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Патент USA US2124452

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July 19, 1938.
-
A. G. SHAVER
2,124,452
RAILWAY TRAIN OPERATING AND DISPATCHING, SYSTEM
Original Filed May 30, 1931
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
July 19, 1938.
2,124,452
A. G. SHAVER
RAILWAY TRAIN OPERATING AND DISPATCHING SYSTEM
Original Filed May 30, 1931
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
A TORNEY
Patented July 19, 1938
>
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_
'0
STATES PTENT OFFICE
2,124,452
RAHJWAY TRAIN ‘OPERATING
DIS
PATCHING SYSTEM
Archibald G. Shaver, Chicago, 111.
Application May 30, 1931, Serial No. 541,131
,
Renewed July 13, 193’?
30 Ca.
((31. 246-40
This invention relates to railway train op-
are modi?ed in such manner that the means
crating and dispatching systems and has special
used for communication between rear end and
reference to the provision of improved means
for communication on and with trains and the
5 operation of track switches and signals for trains
to enter passing sidings to meet and pass other
trains.
_
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‘
'
head end of trains do not normally include
transformer employed for communication
tween the train and the dispatcher. In this
vventi'on, devices are provided for connecting
the
be
in- 5
the
transformer into the intermediate circuit and
More speci?cally, the present invention is re- - the dispatcher's communication circuit when
lated to the type of train operating systems de10 scribed in my applications for letters Patent
?led October 22, 1927 under Serial No. 227,932,
September 7, 1928, under SerialNo. 304,483,
and July 13, 1929' under Serial No. 378,000. In
these pending applications, the systems of train
communication between the dispatcher‘ and the \_
train isdesired. With this arrangement better 10
results are attained for rear end to head end
communication in that the impedance of the
intermediate circuits is lowered, and‘longer inter
mediate circuits, with consequently longer com
15 operation disclosed provide means ‘for communication between the conductor on the rear and
municating zones, are possible where desired;
Another object of the invention is the provi
the engineman on the head of trains and between
the train dispatcher and either the conductor or‘
the engineman, or both, that information may
20 be had by each and instructions issued with regard to the operation of trains, including trains
operating into and out of passing 'sidings in
meeting and passing other trains. Further, in
15
sion of means whereby‘ one device serves to con-1
nect two intermediate circuits with the dis
patcher’s circuit instead of one device for each
intermediate circuit for such connection, as is 20
the case in, the disclosure of the pending appli- ‘
cations referred to.
»
Another object of the invention is the provi-,
connection with the means for communication ' sion of separate train carried inductors for trans
25 there are means for the operation of the switches ‘ mittin'g and receiving communications on the 25
and signals concerned for trains to enter and
train.
’
leave sidings and pass other trains.
In these
Provision is made for train operation in a
systems each train operates in a communication
stretch of track containing alternate sections of
zone of its own which always includes at‘. inter:0 mediate wayside circuit. The stretch of track
over which the trains operate is sectionalized and
an intermediate circuit is provided for each seca
tion; but as, and during the interval. the train
travels from one section to the next, the two
35 intermediate circuits for the adjoining sections
are automatically connected together, thus cre_ ating a traveling circuit e?’ect.
single and double track Where the track Switch
is always set to enter the double track sec- 30
tions, and trains leaving double tracl;v may trail
through the switches without Stopping
Still another object of the invention is an 8-1‘
rangement for control of the switch, signal and
communication circuits by the dispatcher and 35
the control by the dispatcher of the stopping
Each interme-
and starting of the power plants which furnish
diate circuit is so arranged as to be in continu-
energy for the operation of the switches, signals
ous communicative relation with both‘ ends of
40 the train as the train travels through the cor-
responding section. and each such circuit is also
provided with'means for communicative con-
and communication control at passing siding loCations-
'
-
’
40
i To the accomplishment of the foregoing and
Such other Objects as may hereinafter appear.
nection with the communicationmeans provided ‘ my invention consists in the elements and their
for the dispatcher.
' relation one to the other, as hereinafter‘ par
45 i
For entering and leaving passing sidings means
are provided, that the track switch may be operated either from the approaching train or by
the dispatcher, and the signals are controlled to
protect and authorize the movement of the train
50 over the switch. all in accordance with the un-
derstanding had between the conductor, engine-
ticularly described and sought to be de?ned in 45
the claims, reference being had to the accom
panying drawings which show a preferred em
bodiment of my invention, and in which:
Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic view of a portion of
a stretch of single and double tracklshowing the 50
communicating system.
1
Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view of the arrange
man and train dispatcher.
For the system which is the subject matter
ment and control of signals at-the ends of a
of the present invention, the systems disclosed
section of double track.
55 in my pending applications. referred to above,
-
’
Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic view of the inductors. 55
2
2,124,452
circuits and communication apparatus carried , receiver and selective equipment in the train dis- ,
patcher’s o?ice. W is a switch arranged for
on the train.
operation by the dispatcher to connect the con
Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic view of the communi
ductor H3 with either DSE, DR or DT as re
,
cation system circuits including means for the
quired. Normally, this switch is in connection 5
5 dispatcher to connect his circuit with a train.
with DR, and preferably is so biased by a‘ spring
'
Fig. _5 illustrates means for selectively operat
or other suitable means. DI and D2 are way
ing circuit contacts.
,
'
Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic view of circuits and
means for ‘operating a track switch including a
10 power plant for furnishing electrical energy.
Figures 1, 2, 4 and 6 are fragmentary showings
of a stretch of railway track in which TI and T2
are the track rails, BX is a battery for a track
circuit, the insulated joints are represented by a
15 short straight line across the line representing
' the track rails and are generally designated by J,
the track switches are designated F followed by
Y ~a su?lx, the manually operated track switch
stands are designated by G followed by a number
20 which is the‘same as that used for the corre
sponding track switch, track circuit relays are
designated E followed by a suf?x, signal control
relays are designated by C followed by a number
for each which is the same as that of the signal
25 to which it refers, selectors are designated by L
followed by a su??x, relays co-operating with se
side conductors along the railroad connected
with the dispatcher’s telephone and selective
equipment, and constitute what is generally re- 10
ferred to as the dispatcher’s “telephone line".
Li, L2, L3, etc., are selectors adapted to be oper
ated by the dispatcher in connection with his se
lective equipment DSE to control relays Kl, K2,
K3, etc. These relays K close circuits in either 15
of two positions. Such relays are generally
known as “off and on” relays and the actual con
tact operating members may take the form of
the cam and ratchet ‘arrangement shown in Figs.
5 and 6. The selectors Ll, L2, and L3 respec- 20
tively control contacts 42, 46 and 50. With any
one of these contacts closed, the corresponding
relay K is energized to shift its contacts, which
remain in the position to whichshifted until the
selector is again energized to close its contact .25
when the relay K shifts its contacts to the other
lectors are designated by K each followed by a . illustrated position.
number which is the same as that for the selector
with which it is associated, and the transformers
so are designated T followed by a-su?ix to agree
with that for the corresponding selector. The
symbols used in the drawings for the signals, re
lays, relay contacts, batteries, circuits, etc., are
those conventionally employed. In these ?gures
35 various features of the invention are shown seg-_
regated to more clearly illustrate the invention.
Fig. 1iiv illustrates a portion of railroad repre
sentative of a district in which there are alternate
sections of single and double track. The general
40 arrangement of the communicating system is il
H is a relay controlled by ,
contacts of the track circuit relays E5, E6, E1
and E8.
The function of this relay under nor- ‘
mal conditions is to connect the intermediate 30
circuit for the double track section CS to the
dispatcher’s telephone line Di and D2 for com
munication with the dispatcher so that the train
attendants may initiate the conversation.
The intermediate circuits for sections BS and 35
CS are typical of the single and double track
section arrangement.
There is only a partial '
showing of the intermediate circuits for sections
AS and DS.
The intermediate circuit for section
I
AS when shown complete would be like that illus- 40
trated for section CS and the intermediate cir
cuit for section DS if shown complete would be
like that illustrated for section BS.
Shown within the section BS is a train No. 6
lustrated in this ?gure.
CS is generally representative of a section of
double track with the switches F2 and F3 nor
mally-set for trains to enter the double track.
45 BS is generally representative of a section of with a rear end car or caboose CA and a 1000- 45
single track located between .two sections of ' motive L0 at the head end. Shown on track
The section AS is a partial view of
M2 of the double track section CS is a train No.
another section of double track in arrangement
like CS. The section DS is a partial view of an
50 other section of single track in arrangement like
5 also with a car or caboose CA at the rear end
' double track.
BS.
GI , G2 and G3 are switch stands for manu
ally operating the track switches Fl, F2 and F3
respectively. In the connection of each of these
switch stands to the track switch is a device as
55 HI, which permits trains to leave sections of the
double track without it being necessary for an
‘attendant to set the switch for such movement.
In such train operation the train trails through
the track switch without causing damage.
and a locomotive LO at the head end. These two
trains illustrate a condition where train No. 6 50
will proceed along the single track main line into
track Ml of the double track section passing train No. 5 while the latter is on the track M2.
As the trains leave the section they will pass over
the switches, as F2 and‘ F3, without stopping, as 55
heretofore explained.
’
'
Z illustrates a sub-section of any arbitrary
length.
I
'
~
Sig- , ’ . The intermediate circuit for section BS nor
mally comprises conductor l8, contact 19, con- 60
ductor 20, contact 2| and back contact 22. The
conductors l8 and 20 are transposed at intervals
for these signals governing tra?ic to, from and i to form an equal number of loops._ Either con
60 nals I to 12 are block signals with the added func
tion of controlling the passage ofltrains to and
from the sections of double track. The circuits
over the double track section, are illustrated in ‘ ductor I8 or 20 is always so locatedon the rail
road, preferably in the center of,the track on 65
tra?lc on the single ‘track sections may be in ac- the ties, as to be in inductive relationship with
the inductors carried on the train.
:iordance with any of the various known prac
The intermediate circuit for double track sec
ces.
‘
65 Figure 2. The circuits for the signals governing
The railroad is divided into sections for track
70 circuit purposes, arranged in accordance with the
usual track circuit practice. In Figure 1 the
track relays are shown controlling only the con
tacts operated in connection with the communi
cation system.
75
'
D1‘, DR and DSE are respectively, transmitter,
tion CS normally comprises conductor 23, con
tact 24, conductor 25, contact 26, conductors 21 70
and 30, and contact 29 closed. It will be noted
that as’ illustrated there is a conductor for each
track. While but one transposition is shown,
others, to make an equal number of loops, may be
provided if necessary. Since train No. 5 shunts 75
arsensa
3
the circuit for relay E0, this latter is de-ener tacts illustrates the closed position of the com- '
mutator or contact in its respective circuit, for
gized, opening its front contactAS?, which re
sults in relay vH being de-energized to open its example. contacts OI and 03 are normally in the
front contact 29 and close its back contact 38. position closing their respective circuits. . Con
The intermediate circuit for-section CS is now tact 02 closes its circuit only when operated to
closed through front contact 28 and coil S of its fourth position. Contact 03 also closes its
transformer T3. Also, primary P of transformer circuit in position three. Contact 04 closes its
T3 is connected to the dispatcher’s telephone line circuit in position three. The circuits connected ,
conductors DI and D2 by conductor 4|, contact with the commutator devices CM! are generally
closed as explained for commutator device CM! 10
10 40, conductor 39, back contact 38 closed, trans
'and as recited in Figure 2.
former primary P and conductor 31.
The selector L! is connected across‘ the con
The circuit for control relay C5 comprises com.
ductors DI and D2 by the conductors 6°! and 33. ‘ mon conductor C, coil of relay C5, conductor 83,
Selector L2 is connected across the conductors DI normally closed commutator contact OI, con
15 and D2 by the conductors 08 and 36. ‘The selector
L3 is connected to the conductors DI and D2 by
the conductors 31 and 4|.
The circuit for relay ,KI comprises battery BI,
conductor 43, contact 42 normally open, conductor
20 45, coil of relay KI and conductor Ml. The cir
cuit for relay K2 comprises battery B2, conductor
51, contact 46 normally open, conductor 69, coil
of relay K2 and conductor 58.
The circuit for
relay K3 normally comprises battery B3, conduc-.
25 tor 53, contact 50 normally open, conductor 5i,
coil of relay K3 and conductor 52.
That much of the partial intermediate circuit
for section AS, as is shown, comprises conductor
I'I, back contact I6, conductor I5, contact It and
The circuit for relay H comprises battery BY,
conductor 59, coil of relay H, conductor 50, con
tact A60 normally closed, and conductors M and
62. It will be noted by reference to Figure 6 that
battery SY and generator UI are illustrated as a
source of energy for relay H and its circuit, as an
,
'
Conductors Iii and H3 connect DT, DR and
DSE to conductors Di and D2, depending upon the
position of switch W. .
45
‘
‘
and common conductor C.
The circuit for con
25
trol relay Cl comprises common conductor C,
coil of relay Cl, conductor 87, contact 02 nor
mally open and conductor 88 to conductor 84,
and then proceeds ‘in common with the circuit
cuit for control relay C0 comprises common con
35 contact 55, conductor 56, contacts 57 and 58,
‘
conductor Ill and through the other circuit con
trolling contacts of the block, if any, to battery
for control relay C5 already explained. The cir 30
conductor I3.
That much which is shown of the partial inter
mediate circuit for section DS comprises conduc
tor 63, contact 64 and conductor 65.
alternative for battery BY.
ductor 84, contacts 85 and 06, conductor H9 and 15
through the other circuit controlling contacts of
the block to battery'and common conductor C.
The circuit for control relay C6 comprises com
mon conductor C, coil of relay C6, conductor ‘I6,
relay contact "i'l, switch operated contact '19 20
closed, conductor 80, normally/‘closed contact of
commutator 03, conductor 8i, contact 82 closed,
’
Figure 2 is typical ofthe signal arrangement
for a section of double track as CS. Trains move
right-handedly on the tracks.‘ Signals Sand e
govern trains entering the double track in ac
cordance with the established direction of, tra?lc.
50 Signals 8 and II govern traffic over the track
switches F2 and F3 into the double track in the
direction against the regular current of tramc.
Signals 5 and I0 govern train movements from
double track to single track, in accordance with
55 the established direction of tra?ic. Signals ‘I and
I2 govern trains from double track to single track
against the established current of traffic.
Contacts 12 and ‘it 'are connected for operation
when switch F2 is opened and closed, contact ‘59
60 being closed with switch F2lin the normal or
closed position and ‘I2 being closed with switch
F2 in the open or reverse position. Contacts 9'?
and E04 are connected for operation, when switch
F3 is opened and closed, contact @‘i being closed
65 with switch F3 in the normal or closed position
and contact I 013 being closed with switch F3 in the
open or reverse position.
Relays C5 to CIZ inclusive are the relays for
controlling the correspondingly numbered sig
70 nals; that is,- control relay C5 operates to control
signal 5, etc. CMI and CM2 are commutator de
vices or contacts selectively controlled by the dis
patcher, in some such manner as illustrated in
Figure 5 and as hereinafter referred to. The
75 shaded section of each of these commutator con
ductor C, coil of relay C$,'conductor 39, contact
10, conductor it, normally open switch controlled
contact ‘#2, conductor ‘it, normally open contact
Oil, conductor id, contact 15, conductor H8 and
through other circuit controlling contacts of the
block, if any, to battery and common conductor
C. The circuit for control relay C9 comprises
common conductor C, coil of relay C9, conductor
95, normally closed ‘switch controlled contact. 97, 40
conductor 98, contact 99, conductor I00, normally
closed contact 07, conductor Iill, contact I02,
conductor 5 l6 and through other circuit controll
ing contacts of the block, if any, to battery and
commonconductor C. The circuit for control
relay CHO comprises common conductor C, coil of
relay Cill, conductor Bil, normally closed commu
tator contact 06, conductors 90 and 92, relay con
tacts 93 and Q6, conductor 95 and through other
circuit controlling contacts of the block, if any,
to battery and common conductor 0. The circuit
for control relay CII comprises common conduc
tor C, coil of relay CI 5, conductor I03, normally
open track switch controlled contact I04, con
ductor. I05, contact 808, conductor I01, normally
open contact 08, conductor I08, contact I09, con
ductor I I0 and through other circuit controlling
contacts of the block, if any, to battery and com
mon conductor C. The circuit for relay C!2
comprises common conductor C, coil of relay C I 2, 60
contact 05 normally open, conductor 92 and
thence common with the circuit for control relay
om, already explained,’ to battery and common
conductor C.
The signals illustrated in the various ?gures,
including those in Figure 2, may be of eitherthe
two or three position types and ‘they may be
semaphores or' light signals. For convenience,
the semaphore type is illustrated. The corre
sponding control relays, as C5 'to CI2, may be of .70
the ordinary electro-magnet type for two position
signaling or of the polarized type for three posi
tion signaling. Two position and three position
signaling is well known in the art as are also
polarized relays. I have not illustrated means 75
4
2,124,452
for controlling the circuits for three position sig
naling since that is not especially pertinent to the.
invention.
,
.
Figure 3 is a diagrammatic illustration of the
circuits and equipment for locomotives and ca
booses. Two inductors RN and TN‘, each com
prising a coil on an iron core, respectively for re
ceiver RE and transmitter TR, are mounted on
locomotives and cabooses so as to be in inductive
10 relationship with the intermediate circuits here
tofore explained. The circuit for transmitter TR
comprises conductor I55, normally open circuit
controlling contact I68, conductor I58, coil I51
of the inductor TN, and conductor I56. The cir
15 cuit for the receiver RE comprises conductor I5I,
' normally closed circuit controlling contact I59,
conductor I54, coil I53 of inductor RN and con
ductor I52. The switch SH is arranged to con
trol both the transmitter and receiver circuit,
20 such that only one can be closed at a time. Under
. certain conditions I may dispense with the use of
this switch, in which case the inductors RN and
TN are so mounted and the circuits so protected
that there may be simultaneous transmission and
26 reception of communication signals without the
necessity for opening the circuit for receiving
when it is desired to transmit. With such an ar
rangement, transmission and reception of com
municating signals, voice communication for‘in
30 stance, may be‘carried on in a manner similar to
for the partial sections ES and HS; but if these .
circuits were shown complete, that for ES would
be like GS and that for HS like ES. For the sec
tion PS, the intermediate circuit comprises con
ductor I28, back contact I24, conductor I25, front
contact I25, conductor I21 and front contact I28. _
For the section GS the intermediate circuit com 10
prises conductor I29, front contact I30, conductor
I3I, back contact I32, conductor I33 and front
contact . I 54.
With relay EII de-energized the contacts I34,
I25‘ and I38 are made on their back points so that
the intermediate circuits for sections FS‘ and GS
are connected together into one enlarged inter
mediate circuit comprising conductor I23, back
contact I24, conductor I25, back contact I26, con
ductor I29, front contact I30, conductor I3I,_back 20
contact I32, conductor I33. back contact I34, con
ductor I21 and front contact I28 connecting to
conductor I23.
It will be noted that normally each illustrated
section has two equal loops because of one. trans
position in each section. With the relay EII de
energized another transposition is effected, mak
ing in the enlarged intermediate circuit, four
equal loops.
v
The circuit for relay K4 comprises contact I48, 30
that for the usual public telephone systems. 28
conductor I49‘, battery B4, conductor I46, coil of '
illustrates a preferred position of a conductor of
the intermediate circuit with reference to induc
tors RN and TN, as, for example, conductor 23 of
intermediate circuit CS which has. a similar rela
tionship with the inductors on the locomotive L0
relay K4, and conductor I 41. With contact I48
closed, which may be but momentarily, relay K4
and caboose CA of train No. 5.
' ’
The transmitter TR and the receiver RE are
assumed'to be suitably arranged for either audio
40 or radio transmission of communication signals,
depending upon‘ which system is used. In gen
eral, it is desirable to so design these units that,
the transmitter output will be relatively large and
the receiver ampli?cation, where required, will be
45
In the ?gure are two complete intermediate cir
cuits, one for section FS and the other for section
GS. Only partial intermediate circuits are shown
relatively small. This is particularly true where
is energized, shifting its contacts I24, I32 and ,
I44 to theirfront points, connecting transformer 35
secondary ‘S2 through front contact I24 into the
intermediate circuit for section FS, connecting
secondary SI through front contact I32 into the
intermediate circuit for section GS, and connect
ing primary P through front contact I44 across 40
the conductors DI and D2. With the train occu
pying the track circuit for relay EII, this relay
is tie-energized, as heretofore explained. Contact
I38 being closed, secondary coil SI is now shunted
from the intermediate circuit by reason of the '45,
communication is carried on with audio frequency,
circuit being closed through conductor I4I, back
and there is probability of foreign inductive dis
contact ‘I39 and conductor I42. It will, there-‘
turbances affecting the reception. In the use of . fore, be noted that with the train in the section
radio frequencies in this communicating system, of relay EI I; not only are the two intermediate
50 I may alternatively, employ the loop type of in
circuits for sections FS and GS joined together 50
ductors rather than those with iron cores as illus
trated.
-
‘
Figure 4 is illustrative of the wayside'communi
cating system applied to a stretch of track with
special reference to means for connecting the dis
patcher’s selective and telephone circuit, conduc
tors DI and D2, with two intermediate circuits at
the same time.
In the case of a double track rail
road, the arrangement as disclosed would either
60 be duplicated, or, instead of having conductors on
each of the tracks interconnected, the track con
ductors would be connected with separate conduc
tors on a pole line.
The intermediate circuits may
as one circuit, ‘but with the dispatcher having
operated his ‘selector L4 to place his communi
eating set in communication with they train, but
one secondary coil S2 remains connected in the
enlarged intermediate circuit so long as it remains
as such. With relay EII normal, the separate in
termediate circuits for section FS and GS are
again effective. When the dispatcher again oper
ates selector L4, the relay K4 shifts its contacts
back to normal and the transformer secondaries
SI and S2 and primary P again resume normal’
status.
,
The functions of the relays EIII and EI2 are
each be completely on the two tracks, with one
conductor on one track and another conductor _'simply that of connecting the adjacent interme 65
.on the other track, the two connected together at ' diate circuits, that is, ES and FS, together while
the ends of the section making a complete loop. the-train is in the circuit of Eli! and GS and HS
together while the train is in the circuit of EI2.
In the case of this latter arrangement, track cir
Assuming relays EIIl, EI I and EI2 each to repre
cuit sections in the second track, not shown here
70 with, would control the respective track 'relays sent a track circuit location, the arrangement as 70
- EIII, EI I, EI2, etc., of the track shown such that, shown at the location for EII, is repeated for
as the train passes overlthe second track, the every other track circuit location. In this way the
various intermediate circuits would be operated dispatcher by operating one selector, like L4,
as will now be described for the stretchof track _ placed at every other location, is enabled to con
nect his selective and telephone circuit, conduc 75
'
75 shown.
2,194,452‘
5.
tors Di and-D2, with every intermediate circuit ’ relay location comprises gasoline engine GE di
for the track stretch.
'
In Figure 5 is shown a method for operating a
plurality of commutator contacts from one selec
tor; for example, the commutator combinations
CMA and (EMS. L5 is a selector operated from the
dispatcher’s o?lce over conductors DI and D2 by
the selective equipment DSE. Whenso operated,
contact 232 is closed, which may be but momen
10 tarily. 236 is a gear or toothed wheel. When
contact 232 is closed, relay K5 is energized from
battery B5 through conductor 234, coil K5, con
ductor 233, contact 232 and conductor 23E. This
causes armature 235 to be raised, such that the
15 latch connected with it causes gear 236 to rotate
counter-clockwise each time K5 is energized.
Commutators O9, om, and CI hare on the same
shaft and movable with gear 238. The circuits
connected with these commutator contacts are
made and broken as desired. As illustrated in
Fig. 5, four positions are obtainable. While I have
shown this particular detailed arrangement for
operating commutator contacts, there are other
equally e?lcient methods of ‘accomplishing the
same purpose. Therefore, I do not want to be
con?ned to the use of the particular arrangement
shown.
In Figure 6 is illustrated means for the dis
patcher to operate the track switch F2, and to
control the power plant for furnishing the energy
for operating the switch F2 and for operating the
signals which govern tra?lc 'over the switch F2.
HTS is a hand throw stand for manually operat
ing the'track switch F2. SM is a mechanism for
rectly connected to generators UI and U2. ST
is the starting motor, which, when energized,
connects itself through a clutch with engine GE
to start same operating. Battery SY furnishes
energy for the starting motor ST and for the vari
ous relay and signal circuits. S00 is a circuit
controller fastened to the ‘common shaft of the
gasoline engine GE and the generators UI and U2.
The contact 225. is normally closed, but opens
when the speed of the gasoline engine GE reaches
10'
a point where it is self-operating. Thus, when
this point is reached, the starting motor ST is
tie-energized and disconnected from gasoline en
gine GE. The generator UI furnishes energy for 15'
charging the battery SY and for operating the
various relays and signals as indicated and ex
plained. HR is an electrolytic cell, or other de
vice, to prevent a reversal of current; that is, a
?ow of current from battery SY to generator H6, 20
in case, for some reason, the voltage of the cur
rent delivered from UI falls below that for the
battery SY. 0M2 and CM5 are assemblages of
commutator contacts each operated selectively by
the dispatcher. SR is a relay for controlling th
operation of the motor M.
25
_ '
‘When contact 225 is closed, signal 5 becomes
operative to authorize an. approaching train to
proceed over the switch along the main line. Its
circuit comprises common conductor CW, con 30
ductor 222, mechanism of signal 6, contact 265,
conductors 2M and 226, and battery SY con
nected to common conductor CW. When con?
tact 2% becomes closed by reason of relay CB
operating the switch F2, and M is the motor which , being energized, the circuit just described is 35
drives the mechanism.
,
'
v
-
6 is a signal governing trains over the switch
along the main line. 8 is a signal governing trains.
from the main line into the siding. 5 is a signal
adapted to govern trains from the siding to the
main line. 1 is a signal arranged to govern trains
along the main line trailing over the switch.
The control relays C5 to C8 control respectively
signals 5 to 8. The circuit for relay C6 comprises
common conductor CW, conductor ISI, front con
tact I52, conductor I53, coil of relay C8, conduc
tor I58, normally closed commutator contact om,
contact I59 closed when switch F2 is in normal
position, contact I60 closed when switch F2 is
locked, and thence through other controlling con
tacts of the block, if any, to battery and common
conductor CW. The circuit for control relay C2
comprises common conductor CW, conductor I5I,
contact I52, conductor I53, coil of relay C8, con
closed between conductors 2M and 222 and sig
nal 2 becomes operative to authorize a train to
proceed into the siding. When relay Cl is ener
gized, closing contact 201, signal 7 becomes op
erative to authorize a train to proceed over the
switch along the main line, energy being fur
nished through contact 287 from conductors 2B!
and 202- when contact 226 is closed, signal 5
4;»
becomes operative for a train to move from siding
to main line due to the circuit being closed be 45
tween battery leads, conductors 2M and 202. The circuit for the starting motor ST com
prises common conductor CW, battery SY, con
ductor 224, motor ST, conductor 225, contact 226,
conductor 221., commutator contact OI3 closed 50
in position 2, and conductor 228, connected to
common conductor CW.
,
@P is a battery or magneto in the ignition
circuit for the gasoline engine GE. This ignition
55 ductor Q54, contact I55, closed only when switch
circuit comprises battery BP, conductor 2I5, 55
"ignition contacts in. engine GE, conductors 2I6
locked in the reverse position, conductors I57 and and 2 I1, commutator contact OI2, closed in posi
‘ F2 is open, contact I58 closed when switch F2 is
224, battery SY to common conductor CW. The
circuit for relay C5 comprises common conductor
60 CW, conductor I12, coil of relay C5, conductor I89,
ductor- 223, commutator contact OII closed in 60
‘position 3, conductor 222, coil of relay SR, con
reverse position, contact .- I92 closed only when
ductor 22I and battery SY connected to common
switch F2 is open, conductor I92, contact I92, con conductor CW. The circuit for motor M to open
tact I94 and conductor l95 through other circuit ' the switch F2 comprises generator U2, conductor
controlling contacts in the block,_ if any, to bat
2| 4, contact 2I3, conductor 2| 2, contact 2| I closed
tery and to common conductor CW. The circuit - von its front point, conductor 2I0, motor M and
for control relay 01 comprises common conductor ' conductor 208 connecting to generator U2. For
CW, conductors 229'and I88, coil of relay C'I, con— closing the switch F2, the circuit is as above de
ductor I22, contact I98 closed when the switch scribed, excepting contact 2“ is closed on its
F2 is closed and locked, contact I 99 closed only back point, and conductor 209 connecting to 70
when the switch F2 is closed, commutator contact 1 motor M completes the circuit.
09 normally closed, conductors 200 and I92 and
Contained in’ the mechanism for motor M is a.
thence in common with‘ the circuit above ex-' circuit controlling device so arrangedthat when
plained for control relay C5.
the motor is operated to open the switch, the
The power plant ‘for this switch,‘ signal and operation of locking the switch in the open posi- 7'5 '1
contact ISI closed when switch F2 is locked in the
7
65
70
75
tion 2, and ignition energy .‘BP. The circuit for
relay SR comprises common conductor CW, con
6.
2,124,452
tion opens the circuit normally closed over con
ductor 2H! and closes a circuit over conductor 209.
When, the switch has been operated to the closed
position and is vbeing locked, the circuit con
trolling device, above referred to, again operates,
opening the circuit closed over conductor 20!)
and reclosi'ng the circuit over conductor ‘MD.
This is a well known practice in electric power
switch operation incorporated in the systems of
10 various signal companies.
Also getting energy from battery SY and gen
erator Ui, through the conductor 237, contact
238 and conductors 2M and 224, and returning
through common conductor CW, is the control
15 relay (not shown) for the distant signal (also
not shown) for signal 6. The relay H of Fig. 1
is also shown by the partial circuit, contacts 58
and 51, conductor 56, contact 55, conductors 20!
and 224, battery SY and common conductor CW
20 as getting its energy from the power plant of Fig.
.25
.
No. 6 within its block and signal i0 is at “stop”
because its block is occupied 'by train No. 5.
These same signals may also be at stop due to
the dispatcher having opened the circuits at con
tacts Cl and 06 by the operation of selector con
trolled commutators CM! and CM2 respectively.
While these signals are at “stop” with trains in
their blocks, the dispatcher would necessarily
have to place these signals in a condition to indi
cate "stop” to cover such a situation as where 10
train No. 5 would arrive at signal 5 to leave the
double track section CS before train No. 6 had »
entered the block of signal 5.
Considering now the‘ procedure in the passing
of the two trains No. 5 and No. 6 as referred to 15
above, the dispatcher communicates with train
.6 in the case that the track switch F2 of Fig. l
is power operated.- The conductor CW under
such circumstances‘ compares with the conductor
No. 5 and gives it the instructions while it is
within the section D8, which is but partly shown. It has been heretofore stated that the commu
nication arrangement for section DS is similar to 20
that for section BS, and therefore, the procedure
in instructing train No. 5 and receiving a reply
may be considered the same as that which follows
52 of Fig. 1.
for train No. 6.
'
The hand throw switch HTS has two levers.
In operation, one lever disconnects the power
mechanism SM and the other then operates the
switch F2.
Operation
'
'
In communicating with train No. 6 in the sec
25
tion BS, the dispatcher ?rst operates switch W
and causes the selective equipment DSE to oper
ate to send out the code of current impulses to ‘
which selector L2 is responsive, these impulses
following the circuit of conductors H3, iii, Di, 30
30
Referring to Figure 1, assume trains No. 6 and D2, 68 and 36. When selector L2 responds con
No. 5 have to pass each other. Dispatcher in
tact .46 closes causing relay K2 to close its contacts
structs train No. 5 as it approaches station Y 22 and 35 on their front points. This operation
that train No. 6 will-pass it while it is in the connects primary P of transformer T2 to con
35 double track section CS. He also instructs train ductors Di and D2 at contact 35 and secondary 35
No. 6 as it approaches station Y that train No. 5' .S into the intermediate circuit for section BS at
will be passed in the section CS. As a precaution
contact 22. The dispatcher next closes switch
that neither train will leave the double track W on conductor H2 to connect the transmitter
section till both trains have arrived within the DT to conductors DI and D2. He now transmits
section, the dispatcher causes signals 5 and Ill to his communication signals (assume they are voice 40
indicate “stop”. After having received the dis
signals) in the form of electric impulses to the
patcher’s instructions, the conductor in the circuit including the conductors Di and D2 and
caboose and the engineman in the locomotive cab coil P. These signal impulses are induced from
of each train confer with regard to the dis
coil P into the intermediate circuit for section
patcher’s instructions, and arrangement between
themselves is made as to such details for op-‘
eration of their respective trains as are necessary.
‘Upon the arrival of each train within the section
BS, through the secondary S of transformer T2 45
and conductors i0 and 20. Since the receiving
sets RC and RL of the caboose 'and'locomotive
respectively, each of which includes the inductor
‘RN in circuit with receiver RE, are normally in
CS, each conductor will report the arrival of his
He will also engage in‘ , inductive relation with conductors 20 and I8, the 50
signal impulses are picked up by the respective
communication with the engineman to make cer
tain of the identity of the other train as it is inductors RN and carried to the receivers RE I
passed. The dispatcher will then release each where they are transformed into the communi
eating signals which the dispatcher transmitted.
of the signals 5 and In that each train may pro
50 train to the dispatcher.
55 ceed.
If the two trains have arrived in the sec
tion CS before either has stopped for its respec
tive outbound signal (signal 5 for train No. 5
and signal ill for train No. 6), the dispatcher will
release the signals to “clear” so that each train
60 may proceed without having to stop.
As each
train leaves the double track section CS, for ex
ample when the train No. 5 is in the track circuit
of relay E5 and train No. 6 is in the track circuit
for relay E8, the conductor of the train advises
the dispatcher of that fact, the location of the
train, and any other information desirable for the
dispatcher to have in connection with the proper
'70
operation of trains.
As heretofore stated, Fig. 2 is typically illus
trative of the normal arrangement of signals, cir
cuits and operative devices for'signals for the
double track sections in the stretch of track
referred to in Fig. 1, and for this purpose is ar
ranged as applying to the section CS.
75
In Fig. 1, signal 5 is at “stop” because oftrain
‘As soon as the transmission of the instructions is
complete, the dispatcher closes switch W (usually
it will be arranged to automatically sooperate) to
place‘the receiver DR in circuit with conductors
Di and D2. Assume the conductor and engine
man of train No. 6, onefollowing the other, reply 60
to the dispatcher, acknowledging the instructions.
Each does this byoperating the switch SH of Fig.
3 so that the circuit for the transmitter TB. is
closed and the circuit for the receiver RE opened.
Each will repeat into his transmitter, again as 65
suming voice communication, that which he
wishes the dispatcher to know. These signals in
‘the form of communicating current impulses pass
through the coil ii‘! of the inductor TN, thus
setting up a magnetic ?eld which induces corre
70
sponding current impulses into the intermediate
circuit including conductors i8 and 20 and sec
ondary S' of transformer T2. Within transform
er T2 these signal impulses are induced into the
primary 1?, including the conductors DI and D2 75
2,134,452
7
and the receiver DR where they are transformed switch SH of his transmitting and receiving sets
into the communicating signals (speech) trans
TL and RL respectively, opening the circuit of
mitted by the conductorand engineman of train the receiver RE and closing the circuit of the
No. 6. When the conversation is ?nished, the transmitter 'I'R. ,He then transmits communi
dispatcher again operates switch W to close the . cating impulses into the inductor TN on the 10
circuit for the selective equipment DSE to send comotive. This in?uences the intermediate cir
a code of impulses to selector L2 which responds,
closing contact 46. Thus relay K2 is energized
to again shift its contacts to the normal position,
10 that is, closing contact 22 on its back point and
opening contact 35. This operation'disconnects
the dispatcher’s circuit from intermediate circuit
of section BS.
Should the dispatcher have found it more con
16 venient to do so, he might have operated the se
lector L2 for the section BS and the appropriate
selector (not shown) for the section DS connect
ing the respective transformers in the circuit con
taining conductors Di and D2, so that the inter
mediate circuits for sections BS and DS would
be connected to the conductors Di and D2 at. the
same time. Then he could have simultaneously
given his instructions to trains No. 5 and No. 6.
The replies from each train, acknowledging the
.25 instructions, ‘could then come in one following
the other in the order in which he would indicate.
The dispatcher now causes the signals 5 and
ill to indicate “stop.” In Fig. 5 it was indicated
how commutators such as CMI and CMZ are
30 operated. The dispatcher, first sends out a series
of the appropriate code of impulses to cause the
selector for GM? to operate the latter to position
3, closing contact 0? and opening contact 08,
which places the circuits in condition for signal
9 to indicate “proceed” and signal it to indicate
“stop.” He again sends out a series of appropri
ate impulses to operate the selector corresponding
cuit, of which conductors i8 and 20 are a part,
so that electric impulses corresponding to the
transmitted signals pass through this interme- '
diate circuit in?uencing the inductor RN of the 10
receiving set RC such that the electrical impulses
are carried in the circuit of the inductor RN to
the receiver RE where they are transformed into
communicating signals which were transmitted
from the locomotive. During the .time this com 15
municating is taking place the train may have
entered the track circuit for relay E4 in which
case the intermediate circuits for sections BS ‘
and CS are combined and the communicating
impulses between the head end and rear end will
then pass through this enlarged intermediate cir
cuit, which has been heretofore described.
Normally, the relay K3 is in the position shown.
With train No. 5 operating on track M2 of sec
tion CS in the position shown, relay E8 is de 25'
energized, opening the circuit of relay H‘. With
front contact 29 open, the intermediate circuit
for the section CS is connected through the sec
ondary S of transformer T3. With the back con
tact 38 closed, the primary ‘P of transformer T3 30
is connected across the dispatcher’s line, conduc
'tors Di and D2. The conductor of train No. 5
may now talk to the dispatcher. He operates
switch SH of his receiving and transmitting set
ESP-N, opening the circuit for the receiver RE
and closing the circuit for the transmitter TR.
He transmits the communicating impulses an
nouncing his arrival on track M2 into the cir
cult of inductor TN, energizing same with elec
trical impulses corresponding to the communi 40
cating impulses transmitted. These electrical
to commutator CMi, operating this commu
tator to the position 3, to place the circuits
40 through contacts OI and 03 for signals 5 and 5
in condition for signal 5 to indicate “stop” and
signal 8 to indicate “proceed.” Following com ' impulses in?uence the conductor 23 of the inmunication from and with the dispatcher, the termediate circuit for section CS, thus causing
conductor and engineman of each train commu
these impulses to pass through the secondary S
nicate with each other with reference to the in
of transformer T3 where they are induced as
structions from the dispatcher and other matters corresponding current impulses in the primary P
pertaining to the operation of the train in pass
of the transformer T3 and through conductors
ing other trains, including identi?cation of the Di and D2 to the dispatcher’s receiver DR, which
trains passed.
_
is normally connected ‘with the conductors DI
and D2. .In the dispatcher’s receiver DR these
The train No; 5 being assumed still in the sec‘
50
tion DS, the procedure in the communication be
current impulses are transformed into the com
tween the conductor and englneman will be simi
municating impulses transmitted by the conduc
lar to that which is now about to be described for tor from the train. If the dispatcher wishes to
reply or give any information to train No. 5 he
train No. 6. The conductor of train No.33 initi
ates the conversation by- operating switch SH of shifts his switch W to conductor H2, thus con
his set RC-TC to open the receiver circuit and necting his transmitter DT with the conductors
close the transmitting circuit. He then trans
Di and D2 and proceeds to transmit his reply as
mits- communication current impulses which en
communicating impulses into the circuit includ
ergize the inductor TN to induce corresponding ing conductors Di 'and D2 and’ the primary of
60 impulses into the intermediate circuit which in
transformer » T5. These impulses are induced
cludes conductor 20. As this intermediate cir
from the primary to the secondary of the trans
cuit is closed, including also conductor it which former T3 and thus into the intermediate circuit
is transposed with conductor 20, the electrical for section CS. Since the receiving sets RL and
impulses corresponding to the communication RC have again been placed in normal commusignals are carried through this closed circuit as nicative relationship with the intermediate cir
heretofore described. The receiving set RL on cuit, including the conductor 23, the electrical
the locomotive being in communicative relation
communicating. impulses in?uence the inductors
ship with conductor 20, ‘the inductor RN-is in?u-' RN of these sets on both ends of the train such
enced to transmit the corresponding communi
that corresponding impulses are carried to the
cating current impulses to the receiver RE where vreceivers RE and transformed into the} commu
they are transformed into the communicating nicating signals transmitted by the dispatcher.
signals transmitted. These signals may be either
when train N0. 6 arrives in the circuit for
by code or by voice. The conductor's switch SH track relay E5, the latterlis tie-energized, open
is now restored to- normal condition.
The en
gineman, in replying. to .the conductor, operates
> in'g contact 55, which would de-energize relay H"
were it not already ~de-energized dueto trainv
55
60
65
70
8
2,124,452
No. 5 within one of the track circuits controlling
relay H. The procedure by the conductor of
I No. 6 in announcing the arrival of his train with
in the section CS and by the dispatcher in mak
ing a reply, if any, is the same as that already
explained for train No. 5.
7
the train leaves the circuit for track relay E5,
communication may be initiated with the dis
patcher. Similarly, this is true for train No. 6.
As it enters the circuit'of track relay E9, the
intermediate circuits for sections CS and DS are
combined. During the time the train is in this
Should the dispatcher ?nd the exchange of
communications between conductors and engine
track circuit, and until it clears the track circuit
of relay E8, communication with the dispatcher
inen bothersome, he may disconnect the interme
may be initiated on the train No. 6.
10 diate circuit for section CS from the'conductor
DI and D2 by operating selector L3 to cause re
lay K3 to shift contact 28 toits back point and
open contact 40. Such operation leaves the in
termediate circuit for section CS in condition
15 for inter-train and intra-train communication.
As trains No. '5 and No. 6‘ are now both in the
section CS and their train carried communica
tion sets are in communicative relation with each
In cases
where such may be desirable, the engineman, in 10
stead of the conductor, may report to the dis
patcher that the train is leaving the section CS
and he may initiate the conversation similarly as
referred to above for the conductor.
While one of the trains referred to is in the 15
track circuit for relay E4 and the other train is
in the circuit for track relay E9, there may be
I. communication between their train carried com
other through the intermediate circuit for C8.
munication stations via the enlarged intermediate, 20 the conductors of each train, or'the engineman ' circuit for the sections BS, CS and DS. Relays 20
of each train, or all of them, may communicate
E4 and E9 being deenergized, the intermediate
with each other in exactly the same manner as
circuit for the section CS is connected at one end
with the intermediate circuit for section BS and
at the other end with the intermediate circuit for
heretofore explained for conductor and engine
'man on the same train, and thus each may es
25 tablish for a certainty the identity of the train
being passed and exchange such other informa
section DS.
25
_
In Fig. 4 is‘ shown a somewhat different ar
tion as seems desirable.
rangement for the dispatcher to connect his sta
Since the dispatcher is advised that both trains
are now in the double track stretch CS, he will
tion with the intermediate circuits for communi-;
cation with a train. If the dispatcher wishes to
have communication with a train in either section 30
FS or GS, or trains in each of these sections, he
will move his switch W (see Fig. 1) from the
normal position to connect with conductor H5,
and send out a code of impulses to which selector
30 close the switch W on conductor H5 and oper
ate the selective equipment DSE to send out the
appropriate code to operate the selector control
W ling commutator CMI, stepping the commutator
contacts around to the normal position} which is
'35 position I. This closes the circuit for control
relay C5 through contact OI so that signal 5 may
indicate “proceed" providing its block is clear,‘
I for train No. 5 to enter the single, track stretch
BS and continue on its way. Thedispatcher also
sends out the appropriate code for the selector
controlling commutator CMZ stepping same
around to its normal position or positionl. This
completes the circuit for control. relay CIII
through contact 06 so that signal III may indi
45 cate “proceed”, providing its block is clear, so
that train No. 6 may pass from the double track
section CS into the single track section DS.
As train No. 5 is about to leave track M2 to
' enter the single track section BS, the conductor
60 of this train operates his swtich SH opening the
receiver circuit of his receiving set RC and clos
ing the transmitting circuit of the transmitting
set TC. Relay K3 having been restored to nor
mal, he announces in the transmitter TR to the
55 dispatcher that the train is leaving the double
track section CS.
This causes current impulses,
corresponding to the signals transmitted, in the
circuit of inductor TN on the caboose, thus in
?uencing the intermediate circuit for section CS
60 of which conductors 25 and 23 and transformer
T3 are a part.
These current impulses are in
duced from the secondary S into primary P and
thus into the dispatcher’s circuit containing con
ductors DI and D2 and carried to the dispatcher’s
65 receiver DR, where they are transformed into the
transmitted communicating signals.
As train No. 6 leaves the section CS, its con
ductor also announces the departure. of that train
into the single track section DS and the procedure
70 in making the announcement is similar to that
already described for train No. 5.
I .
When train No. 5 passes into the circuit for
track relay E4, the intermediate circuits for sec
tions CS and BS are combined into one enlarged
intermediate circuit. 'During this. time and until
L4 will respond. When contact I48 is closed,
relay K4 is energized to shift its contacts I24,
35
I32 and IM to their front points, the latter con
necting primary P to conductors DI and D2. The
closing of front contact I32 connects secondary
SI of transformer T4 into the intermediate cir 40
cult for section GS.
The closing of front contact ‘
I24~ connects secondary S2 into the intermediate
circuit for section FS. The dispatcher may then
initiate and carry on communication with trains
in either or both of these sections similarly as
heretoforeexplained. Should he be communi
cating with the train in section FS and it should
proceed into the circuit for track relay EI I, then
the intermediate circuits for sections FS and GS
are transposedly connected together into one en-I 50
larged intermediate circuit. During this time,
back contact I 39 is closed in parallel with back
contact I34 and front contact I32 so that trans
former secondary SI is shunted. This leaves but
one transformer secondary in the circuit and re
55
duces the impedance of the enlarged intermediate
circuit in the case of rear end to head end con- ,
versation during this time. The use ‘of such an
arrangement as indicated in Fig. 4 decreases the 60
numberof selectors necessary to be operated in
the‘ dispatcher’s selective system over the con
ductors DI and D2. It also makes possible the
operation of the system over a long track stretch,
where the selector system is such that only a given 65
number of selectors can be operated on any one
circuit.
_
Assuming a train in section GS is passing
through the track circuit of relay EIZ to the
section HS, then the intermediate circuit for sec
tion HS, which is only partially shown but which
is similar to' that for section FS, will be trans
posedly connected with the circuit for section GS
making one enlarged intermediate circuit. Dur-'
ing this interval communication between the dis 75
9
2,124,452
patcher and the train may still be carried on
gizing switch motor M.
through the transformer secondary SI.
In Fig. 6 is illustrated'an arrangement of cir
mechanism SM to open the switch and divert
train No. 6 from the main line into the siding.
cuits and apparatus at a switch where there is
As soon as the switch-is opened and locked in
only single track in the stretch, instead cf al
position, the contacts H5 and I56 in the circuit
of control relay C8, and I90 and, it! in the cir
ternate sections of single and double track.
' ' Passing sidings are assumed to be provided at in
Motor M nowwoperates ‘ -
cuit of control relay C5, are closed so that both .
of the signals 8 and 5 will indicate “proceed,” un
' also desirable for the dispatcher to control the . less the block of signal 5 is occupied at some
10 operation of the track switch for trains to leave other point holding said signal at stop. When
and enter sidings. It is further desirable that train No. 6 arrives, ?ndingsignal 8 “clear” it pro
the dispatcher control the operation of the power ceeds into the siding. Since track relays E5 and
E6 control the relay H shown in Fig. 1, train No.
plant for furnishing electrical energy to the vari
ous relays, signals and switch mechanism motor. 6 may announce its arrival on the siding to the
dispatcher, similarly as heretofore described in
In such a lay-out, the arrangement of the com
the case of the trains operating as shown in Fig.
munication circuits will be the same as that al
ready explained for Fig.1. The commutator 1. The dispatcher will now again operate the
selector for commutator 0M4, returning this
0M6 controls the operation of the main line sig
nals at each passing track end and the circuit commutator to its normal position. This causes
20 for operating the. switch mechanism for the ‘ relays SR to become de-energized, that contact
motor M. The commutator 0M5 controls the 2!! is made on its back point, thus causing the
motor M to operate the mechanism SM to return
operation of the, power plant. Both commuta
tors CMQ. and CMS are operated in the manner the track switch F2 to its normal position. With
shown in Fig. 5. Let it be assumed that this track switch F2 returned to its normal position
25 method of switch and signal control is applied and the contacts 09 and Oil! back in their normal
to the switches in Fig. I, and that the sections position, signals 1 and t are in a condition to in
dicate “proceed” except as their blocks may be
vshown as double track in that ?gure are in re
occupied.
'
.
ality sections of single track with a passing sid
Train No. 5-in the meantime approaching on
ing. Normally, trains keep to the main track
30 unless there is necessity for them to enter the the main line, ?nding signal ‘I. “clear” proceeds
tervals that trains may pass each other. It is
siding. Assume there are two trains, as No. 5
and No. 6, approaching a passing track location.
The dispatcher communicates with both as here
tofore described in connection with Figure 1.
35 The arrangement shown in Fig. 6 will be in use
40
hi)
it reports its position to the dispatcher. As train
No. 6 leaves the passing siding at the other end 35
through switch F3, operated similarly as de
Also, train No. 5 may announce‘ its departure to
tion Y, train No. 6 to enter the passing siding and
No. 5 to keep to the main line, and getting a reply
from them that the instructions are understood,
the dispatcher when leaving the circuit of‘ track
ing. The dispatcher again operates his selective
equipment DSE sending out an appropriate code
of impulses to operate the selector controlling
commutator CMS operating this commutator to
the position 2, which closes the ignition circuit
for the gasoline engine GE through contact OI2
25
No. 5 is on the main linebetween the siding
structing them that they are to pass at the sta
With the closure of contact Oll re
lay SR is energized and its contact III is caused
to be made on its front point. vThis places the
motor M in condition to operate to. open the track
switch F2 so that train No. 6, may enter the sid
20
switches F2 and F3, relay H- being de-energized,
scribed for switch F2, it may announce its de
50 indication.
15
30
over the switch; but during the timelthat train -
at each end of the siding so that switches F2 and
F3. will both be controlled by the dispatcher.
After communicating with the trains, and in
the dispatcher closes the switch W and operates
the selective equipment DSE to send the ap
propriate code of impulses to the selector operat
ing commutator 0M4, placing this commutator
in the position 3. This opens the circuits at con
tacts Olli and 09 for control relays C6 and Cl
causing both signals 6 and ‘I to give the “stop"
10
parture to the dispatcher as heretofore explained.
relay E5, for example.
'
After the switch F2 has been returned to its
normal position, the dispatcher again operates
the selective system DSE to control the commu~
tator CM5 to return same to its normal position, 45
thus stopping the gasoline engine GE, and, con
sequently, operation of the power plant.
It is assumed that the charging of the battery
SY by the generator U! will be at such a rate
as to recuperate this battery for the drain upon 50
it by the relays and signals during the interval‘
when the power plant is not operating.
A principal feature of ‘this invention is that
of the communication zone for each train which
in reality travels with the train and within the 55
limits of which‘ communications to and from the
train are con?ned. Such a zone always includes
a circuit, arbitrarily referred to as an inter
mediate circuit, in inductive relation with the
train carried devices and adapted to be connected, 60
when so desired. with communication devices
- and the circuit for the starting motor ST through
the contact Ol3.. The starting motor then oper- . in a wayside station. Such a station is more spe
ates from battery SY connecting itself through a ‘ ci?cally referred to herein as the dispatcher's
suitable clutch with gasoline engine GE to turn
office. The operation of this traveling communi
the gasoline engine over to start same. As soon ' cation zone, or traveling intermediate circuit,
- as gasoline engine GE has reached the speed at
which it is operative from its own power, circuit
controller SCC opens, stopping motor ST and
will nowbe described.
Assume a train in the section AS, which is but
partly shown in Fig. 1. The communication zone
disconnecting it from gasoline engine GE. Gaso . for the train is con?ned to the intermediate cir
cuit for section AS. When the train, moving to
line engine GE is directly connected with gen
erators UI and U2, each of which‘ delivers electric ward the right, enters the track. circuit for relay.
current at the rated voltage as soon as operation
is~up to speed. These generators deliver current,
UI' for charging battery SY and for energizing
75 the various relays, signals, etc., and U2 for ener
70
E2, the separate identity oi’ the intermediate
circuitsv of section AS and section BSvis tempo
rarily destroyed in that during the interval the
train is in said track circuit, these two inter 76
.10
2,124,402
mediate circuits are connected together m1 one
circuit so that the limits of the communicating
transpositions through transformers in a manner
as illustrated in United States patent No.
zone are now that of the two sections AS and BS. _
1,899,105 granted February 28, 1933 to W. ‘C.
When the train moves from the track circuit of
Phebus, on an application Serial No. 464,792
relay E2, the intermediate circuit for each section
?led June 30, 1930.
AS and BS is restored to its normal status. The
There are certain advantages in the effects of
' train now being wholly within the section BS its v induction, where it exists, from foreign electrical
communicating zone and intermediate circuit is ‘_ disturbances in intermediate circuits of the com- 10
that for said section. As the train proceeds into
munication system described.
the track circuit of relay E4, the communicat
ing zone for the train is again changed by being
patcher connects his receiver circuit with an
intermediate circuit, the audible e?ect from ‘the
foreign current induced in the intermediate cir
enlarged to cover both sections BS and CS with
the intermediate circuits for each section now
combined into one correspondingly large inter
15 mediate circuit comprised within the said two
sections. As the train moves from the track cir
cuit for relay E4, the intermediate circuit for
‘ each of the sections BS and CS is restored to its
normal condition. The train now being ‘within
20 the limits of section CS its communicating'zone
and corresponding intermediate circuit is con
?ned to the limits of said section. This traveling
zone or circuit condition is automatically main
tained by the train, similarly as described, as the
25 train travels the length of the stretch. With this
traveling zone or circuit feature, the two ends of
the train or two train points, are always in un
interrupted communicative relation “with each
other; and with the means provided and hereto
30 fore described, both train points and the way
side station may be placed in communicative
relation with each other. This novel communica
tion zone means‘ admits of several trains being
in the stretch at one time, each within its own
communicating zone, and the attendants on each
train, end at liberty to communicate between
themselves, or to be in communication with the
' wayside station, without interfering with, or be
ing interfered with by, any other train which
may be within the stretch but not in the same
zone.
,
.
It will be noted that, as illustrated, when two
adjacent intermediate circuits are joined together
into one circuit, the conductors of the two sec
45 tions are connected in transposed relation; for
When the dis
10.
cuit serves as an indication that the intermediate
circuit is complete and properly connected.
Where such indication is desirable, this foreign 15
current disturbance, may be used for this pur
pose, and thus the expense of special indication
‘means is not necessary.
I have hereinbefore mentioned the use of radio
frequencies as well as audio frequencies for con 20
veying communications. I do not wish to be con
?ned‘ to the use of either or both of these. It
will be observed that the system is adaptable
for communication to be carried on by code, as
the telegraph, by written message, as the tele 25
type, and, in fact, by any suitable means de
pendent upon electrical energy.
What I claim as new is:
1. In a train communicating system, means for
communicating between the head end and rear‘
end of a train, comprising, a communicating set
on each end of the train and a circuit in com
municative relation with each of said communi- .
eating sets connecting between said sets, and
means for communicating between either or both 35
endsof said train and a ‘wayside station, com
prising, said ?rst named means, a communicating
set in said wayside station, and a transformer
normally in disconnected relation with said cir
cuit but adapted to be selectively connected to 40
said circuit and said wayside communicating set‘
for establishing communicative relations between
said train ends and said wayside station.
2. In a system vfor communication between a '
vehicle and a wayside station, communication sets 45
example, with. a train in the circuit of track relay ’ on the vehicle and in the wayside station, an in
‘E4 of Fig.1, conductor 23 is connected to con
ductor l8 and conductor, 20 is connected to con
ductor 25. The purpose of transpositions in these
circuits, is to eliminate, or minimize, foreign cur
rent inductive disturbances. In certain localities,
where foreign circuits, and other sources of in
ductive disturbances, are not present, trans
positions in ‘the intermediate circuits are not
55
necessary. Further, where the. communication
7‘ impulses are by certain frequenciesto' which the
_ various circuits, as necessar'y,are tuned, trans
termediate circuit in electrical relation with said
vehicle carried set, a wayside circuit connecting
to said wayside station-set, a transformer adapted
for communication purposes, and means opera 50
tive from the wayside station to connect said
transformer in both said intermediate circuit and
said wayside circuit.
' 3. In a system for communication between a ve
hicle in a stretch of track and a wayside'station, 55.
communication sets on the vehicle and in the
wayside. station, a series of sections for said
positions are not essential if ‘the foreign current
inductive effects are of frequencies differing from
stretch each with a circuit normally in com- '
that used for communication purposes. ‘
as the vehicle moves through the stretch, and a 60
municative relation with said vehicle carried set
It will be further noted that I have not con
- ?ned myself solely to the use of transpositions
transformer adapted to be selectively placed in
in intermediate circuits when, and as, adjacent
intermediatecircuits are joined for the interval
and said wayside station set.
4. In a system for providing telephonic com
a train is passing from one section to the sec
munication between a vehicle and a wayside sta
tion next adjoining. Figures 1 and 4 indicate
transpositions of the conductors of the inter
mediate circuits at points between the limits of‘
the sections. The number and style of transposi
tion, telephone sets on the vehicle and in the
70 tions desirable in- an intermediate circuit are
largely determined by conditions existing on the
railroad where the installation is made. In this
?rst mentioned means and remotely controlled
inVentionLI do not ,yvish to bev limited to the
transposing of the two conductors as shown in
the ?gures.
I may alternatively make such
communicative relation with each of said circuits , _
65
wayside station, means controlled by the vehicle
placing said sets in communicative relation with
each other, and‘means in close proximity to said
from the wayside station adapted to modify the
vehicle control of said ?rst named means to annul
such relationship.
'
‘
5.‘ In a system for‘communication‘ between a
vehicle and a wayside station, communication 75
- I1
9,124,452
sets on the vehicle and inithe wayside station, a communicative relation with said wayside sta
'
communication zone .for the vehicle comprising tion set.
12. In a- system for communication between
‘a circuit within the zone to which communica- _'
tions to and from said vehicle are con?ned, and
means operable by the vehicle in co-operation
with means'within said zone controlled from the
wayside station for placing said sets in communi
cative relation with each other via said circuit.
6. In a system for communication between a
10. moving vehicle and a wayside station, communi
cation sets on the vehicle and in the wayside
station, a communication zone comprising an
intermediate-circuit traveling with said vehicle,
vehicles in a stretch of track and a wayside sta
tion, a wayside assemblage comprising, a series
of sections in said stretch each with an inter
mediate circuit, selective means operative from
and a communication circuit connected with said
wayside station, a transformer having a primary
,coil and a ‘plurality of secondary coils, and 'a
relay responsive to the operation of said selective‘
means connecting one secondary coil into one
intermediate circuit, another secondary coil into
another intermediate circuit and said primary
a circuit extending from the station to said zone,
15
15 and means within said zone controlled jointly » coil to said communication circuit.
13.’. In a system for communication between a
from said wayside station and by said vehicle for _
connecting said two circuits to place said sets in
_ communicative relation with each other.
vehicle in a section ofvtrack and a wayside sta
tion‘, a wayside assemblage comprising, an inter
mediate circuit for said section, selective means
‘7. In a system for communication between a
plurality of vehicles and a wayside station, com ; operative from and a communication circuit 20
20'
munication sets on each vehicle and in the way- a
side station, a communication zone for each ve
connected with said wayside station, a trans
former having a primary coil and a secondary
hicle, and means associated with each zone, at coil, a relay responsive to the operation of said
times controlled from said wayside station and at selective means having a normal position and
25 other times controlled jointly from said wayside an abnormal position, and means operative by 25
station and by said vehicle, adapted to place any the train while in said section‘ effective, only
one vehicle, communication set or any several when said relay is in the normal position. to con
néct said secondary coil into the intermediate
vehicle communication sets in communicative re
lation with said wayside‘ station communication circuit and said primary coil to said communi-\
30
set.
cation circuit.
-
8. In a system for communication between ve
hicles in a stretch of track and the wayside, sec
'1
a
14. In a system for communication between a
vehicle in a stretch of track and a wayside sta-j
tion, communication sets on the vehicle and in
tions of single track“ and double track in said
stretch, a communication station on each of said ' the wayside station, a series of intermediate cir
-35 vehicles, a communication station on the wayside, cuits for said stretch each adapted to. be in com 35
and means, adapted to place said wayside station municative relation with said vehicle carried set,
in communicative relation with said vehicles, con . each ofsaid circuits being adapted to be modi
trolled by said vehicles as to each track or the ?ed to include means for communicative rela
tionship with‘ said wayside station set'in addi
double track sections and from the wayside sta
tion to its normal circuit elements, and means
tion
as
to
the
single
track
sections.
M40 9. In a system for communication between a adapted to connect a plurality of said interme
vehicle in a stretch of ‘ track and a wayside sta
tion, communication sets on the vehicle and in
the wayside station, a series of sections for said
45 stretch each with an intermediate circuit in com
municative relation with said vehicle carried set
as the vehicle moves through the stretch, and
diate circuits together.
15. In a system for communication between the
head end and the rear end of a train, a trans
mitting set on each end of the train‘including
an inductor in circuit with a transmitter, a re
ceivlng set on each end of the train including _
means associated with said intermediate circuits ‘ another inductor in circuit with a receiver, ‘and
means operative in said receiver circuit adapted
to render said receiver inactive while said trans 60
the
medium
of
a
single
control
circuit
adapted
to
50
simultaneously place said wayside station set in ~, mitter is‘ active.
16. In a train operating system under the com
communicative relation with a plurality of said
and'controlled from the wayside station through
intermediate circuits.
'
10. In a system for communication between ve»
55 hicles in a stretch of track and a wayside sta
tion, a wayside assemblage comprising, a series
of sections in said stretch each with an inter
mediate circuit, a wayside communication station,
and means common to adjacent intermediate cir
60 cuits andassociated directly therewith operable
to simultaneously place said wayside station in
communicative relation‘ with said intermediate
circuits in pairs.
11. In a system for communication between the
55 head end and rear end of a train and between
either or both ends of said train and a wayside
station, a transmitting set on each end of the
train including an inductor in circuit with a trans
mitter, a receiving set on each end of the train
70 including another inductor in circuit with‘ a re
ceiver, a communication transmitting and re
is
trol of a dispatcher, a stretch of railway track
including a section of single track line and a sec
tion of two track line, a train in said single track 55
section~proceeding toward and into‘ one of the
tracks of said two track section, means permit
ting said train to 'pass fromv said single track‘
section to said two track section, communication
sets on said train and in the oiiice of said dis
patcher, means for conveying communications
betweenisaid dispatcher’s set and said-train set,
selective means in said o?ice adapted to control
both said ?rst named means and second named
means, said second named" means being subject
to such control only while the train is in the
single track section, and means controlled by
asv
said train, controlling said second named means
while the train is in the two track 'section.
17. In a system for communication between 70
the head end and rear end of a train in a stretch .
ceiving set in the wayside station} and means
of track and between either end or both ends of
within a communicating zone, which travels with
said train and a wayside station, communication .
the train, communicatively connecting said in
ductors and adapted to be selectively placed in
station, means controlled by the train adapted 75
sets on each end of the train and in the wayside
2,124,452
12
to place said train sets in communicative relation
with each other, means in said station adapted
to control said first named means to place said
station set in communicative relation with either
or both‘ of said train sets for some‘ portions of
said stretch, and means controlled either by said
‘ train or by said means in said station for placing
said station set in communicative relation with
either or both of said train sets for other portions
ll) of said stretch.
.
18. In a train telephone system, in combina
nation, two intermediate circuits associated with
a stretch of railroad track and adapted to co
operate with telephone apparatus carried by
trains occupying the track, a telephone line, a
transformer comprising a primary winding and
two secondary windings, and a switching device
for simultaneously connecting the secondary
windings in said two circuits,“ respectively, and
for connecting the primary winding to said line.
track line connecting at each end of the stretch
to a single track line, a train in the stretch, a
wayside station, an intermediate circuit asso
ciated with the double track line, a wayside line
connecting to the wayside station, means con
trolled by the train on entering the stretch at
either end thereof for connecting the interme
diate circuit with the wayside line, and means '
associated with said intermediate circuit and
controlled from said station for disconnecting ,
said intermediate circuit from the wayside line.
24. In a communication system for railways, in
combination, a stretch of track,‘ a plurality of
intermediate circuits electrically independent
of each other, said circuits each being associated
with a particular portion of said stretch of track,
a transformer for each intermediate circuit, a
wayside station, a communication circuit asso
ciated with the stretch of‘ track and connecting
with said station, and‘means controlled from the 20
19. In a‘ train telephone system, in combina- _ station over saidrcolmmunication circuit for con
tion, two closed metallic loop circuits associated necting one winding of each of any desired .num
with a stretch of railroad track and'adapted to ber of said transformers in their associated in
co-operate with telephone apparatus ‘carried by
trains occupying the track, a telephone line, a
transformer comprising a primary winding and
two secondary windings, a switching device for
simultaneously connecting the secondary, wind
ings in said two circuits, respectively, and for
30 connecting the primary winding to said line, and
termediate circuits.
_
25. A trackway system for conveying signals to 25
and from moving vehicles comprising, in com
bination, a series of electrically separate inter
mediate circuits associated with a stretch of track ‘
for vehicles, a, transformer associated with ad
joining circuits of said series for inductively con 30
a second switching device for joining said two necting the circuits together under certain con
circuits to form a single closed loop circuit and‘. ditions, and means associated with said adjoining
for simultaneously short circuiting one of said circuits for conductively connecting the circuits
secondary windings.
:13
together under other conditions.
26'.‘ In a communication system for railways, v35
20. In a train telephone system, in combina- *
tion, a stretch of railroad track, a train on said a stretch of railwayv track with a train therein,
‘track, telephone apparatus carried by the train, a wayside station, an intermediate circuit for
a ‘normally closed electrical circuit consisting
solely of a trackway conductor co-operating with
40 the train carried telephone apparatus, a wayside
conductor and switching contacts connecting
said conductors together, a telephone line, a
transformer having two windings, and a switch—
ing device for abnormally operating one of said,
in LI contacts to connect one transformer winding in
said circuit and for operating another contact
said stretch, a wayside communication circuit‘
connected with the wayside station, means asso
ciated with said intermediate circuit and con 40
trolled by s'aid train to connect the intermediate
circuit with the communication circuit, and other
means associated with said intermediate circuit ‘
controlled from said wayside station to annul
said connection and thereafter to reconnect said .
to‘ connect the other transformer winding to said
intermediate circuit with and disconnect said in
termediate circuit from said communication cir
line.
cuit at will.
-
.
, 21. In a train communication system, in com
130 bination, a stretch of railroad track, a train on
said track, transmitting and receiving apparatus
»
27. In a communication system for railways,
a stretch of railway including a passing siding
location, an. intermediate circuit associated with
on the train, a closed electrical circuit compris- 1 saidlocation, intermediate circuits in said stretch
ing a trackway conductor co-operating with said
transmitting and receiving apparatus, a wayside
‘conductor and switching contacts connecting
said conductors together, a transformer having
two windings, a communication circuit, and a
. switching device controlled over said last circuit
adjoining on either side of said location and nor
mally electrically isolated from the intermediate
circuit at said location, a wayside communica
tion circuit, means controlled by a train for elec
trically connecting the intermediate circuit at
said location with one of the adjoining inter
for operating one of said switching contacts to " mediate circuits to form a single enlarged circuit,
60 connect one transformer winding in said ?rst
circuit and for operating another switching con
tact to connect the other transformer winding to
said last circuit.
22. A trackway system for conveying electrical
_ a relay controlled by the train, and contacts con
trolled by said relay for connecting the inter
mediate clrcuit for said location and also said
enlarged circuit with said wayside communica
tion circuit.
'
to
‘Y
impulses between a vehicle and a wayside station
28. In a communication system for railways’, a
comprising a ?rst circuit associated with a stretch
stretch of railway including a main line track _
oitrack for the vehicle, a second circuit extend?
ing from the stretch of track to the, station, a
transformer, a. relay controlled from said station
normally connecting one winding of said trans‘
and 'a siding track, a switch at each end of the
siding track connecting said track with the main
line track, a wayside circuit associated with each
of said tracks, a wayside station, a communica
former in said ?rst circuit, and a vehicle con
tion circuit extending from said station along
trolled relay for connecting the other winding 7 said tracks, means associated with the wayside
of said transformer in said second circuit.
circuit and controlled by a‘ train moving over
23. In a train communication system, in com
said tracks for automatically connecting the way
75 bination, a stretch of railway comprising a double side‘ circuit with the communication circuit, and 75
13
2,124,452
means ‘associated with the wayside circuit and
controlled over the communication circuit for
ing away from said siding track in each direction,
two trains, each on the main line track moving
interrupting the connection between said circuits,
said connection ‘between the circuits continuing
after the same has been automatically estab
toward said siding, a communication set on each
end of each of said trains, each set including a
transmitter‘ and a receiver and a train carried
lished until said last means is operated.‘
circuit adapted to be connected to said transmit
_
29. In a system for conveying electric current
between a vehicle and a wayside station, an elec
trical transmitting and receiving circuit on the
10 vehicle and at the wayside station, a zone for the
vehicle including at all times a circuitwithin the
zone in electrical relation with the circuit on the
vehicle and to which electric currents for and
from said vehicle are con?ned, and means oper-~
1B able by the vehicle in cooperation with means
within said zone controlled from the wayside sta»
.tion for placing said station circuit and zone
circuit in electrical relation with each other.
30. In a. system of communication for railway
ter andreceiver, a circuit associated with said
track for each of said trains in electrical relation
with the train carried circuits, and a circuit as
sociated with both said main line track and said 10
siding track while one train is on the main line
track and the other train is on the siding track
in electrical relation with the train carried cir
cuits of both trains, the arrangement being such
that communication may be carried on between‘ 15
the ends of each of said trains as the trains ap
proach the siding and between said trains while
one train is on the main line track and the otherv '
train is on the siding track.
20
20 trains, a track district including a main line track
and a siding track, ‘said main line track extend
ARCHIBALD G. SHAVER.
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