stock into a mat or web, and means to
- ß driving some of said rolls, and doctor means for pile said mat, said means comprising laterally is'
said rolls.
.
reciprocable guide `means for the- mat leaving
9. Apparatus for drying bleached rag half th`e screen, a vertically movable table located
stock, said apparatus comprising a frame, a beneath said guide means, and» means for re
breast roll at one end of said frame, a couch roll ciprocating the guide means and for simulta
„Zat the other end of said frame and higher than neously lowering the table.
said breast roll, an- endless wire screen passing-V
16. Apparatus for drying bleached rag half
around said breast roll and couch roll, a plurality stock, said apparatus comprising a wringer
of carrier rolls located beneath and supporting screen to form the stock into a mat or web, and
said screen, a plurality of forming rolls spaced means to pile said mat, said means comprising
s; along said screen, drain boards located beneath an endless conveyor or apron, a drive roll for
i the screen at said forming rolls, a plurality' of moving the same, a vertically movable table lo
‘Y press rolls following said forming rolls, a rubber cated beneath said apron, guide rolls mounted
„covered pressure roll located above the aforesaid on a laterally reciprocable carriage for4 recipro
couch roll, said rolls being arranged successively catin'g- the discharge end of the apr‘on over the
do ‘progressively nearer the screen, means driving at table, means for taking up the slack of the apron,
least some of said rolls, said means being ar
and means for reciprocating the guide' rolls and ,
ranged to drive the ilrst rolls ata speed somewhat for simultaneously lowering the table.
greater than the speed of the screen, and doctor
' 17. Apparatus 'for treating unbeaten rag bali'
means for said rolls.
‘
l
10. Apparatus for treating unbeaten rag half stock, said apparatus comprising a bleacher, a
stock, said apparatus comprising a bleacher, a traveling wire wringer screen located at an ele
wringer, means to feed the unbeaten stock from vation higher than said bleacher, a pump con
the bleacher to the wringer, and means to bleed - nected to said bleacher and having a discharge
away part of the stock being fed to the wringer conduit extending upwardly to a point. directly
70.111 order _to regulate the rate of feed of stock over the receiving end of the wire screen without
reaching the wringer.
>intermediate breast box or the like, the dis-_
1l. Apparatus for treating -rag half stock, said charge end oi' said conduit being provided with ‘
apparatus comprising a bleacher, a traveling a downwardly directed expanded or bell-mouthed
drainage and wringer screen, means to feed the spout the edge of which is disposed generally,
u ‘stock from the bleacher and to ñow the same on parallel to the surface of the screen andi at a.
2,123,958
height thereabove such as to help regulate the
discharge of the stock onto the screen.
18. Apparatus for drying bleached but un
beaten rag stock, said apparatus comprising an
endless wire drainage screen, a plurality of rolls
for supporting and moving said screen, one or
more rolls for pressing stock ñowed onto said
screen, and means including an enclosed sup
ply conduit having a downwardly turned spout
for so flowing the unbeaten stock directly onto
the drainage screen as to initially spread and
distribute the stock over the surface of the
screen, said spout being an enclosed conduit
forming a continuation of the supply conduit
and having at its bottom end a fully open down
15 wardly directed mouth of large area, said mouth
being as large as the cross-section of the con
duit and opening directly onto the top of the
screen, without intermediate box or the like, the
periphery or lip of said open mouth being dis
20 posed directly over and generally parallel to the
screen, and sufliciently close thereto as to cause
the unbeaten stock to spread out sidewardly from
the spout over the surface of the screen.
19. Apparatus for drying bleached but un
25 beaten rag stock, said apparatus comprising a
breast roll, a couch roll, an endless wire screen
passing around said breast roll and couch roll,
a pressure roll located above said couch roll,
other pressure rolls above said screen between
30 the couch roll and the breast roll, means driving
at least some of said rolls, said means being so
arranged as to drive the iirst pressure rolls at
a speed higher than the last pressure rolls, and
means to feed the stock in an active dynamic un
35 settled condition directly onto the screen, said
means including an enclosed supply conduit hav
ing a downwardly turned spout for so iiowing the
unbeaten stock directly onto the drainage screen
as to initially spread and distribute the stock
over the surface of the screen, said spout being
an enclosed conduit forming a continuation of
the supply conduit and having at its bottom end
a fully open downwardly directed mouth of large
area, said mouth beingl as large as the cross
section of the conduit and opening directly onto
the top of the screen, Without intermediate box
or the like, the periphery or lip of said open
mouth being disposed directly over and generally
parallel to the screen, and sufiiciently close there
to as to cause the unbeaten stock to spread out
sidewardly from the spout over the surface of
the screen.
'
20. Apparatus for drying bleached but un 10
beaten rag stock, said apparatus comprising a
frame, a breast roll at one end of said frame, a
couch roll at the other end of said frame, an
endless wire screen passing around said breast
roll and couch roll, a plurality of carrier rolls 15
located beneath and supporting said screen with
out appreciably obstructing free ñow of liquid
therethrough, a substantial number of rolls 1o
cated above and spaced along said screen, means
to limit the movement of said rolls away from 20
said screen to amounts which are successively
progressively less, whereby the rolls are pro
gressively nearer the screen and have a pro
gressive wringing action, means driving one or
more of the rolls, and means to flow the unbeaten
stock directly onto the drainage screen, said
means including an enclosed supply conduit hav
ing a downwardly turned spout for so ñowing
the unbeaten stock directly onto the drainage
screen as to initially spread and distribute the
stock over the surface of the screen, said spout
being _an enclosed conduit forming a continuation
of the supply conduit and having at its bottom
end a fully open downwardly directed mouth of
large area, said mouth being as large as the
cross-section of the conduit and opening di
rectly onto 4the top of the screen, without inter
mediate box or the like, the periphery or lip of
said- open mouth being disposed directly over
and generally parallel to the screen, and suiiiciently close thereto as to cause the unbeaten
stock to spread out sidewardly from the spout
over the surface of the screen.
«
ROLAND A. PACKARD.
‘
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