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Патент USA US2124705

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Jl?y 26, 19381.
w. o, LOCKLIN
2,124,705
SURFACING MACHINE
Filed March 21, 1935
I
2 Sheets-‘Sheet 1
BY
r
1
‘I,
‘
ATTORNEY
July 26, 1938.
w_ Q_-LOCKLIN
2,124,705
SURFACING MACHINE
Filed March 21, 1935
'
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
(11,, alluwém
. 47
INVENTOR
QZOcX'
BY
"-'-'
%¢'S ATTORNEY
2,124,705
Patented July 26, 1938
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE
2,124,705
SURFACING MACHINE
William 0. Locklin, Rochester, N. Y.
Application March 21, 1935, Serial No. 12,129
10 Claims. (Cl. 51-—180)
My present invention relates to abrading ma
chines and more particularly to power driven
portable machines of the kind that is taken to
its work instead of the reverse, and it has for
,
its object to provide a simple, durable and ef?cient
machine of this character particularly adapted
for surfacing concrete and similar walls. The
improvements are directed in part toward render
ing the machine capable of smoothing the ceiling,
10 side walls and floor of a room with equal facility;
toward the mounting of the abrading head
whereby this feature is developed, and toward the
adjusting means for carrying the head toward and
from its work. To these and other ends, the
15 invention resides in certain improvements and
combinations of parts, all as will be more fully
described hereinafter, the novel features being
pointed out in the claims at the end of this speci?
cation.
In the drawings:
20
Fig. 1 is, what may be termed as well as not,
a front elevation of an abrading machine con
structed in accordance with and illustrating one
embodiment of my invention, the same being
shown at work against a side or vertical wall;
Fig. 2 is a similar view of the machine con
verted and at work upon a ?oor or lower hori
zontal surface;
Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the machine ad
justed for and at work against a ceiling or upper
horizontal surface;
Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary horizontal
section taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 5 is a plan view of the working face of
35 the abrading head;
My machine, as illustrated, to ?rst give a gen
eral idea of its construction and use, embodies a
frame or carriage mounted on wheels to be pushed
about as the abrading head traverses a ceiling,
side wall or floor in a concrete building to- bring 5
to a smooth plane condition the hardened sur
face thereof.
To achieve this versatility, the
abrading head revolves to any of the several
necessary positions on a rotary turret by which
its spindle is carried. The turret is vertically 10'
adjusted or, rather, has two different positions
for floor and ceiling work on a vertically adjust
able frame mounted on the carriage. The latter
carries a prime mover and the drive and trans
mission therefrom to the head is made adaptable 15
to the movements of the frame.
Referring more particularly to the drawings,
I indicates a rectangular angle iron carriage
frame having an axle 2 carrying ground wheels 3
at the front functioning in company with a trail- 20
ing caster 4 at the rear. The prime mover 5, in
the present form of an electric motor, mounted
on the ?oor of the carriage has a direct driving
connection through a pinion 6 on the motor shaft
with a bevel gear 1 on the inner and lower ele
ment 8 of a telescopic drive shaft, the upper com
25
panion and tubular element of which, indicated
at 9, is slotted and keyed thereto at In for exten
sion and contraction, as will be understood.
Slidable vertically on the front angles of the 30
carriage frame I is an extension frame ll held
thereto in the manner best shown in Fig. 4. It
consists of angle irons l2 connected by tie pieces
l3 to ride against the inner faces of the angles I.
Gibs l4 welded to the frame angles through spac 35
ing strips l5 engage the outer and side faces of
Fig. 6 is an enlarged section through one of the carriage frame pieces. A cable I6 attached to’
the abrasive blocks thereon taken on the line 6-6’ the lower portion of frame ll, runs over an idle
of Fig. 5;
pulley I1 and thence rearwardly to a ratchet
Fig. 7 is an enlarged vertical fragmentary cen
windlass or drum I8, provided with a crank, by 40
4:0 tral section in the axis of the transmission shaft
means of which the frame H may be raised and
through the transmission gear between the drive lowered and adjusted to any desired height within
shaft and the head spindle;
limits for floor or ceiling work and to regulate a
Fig. 8 is a similar section taken horizontally height of the operations upon vertical wall sur
through said axis on the line 8-8 of Fig. 7;
45
Fig. 9 is a further enlarged detail section faces.
The upper end of the frame H is provided
through the spindle bearing taken substantially with a cross head 19 (Fig. 7) containing a bear
on the line 9-—9 of Fig. "I;
ing 20 for a jack shaft 2|, said bearing includ
Fig. 10 is a detail horizontal section through the ing a sleeve 22. A rearwardly extending bracket
driving shaft bearing taken substantially on the 23 on the head provides a bearing between col- 50
line l0-I0 of Fig. '7, and
lars 24 and 25 on the outer tubular element 9
Fig. 11 is a detail of the stop plate for the of the drive shaft whereby the latter is support
spindle turret taken in section on the line I l-H
ed. Another bracket 26 provides a bearing for
of Fig. 8.
Similar reference numerals throughout the
55 \. several views indicate the same parts.
the hub of a miter gear 21 splined to the driving
shaft element and held in place by a collar 28. 55
2
2,124,705
The gear 2? meshes with a similar gear 29 ?xed
to the jack shaft 2! whereby the latter is driven.
On the forwardly projecting end of sleeve 22
there is mounted to turn freely a yoke 30 con
stituting a bearing bracket. Its two bearings
3| and 32 carry a spindle 33 for an abrading
head or disk 31!. The spindle is grooved at 35
and splincd thereon at 35 is the hub of a miter
gear 3? so that the spindle may slide through
10 and yet be rotated by the gear. The said hub
of the latter occupies the bearing to which it
is held by collar 38 and this gear meshes ‘and
is driven by a miter gear 39 ?xed to the further
projecting end of the jack shaft 2|. This brings
15 us to a point where it is clear that the spindle
33 may be rotated and driven from the base
motor 5 at any desired elevation of the'carry
ing frame or carriage H.
The abrading head 312, as best shown in 'Figs.
20 1, 5, and 6, comprises, as before stated, a disk
upon the outer face of which are secured a plu
rality of blocks of abrasive material 40, pref
erably radially arranged and three in number
as shown whereby uniform contact of all is as
25 sured with the mode of supporting the disk about
to be explained. Each block is secured in a re
cess in the disk by means of a wedge shaped gib
4i screwed to the disk with an intervening wooden
strip $2 between it and the block.
These wooden
30 strips avoid harsh contacts between the wedges
and the. blocks and, being slightly compressible,
maintain an even clamping pressure against the
blocks. As will be readily vseen from Fig. 6, the
tighter the wedge 152 is screwed down, the greater
35 will be the clamping pressure against the block
in]. The blocks 46 may consist of carborundum
or similar abrasive, or any suitable cutting, grind
ing, or polishing material or tool. Brushes may
also be employed in place of the blocks 40, when
40 it is desired to wash or clean the surface op
erated upon, rather than to abrade or cut it.
The disk 313 has secured to-its under side three
bolts or posts 43 which are reciprocatably held
in a spider Fall ?xed to the outer end of the spin
45 dle'33. The posts are headed and are encircled
by springs 45 interposed between the spider and
the disk so that the latter is yieldably and re
siliently supported. In other words, it is a ?oat
ing connection that equalizes the contact of the
50 abrading blocks with the work when axial pres
sure is applied to the spindle.
' I
Further resilience and spring pressure ‘in an
128 having four stop notches 49 therein 90° apart
at top, bottom and the two sides. Mounted on
the hub of the bracket yoke 30 is a spring latch
50 that rides on boss 48 to engage and lock se
lectively with any of the stop notches whereby
these ceiling and side wall operating axes of the
spindle are changed and established in position,
as will be understood.
For operations on the
?oor or the ground line of the supporting wheels,
the spindle carrying bracket is changed to an
other position on the vertically adjustable car
riage II in ‘the following manner:
Referring more particularly to Fig. 2, in which
this adjustment is shown and the abrading head
is at work against a ?oor, 5| indicates the bolt
holes at the top of the carriage that de?ne the
previously described position of the head l9.
With the ‘readjustment, the head is similarly
secured at lower end of the carriage, which lat
ter is lowered and the tubular outer portion 9 1?
of the telescoping drive shaft with it, so that
it still drives the gear 21. and hence the jack
shaft to the spindle. The bracket yoke 30 is
simply inverted and locked in that position,
whereupon ‘the carriage H may be manipulated
to impart the desired pressure to the rotating
abrading head, as before. The weight of the
carriage is ordinarily more than su?icient to
contribute the desired pressure through the
springs, which pressure can, of course, be re— 30
lieved through the cable l6 and drum l8, just as
it would be increased in reverse operations
against the ceiling.
To obtain the necessary abrading pressure
against a side wall surface, when the machine 35
is used as in Fig. 1, the machine may, if desired,
be slightly tilted so that the wheel 3 which is
toward the wall is elevated slightly above the
floor or scaffolding upon which the machine rests,
thus throwing the entire weight of the machine
upon the caster 4 and the other wheel 3 which
is farther from the wall. Even when in this
slightly tilted position, the machine may, if de
sired, be moved along the floor while the abrad
ing head is in motion, and may be guided by 45
suitable means such as a strip of material nailed
to the floor just outside of the outer wheel 3
and extending parallel to the wall, to prevent the
wheel 3 from moving farther away from the
wall as the machine rolls along.
I claim:
1. A surfacing machine comprising a support,
a frame mounted on said support for substantial
ly vertical upward and downward movements
outward direction is imparted to the spindle by
a coil compression spring 46 that encircles its
55 inner end and reacts between the bearing 32'and
a collar 41 adjustably secured :to the spindle , relatively to the support, a shaft mounted on said
within the yoke bracket 30.’ Thus, in Fig. 3, frame for rotation about'a substantially hori
the head is at work against a ceiling C under zontal axis, said shaft moving upwardly and
the pressure of springs 135 and 46 acting jointly. downwardly bodily with said frame, motor
60
With the foregoing description, it is deemed means mounted on said support, a substantially
unnecessary to further explain the mode of op
vertical shaft driven by said motor means,
eration and use of the device. The mobility of means for driving said horizontal shaft from said
the carriage 8 together with the vertical offset vertical shaft in all positions to which said hori
of the abrading head with reference thereto and zontal shaft may be moved by upward and down
65 to the wheels 3 permits the operator to trav
ward movement of said frame, a carrier mounted
erse the entire surface of a ceiling. Much the on said frame and movable bodily therewith and
same thing is done in surfacing a side wall. The also rotatable relatively to said frame about an
bracket yoke 36 is simply swung to a horizontal axis substantially coincidental with that of said
position at right or left, as may be more con
70 venient for reaching the particular wall, as shown
in Fig. 1, in the following manner, the side wall
with which the head is engaged being indicated
at W in that view.
Referring more particularly to Figs. 1, 8 and
76 11, the cross head l9 is'pr'ovided with a boss
horizontal shaft, a third shaft mounted on and
movable bodily with said carrier and extending
substantially perpendicular to said horizontal 70
shaft, means for driving said third shaft from
said horizontal shaft, and rotary surfacing means
operatively connected to said third shaft and
driven
thereby.
.
.
,
2. A surfacing. machine comprising a support,
3
2,124,705
a frame mounted on said support for substantial
ly vertical upward and downward movements
relatively to the support, a shaft mounted on
said frame for rotation about a substantially
horizontal axis, said shaft moving upwardly and
on said third shaft, apertures in one of said ele
ments, and pins secured to the other of said
elements and extending loosely through said ap
ertures to provide a driving connection between
said third shaft and said surfacing means.
downwardly bodily with said frame, motor means
mounted on said support, a substantially vertical
shaft driven by said motor means, means for
driving said horizontal shaft from said vertical
shaft in all positions to which said horizontal
shaft may be moved by upward and downward
movement of said frame, a carrier mounted on
said frame and movable bodily therewith and also
rotatable relatively to said frame about an axis
15 substantially coincidental with that of said hori
zontal shaft, a third shaft mounted on and mov
able bodily with said carrier and extending sub
5. A surfacing machine adapted to perform
surfacing operations upon both walls and ceil
ings, comprising a carriage, motor means
mounted on said carriage, frame means mounted
on said carriage for upward and downward sub 10
stantially vertical movement thereon, substan
tially vertical telescoping shaft means mounted
in part on said frame means and in part on said
carriage and driven by said motor means, a sub~
stantially perpendicular to said horizontal shaft,
stantially horizontal shaft mounted on said
frame means for bodily upward and downward
movement therewith, means for driving said
horizontal shaft from said telescoping vertical
means for driving said third shaft from said hori
20 zontal shaft, rotary surfacing means driven by
said third shaft to rotate approximately in a
plane perpendicular to said third shaft, and
means for holding said carrier in any one of a
plurality of different positions with respect to
25 said frame, so that said third shaft may be held
in different positions at an angle to each other
to enable said surfacing means to operate upon
different surfaces at an angle to each other.
3. A surfacing machine comprising a support,
a frame mounted on said support for substan
shaft, turret means mounted on said frame means
for rotation thereon about an axis substantially 20
coincidental with that of said horizontal shaft,
a surfacing head shaft mounted on said turret
means for rotation about its own axis and also
for bodily rotation with said turret means about
the rotary axis of said turret means, means for 25
tially vertical upward and downward movements
relatively to the support, a shaft mounted on
said frame for rotation about a substantially
horizontal axis, said shaft moving upwardly and
35 downwardly bodily with said frame, motor means
mounted on said support, a substantially ver—
tical shaft driven by said motor means, means for
driving said horizontal shaft from said vertical
shaft in all positions to- which said horizontal
shaft may be moved by upward and downward
movement of said frame, a carrier mounted on
said frame and movable bodily therewith and
also rotatable relatively to said frame about an
axis substantially coincidental with that of said
horizontal shaft, a third shaft mounted on and
45 movable bodily with said carrier and extending
substantially perpendicular to said horizontal
shaft, means for driving said third shaft from
said horizontal shaft, surfacing means, and a
resilient connection between said surfacing means
50 and said third shaft, whereby said surfacing
means is loosely mounted on said third shaft and
rotated thereby.
4. A surfacing‘ machine comprising a support,
a frame mounted on said support for substan
56 tially vertical upward and downward movements
relatively to the support, a shaft mounted on
said frame for rotation about a substantially
horizontal axis, said shaft moving upwardly and
downwardly bodily with said frame, motor means
60 mounted on said support, a substantially vertical
shaft driven by said motor means, means for
driving said horizontal shaft from said vertical
shaft in all positions to which said horizontal
shaft may be moved by upward and downward
65 movement of said frame, a carrier mounted on
said frame and movable bodily therewith and also
rotatable relatively to said frame about an axis
substantially coincidental with that of said hori
70
zontal shaft, a third shaft mounted on and mov
able bodily with said carrier and extending sub
stantially perpendicular to said horizontal shaft,
means for driving said third shaft from said hori
zontal shaft, surfacing means including a sur
75 facing head element, a driving element mounted
driving said surfacing head shaft from said hori
zontal shaft, and surfacing head means includ
ing a surfacing element operatively connected to
said head shaft to be rotated thereby approxi
mately in a plane perpendicular to said head 30
shaft, so that said surfacing element may op
erate upon wall surfaces when said turret means
is in one position and upon ceiling surfaces when
said turret means is turned to another posi
35
tion.
6. A surfacing machine adapted to perform
surfacing operations upon both walls and ceil
ings, comprising a carriage, motor means
mounted on said carriage, frame means mounted
on said carriage for upward and downward sub
stantially vertical movement thereon, substan
tially vertical telescoping shaft means mounted
in part on said frame means and in part on said
carriage and driven by said motor means, a sub
stantially horizontal shaft mounted on said frame
means for bodily upward and downward move
ment therewith, means for driving said horizon
tal shaft from said telescoping vertical shaft,
45
turret means mounted on said frame means for
rotation thereon about an axis substantially
coincidental with that of said horizontal shaft,
a surfacing head shaft mounted on said turret
means for rotation about its own axis and also
for bodily rotation with said turret means about
the rotary axis of said turret means, means for 55
driving said surfacing head shaft from said hori
zontal shaft, surfacing head means mounted on
said surfacing head shaft and including a rotary
surfacing element operatively connected to and
driven by said head shaft, and latching means 60
for holding said turret means at will either in a
position in which said surfacing head shaft is
substantially horizontal or in a position in which
said surfacing head shaft is substantially vertical.
'7. A surfacing machine adapted to perform 65
surfacing operations upon walls, ceilings, and
floors, comprising a
carriage,
motor
means
mounted on said carriage, frame means mounted
on said carriage for upward and downward sub
stantially vertical movement thereon, substan 70
tially vertical telescoping shaft means mounted
in part on said frame means and in part on said
carriage and driven by said motor means, a
bracket, a substantially horizontal shaft rotat
ably mounted on said bracket, turret means 75
4
‘2,124,708
mounted on said bracket for rotation relatively
thereto about an axis substantially coincidental
with that of said horizontal shaft, means for
mounting said bracket in either of two- positions
on said frame means, one of said positions being
nearer the top of said frame means and the other
of said positions being near the bottom of said
frame means, means for driving said horizontal
shaft from said telescoping vertical shaft when
10 said bracket is mounted in either of said posi
tions, a surfacing head shaft mounted on said
turret means for rotation about its own axis
and also for bodily rotation with said turret
means about the rotary axis of said turret means,
15 means for driving said surfacing head shaft from
said horizontal shaft, and surfacing head means
supported at least partially from said surfacing
head shaft and including a rotary surfacing ele
ment operatively connected to and driven by said
20 head shaft, said surfacing head means being
adapted to operate upon a wall surface when said
turret is turned so that said surfacing head
shaft is substantially horizontal and being
with said elevating frame, means for rotating
said shaft, a head shaft substantially perpen
dicular to and driven by said horizontal shaft
and mounted to turn bodily on an axis substan
tially coincident with that of said horizontal
shaft as well as to rotate on its own axis, said
head shaft also being mounted to slide longitu
dinally With respect to said horizontal shaft,
means-for holding said head shaft in any one of
a plurality of positions at an angle to each other
around the axis of said horizontal shaft, sur
facing head means rotatably driven by said
head shaft to rotate approximately in a plane
perpendicular to said head shaft, and spring
means tending to move said head shaft longitu 15
dinally to press said surfacing head means
against the surface being worked upon.
10. A surfacing machine including a wheeled
carriage, means forming a substantially vertical
guideway on said carriage, shaft supporting 20
means movable upwardly and downwardly along
said guideway, a substantially horizontal shaft
adapted to operate upon a ceiling surface when rotatably mouted on said supporting means and
25 said bracket is mounted in its upper position on »movable bodily upwardly or downwardly with
said frame means and said turret means is said supporting means when the latter moves
along said guideway, power means mounted on
turned so that said surfacing head shaft is sub
stantially vertical, and being adapted to operate
upon a floor surface when said bracket is
30 mounted in its lower position on said frame
means and when said turret means is turned so
that said surfacing head shaft is substantially
vertical.
8. A surfacing machine comprising a wheeled
35 carriage, a substantially horizontal shaft, means
on said carriage for rotating said shaft, a lon
gitudinally slidable head shaft substantially per
pendicular to said horizontal shaft and driven
thereby, surfacing head means mounted at least
40 partially on and rotatably driven by said head
shaft, means for moving said horizontal shaft,
head shaft, and surfacing head means together
upwardly and downwardly by rectilinear move
ment in a substantially vertical direction, and
spring means tending to move said head shaft
longitudinally to press said surfacing head means
constantly upon the surface being worked upon.
9. A surfacing machine comprising a wheeled
carriage, an elevating frame movable along a
'50 substantially rectilinear path substantially ver
tically upwardly and downwardly on said car
riage, a substantially horizontal shaft mounted
on and movable bodily upwardly and downwardly
said carriage, means for driving said horizontal
shaft from said power means, a shaft bracket
mounted for rotation with respect to said sup
porting means about an axis substantially coin
cidental with that of said horizontal shaft, means
for retaining said bracket in any one of a plu
rality of positions with respect to said supporting
means, a second shaft rotatably mounted in said ,
bracket and positioned substantially perpen
dicularly to said horizontal shaft, means for driv
ing said second shaft from said horizontal shaft,
and rotatable surfacing means driven by said
second shaft and rotating approximately in a
plane perpendicular to said second shaft, so that
when said bracket is positioned to hold said sec
ond shaft approximately vertically, said surfac
ing means may operate upon an approximately
horizontal surface, and when said bracket is posi
tioned to hold said second shaft approximately 45
horizontally, said surfacing means may operate
upon an approximately vertical surface, the up
per surface of said surfacing means, when ad
justed to operate upon a substantially horizontal
ceiling, being at an elevation above all other
so
parts of the machine.
WILLIAM O. LOCKLIN.
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