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Патент USA US2124561

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Patented July 26,‘ 1938
-
UNITED STATES
2,124,561 L.
PATENT OFFICE '
2,124,501
MAGNESIUM BASE ALLOY
John A. Gann, Midland, Mich, assignorto The
Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Micln, a cor
poration oi.’ Michigan
No Drawing. Original application-August 2, 1937,
"
Serial No. 156,941.
Divided and this applica-.
tion February 3, 1938, Serial N0. 188,462
4 Claims. (Cl. 75-168)
The present invention relates to magnesium al
as cast alloys, 35 per cent for ‘the solution heat
loys and more particularly to those in which mag
treated alloys, and 55.per cent for the solution ’
nesium is the predominant constituent.
_ heat treated andv aged alloys.
A large number of magnesium alloys have been
Cast alloys
developed and many of them have been used
commercially. While certain of these alloys have.
-
Nominal com
wide variety of. uses, their yield strengths are
A]
ceeds.
2.
0
0 7 10
0
10
4
25,000 ‘
20,000
20,200
7,400 “
27,200
.32
.35
.27.
2
0,000
20,500
.31
2
10,500
- 20,000
.30
0
s
4
4
2
2
13,100
13,200
22,400
27,300
.50
.43
25000
23100022,700
.42
.53
.72
0
2
1
3
0
15,300
4
4
12,000
15,200
' 10,400
s
2
1
5
4
17,100
22,100
.77
4
0
_0
2
3
11,000
23,400
.51
'
24,500
10
‘.24
4
1
-15
~
.03
‘
20
Solution Mat treatad alloys
2
group, tin and zinc. I have likewise discovered
s
when these alloys are subjected to the well known
a
s - 10
10
2
4
.00
.32 Q
7,000
4
2
0,300
2
0,000
4
4
.4
approximately 0.5 to 10 per cent of lead, is
added to the known magnesium-aluminum
cadmium alloy containing 1 to 12 per cent of
s
2
2
0
.23
20,000
20,000
4
0
25,000
7,000
4
0
0
25
0,000
0
I have found that these advantages occur when
methods of solution heat treatment and aging.
' 5,000‘
2
2
4
30 that maximum property improvement is obtained
my
0,200
0,400
0,200
- 4
4
by the addition of relatively small amountsoi’
at least one'of the metals selected ‘from the
producing
-
4
133g’
strength
to tensile
strength
4
2
2
2
described in United States Patent, No. 1,729,339,
may be improved to a very marked extent _by_
the addition of relatively small amounts of lead
and that this alloy may be still further improved
Tensile
strength,
lb./sq. in.
0
0
0
s
This invention is based on the‘ discovery that
the magnesium-aluminum-cadmium alloys, as
thereby
2
‘,0
'
aluminum and 1 to 10 per cent of cadmium,
Yield
strength,
lb./s(‘1.1n. '.
03 ‘Pb Sn Zn
2»
2
_
15 duce magnesium alloys having improved physical
properties. A more speci?c objectis to produce
20
-
, “1198f, W11“ Fm‘
The principalobject of my invention is to pro
magnesium alloys having improved ratios of yield
strength to tensile strength. Other objects and
advantages will appear as the description pro
sition
_ mam er)
often so low that articles made. from such al
10 loys will deform readily and assume a large per
manent set at a stress considerably below the
stress corresponding to the ultimate tensile
strength.
5
\
tensile strengths that are satisfactory for a
/
3,000
‘.25
I
20,000
\20
30.
30,300
.30
12,400
20,000
.42
2 --_2 _--_
0
13,100
15,000
35,000
20,700
.37‘
.53
1
32,000
32,500
.30
‘.47
4
111,500
15,300
s
2
1
3
4
10,300‘
s
4
2
0
1
0
5
2
-
4
3
17,200
12,400
.
°
20,000
.55
35
20,000.
27,200
.00
.45
,
new magnesium-alu- -
minum-cadmium-lead alloy. I'have likewise dis
Solutionlmttreated and and alloys '
covered that the vproperties of this magnesium-,
aluminum-cadmium-lead alloy may be improved
by adding approximately 0.5 to 8 per cent of at
least one of the metals selected from the group
of relatively low melting-point metals, tin and
zinc.
_
'
'
The following tables give speci?c examples
which illustrate the improvement in yield
strength and in the ratio of yield strength to
tensile strength 01' my new. alloy as compared
to the known magnesium-aluminum-cadmium
alloys. I have likewise found that the increase in
yield strength and in the yield strength to tensile
strength ratio, as given in these tables, is accom- '
panied by an ,- improvement in Brinell hardness
amounting to approximately 25 per cent for the
.
2
“2
0
s-
10
10
'
2
40
0,100
20,000
.23
3,100
25,000
.31
10,200
25,000
_.41
20,500
20,000
2
s
4
4
4
4
2
7,200
7,700
.25
.27
-
0
4
2
10,100
31,100
.32
45
0
0
4
4
2
0
2 ____
13,000
10,000
- 30,300
34,300
.45
.52
,0
4
2'
s
2
s
0
0
2
2
2
1
1
1
5
-4
4
4
23,200
23,500
23,300
4
0
0
2
3
10,400
'
0
'
23,300
14,200
,
I
20,000
.02
32,000
.44
35,400
33,000
32,200
.05
.70
.72
30,000
.55
50
The speci?c proportionsot each metal 'to be
employed in these new alloys depends on the use
for which the alloy is intended. In geperalrl/?o/
-
2
2,124,561
prefer to use alloys containing more than 80 per
cent of magnesium and less than 20 per cent of
_
_
_
,
ment consists of approximately 16 hours’ heating
at 175‘? 0., subsequent to the above solution heat
treatment. Plastic deformation operations, such'
- total added metals, but where the alloy is to be
used for the productionof wrought shapes gen-' - as extruding, forging, and rolling are best con
erally, suitable compositions are those containing
more than 90 per cent of magnesium and less
than 10 per cent of ‘total added metals. For the
production of castings, the alloy should'prefer
ably contain 85 to 92 per cent of magnesium and
the various alloying ingredients in the following
proportions: 4 to 10 per cent of aluminum, 2 to 8
' per cent of cadmium, 1 to 6 per cent of lead, 1 to 6
._ per cent of tin, and 1 to 4 per cent of zinc. For
the production of wrought shapes by extrusion
15 and forging, the alloy should preferably contain
ducted at temperatures between 300° and 400° C.
This application is a division of my co-pending
application Serial No. 156,941, ?led August 2, 1937.
Other modes of applying the principle of my
invention may be employed instead of those ex
plained, change being made as regards the in 10
gredients and the steps herein disclosed, pro
vided those stated by any of the following claims _
or their equivalent be employed.
7
v
‘I particularly point out and distinctly claim as
my invention:—
-
_
-
15
_
90'to 96 per cent of magnesium and the various
1. A magnesium-base alloy containing about 1
cadmium, 0.5 to 2 per cent of lead, 0.5 to 3 per
If the
about 0.5 to 8 per cent of tin, and about 0.5 to 8
per cent of .zinc, the balance being magnesium.‘ '
alloying ingredients in the following proportions: ' to 12 per cent of aluminum, about 1 to, 10 per cent
1 to 8 per cent of aluminum, 1 to 3 per cent of ' of cadmium, about 0.5 to 10 per cent of lead,
20 cent of tin, and 0.5 to 2 per cent of zinc.
alloy is to be fabricated by rolling rather than by
extrusion'or forging, the percentage of aluminum
should preferably lie within the range of 1 to 45
per cent.
25
‘
-
My new polynary alloys may be prepared by the
methods usually employed for melting and alloy
ing metals with magnesium, such as adding the
respective alloying metals singly or jointly to a
bath of molten magnesium protected from oxida
30 tion by a cover of ?uid ?ux.
The solution heat
treatment for the zinc-free alloys may consist in
heating the material for 20 hours at 430° 0., fol
. lowed by air cooling, or, when zinc is present in
the alloy, 12 hours at 320° C. plus 16 hours at
35 420° 0., followed by air cooling. ‘The aging‘treat
2.- A magnesium-base alloy containing about 4
to 10 per cent of aluminum, about 2 to 8 per cent
of cadmium, about 1 to 6 per cent of lead, about
1 to 6 per cent of tin, and about 1 to 4 per cent of
zinc, the balance being magnesium.
3. A magnesium-base alloy containing about 1
to 8 per cent of aluminum, about 1 to 3 per cent
of cadmium, about 0.5 to 2 per cent of lead, about
0.5 to 3 per cent ofv tin, and about 0.5 to 2 per cent
of zinc, the balance .being magnesium. I
.
4. A magnesium-base alloy-containing about 8
percent ‘of aluminum, 2 per cent of cadmium, 1
per cent of lead, 3 per cent of tin, and 4 per cent
of zinc, the balance being magnesium.
>
‘
JOHN A. GANN.
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