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Патент USA US2124396

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July 19,1938.
J
HS‘FRANK
'
.
‘
2,124,396
SACHET
Filed May 5, 1957
$2916.
INVENTOR
Barr.9 /$'- Frail/2'
ATTORN EY
Patented ‘July 19, 1938
2,124,396
UNITED STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,124,396
SACHET
Harry S. Frank, New York, N. Y.
Application May 5, 1937, Serial No. 140,961
6 Claims.
(Cl. 299—-24)
Figs. 15 and 16 illustrate two cross-sections
tainers, such asv sachets or similar devices, and through ribbon-shaped types of my device; and
particularly to what may be tremed continuous
Fig.'17 illustratesa border decoration provided
‘ The present invention relates to scented con
sachet devices or sachet cords.
CH
with bows, all made from my sachet device, as ap
The prime object of this invention is to provide
a sachet device of an elongated continuous struc
ture, adapted to be severable at any point of its
length forthe purpose‘ of ‘ forming self-contained,
independent sachets‘or scented units which may
10 be formed into any desired shapes‘ or articles of
such as cotton or wool, which is either scented
by a liquid perfume or which is dipped into, and
dividual units, ‘left either in plain, original form,
is caused to retain a sufficient quantity of sachet
or shaped into ornaments, may be applied to ex—
powder, and from which ?brous, scented material
isting garments, apparels of any sort, hats, and
I form longitudinal strips, ribbons or rolls which
I place into and uniformly distribute within the
tubular covering. Thereupon I secure the ?brous
struct and arrange .a continuous, scent-carrying
gether the cover material or by stitches, which
bons, edge-borders or make them otherwise at
pass through the material of the covering and
tachable for the double purpose‘of ornamenting
and scenting the articles to which arey are ap
also through the ?brous ?ller itself. The ar
rangement of the through-stitches may be dif
plied.
ferent, depending upon the intended use of my
'
e
_
or‘ metho’d‘whereby my continuous sachet device
‘J is produced.
'
"
With the foregoing and still further objects
and additional important advantages in view,
this invention will be more readily understood
from the following description, in connection with
the accompanying drawing, which latter, al
though forming an‘ important part of my dis-,
closure, are not intended to limit‘the same to the
actual illustrations presented.
In the latter, Figs. 1,2, ‘3, 4, and 5 illustrate
35 various forms of my continuous sachet device;
Fig. 6 is a typical cross-sectional view through
the modi?ed form shown in Fig. 5;
‘ Fig. 7 is a typical cross-sectional view through
any one of the modi?cations shown in Figs. 1, 2,
‘10 4 and 9;
e
.
Fig. 8 is a typical cross-sectional view through
the modi?ed form illustrated in Fig. 3;
Fig, 9 illustrates an embodiment of my device
p, Cl
in'the process of being severed;
Fig. 10 is a; modi?ed form of my continuous
sachet‘ device;
'
Fig. 11 is a typical cross-sectional viewthrough
Fig.
-
?ller within the covering by either drawing to
device as to make it applicable to serve as rib
Another object of my invention is a process
7
a close-textured or closely woven fabric a con
tinuous tubular structure, into which I place
either sachet powder directly, or a ?brous ?ller,
decorative nature'or adornments, and which in
i5 carriable articles, such as handbags, etc.
Another object‘ of this invention is to so con
20
plied to a garment.
In producing my device I preferably form from
10;
‘
‘
‘
v
<
'
Fig. 12 illustrates an ornamentation produced
of a bow held together by‘ a pin;
I
Fig. 13 illustrates a spiral con?guration pro
.
tively prevented. _ The
independent
compart
ments formed by this method prevent the loss
of appreciable quantities of scenting material,
when the device is transversely severed at any
point or points throughout its length, and limit
such loss to the ,quantity of scenting material
contained in one such minute compartment.
In
cidentally, the through-stitching may be made
highly ornamental, thus enhancing the appear
ance of my ‘device.
Under certain circumstances, however, it may
be advantageous to use either a truly transverse
stitching, or draw together or tie the tubular
outer covering .at uniform distances, thereby si
multaneously squeezing the interior ?ller. Obvi
ously, the shape of the tubular outer covering may
be altered, and while it may be constructed to
have a uniform shape or diameter, under certain
‘
50.‘ from my continuous sachet device in the form
duced ‘from my. device; I‘
article. However, I prefer to provide a zigzag
stitching or zigzag crosswise stitching, whereby a
continuous series of independent, closed com
partments are formed, and whereby the disen~
gagement of the ?brous ?ller from the outer cov
ering, at any point of the device at which it
may be severed into individual units, is effec
..
' Fig. 14 is another bow‘ ornamentation made
55> from my continuous sachet cord;
'
circumstances outer coverings may be employed
with varying cross-sections. Similarly, it is my
intention to provide for certain speci?c purposes,
such as for border decorations, double or multiple
rows of parallel sachet cords, each of which rows
may be filled either individually, after the rows
are‘formed, or the scented ?ller material may be
all)
2
52,124,396
placed into the covering before it is divided into
rows by longitudinal stitching.
Referring now speci?cally to the different ?g
ures of the drawing, in Fig. 1 there is illustrated
ployed for producing multiple sachet cords, such
as triple or quadruple sachet cords.
Referring now to Fig. 9, there is illustrated a
a simple sachet cord consisting of an outer fabric
sachet cord similar to that shown in Fig. 2, which
is provided with the zigzag cross-stitching l2.
covering l0, which is ?lled with a scented inlay,
and which covering is provided with a through
In this ?gure is illustrated how a continuous
sachet cord of my construction may be severed
stitching, indicated at ll, engaging both the
at any point into individual sachet cord units
without practically any loss of the sachet powder
held within.
10
outer covering and the inlay, so as to prevent the
latter from disengaging the outer covering at
any place the device may be severed. A similar
structure is illustrated in Fig. 2 where I employ
a crosswisely arranged zigzag stitching, indi
cated at [2.
In Fig. 3 the outer covering extends into an
15
attaching tab l 3, formed by the edges of the cov
ering material, which are held together along a
stitched line indicated at M. Attaching tab 13 is
intended to be secured to existing garments or
20 other apparels so that the scented, cross-stitched
portion of the covering is free of the article to
which it is attached. An enlarged cross-section
through Fig. 3 is shown in Fig. 8, clearly. illus
trating the construction of the outer covering Ill
25 and the tab extension I3. The interior of the
covering is ?lled with cotton, wool or other
?brous material, indicated at [5, which is either
?rst dipped into and sprayed with sachet powder,
or is scented with a liquid, before being placed
30 within covering Iii.
In Fig. 4 a modi?ed form of stitching through
my sachet device is indicated at Hi. In this
construction I transverse the outer material by
either one or two stitching rows which divide
35 the sachet device into uniform individual com
partments so that when this modi?ed form of my
device is severed at any point, the only loss of
sachet powder suffered would be at most from
the‘ two severed ends of one compartment. It
40 is obvious, of course, that this ribbon or cord may
be severed between the two parallel stitches 16,
thereby reducing a possible loss of sachet powder
to a minimum.
In Fig. '7 is shown a typical cross-section taken
through either one of the Figs. 1, 2, 4, or 9, again
showing an outer fabric covering I0 in the shape
of a tube, and wherein the ends of the fabric
indicated at I9 are ?rst sewn together exteriorly,
while the material is turned with “the wrong side
50 out”, whereupon the ?nished tube is inverted so
that the united edges of the material are brought
inwards, as indicated in Fig. '7. Now the tube
interior is ?lled with scented wool 15.
Referring to Figs. 5 and 6, there is illustrated
a double row of my sachet cord which consists
of an outer covering I0’, made of a wide strip
of. fabric, the latter being sewn together at its
edges at 20 in the manner explained above,
whereupon the material is inverted. Then the
interior of the now formed large tube is ?lled
with scented wool. The ?lled device thereafter
is ?attened; then the device is divided longitu
dinally by stitching, as indicated at 21 in Fig. 5,
whereby the device is shaped into two symmetri
cal halves, each half forming a structure simi
lar to that shown in Fig. '7.
Then I provide a
zigzag cross-stitching 23, which holds the scented
?ller within its outer covering in the same man
ner as described in connection with the previous
In Figs. 10 and 11 is illustrated a modi?ed con
struction of my continuous sachet cord where I
employ an outer covering 22, which is periodi
cally broadened and reduced in cross-section and
is provided with a correspondingly shaped, inte
rior scented ?ller 23, the latter being held within
the outer covering by a zigzag cross-stitching of
graduated dimensions indicated at 24.
The shapes or cross-sections of the continuous
sachet cords do not necessarily have to be circu
lar as indicated in Figs. 6, 7 and 8, but may be
oval, as in Fig. 11, or may take shapes similar to
that indicated at 21 and 28 in Figs. 15 and 16.
In employing my ready-made continuous sachet
cord, any number of attractive ornamentations
may be formed therewith, as indicated in Figs.
12, 13, 14 and 17. Moreover, my sachet cord in
band form, shown in cross-section in Figs. 15 and
16, may be employed as ribbons for holding to
gether different articles, such as handkerchiefs, 30
napkins, etc., for the purpose of not only deco
rating them, but also scenting them and keeping
them scented when stored in closets or other
storing places.
In the various illustrations I have shown the 35
?brous ?ller of my sachet cords to be secured
therewithin by stitching. However, I have also
experimented with, and succeeded in securing
the ?ller, scented with sachet powder, in the
tubular outer covering by means of applying to 40
the interior surface of the covering a cement or
glue at uniform distances in very small quanti
ties, and by subjecting the ?lled coverings to a
sort of rolling or squeezing operation, until the
?ller is securely held in place at a series of indi»
vidually minute areas or points.
The material employed for the outer covering
of my sachet cord is preferably fabricated in the
manner stated before.
However, I have also
found it advantageous to construct my outer .
coverings from round-knitted material or from
hollow cord. My ?ller may be constructed from a
similar material. I have experimented with and
succeeded in ?lling tubular cording with sachet
powder, and inserting the ?ller in an outer hollow
covering. In every case, however, the material
used for the outer covering is preferably of close
texture, either woven or knitted, Whereas the
?ller is made of a relatively coarse texture. When
I substitute my cross-stitching by spot-cement
ing, the ?nished product will resemble a sachet
cord used in the ornamentation illustrated in
Fig. 13.
,
In the foregoing description I have stated that
I preferably use an outer covering and an interior 65
?ller or scent-carrier. However, during the de
velopment of this device I have also succeeded in
forming continuous sachet cords wherein the
sachet powder is held within the tubular outer
covering without the employment of an addi 70
?gures. Filler I5’ of the two symmetrical
shapes of Fig. 6 may be introduced individually
after the double tubular structure of the outer
tional ?brous carrier, whereby the powder itself
covering is formed.
whereupon I force thereinto scented sachetpow
der which I uniformly distribute by rolling the 751
The same principle of con—
75. struction as used in Figs. 5 and 6 may be em
constitutes a scent-carrier. In other words, I
form tubular material in‘the manner outlined,
3
2,124,396
covering-gtoa icertain uniform thickness,- where
upon I ‘again-employ, a cross-stitching operation
inorder todivide the. ,longitudinalsachet device
into individual, independent compartments for
' preventing the spilling of the powder- from the
entireyd'evice'.whenithe latter is severed to form
individual sachet units. Thus it becomes clearly
evident vthat I am not depending entirely upon
the insertion of avscented ?brous carrier within
10 an outer covering and that I can use the sachet
powder directly within the covering. A thus pre
pared sachet cord is! particularly advantageous
when it is desired to produce a stronger scenting
of the article to which my sachet cord is applied.
15 When producing a sachet cord directly ?lled with
sachet powder, care is to be taken to the covering
material which has ‘to be Very closely woven so as
‘to prevent the powder from penetrating through
the pores of the material. Any one of’ the em
20 bodiments in Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 15, 16,
or 17 may be produced either with a ?brous
scent-carrier for absorbing liquid, or powdered
scenting material, or with a scent-carrier, such as
sachet powder per se.
25
My invention lends itself to a color- and scent
scheme combination in that, for instance, rose
colored sachet cord may be scented in a par
ticular way, whereas blue sachet cord would have
another odor, while green sachet cord may be
30 scented again differently. In this way the scent
ing of the sachet cord may be identi?ed also by
the coloring of the article.
In marketing my continuous sachet cord, I
preferably employ individual, “Cellophane”-c0v
35 ered packages containing generous lengths of
sachet cords of different coloring, which may
indicate different scenting, and from which pack
age individual sachet cord pieces may be cut for
such ornamentations as described previously.
40
While I am aware of sachet ornaments of vari
ous descriptions, I do not know of any continu
ous sachet device which may be readily severed at
any place to form’ individual and independent
- sachet cord units. from which different ornamen
tations may be constructed, without an appreci
able loss of the scenting material held within and
wherein the length dimensions of the sachet de
vice and of each sachet unit severed therefrom
50 are substantially greater than any of its other
dimensions, such as its diameter, cross-section or
width. In the drawing I have illustrated various
embodiments of my continuous sachet cord con
struction, and since it is obvious that still fur
ther variations and improvements may be readily
developed, I reserve for myself the right to make
changes and improvements, necessitated by spe
ci?c employments of my device, without depart
ing from the broad scope of my invention, as set
forth in the annexed claims:
I claim:
i
1. A sachet device, comprising a substantially
continuous tubular outer covering made of rela
tively close-textured fabric, a scented, coarse
' textured ?ller, constituting a scent carrier in the
interior of the covering throughout its entire
length, said covering and said ?ller being per
either‘ the scenting material or of the scent'car
rier, at the severing-points.
._
I
~;
I
.
uniformly and in even distribution the interior of
the covering throughout its entire length, said
covering and said ?ller being permanently united
with one another at such a multitude of points 10
throughout their combined length that relatively
small, self-contained, individual compartments
‘are formed,‘ and that when the device is severed
at any point or points of its length, the severed
portion or portions will have and retain all essen 15
tial characteristics of the whole device, without
any appreciable loss of either the scenting mate
rial or of the scent carrier, at the severing points,
and a tab extending from the covering for facili
tating the attachment of the device.
3. In a sachet device comprising a substan
tially tubular, continuous structure, the length
dimension of which very substantially predomi
nates any of its other dimensions, said structure ‘
consisting of an outer covering made of rela
tively close-textured fabric, and a scent carrier
25
completely ?lling the interior of the covering
and being uniformly distributed throughout the
entire length of the latter, a multitude of sub
stantially transversely arranged stitches passing
30
through the walls of the covering, and being so
closely ‘spaced that a multitude of self-contained,
small, individual compartments are formed, and
that when the device is severed at any point of
its length, the loss of the scented carrier is
minimized.
4. In a sachet device comprising‘ a substan
tially tubular, continuous structure, the length
dimension of which very substantially predomi
nates any of its other dimensions, said structure 4.0
consisting of an outer covering made of relatively
close-textured fabric, and a scent carrier com
pletely filling the interior of the covering and
being uniformly distributed throughout the entire
length of the latter, a'multitude of substantially
transversely arranged stitches passing through
the walls of the covering, and being so closely
spaced that a multitude of self-contained, small,
individual compartments are formed, and that
when the device is severed at any point of its
length, the loss of the scented carrier is mini
mized, and a tab extending from, and along the '
entire length of the covering for facilitating the
attachment of the device.
5. In a sachet device comprising a substan
tially tubular, continuous structure, the length
dimension of which very substantially predomi
nates any of its other dimensions, said structure
consisting of an outer covering made of rela
tively close-textured fabric. and a scent carrier 60
completely ?lling the interior of the covering
and being uniformly distributed throughout the
entire length of the latter, a multitude of means
arranged‘ substantially transversely to, and so en
gaging the covering, that the latter is divided
manently united with one another at such a mul
titude of points throughout their combined length
of the scented carrier is minimized.
compartments are formed, and that when the
device is severed at any point or points of its
length, the severed portion or portions will have
and retain all essential characteristics of the
whole device, without any appreciable loss of
5
.textured ?ller, constituting ascent. carrier, ?lling
into a multitude of self-contained, small, indi
vidual compartments, and that when the device
is severed at any point of its length, the loss
that relatively small, self-contained, individual
‘ .
,2. A sachet device, comprising-a substantially
continuous tubular outer covering made of rela
tively- closeetexturedfabric, a .scented,~ coarse
‘
6. Inv a sachet device comprising a substan
70
tially tubular, continuous structure, the length
dimension of which very substantially predomi
nates any of its other dimensions, said structure
consisting of an outer covering made of rela
tively close-textured fabric, and a scent carrier 75
4
2,124,396
completely ?lling the interior of the covering
and being uniformly distributed throughout the
entire length of the latter, a multitude of means
arranged substantially transversely to, and so
Cl engaging ‘the covering, that the latter is divided
into a multitude of self-contained, small, indi
vidual compartments, and that when the device
is severed at any point of its length, the loss of
the scented carrier is minimized, said dividing
means consisting of a multitude of spaced, dou
ble rows of stitches.
1
HARRY S. FRANK.
v
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