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Патент USA US2124480

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July 19, 193-8.
M. DQWILSON
vCROSSING SIGNAL
Filéd March 18. 1955
" ¿#2,124,480
I
v 3 SheefS-Sheet l
July 19, 193s.
M_ D, WILSQN
.
2,124,480
CROSS ING S IGNAL
l",
' July 19, 1938.
`
M. D. wlLsoN 1
2,124,480
CROSSING SIGNAL
Filed March 18, 1935
_5 'Sheets-Sheet 5
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Patented July 19, 1938
2,124,480
UNITED STATES
PATENTr orrles
2,124,480
CROSSING SIGNAL
Mercer D. Wilson, Phoenix, Ariz.
Application March 18, 1935, Serial No. 11,597
13 Claims. (Cl. 246-130)
This invention relates to traino control devices,
One object of my improvement is to provide
particularly to automatic signal mechanisms for for maintaining the signal in the “Go” position
railroad crossings, and is directed to an improve
ment of the device shown in my Patent Number
Cil
1,890,352, issued December 6, 1932, entitled
“Crossing signals”.
The present inventionV embodies the same gen
eral principles as those disclosed -in the aforesaid
patent. A signal means adapted to control traf
ñc across a railroad track reciprocates between
a “Stop” position and a “Go” or clear position,
one movement of the reciprocation being effected
by power-driven mechanism, and the opposite
movement being accomplished by the force of
gravity. By this arrangement, the power-driven
movement not only moves the signal member
from one position to another, but also, by dis
placing a suitable weight against the force of
gravity, stores energy in the form of energy of
position to be used in accomplishing the second
and opposite movement of the signal member.
Preferably, the signal member indicates “Go”
when it is at the end of the power-driven move
ment, energy then being stored for the opposite
movement of the signal member to the “Stop”
position. In other words, when the signal is in
the clear position, potential energy is available
for the second movement, and an approaching
train or control vehicle merely releases the stored
energy. After the departure of the train, the
reverse power-driven movement isautomatically
initiated and then 'completed to place the parts
in their “Go” position. 'I'he word normal as
hereinafter used will refer to the position ofthe
mechanism at the “Go” or clear position of the
signal.
a positive manner by utilizing the impact of an 5
auxiliary weight released when the train enters
the control zone. Another object of my inven
tion is to provide for controlled non-uniform
movement of the signal member from the “Go”
position to the “Stop” position. The signal is 10
arranged to move suddenly to an intermediate
warning position and then to proceed slowly to
the “Stop” position, the latter movement being
subject to precise adjustment.
The above and other objects and advantages 15
of my improvement will be apparent from the
detailed description `to follow, considered with
the accompanying drawings, _in which
Fig. 1 is a side elevation of my invention;
Fig. 2 is an enlarged side elevation with the 20
outer housing or casing shown in section;
Fig. 3 is a vertical, medial section of Fig. 2 on a
somewhat larger scale;
Fig. 4 is a plan view of the mechanism withinv
the signal housing, taken with the signal in the 25
“Stop” position;
Fig. 5 is similar to Fig. 4, with the signal in
the “Go” position;
Fig. 6 is an elevation of the mechanism in the
upper part of the housing, with the signal in the 30
“Stop” position;
'
Fig. 7 is similar to Fig. 6, with the signal in the
“Go” position;
Fig. 8 is a horizontal section of the signal mech
anìsm, taken as indicated by the line 8_8 o-f 35
Fig. '7;
An important advantage of this arrangement
is that if the power-driven mechanism fails, the
signal member will subsequently fail to move
from the “Stop” position when the train clears
the controlled zone, thereby calling attention to
the condition of the mechanism before any se
rious accident can be caused by the break-down.
An additional safety feature is that the signal
is maintained in the “Go” position only so long
as an electric control circuit is energized.
by a. positive latch instead of by fluid pressure,
and to further provide for opening the latch in
Con
sequently, Whenever the control 'circuit fails or
is broken by accident or for some other reason,
the signal member Will immediately move to
the “Stop” position, regardless of the proximity
of a train, thereby calling attention to the need
for immediate repair.
As in my previous disclosure, I prefer that the
power-driven mechanism comprise an hydraulic
lift actuated by an electrically driven pump.
`
Fig. 9 is a vertical section, taken as indicated
by line 9--9 of Fig. 8;
Fig. 10 is a vertical section, taken as indicated
by line IIJ-_l0 of Fig. 9, with the signal mecha- 4,0
nism in the “Stop” position;
Fig. 11 is similar to Fig. l0, with the signal
mechanism at the end of theY movement to the
“Go” position;
'
Fig. 12 is a vertical section as indicated by the '45
line |2-I2 of Fig. 8, with the signal in the
“Stop” position;
’
A'
Fig. 13 is similar to Fig. 12, showing the mov
able parts at the end of the movement tothe
“Go” position;
l
Fig. 14 is a wiring diagram, indicating one elec
trical arrangement that may be embodied in the
invention; and
Fig. 15 is a wiring diagram showing a second
electrical arrangement that may be employed.
55
2,124,480
2
The mechanism of the signal is housed in a
cylindrical casing 20 having a `conical top 2l.
'I‘Íhe base plate 22 of the casing is integral with a
platform 23 that supports the major part of
the mechanism.
5l) mounted in top casting 5l of the main hy
draulic cylinder 52. The upper end of the signal
drive shaft is kept in vertical alignment by a
suitable annular bearing 53 embracing the lower
'
My invention is not, limited to any particular
type of signal member, nor any particular eleva
tion of the signal member above the ground. yIt
is an object of the preferred form of my inven
10 tion, however, to provide a lower signal member
in the form of a barrier, generally designated by
numeral 2li, mounted to yield to the impact of a
vehicle„and an upper signal member, generally
designated by numeral 25, independent of the
barrier and of sufñcient elevation to clear ve
hicles. The manner in which the requisite de
gree of independence of these two signal members
may be attained will become apparent with fur
ther description.
The upper signal member 25 includesV a hori
zontally extending arm 25 rigidly mounted to ver
tical signal shaft 2l byv means. of a suitable T
ñtting 28, the arm being suitably braced by a
cable 26a. extending to a top ñtting 25 on-the
The barrier, or lower sig
nal member, 24 is mounted on a horizontal arm
30 extending from a sleeve 3l that rotatably em
' vertical signal shaft.
bracesthe signal shaft. Preferably, barrier 25
is counterbalanced by a suitable weight 32on a
diametrically opposite arm 33 also mounted on
sleeve 3l, a suitable cable 313 bracing the barrier
and two similar cables 35 and 35 bracing arm 33.
To protect the upper end of sleeve 3l from
moisture, an'overhanging conical protector 3l
may be suitably positioned on signal shaft 2l; and
for further'protection from the weather, a coni
.cal shield 38, having a vertical skirt 35, may be
connected to sleeve 3l in a position >to cover the
tcp of the signal casing, as shown.
40
Signal sleeve 3l is operatively associated with
a signal drive shaft 40 through a flexible con
nection that will permit, under certain circum
stances, a degree of independent movement. The
purpose Yhere is to avoid damage to the mecha
45 nism by a vehicle colliding with barrier 24.
Such a flexible connection may comprise a suit
able yoke êl embracing and supporting sleeve 3l, Y
portion of signal base 42. This upper bearing C71
is mounted on a horizontal plate 54 that is sup
ported largely by casing 25. Either or both of
these bearings may support the major portion of
drive shaft 45 and the associated elements here
tofore described.
Drive shaft ¿lll is actuated by movement of a
suitable weight 55, the operative connection be
tween the two being such that vertical move
ment of weight 55 from the position shown in
Fig. 6 to that shown in Fig. 'l causes shaft 45 to
rotate approximately 90 degrees in one direction,
and the reverse movement of weight 55 causes the
reverse rotation of the shaft.- Preferably, this
operative connection is provided by means of
spiral ribs 56 associated with. weight 55 in mesh
with complementary spiral grooves 5l on the
periphery of drive shaft 55. The ribs may be
formed in a hard Babbitt liner 58 of a nickeled
steel sleeve 59 incorporated in weight 55. Weight
55 may be held against axial rotation by suit
able guide rods E55 that are slidably embraced by
bronze bushings 6l incorporated in the body of
the weight.
The mass ofweight 55 is> such that byforce
of gravity alone it will move freely, if unsup
30
ported, from its normal position at the upper
end of its range of movement-to its lowermost
position, thereby revolving shaft 45 to place the
two signal members in the “Stop” position.
The power means for moving weight 55 upward
preferably includes a hydraulic lift. In the con
struction-shown, hydraulic cylinder 52, mounted
on platform 23, encloses a suitable piston 62 from
Vwhich two spaced piston rods 53 extend upward,
40
terminating in weight 55.
To limit the upward movement of the piston
under hydraulic action, it may be provided with
a suitable relief valve 54 that normally covers
relief passages 55. The valve includes a stem
56 extending upward a suitable distance towards 45
top casting 5l. The valve is normally main
tained in a closed position by virtue of a suitable
together with a complementary revolvable signal
helical spring 6l confined between piston 62 and
base 52 suitably mounted on the upper end of
drive shaft 40 as by screw-threaded engagement.
Yoke 4l has two diametrically positioned arms
43 that turn downward and terminate in suitable
non-friction members, such as revolvably mount
It may be noted here that in the construction 5.0
shown the piston reciprocates only over the lower
portion of cylinder 52. The pump, generally des
ignated by numeral 59, is mounted below the cyl
inder in the space between platform 23 and base
plate 22. Thel pump may be of the gear'type, estY
ed balls ¿l5 that ride on signal base 42. Yoke ¿ll
floats on signal base 52 and is kept centered with
respect to the signal base by virtue of the fact
that the lower end of signal shaft 21 is embraced
by the signal base. A suitable key 45 causes
signal shaft 21 to turn with signal base 52.
Signal base 42 has a radial flange 46, at the
60
periphery of which a vertically disposed annular
flange ¿l'l serves as a circular track‘for balls'll‘t of
yoke 4i. At diametrically opposite points, an
nular flange 4l rises to apexes - 58 and at 90
degrees from the apexes the annular ñange falls
65 todiametrically
opposite low points or valleys @5.
It is apparent that normally yoke 4l will ride
in valleys 49, barrier 24 turning in-vertical align
ment with upper signal member 25, and that
70 should a vehicle collide with barrier 265, displac
ing it from its usual alignment with member 25,
a vcam action will be provided to return the bar
rier to such alignment.V
f
The vlower end of signal drive shaft 55 is re
75 volvably supported by a suitable thrust bearing
a stop 68 on the stem.
comprising two interlocking rotary elements 10
and ll in pump chamber l2. The two rotary
elements are mounted, respectively, onshafts 13
and lll, shaft ‘it being driven by a suitable motor
l5.
60
-
Any fluid may be used in the hydraulic lift,
preferably a suitable grade of oil. The space in
cylinder 52 above the piston is utilized as a res
ervoir, the oil being pumped out of the reservoir
into the cylinder under the piston to raise the 65
weight, and the oil being returned to the reservoir
when the weight is permitted to force the piston
downward. The drawings show an arrangement
that may be employed to provide such a cycle of
fluid movements.
Y
70
From a port 'i6 in the cylinder wall just above
the upper position of piston 62 (Figs. 12 and 13),
a down-flow passage 'll (Fig. 10) leads to pump.
chamber l2. From the outlet side of the pump a
pressure passage 85 leads to the bottom of a ver 75
2,124,480
tically disposed valve chamber 8|, in which a
valve 82 is free to move longitudinally from a nor
mal lower position, shown in Fig. 10, to an alter
nate higher position, shown in_Fig. 11, the valve
moving upward by huid pressure from the pump.
The Valve includes an extensive stem 83 terminat
ing in a valve head 84. Preferably, the gravi
tational return of the valve is facilitated by a
helical spring 85 conñned between valve head 84
and the upper end wall 88 of the valve chamber.
End wall 86 has a suitable bleeder port 81 to pro
vide ready escape of any fluid trapped above the
valve head.
When the valve is in its uppermost position, it
15 clears a lower valve port 88 from which a passage
89 leads to a port 98 in the cylinder wall below
the lowermost position of piston 62. In such po
sition of the valve an upper valve port 9| is cut
off from both pump pressure passage 88 and the
In the lowermost po
20 lower cylinder passage 89.
sition of the valve (Fig. 10), pressure passage 80 is
cut off and communication is established between
the space in the cylinder under piston 62 and the
space in the cylinder above piston'62 as follows:
port 98, lower cylinder passage 89, port 88, valve
chamber 8|, upper valve port 9|, up-flow passage
92, and spaced ports 93 and 94 in the cylinder
wall above the uppermost position of the piston.
It will be noted that the arrangement is equivalent to an ordinary three-way valve responsive
to fluid pressure, i. e., when the pump is in opera
tion fluid pressure forces the valve to its upper
most position, thereby placing the pump in com
munication with the cylinder under the piston,
and, when the pump ceases operation, thevalve
automatically returns to a position placing the
lowermost portion of the cylinder in communi
cation with the uppermost portion of the cylinder.
Since oil trapped in pump .pressurel passage 88
may hinder„if not prevent, the downward return
of valve member 82, either the pump must permit
sufficient reverse leakage to release the trapped
oil or a suitably Ydimensioned bleeder passage 95
must be provided between pressure passage 88
[la and down-flow passage 11.
Normally, the weight is held at its uppermost
position independent of the hydraulic lift by vir
tue of a lock means that will be described later.
When a train or control vehicle enters the control
zone of the track„the weight is released to gravi
tate downward, thereby turning the signal to the
stop position and forcing oil from the bottom of
the cylinder to the top of the cylinder through
passage 92. One of the objects of this invention
is to provide relatively fast movement of the sig
nal for the first 30 degrees and relatively slow
movement for the remaining 60 degrees. This
object may be accomplished by controlling the
flow 'of iiuid through passage 92 in accordance
with the desired rate of movement of the signal.
For this purpose, the upper portion of passage
92 is enlarged to a time-control cylinder 96 in
which reciprocates a time-control plunger 91. By
- means of a connecting rod 98 extending upward
through a suitable packing gland 99, time-control
plunger 91 is connected to a bracket |88 integral
with weight 55 (Fig. '1). Plunger 91 has one or
more longitudinal passages |0| dimensioned to
suitably restrain the iiow of oil through up-iiow
passage 92.' Preferably, adjustment of degree of
restraint of oil flow is provided by a suitably aper
tured complementary disk |02 having apertures
corresponding to passages |8| in the time-control
753 lplunger. 'I'his disk may be held ñxed by nut |83
3
at any of various positions partially closing pas
sages
|8|.
'
.
-
The reasons for providing two ports 93 and 94
spaced as shown will now be apparent.
In the '
normal position of the signal, time-control
plunger 91 clears lowermost port _93 by a distance '
corresponding to the ñrst 30 degrees of the signal
movement. When the weight is released to gravi
tate downward, the time-control plunger will not
restrict the ñow of ñuid through passage 92 until
it begins to cut 01T ports 93. Thereafter, how
ever, the downward movement of the weight will
be retarded by the restricted flow of the oil
through apertures |8| until the time-control pis
ton reaches its lowermost position, indicated in
Fig. 10. Two spaced ports are'required so that
when the time-control plunger is passing over
lowermost port 93, uppermost port 94 is available
for'oil passage.
The latch means to releasably retain the weight `
at its normal uppermost position independent of
the hydraulic lift may be associated either with
the weight itself or with drive shaft 48. In the
arrangement shown, the latch is associated with
the shaft through signal base 42.
A suitable latch pinion | 84 (Figs. 4_7) , mounted
on the periphery of signal base 42 in radial align
ment to the axis of shaft 48, meshes with an
arcuate rack |85 mounted on plate 54. A pawl
|86 overhanging the normal position of pinion |84 3l)
is pivotally mounted in a suitable latch bracket
|81, the bracket being mounted on plate 54.
« Mounted in bracket |81 on the same axis as
pawl |06 is a latch rocker arm |88.
The inner
end of this rocker arm is provided with an arcuate
slot |89 which coniines a pin ||8 extending lat
erally from pawl |86. This inner end of the
rocker arm is operatively connected by a down
wardly extending portion |88a to a suitable
motor cut-ofi" switch ||| mounted on plate 54,
which switch may be of the mercury type adapted
to rock between open and closed positions. When
the inner end of the rocker arm is down, i. e., in
the normal position shown in Fig. 7, switch ||,| is
ci
open; and when the rocker arm is in the alternate L
position of 'Fig 6, the motor cut-off switch is
closed. It will be noted that when the inner
end of the rocker arm is down, slot |89 permits
pivotal movement of the latch in a range of en
gagement with pinion |84, but when the inner
end of the rocker arm is at its uppermost posi 50
tion (Fig. 6) the pawl is lifted clear of the pinion.
`From the outer forked end of rocker arm |88
pivotally depends` a stirrup | l2 that passes through
a vertical slot | I3 in a latch weight | |4. An arm- f
aturc` SI5, integral with the upper end of weight
| M, is designed to co-operate with -a U-shaped
electro-magnet
H8. Electro-magnet || 6 has a
Y
suitable coil H8@ and is mounted on a horizon
tal extension ||8 ofv bracket |81, the electro 00
magnet being within the fork of rocker arm |88.
In the normal position of the various parts of
the lat-ch mechanism shown in Fig. '7, the latchweight is held at its uppermost position by virtue
of electro-magnetic coupling between armature
H5 and electro-magnet H8, and rocker arm |88
is held in a position with the inner end depressed
by virtue of the fact that stirrup ||2 is held
up by the bottom of slot H3.
When the electro-magnet ||6 is de-energized
by a train entering the control zone of the track,
latch weight || 4 is released to gravitate down
ward. Slot ||3 is of suiiicient length to provide
al substantial degree of lost motion between
latch weight ||4 and stirrup U2, so that the re
2,124,480
4
the action of relief valve 64, as previously de
leased Weight strikes the stirrup >with sufficient
force to draw> the forked end of rocker arm |68
downward in a positive manner. Asklong as a
train is in the control zone, weight ||4 will re
scribed.
nection between rocker arm |38 and switch |_||.
electro-magnet
l
Y
v
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of its range of reciprocation and lat-ch weight ||4,
except for the attraction of electromagnet ||6,
is again free to drop down upon stirrup ||2. It
Vis contemplated that all pressure in cylinder 52
beneath the piston will Lbe released immediately
after the pump stops by virtue of valve 82 re
turning to its lowermost position and thereby
providing ~free communication from port 96'at
the bottom of the cylinder to ports V93 and 94 at
main suspended from stirrup ||2 in the position
shown in Fig.'6, the downward movement lof
the weight being limited bythe voperative con
While
.
As soon as pump 69 stops, cut-off plunger |25
returns to its normal position'at the lower end
||6 is> of sufficient
. strength to hold the weight >suspended in the
Y position shown in Fig. '1, it is not of sufficient
strength to draw the weight upward against grav
ity from the position shown in Fig. 6. I have,
the top of the cylinder.,
'
>
therefore, provided automatic means for restor
In
my
previously
granted
patent,
referred
to
ing the latch weight to its normal position upon
above,
I
disclose
a'wiring
diagram,
the
principles
the arrival of signal weight 55 at its uppermost ‘ of which may be adapted to the' present device.
position.
`
.
The essence ofv such an arrangement consists
vBelow the weight, a vertically disposed cut
in providing-two control switches, both‘of which ,
off cylinder ||9 communicates with main cylin
must be closed to energize the signal motor,-one
being -a mechanically operated switch that opens
only when the signal is -in thev “Go” position, the
other being an electrically operated switch open
der 52 by an upper passage |29 and a lower pas
sage |2|, lower passage |2| opening thence to a
chamber |22 on the wall of the m-ain cylinder 52.
Towards the upper end ofrchamber |22 a bore
or group of bores generally designated by numeral
only when a` train'is »in the control zone.v Both
|23 extends through the wall of cylinder 52, and
a similar bore or group of bores, generally desig
nated by numeral |24, extends through the wall
of the main cylinder near the lower end of
chamber |22. A suitable cut-off plunger |25 slid
ably mounted in cut-off cylinder ||9 is mounted
switches, in such an arrangement, will be closed _
to operate the motor whenever the signal is inthe “Stop” position and no train is in the control
zone.
l
5‘
l
~
'
A simple form of such a wiring diagram is
shown in Fig. 14. .Relay |32 is» normally ener
gized in the closed position by wires |33 and |34
on a rod` |26. The rod extends Vupward through
a packing gland |21 into a vertical bore |28 in
weight ||4. A suitable helical spring |29 .em
that are part of a circuit associated with the
braces rod |26 below'weight ||4, the spring rest
ing upon a suitable sleeve |30 adjustably mounted
circuited to de-energize relay |32, thereby break
ing the normal circuit through electromagnet
on the rod.
Y
r
control zone of the railroad track. Whenever a
train entersthe control zone this circuit is short
||6.
This last named'normal circuit includes
Normally, i. e., when the signal is in the clear"
position and notrain is in the control zone of
wire |35, battery |36, wire |31, relay-member |33,
the track, rod |26 rests upon the bottom end
plate |3I, holding cut-off plunger |25 at a posi
magnet.
tion just above passage l2 | , and no eiîective pres
sure is exerted by spring |29 against the bottom
of latch weight |l4. The normal positions of
these elements are shown in Figs. 7 and 12.
When latch weight ||4 is released by a train
entering the control zone, it m-ay fall far enough
to partially contract spring |29, as shown in Fig.
6.
As soon as the train clears the control zone,
motor 15 is energized and pump 69 begins to de
liver oil to the bottom of cylinder 52 beneath
piston 62. When piston 62, on its upward move
ment, opens the lowermost of bores |24, oil under
pressure escapes into chamber |22 and passage
|2| to exert pressure on the under side of cut-ofi
plunger |25. The full force of the oil pump is
not delivered against the cut-off plunger initial
and wire |39 to the other side of the electro
‘~
~-
Y
~
~
-„
,
‘ When the electro-magnet releases _.weight |49
of the Vwiring diagram, which represents latch
weight' ||4 in the -device itself, a switch member
543e connects contacts |4| »and |42, Vthe switch
member and two contacts representing cut-off ,
switchl | |. As long as the-train is in the control
zone, relay |38'remains open and switch member
140@ bridges contacts |,4I and |42. As soon as the
train leaves the control zone, the signal being in
the “Stop” position, relay |32 closes to re-estab 50
lish the normal vcircuit through electro-magnet
l i6 and also the following circuit through motor
15: battery., |36, wire |35, «wire |43, motor 15, wirev
|44,- switch memberrllllla, wire |45, wireì|39, re
lay member |38 and wire |31 back to battery |36.
The wiring diagram of Fig. 15 is similar to
Fig.> 14, but provides- for controlling the motor
1y, however, because bores |23 and bores |24 areY through a motor relay |46. Corresponding parts
so spaced that momentarily oil ñows both- out
ward from underneath the piston through one of the two wiring diagrams are given correspond
or more bores |24 and inward above the piston ing numbers. Normally, electro-magnet ||6 is
through one or more bores |23. This momentary energized by the circuit above described and sinceV
condition yceases as piston 62 moves upward to switch member |46a is spaced from contacts |4|
and |42, relay | 46 is de-energized.
‘
completely cover bores |23 and completely un
cover all of bores |24, so that'the full force of
the pump is thereafter delivered against cut-off
plunger
|25.
~
'
The cut-oir` plunger is forced upward, carrying
with it rod |26, the upward movement forcing
weight ||4 into the normal position shown in
Fig. '1. ' It will be noted that spring |29 serves as
a shock-absorberL and permits a certain latitude
in the adjustment of sleeve |36. If, for any rea
son, motor cut-off switch ||| is not closed by
the arrangement described to stop lthe pump,
damage to the mechanism will be prevented by
When a train enters the control, zone, relay
| 32 opens, thereby de-energizing electro-magnet
| |6. When switch member |4611 drops to bridge
contacts |4| and |742, relay |46 does not close
because the relay circuit includes relay member
|38. When, however, the train leaves the control
zone and relayr|32 closes, motor relay |46`is 70
energized through the following circuit: battery
|36, wire |31, relay member |38, wire |39, wire
|45, switch member |49a, wire |41, coil of relay
|46, wire |48, and wire |35 back to battery |36.
When relay |46 is thereby energized, the> follow 75
2,124,480
ing motor circuit is established: battery |36, wire
|31, wire |49, relay member |50, wire |5|, motor
15, wireV |43 and wire 4|35 back to battery |36.
The operation of vmy invention may be readily
understood from vthe foregoing description.
When the various moving parts are in their nor
mal positions with'the-control zone ofthe track
clear,`track relay |32-is closed; electro-magnet
H6 is energized; cut-ofi switch |||is open; the
10 signal is in the “Go” position; weight 55 and
piston 62 are at their uppermost positions by
virtue of the latch mechanism; latch weight H4
is held-at its highest position by electro~magnet
H6; cut-off plunger |25 rests at its lowermost
position; and since rthe motor and pump are
idle, valve 82 is 'at its lowermost position, pro
viding free communication between the portion
of the cylinder below the piston and the portion
ofthe cylinder above the piston.
As soon as a train ’enters the control zone,
thereby de-energizing the' track relay, electro
magnet | I6 is de-energized, releasing latch weight
H4. The latch weight drops with considerable
impact against stirrup H2, thereby disengaging
the latch with'a jerk, and at the same time clos
ing motor cut-otfswitch' 'I l I. The latch is held
suspended `in the position shown in Fig. 6. Pinion
|04, being free to rotate, moves around rack |05
as signal base 42 and shaft 40 are rotatedpby the
downward movement of weight 55. V'I'he signal
swings ‘rapidly 30 degrees until time-control
plunger 91 becomes effective, and then proceeds
more slowly the remaining 60 degrees to .the
“Stop”> position.
Y
5
weight elevated, said weight being adapted to
open the latch by impact when released by the
electro-magnet; and an electric circuit normally
energizing said electro-magnet, said circuit being
adapted to be interrupted by'an approaching`
control vehicle to release the latch weight.
2. A signal having, in combination: a signal
member movable between two positions; a signal
weight movable from a lower position to an
upper position and vice versa, said signal weight
being operatively connected to the signal mem
‘ser whereby the upward movement of the signal
weight will move the signal to one position and
the reverse gravitation of the signal weight will
move the signal to the alternate position; a latch 15
to releasably hold the signal weight against gravi
tation; a latch weight; an electro-magnet adapt
ed to hold the latch weight elevated, said weight
beingY adapted to open the latch by impact when
released by the electro-magnet; an electric cir
cuit normally energizing said electro-magnet,
said circuit being adapted to be interrupted by
an approaching control vehicle to release the
latch weight; and power means adapted to be
energized upon departure of the control vehicle
to lift the signal weight to its normal latched
position and to lift the latch weight to the elec
tro-magnet.
`
_3. A signal having, in combination: a signal
member movable between two positions; a signal 30
weight movable from a lower position to an upper
position and vice versa, said signal weight being
cneerativclyY connected to the signal member
whereby the upward movement of the signal
As soon as the control vzone of the track is again . weight will move the signal to one positionV and
35
clear, the motor circuit is re-established, as here
tofore described, and pump 69 begins to deliver
oil through the cylinder under piston 62, valve
82' being moved to its upper position auto
matically. The pump continues to force piston
62 and weight 55 upward until oil escaping from
the cylinder through bores |24 forces ¿cut-oli
plunger |25 upward to close cut-oir fswitch |||
and to permit pawl |06 to drop into engagement
' with pinion |04.
If the track circuit fails for any reason, relay
|32 will open, thereby de-energizing electro-mag
net H5 to cause the signal to turn to the “Stop”
position. If the motor circuit should fail, the
track circuit remaining operative, the signal will
remain in the “Go” position uniti] a train in the
control zone causes the weight to be released to
turn the signal to the “Stop” position; and then
upon re-energization of the track relay, the sig
. nal will remain in the “Stop”
position, thereby
inviting attention to the motor circuit. It is
apparent that by providing gravitational move
ment of the signal from the “Go” to the “Stop”
position, I have avoided many Vof the hazards
(il)
ordinarily inherent in'an ¿electrically operated
signal.
,
-
I have described a preferred form of my ine
vention in specific detail for the purpose of dis
closing and illustrating the principles involved.
Since this preferred form suggests a wide range
of modiiìcations that come within the spirit of
my invention, I reserve the right to all such
modiñcations that are properly within the pur
view'of my appended claims. .
,»
Having described my invention, I claim:
1'. In a signal mechanism adapted to gravitate
from one signal position to another, the combi
nation of: a latch to releasably hold the signal
mechanism against gravitation; a latch weight;
»an electro-magnet adapted to hold the latch
the reverse gravitation of the signal weight will
move' the signal to the alternate position; a latch
to releasably hold the signal weight against
gravitation; a latch weight; an electro-magnet
adapted to hold the latch weight elevated, said
weight being adapted to open the latch by impact
when released by the electro-magnet; an electric
circuitV normally energizing said electro-magnet,
said circuit being adapted to be interrupted by
an approaching controlv vehicle to release the
latch weight; electrically actuated means to lift
the signal weight and the latch weight back to
their elevated positions; a second electric cir
cuit to energize said electrically actuated means;
and two switches controlling said second circuit,
the circuit being energized only when both
switches are closed, one of said switches being
normally closed and being adapted to open
temporarily in response to the approaching con
trol vehicle, the other switch being adapted to «
open automatically Vwhen the signal weight
reaches its normal latched position and to close
when the signal weight drops from said normal
position.
4. A signal having, in combination: a signal
member movable from a “Go” to a “St0p”_position and vice versa; a signal weight movable from
a lower position to an upper position and vice
versa, said signal weight being operatively con
nected to the signal member whereby the upward 65
movement of the weight will move the signal
member to the “Go” position and the reverse
gravitation of the signal weight will move the
signal member to the “Stop” position; means
to lift the signal weight against gravity; means to 70
retain the signal weightat its higher position,
said retaining means being adapted to release the
signal weight in response to the approach of a
control vehicle; a fluid chamber having an out
let passage; means operated by the falling weight 76 -L
2,124,480
6
to expel fluid from the chamber through said out
let passage; and a time control means adapted to
be moved by the falling weight against the íiuid
stream in said outlet passage, said control means
Si restricting flow through Ysaid passage, thereby
retarding the fall of the plunger.
Y
5. A'signal having, in combination: a signal
member movable in one direction from a “Go”
position to an intermediate warning position and
10 then to a “Stop” position and in the opposite
direction from the “Stop” position back to the
“Go” position; a signal weight movable from a
lower position to an upper position and vice versa,
said signal weight being operatively connected
15 to the signal member whereby the upward move
ment of the weight will move the signal member
to the “Go” position and the reverse gravitation
of the weight will move the signal member ñrst
to the warning position and then to the “Stop”
position; means to lift the signal weight against
gravity; means to retain the- signal weight at its
' higher
position,
said
retaining
means
being
adapted to release the weight in response to the
approach of a control vehicle; and means to
25 retard the fall of the weight between the warning
position and the “Stop” position.
6. A signal having, in combination: a signal
member movable in one direction from a “Go”
position to an intermediate warning position and
30 then to a “Stop” position, and in the opposite
direction from the “Stop” position back to the
“Go” position; a signal weight movable from
a lower position to an upper position and vice
versa, said signal weight being operatively con
nected to the signal member whereby the upward
outlet passage‘against the ñuid stream to retard
the fall of the weight.
8. A signal having, in combination: a signal
member movable between two positions; a signal
weight movable from a lower position to an upper ,
position, and vice versa, said signal weight being
operatively connected to the signal member
whereby the upward movement of the signal
weight will move the signal to one position and
the reverse gravitation of the signal weight will 10
move the signal to the alternate position; a latch
means to releasably hold the signal weight at the
raised position, said latch means beingV adapted to
release the signal weight in response to the ap
proach of a control vehicle; an hydraulic cylinder; 15
a piston in said cylinder operatively connected
with the signal weight; a power driven pump to
deliver fluid to the cylinder under _the piston,
thereby elevating the weight; and control means
to stop the pump when the weight reaches its 20
elevated position, said control means including
an auxiliary hydraulic means having its inlet
connected to the cylinder adjacent the desiredY
upper position of the piston, whereby said auxil
iary means' is energized `by iiuid pressure when
the piston clears said inlet. .
~
9. A signal having, in combination: a signal
vmechanism adapted to gravitate from a iirst sig
nal position to a second signal position; a latch
to releasably hold said mechanism atthe ñrst 30
position; a latch weight; an electro-magnet
adapted to hold the latch weight elevated, said
weight being adapted to open the latch by im
pact when released by the electro-magnet; an
electric circuit normally energizing said electro
magnet, said. circuit beingadapted to be Ainter
movement of the weight will move theV signal _
rupted by an aproaching control vehicle to release
member to the “Go” position, and the reverse
gravitation of the weight will move the signal
member to the warning position and then to the
“Stop” position; means to lift the signal weight
against gravity; means to retain the signal weight
at its higher position, said retaining means being
adapted to release the weight in response to the
the latch weight; power driven hydraulic means
to move the signal mechanism against gravity
from the second signal position to the first signal
position for engagement with said latch; and
auxiliary hydraulic meansadaptedto receive ñuid
approach of a control vehicle; a fluid chamber
magnetic engagement with the electro-magnet at
having an outlet passage; means operated by the
falling weight to expel iiuid from the chamber
through said outlet passage; and means operatedV
by the falling weight to restrict ñow through the
outlet passage, said means being adapted to re
strict the ñow beginning at the warning posi
tion, whereby the signal will move relatively
rapidly from the “Go” position to the warning
position and thereafter move relatively slowly to
under Apressure from the lfirst hydraulic means '
for the purpose of restoring the latch weight to
the latchedposition of the. mechanism.
.
move the signal to the alternate position; a
l0. A signal having, in combination: a signal
mechanism adapted to gravitateV from a first sig
nal position to a second signal position; a latch
to releasably hold said mechanism at the first 50
position; a latch weight; an electro-magnet
adapted to hold the latch weight elevated, saidY
weight being adapted to open the latch by impact
when releasedV by the electro-magnet; an electric
circuit normally energizing said electro-magnet,
said clrcuit being adaptedA to be interrupted by
an approaching control vehiclento release the latch
weight; electrically driven hydraulic means to
move the signal mechanism against gravity from
the second signal position-to the iirst signal posi 60
tion for engagement with said latch; an electric
circuit to energize said hydraulic means; two
electric switches associated with the second cir
cuit arranged to cause the circuit to be energized
latch means to releasably hold the signal weight
when >both switches are closed, theiirst of said
at the raised position, said latch means being
switches being normally closed and being adapted
the “Stop” position.
'LA signal having, in combination: a signal
member movable between two positions; a signal
weight movable from a lower position to an upper
position and vice versa, said signal weight being
operatively connected to the signal member
60 whereby the upward movement of the signal
weight will move the signal to one position and the
reverse gravitation of the signal weight will
65
adapted to release the signal weight in response
to opentemporarily'in response to the approach- ~
to the approach of a control vehicle; an hy»,
ing vcontrol vehicle, the second switch havingv` an
draulic lift for elevating the signal weight; power
means to pump ñuid into said hydraulic lift,
inherent tendency to close; means associated with V.
thereby elevating the signal weight to the latched
position, said hydraulic lift having an outlet
passage for the release of said iiuid under pres
sure from the falling weight; and an apertured
75
40
plunger movable by the falling weight into said
said, second Vswitch and the electro-magnet
whereby theelectro-magnet when energized holds
said second switch open; and auxiliary hydraulic
means adapted to receive ñuid under pressure
from the first hydraulic means for the purpose of
restoring the latch» weight to magnetic engage 75
2,124,480
ment with the electro-magnet at the latched posi
tion of the mechanism, and for the further pur
pose of opening said second switch when the sig
nal mechanism reaches the latched position.
11. A signal having, in combination: a signal
mechanism adapted to gravitate from a first sig
nal position to a second signal position; a latch
to releasably hold said> mechanism at the ñrst
position; a latch weight; an electro-magnet
adapted to hold the latch weight elevated, said
weight being adapted to open the latch by impact
when released by the electro-magnet; an electric
circuit normally energizing said electro-magnet,
said circuit being adapted to be interrupted by
an approaching control vehicle to release the
latch weight; Yelectrically driven hydraulic means
to move the signal mechanism against gravity
from the second signal position to the ñrst signal
- position for engagement with said latch; an elec
tric circuit to energize said hydraulic means; two
electric switches associated with the second cir
cuit arranged to cause the circuit to be energized
when both switches are closed, the ñrst of said
switches being normally closed and being adapted
25 to open temporarily in response to the approach
7
from the gravitating mechanism, thereby control
ling movement of the mechanism from the iirst
signal position to the second signal position.
12. A signal having, in combination: a signal
member mounted to rotate between two posi
tions; a signal weight movable from a lower posi
tion to an upper position, and vice versa, said
signal weight being operatively connected to the
signal member whereby non-rotary upward move
ment of the signal weight will rotate the signal
to one position and reverse non-rotary gravita
tion of the signal weight will move the signal to
the alternate position; guide’means to prevent ro
tation of the weight; an electrical latch means
adapted when energized to releasably hold vtheA
signal' weight at the raised position; an electric
circuit normally energizing the latch means, said
circuit being adapted -to be interrupted by an
approaching control vehicle, thereby de-energiz
ing the latch to release the signal weight; and I
power means adapted to Abe energized upon the
departure of ther control vehicleto lift the signal
weight back to its normal latched position,
13. Ina signal of the class described, a yielding
connection between a vertical shaft and a hori
25A
ing control vehicle, the second switch havin-g an zontally pivoted signal member, said connection Y
inherent tendency to close; Vmeans to hold said comprising: a base mounted on the vertical shaft,
second switch open while the signal mechanism is said base presenting on its upper surface a plu
in the ñrst'position; auxiliary hydraulic means rality of radially disposed V-shaped valleys; and
30 adapted to receive iluid under pressure from the
a complementary member rotatably mounted on 30
first hydraulic means for the purpose of restor
said base co-axial thereto, said member support
ing the latch weight to magnetic engagement with ing the signal member and normally resting in
the electro-magnet at the latched position of the ' the vertices of said valleys at all positions of Vthe
mechanism; and means restricting flow of fluid signal member.
35 from the first hydraulic means under pressure
MERCER D. WILSON.
35
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