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Патент USA US2125291

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Aug. 2, 193,8.
R. B. HAYDEN
2,125,291
PRECIOUS METAL RECOVÈRY DEVICE
Original Filed Feb. 11, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet 1
î@
ATTORNEY
Aug; 2, 1938.l
R. B. |-|AYDE|~14
2,125,291
PRECIOUS METAL RECOVERY DEVICE
Original Filed Feb. ll, 1955
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
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ßgéerïâ?’dydf/î
INVENTOR
`r
gil-ORN EY
I
,
2,125,291
Patented Aug. 2, 1938
4PM‘ENT OFFICE
UNITED STATES
2,125,291
PRECIOUS METAL RECOVERY DEVICE
Robert B. Hayden, Seattle, Wash.
Application February 11, 1935, Serial No.' 6,025
Renewed November 1, 1937
(Cl. 209-184)
_ 12 claims.
This invention relates to means for and meth-y
’
Fig. 2 is a view of the same partly in plan and
ods of extracting precious metals from ñnely partly in section substantially on broken line
Of Flig, 1.
l
divided ores, black sands and other ñnely divided
I Fig.y 3 is a detached elevationy of a tubular feed
Value bearing material.
A primary object of this invention is to provide valve embodied in the invention.
an eñicient means for and method of extracting
precious' metals from ores which have been
ground to a iineness which releases the precious
metals or from other finely divided materials in
10 Which the precious metals occur in a free state.
Another primary object of the invention is to
provide means for and a method of extracting
precious metals from finely divided concentrated
material by bringing said material into intimate
15 contact with molten lead.
Another primary object of the invention is to
provide means for extracting precious metals
from finely divided concentrated material, which
O
means may take the place of smelting at a much
lower cost and with a much more efficient re
covery of values.
Another primary object of this invention is to
provide efiicient means for extracting precious
metals from finely divided value bearing material,
which means is relatively inexpensive to manu
facture and operate; is smalland compact in
construction and readily transported to locations
diihcult of access, thereby saving expense in
curred in the shipment of concentrated material
30 to smelters; is capable of saving a very high
percentage of all of the precious metals in ores
or concentrates; and is capable of being suc
» `cessfully operated by persons of ordinary skill.
It is well known that a substantial amount of
35
values are lost in smelting processes by being
carried away with the smoke and by-products-of
combustion. My invention overcomes this -difñ
culty and saves a large percentage of the values
40 ordinarily lost in this manner in smelting and
at the same time provides a less expensive process
of extraction.
A still further object of this invention is to
prevent losses of lead and values due to oxida
tion in the course of the extraction treatment and
to provide a method and means applicable to sub
stantially all ñnely divided concentrates and .ores
including complex ores.
Other and more specific objects will be appar50 ent from the following description taken in con
nection with the accompanying drawings.
In the drawings, Fig. 1 is a view in vertical mid
section, with parts shown in elevation, of a pre
cious metal extraction device constructed in
accordance with this invention.
.
Fig. 4 is a detached plan view of a mixing im
peller embodied in the invention.
Fig. 5 is a side elevation of said mixing impeller.
Fig. 6 is a detached perspective view of a vane
used on the bottom of a rotatably mounted float. 10
Fig. ’7 is a View partly in section and partly in
elevation of a mixing receptacle embodied in the
invention.
Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional View illustrat
ing a modified form of the invention.
Like reference numerals designate like parts
throughout the several views.
Referring to the drawings, IU designates a bowl
shaped receptacle which is supported on a suit
able upright housing like frame II. The recep 20
tacle Ill is centrally provided with a relatively
ilat conical bottom portion I2 of slightly concave
shape on the inside. The conical bottom I2 has
a centrally positioned outlet opening I3 controlled
by a rotary valve I4. The valve I4 may have a 25
long stem I5 so that it may be operated from the
exterior‘of the housing like frame II. Extending
around the flat conical bottom portion I2 and
integral with the receptacle Il] are a plurality of
annular upright shoulders I6 and I1. At their 30
upper edges the shoulders I6 and I'I merge with
annular flat shelf like portions I8 and I9 respec
tively. Extending upwardly from the outer edge
of the ñat shelf like portion I9 is an upper annu
lar wall section'20 which is inclined inwardly to
a point near the top of the receptacle and then
has a short outwardly inclined portion 2| which
terminates in a flat top portion 22. An annular
vertical ñange 23 extends upwardly from the flat
top portion 22.
,
40
A feed hopper 24 is positioned above the re
ceptacle 1_0 and preferably supported from the
frame II by base members 25. The base mem
bers 25 may rest on and be secured to the top
of the receptacle I0, the receptacle I0 being sup
ported directly on the frame I I. An upper frame
member 26 is supported on the feed hopper 24
and extends upwardly therefrom to a substantial
distancev above the hopper 24. A vertical shaft
21, having a lower end 28 of smaller diameter,
is journaled in bearings 29- in the upper frame
Vmember 26 and extends downwardly through the
feed ‘hopper and into the receptacle I0. The up
per frame member 26 is shown partially broken
away in Fig. l, but said upper> frame member is 55
2,125,291
preferably made long enough to afford a good
bearing arrangement for the shaft 21 and to
allow the upper end of said shaft to be positioned
tube 46 is of substantially larger diameter than
the lower end portion 28 of the impeller shaft
and said shaft 28 is externally provided within
at a substantial distance above the hopper so
the feed tube 46, with a spiral thread or worm
that the driving connection at the upper end of
said shaft will be less subject to the heat applied
to the hopper and to the receptacle Ill. A belt
pulley 35 on the upper end of the shaft 21 may
be connected with a belt 3| by which the shaft is
41 which feeds ground material downwardly
the the shaft rotates. This provides positive feed
means for delivering the value bearing material
into the mixing impeller.
e
Positioned within the upper portion of the re
A mixing impeller, designated generally by 32,
ceptacle lû is a relatively large heavy float 45.
This float 43 is provided with a plurality of lugs
is secured to the lower end of the shaft 21-28.
49 Which project beyond the peripheral portion
driven. y,
j
n
`r
'
"
'
l
This mixing impeller embodies a disc like bot- ' thereof and are adapted to rest on the top 22
tom member 33 having a central hub into- 4which
15 the lower end of the shaft 21-28 may be thread
ed. A ring like top member 34 is spaced above
the disc like bottom member 33 and rigidly con-v
nected with said disc likey bottom member 33 by
peripherally disposed upright 1Janes 35.`
These
varies 35 are flat and are positioned at anv angle
,vars/respects radial` planes ofthe impeller. The
Vanes «35 preferably havev integral rivets 35 on
the ends thereof whichv are riveted into the ring
„34 _andrbottom member 33. The function of these
yvanes is to direct and propel material outwardly
toward the »periphery ofthe receptacle lIU. An
other set of vanes 31, integral withîor rigidly se
cured to the- ring like top member 34,> are pro
portie-n of the receptacle l@ and support the float
when the device is not in use. When the device
is in operation the float 48 is supported on the
molten lead. The float 48 has a conical central
opening 55 through which the feed tube 45 ex
tends.y This opening 551s only slightly larger
thanthe exterior of the feed tube 45 at the top 20
and said opening diverges or expands toward the
bottom, portion of the ñoat. . Spiral thread means
5l
provided within the conical opening 55B'.
This thread means 5l helps to prevent lighter
material from being crowded up through the
openingA 55 by the heavier molten lead wh-en the '
device isin use. '
The peripheralrwalls 52 of the float 4B are in
"clined conically and eonvergently from` bottom to
r3.0 tend inwardly from ‘the ring like'top member 34 'top to conform 'to the incline of the upper wall1
toward -the axis of said `mixing» impeller. -The section 25 Vof the receptacle l0. The walls 52 of
van'es v31I arepltched like the blades vof a propel the float 48 are spaced from the walls 2li of the
ler and are adapted to exert a downward force receptacle Iii to afford an annular passageway
von lmaterial which enters the impeller from the for the discharge of material which has been sub
lL35 top. Bands 33, as of Wire, extend circumferen
jected to the action of the molten lead. The bot
tially around the impeller in engagement with tom of the float 48 is also of conical shape, as .135
the upright varies 35 and form screen like means indicated at 53, said bottom 53 being inclined up
for breaking up the material which is passin-g wardly from the center toward the periphery.`
radially outward through the impeller. The disc
A plurality of vanes 54 are secured to the bot
40 like bottom member of the impeller is positioned tom of the float 48. These vanes, see Figs. l, 2
a short distance above the bottom Al2 o-f the re
-and 6 are not radial but are positioned substan 40
tially tangential to the bottom portion of the
The shaft 21428 is of larger diameter down conicalropening E50-and extend toward the pe
to a'location a’short distance above the bot e riphery of the float. These Varies 54 Apreferably
tomof the‘feed hopper and the lower end por
terminate just inwardly from the shoulder l1 of
tion 23 of said shaft is of smallerr diameter to the receptacle l5 so that said vanes 54 may ex 45
afford a material feed passageway 39. A tubular tend downwardly into the receptacle l5 inside of
feedcontrol valve 4U' is provided on the exterior the shoulder I1. These vanes 54 are preferably
`of theshaft 21. The lower end ofthe feed con
shaped, as more clearly shown in Fig. 6, to pro
50 trol valv'e 45, Fig. 3, has upwardly extending feed vide base portions 55 arranged to be bolted to
notches 4l through which ñnely divided mate
the bottom of the iloat and vertical-1in portions
rial may pass lfrom the feed hopper 24linto the 58-y and horizontal portions 51. These vanes 54
feed passageway 39 when the feed control valve form channels on the bottom of the slowly ro
40 is elevated into a position, as shown in Fig. 1. tating float 48, through which molten lead may
55 The upper end of the feed control valve 40 has flow back toward the axis of the machine and
a lever 42 connected therewith. The lever 42 is beldelivered into the mixing impeller 32 on top>
y.angularly movable over an inclined notched seg of the'incoming material from which the values
-ment 4_3 Aon the rim of the feed hopper and is are tobe extracted.
adapted to `-raise and lower the feed control valve
An inlet opening 5S through which molten lead
maybe introduced isprovided in the peripheral
-60 40 and to hold said valve 40 in any desired ad
60
_justed position. In Fig. 1, the valve 40 is shown portion of the receptacle l0.
at the upper limit of „its movement thus afford
A discharge spout 59 is provided at the top
ing a maximum feed. By moving the lever 42 of the receptacle l5'. The discharge spout 59 is
vided at the top of the mixing impeller and ex
ceptacle
Ill.v
'
.
`
~
toward the lower end of the inclined notched
65 segment 43 the feed will be decreased and said
feed will be entirely cut off- when the feed notches
4l yare entirely within the passageway 39 in the
hub portion 45 of the feedhopper 24.
_ - A feed tube 46 is secured within the opening
70 39 inthe feed hoppern hub 45 and extends down
Wardlyfinto thev mixing. impeller 32 so as to de
liver’ñnely ground valuerbearing material di
rectly into .saidmixing impeller. The ends of the
preferably substantially tangential to the top of
the receptacle lil and has an opening through
the vertical flange 25 on the top> of said recep 65
tacle l0. The inner end of the discharge spout
59 is preferably level with the flat top portion 22
,of the receptacle l0 and said discharge spout 59
is inclined downwardly toward Vthe outer end.
The float 48 floats on molten lead 55 within the
70
receptacle I0 with the lugs 49 raised just clear
of the lshelf portions 22.Y yA rotary motion is im
`vanes 31. preferably terminate in close proximity '.parted to the molten lead by the rotating im
tov theexterior >of the feed .tube~45. kThe feed peller and this rotary motion is communicated
75
¿2,125,291
.3
to thelioat> 48. The lugs 49 on the float 48 are rate of speed and the feed control valve is opened
moved around the receptacle I0 a short distance to allow material to feed downwardly. For a mix
',above'the flat shelf portion 22 of said receptacle . ing impeller of three inches over all diameter I
findl that a speed of about 1750 revolutions per
l0V and serve as means to sweep discharging ma
minute, providing a peripheral speed of about
<.terial outwardly into said spout 59.
1400 feet per minute, gives satisfactory results
.; Receptacle heating means 6l is provided within
but it will be understood that the angular and pe
-the base frame VIl in operative relation with re
spectV to the receptacle I8. This heating means ripheral speed of this impeller may be Varied de
6l is of sufficient capacity to maintain the lead „pending on various factors, as the size and shape
68 within the receptacle I0 in a molten condition of the impeller, shape of receptacle and char n10
it ybeing a characteristic of finely divided gold acter of material being treated. The rapid ro
that it will liquefy at substantially 950 degrees tation of the impeller produces an outward and a
-Fahrenheit when it is brought into contact with rotary motion of the molten lead in the receptacle
lû and causes the molten lead to rise higher at
molten lead. Another heating means 62 is also
preferably provided for heating the material the circumference of the receptacle I0 and as 15
supply hopper 24 to keep the material in said sume a somewhat conical shape characteristic of
liquids when rotated in cylindrical receptacles.
hopper heated.
In`> Fig. 8 I have shown a modiñed form of my When the molten lead is rotated in this manner it
invention embodying a mixing impeller compris« will lift the float 48 so that the lugs 49 are clear
ing a lower horizontal disc portion 63 secured to of the shelf like portion 22 on which they may U20
a rotating vertical shaft 64. An upper horizontal rest when the machine is not in operation. As
disc portion 65 of larger diameter than the disc the ñoat is supported on the molten lead which
portion 63 is secured to said disc portion B3, in is rotating in the receptacle the float will be
spaced relation thereabove, by rivets 66 having caused to rotate at comparatively slow speed in
the receptacle, due to the action of the rotating
Vspacer sleeves. 61 thereon. A feed tube 68 ex
molten lead on thevanes 54. This molten lead
tends downwardly around the shaft 64 -and ter
minates in an opening 69 which is provided in is also being driven toward the periphery of the
receptacle l0 by the mixing impeller 32 and it
the larger upper disc portion B5. The disc por
tion 85 is provided on the bottom surface with a will flow upwardly along the outer receptacle walls
plurality of downwardly extending’spaced apart and inwardly along the bottom of the float 48 30
between the vanes 54. This molten lead which
lugs 'H0 which agitate and thoroughly mix ma
fiows inwardly between the vanes 54 will pour into
terial and molten lead which are directed out
wardly by the impeller. ‘ These lugs 'lllvery thor-> the top of the impeller along with, and on top of,
the incoming powdered valuebearing material
oughly agitate and mix the material to be sepa
rated because this material is lighter in weight thus bringing the molten lead into intimate con- il 35
than the molten lead and will continually tend to tact with the powdered material from which the
values are to be extracted. The vanes 3l in the
rise upwardly against the disc portion 65. In
impeller will help to force this circulating molten
clined vanes 'll are provided in the central por
tion of the disc 65. These vanes 1l help to force lead down through the impeller and will keep the
-40 the> material downwardly and outwardly. Other vlighter value bearing material forced down and f A40
vanes 'l2 are provided on the peripheral portion prevent it from rising through the impeller. The
of the disc 65. The varies 'l2 are pitched so that `value bearing material is compelled to pass out
they tend to force the material downwardly as it through the periphery of the mixing impeller and
passes outwardly under said vanes. This secures is thoroughly mixed with the hot lead and gold
and silver and all other precious metals having
45 a better mixing of the material with the molten
aihnity for hot lead, will be absorbed and picked
A receptacle 13 of modiñed shape is also shown up and held by the molten lead. The agitation
in Fig. 8, this receptacle 13 has a concave bottom and whipping of the molten lead may cause a
'i4 of flattened cone shape and side walls 15 which portion of the lead and especially that portion
are convergent inwardly from the bottom toward which has absorbed precious metals to flour or
break up into small globules. This flouring may
` the top.
i
When this extraction device is to be operated be due to the action of oxygen in the material
solid lead may be placed in the receptacle IIJ and being treated. This iloured lead, which hol-ds
-melted or molten lead may be poured into the Values, together with the finely divided lighter
receptacle l0 through the opening 58. Enough material or tailings will move outwardly along
molten lead is provided to submerge the mixing the inclined bottom 53 of the float 48 and will
impeller 32 and come into contact with the lower move upwardly between the internal wall of the
portion of the float 48. The receptacle I0 is receptacle and the external wall of the ñoat 48
heated hot enough to keep this molten lead in and will be discharged through the spout 59.
Some of the values will ordinarily be retained in 1 i60
FGO molten condition during operation.' The feed
control valve 40 may be closed While the feed the molten lead in the receptacle which does not
hopper is ñlled or partially ñlled with ñnely di
ñour off.
lead.
`
'
vided or pulverized ore which carries values. This
ore will usually have been previously roasted to
its condition it for the extraction treatment and may
come directly from an ore roaster. It will also
have a suitable flux mixed with it which has been
determined in the usual manner by the character
of the ore. The feed hopper 24 is maintained at
a high enough temperature so that the material
to' be treated will not reduce the moltenlead be
low the temperature necessary to liquefy the pre
cious metals as it mixes therewith. The mixing
itsV
`impeller is then driven in the direction indicated
by'thearrows in Figs, 1 and 4 at a relatively high
The molten lead covered by the float 48 will not '
be expose-d to the air and will be protected against
oxidation. The portions of molten lead toward:
the center and toward the periphery which are not
covered by the float will be covered by the pow
dered material or tailings and will be protected
from oxidation by exposure to the air.
710
n
In the floured lead and tailings thus discharged
some of the values will be held by the floured lead.
The iioured lead may then be separated from the
tailings in any well known manner, as by passing
the' Same over _a concentrating table or by sub
2,125,291
jecting vsaid floured lead and tailings to a selective
ceptacle; a driven rotary mixing impellerV posi
tioned in the molten lead in said receptacle; said
The floured lead with the values in it may then _ impeller having anropen center; a float in said
be treated to recover the values. . I find that one
receptacle floating in the molten lead and posi
oil flotation process.
`
method of recovering the values from this floured
lead witha minimum loss of lead is to place the
same in a receptacle, heat to a molten state and
agitate the molten mass. I ñnd that agitation
for a period of ten minutes is ordinarily sufficient.
10 This will cause the values to rise to the top
while the lead which does not carry values
will be left in the bottom of the receptacle.
During this process the surface of the molten
mass is covered with powdered lime rock or with
-15 any powdered material which will prevent oxida
tion. By providing a valve inthe bottom of
the receptacle it is possible to draw 01T first the
molten lead which does not carry values and then
the molten lead which carries the values. The
molten lead carrying the concentrated values
may be separatedly collected and later treated
in such a manner as to recover the values. Well
known treatments for `the recovery of the con
centrated values may be used. These treatments
:25 usually involve they destruction or yloss of what
lead> remains in the concentrated matter.`
The re-melting, agitation and final concentra
tion of the lead containing the values may be
done in the receptacle Iû, preferably with the
'.30 float 68 removed, and the lead drawn 01T through
the valve l4'or a separate receptacle similar to
the receptacle l0 -may be provided for this re
melting agitation and final concentration. It is
tioned above said impeller; the bottom of said
float being conically inclined upwardly from the
center outwardly and said bottom float wall ex
erting a substantial pressure on the molten lead
whereby material moving outwardly between said
float and saidA molten lead will be subjected to
pressure rolling and rubbing said material into
saidmolten lead; and material feed means ex
tending down through said float and connected
with the open center of Vsaid impeller.
2. In a. mineral extraction device, a cylindrical
heated molten lead receptacle; molten lead with
in said receptacle; a driven rotary mixing im
peller having a central material intake opening
and peripherally directed material discharge
openings and positioned within the lower portion
of said receptacle; upright tubular feed conduit
means communicatively connected with the ma
terial intake openings of said impeller; and a
relatively heavy float positioned in said recep
tacle and floating in the molten lead and forming
a top- wall spaced above said rotary impeller, the 25
bottom of said float being> conically inclined up
wardly from the center outwardly and said float
bottom exerting a substantial pressure î,on the
molten lead whereby value bearing material mov
ing outwardly between said float bottom and 30
said molten lead will be subjected to rubbing and
rolling pressure, the periphery of said ñoat being
also possible to allow this lead containing the
' spaced from the walls of said receptacle afford
.35 concentrated values to cool and solidify after
it has been re-melted and agitated and the values
caused to rise to the top. If this is done the
>values which have been caused to rise to the top
ing a material discharge outlet.
3. In a mineral extraction device, a heated cy
will not settle but will remain stratified at the
.40 top of the' cooled, solidified lead ingot and this
54.5
value bearing top portion may be cut off and
treated for the recovery of the values. When the
values are thus caused to concentrate at the top
of the molten lead it is found that there will be
very little of the values left in the lead at the
said receptacle; a driven rotary mixing impeller
positioned in the lower portion of said receptacle,
said impeller having an open periphery and a
40
hollow central portion; vanes provided in said
hollo-W central portion forcing material down
wardly in response to rotation in one direction
of said impeller, other vanes provided in said open
peripheral portion forcing material outwardly in
If any values are left in the leadl in the
response to rotation in the same direction of said 45
bottom of the receptacle they will not be lost as
this lead is returned to the receptacle l@ and
impeller; means rotating said impeller at a high
rate of speed throwing lthe molten lead out of said
impeller;v and an upright tubular feed conduit
connected with the hollow central portion.
4. In a mineral extraction device, a heated cy 50
lindrical molten lead receptacle; molten lead in
said receptacle; a driven rotary mixing impeller
-positioned within said receptacle and having a
central material intake opening and peripherally
bottom.
used over and over again. f The values which stay
,50 in the molten lead in the receptacle Ill may be
recovered from this lead .in a manner similar to
that above described after the lead in the recep
tacle holds a. substantial amount of` values which
do not fiouroff. New lead may be added to the
55 receptacle from time to time to replace the
lead which ñours off.
It has heretofore been found difñcult to recover
values from finely divided ore bearing concen
trates by the use of molten lead on a scale large
60 enough for commercial use. My invention pro
vides a machine which may be used commercial
ly at a great saving as compared to the usual
smelting processes. This machine is efñcient
in its extraction of values, not expensive to
65
35
lindrical molten lead receptacle; molten lead in
manufacture and easy to operate.
The foregoing description and accompanying
drawings clearly disclose what I now regard as a
’ preferred embodiment of my invention but it will
be understood Vthat this disclosure is merely illus
70 trative and that such changes in the invention
may be made as are fairly within the scope and
spirit of the following claims.
I claim:
-
1. In a mineral extraction device, a> heated
15 molten lead receptacle; moltenvlead in said re
directed Vmaterial dischargeopenings; upright tu 55
bular feed conduit means communicatively con
nected with the material intake opening of said `
impeller; a relatively heavy float positioned in
said receptacle forming a top wall spaced above 60
the top (of said rotary impeller, the periphery of
said float being spaced from the walls of said re
ceptacle affording a discharge outlet for mate
rial; and vanes on the bottom of said float ex
tending from the central toward the peripheral 65
portion thereof.
5. In a mineral extraction device, a cylindrical
receptacle; heating means operatively connected
with said‘receptacle; molten lead in said recep
tacle; an upright shaft extending down into said 70
receptacle; driving means connected with said
shaft; a mixing impeller secured to the lower end
portion of said shaft, said mixing impeller having
a screen like peripheral portion and a hollow
central portion; a feed hopper positioned above 75
5
2,125,291
said receptacle; a feed tube communicatively
having a peripheral wall section which is in
connecting said feed hopper and said mixing im
peller, said shaft extending through said feed
distance from the walls of said receptacle to
provide a discharge outlet for material; and
clined conically and divergently from the upper
toward the lower portion of said receptacle and
having a plurality of annular upright shoulders
in the bottom thereof; receptacle heating means;
a driven rotary mixing impeller disposed in the
portion of said receptacle surrounded by said
shoulders; said mixing impeller having a hollow
center and having peripheral openings; ñoat
10 vanes on the bottom of said float extending from
means forming a top wall above said mixing
CII
tube; a feed screw on said shaft within said feed
tube; a circular float positioned in said recep-.
tacle above said mixing impeller, the circumfer
' ential walls of said float being spaced a short
impeller; the peripheral walls of said float being
the central portion of the float outwardly.
6. In a mineral extraction device, a cylindrical
receptacle; ~heating means operatively connected
with said receptacle; molten lead in said recep
15 tacle; an upright shaft extending down into said
receptacle; driving means connected with said
shaft; a mixing impeller secured to the lower
end portion of said shaft, said mixing impeller
having a screen like peripheral portion and an
inclined to conform to the incline of said conical
receptacle walls and being spaced from said
conical receptacle walls; molten lead in said re
ceptacle submerging said impeller and contact
ing said float means; and material feed means
communicatively connected with said mixing
impeller.
10. In a mineral extraction device, a recep
screw on said shaft within said feed tube; a cir
tacle, receptacle heating means; molten lead in 20
said receptacle; a driven rotary impeller posi
tioned in the lower portion of said receptacle;
said rotary impeller having material passageway
cular ñoat rotatively mounted in said receptacle
means extending from the upper axial portion to
20 open central portion; a feed tube communica
tively connected with said mixing impeller, said
shaft extending through said feed tube, a feed
25 above said mixing impeller and floated on the
molten lead when the machine is in operation,
the ,circumferential walls of said float being'
spaced a short distance from the Walls of said
receptacle to provide a discharge outlet for ma
30 terial; and vanes on the bottom of said float ex
tending from the central portion of the float out
wardly.
7. In a mineral extraction device, a receptacle
having a plurality of annular upright shoulders
35 in the bottom thereof; receptacle heating means;
a driven rotary mixing impeller disposed in the
portion of said receptacle surrounded b-y said an
nular shoulders, said mixing impeller having a
the peripheral portion thereof; upright feed tube 25
means communicatively connected with said mix
ing impeller; a float member rotatively sup»
ported in said receptacle above said impeller,
said float member having a cone shaped axial
opening expanding from the upper end down
wardly and fitting over said feed tube means;
spiral thread means in said cone shaped opening;
and vanes on the bottom side of said float sub
stantially tangential to said conical opening.
11. In a mineral extraction device; a recep- ,
tacle, receptacle heating means; molten lead in
said receptacle; a driven rotary impeller posi
hollow center and having peripheral openings;
tioned in the lower portion of said receptacle, said
rotary impeller having material passageway
40 means rotating said impeller at a high rate of
means extending from the upper axial portion
speed throwing the molten lead outwardly from
said impeller against said annular upright shoul
ders; float means forming a top wall above said
mixing impeller, the bottom of said float means
being conically inclined upwardly from the center
outwardly; molten lead in said receptacle sub
merging said impeller and contacting and sup
porting said float means; and material feed
means communicatively connected with said mix
tube means communicatively connected with said
mixing impeller; a float member rotatively sup
ported in said receptacle above said impeller and
having a central opening through which‘said feed
pipe extends, the peripheral walls of said ñoat
member being spaced from the surrounding walls
of said receptacle affording an outlet opening
for material; lugs projecting from the periphery
of said ñoat member; and an annular shelf on 50
50 ing impeller, said iioat means exerting a sub
stantial pressure on the molten lead whereby ma
terial between said float means and said molten
lead vwill be spread out into a thin film and
rubbed between said iioat means and the molten
55 lead.
8. In a mineral extraction device, a receptacle;
having a peripheral wall section which is inclined
conically and convergently from the lower toward
the upper portion of said receptacle; receptacle
60 heating means; a driven rotary mixing impeller
disposed in the lower portion of said receptacle,
said mixing impeller having a hollow center and
having peripheral openings; float means forming
a top wall above said mixing impeller; the peri
65 pheral walls of said float being inclined to con
form to the incline of said conical receptacle walls
and being spaced from said control receptacle
walls to provide an annular outlet opening;
molten lead in said receptacle submerging said
70 mixing impeller and contacting said float means;
and material feed means communicatively con
nected with said mixing impeller.
to the peripheral portion thereof; upright feed
'
9. In a mineral extraction device, a receptacle;
said receptacle on which said lugs may rest, said
float resting on the molten lead in the receptacle
when the machine is in operation.
12. In a mineral extraction device, a receptacle,
receptacle heating means; molten lead in said
receptacle; a driven rotary impeller positioned in
the lower portion of said receptacle, said rotary
impeller having material passageway means ex
tending from the upper axial portion to the
peripheral portion thereof; upright feed tube 60
means communicatively connected with said
mixing impeller, a float member rotatively sup
ported in said receptacle above said impeller and
having a central opening through which said feed
pipe extends, the peripheral walls of said float
member being spaced from the surrounding walls
of said receptacle affording an outlet Vopening
for material, said float member having a cone
shaped bottom portion contacting the molten lead
in said receptacle; and vanes on said cone shaped 70
float bottom extending from the central portion
thereof outwardly.
‘
y
ROBERT B. HAYDEN.
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