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Патент USA US2126326

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Aug. 9, 1938.
w. F, HELMOND
2,126,326
TYPEWRITING MACHINE
Original Filed Nov. 1, 1935
2_ Sheets-Sheet l
Aug. 9., 1938.
w. F. HELMOND
2,126,326
M TYPEWRITING MACHINE
original Filed Nov‘. 1, 1935
2 Sheets-Sheet 2
A
,m RNm.
Patented Aug. 9, 1938
2,126,326
UNITED STAT T‘?
wi‘E'i" OFFICE
2,126,326
TYPEWEKTHNG MACHINE
William F. Hehnond, West Hartford, Conn, as
signor to Underwood Elliott Fisher Company,
New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware
Original application November 1, 1935, Serial No.
47,731. Divided and this application October
8, 1937, Serial No. 167,906
6 Claims.
(Cl. 197-186)
This invention relates to sound-deadening de
vices for typewriting machines and other utensils
having sheet-steel or other weldable worked
metal parts.
Primarily the intensity of the sound depends
upon the amplitude of the vibrations, and the pro
longation or repetition of sound by re?ection or
reverberation is resonance. The impact of the
type-bars upon the platen of a typewriter sets up
10 vibrations and resonance proportional to the form
and structure of the several essential parts of
the machine. To choke the vibrations, partic-,
ularly that of sheet-metal parts is therefore effec
tive to deaden the sonorousness of these parts.
An object of the present invention is to im
prove the construction of the sonorous parts, and
more especially of the sheet-metal parts in a
typewriter, so as to reduce vibration to a minimum,
more especially so to improve the construction of
the mask in a portable typewriting machine, so
to improve the construction of the paper-table in
a typewriter, so to improve the construction of
the stop-ring for type-bars, so to improve the
construction of the platen, so to improve the con
25 struction of panel plates, and so to improve the
construction of other parts, devices or elements,
directly or indirectly connected with any type
writer, it being obvious that the reduction of
revealed that for a complete and satisfactory
deadening effect the surfaces of the contiguous
sheets of metal must be positively locked by spot
welding, so that at de?nite places the contiguous
pieces of sheet-metal are integrated one with the
other, particularly at the loci of the maximum
amplitude of vibration of said pieces. Important
consideration attaches to the construction of
spot-welding similar pieces having fractions of
the usual thickness, so that the resulting non
vibrating or sound-deadening unit is identical in
size or thickness with the part or piece for which
it is substituted, thereby effecting a great saving
in cost in introducing this improved sound-dead
ening construction throughout a typewriter, or in
any other utensil made of weldable worked metal,
the sound of operation being decreased propor
tionally more in each instance when and as this
improved sound-deadening device is used in addi
tional places in the typewriter or utensil.
In spot-welding one piece of sheet-metal or
other weldable worked metal upon another piece
of sheet-steel, in order to substantially elimi
nate the sound, it is important that the sono
rousness of one plate be approximately the same
as that of the other. Plates of the same composi
tion, size, form and thickness are substantially
the same in sonorousness. Variation in the rela
sound and the elimination of sonorousness are
tionships in any of these elements varies the
important utilities in this art.
Another object of the invention is to eliminate
sonorousness. A convenient form of plate is one
of the same size, form, thickness and material as
the sonorousness of sheet-metal parts in any
the other plate, so that when the two plates of
utensil utilizing steel or other weldable worked
metal, preferably sheet-steel, and more partic
steel or other weldable worked metal are spot
35 ularly where, during the operation of such uten
sils, there is a tendency to set up vibrations.
Other objects will appear as the description
proceeds.
welded together, the sonorousness of the plates
is substantially identical so that when integrated ;
by spot-welding at the loci of the maximum
amplitude of vibrations, the sonorousness of the
one plate is entirely choked or deadened by the
To deaden or muffle the sound of a typewriter,
40 sheet-metal parts have been lined internally
that this invention is applicable to typewriters
with linoleum, felt, rubber, asbestos, cork, and
or other metal utensils having frames of steel or
sometimes with intermediate layers. of lead. In
any or all of these constructions, it is obvious that
the wall formed by the sheet-metal and its sound
45 deadening lining is many times thicker than is
the sheet-metal alone, and also that the lining
or interlining adds nothing to the strength of the
sheet-metal wall.
A feature of the present invention is to lock
50 together two similar pieces of sheet-metal, but
of plies of less than the usual thickness of each,
sonorousness of the other plate.
It is obvious
other weldable Worked metal, preferably sheet
steel.
By spot-welding along axial or medial lines of
the adjacent contiguous small-area pieces of
sheet-metal a good result is obtained with a mini
mum of the spot-welding operations. In such
pieces that have a relatively small-area spot
Welding along an axial or medial line effectively
integrates the contacting pieces at or in the zones
of maximum potential amplitude of vibration,
surface upon surface throughout, positively by
and so therefore more effectively binds the sur
the use of spot-welding, whereby vibrations in
either piece are immediately deadened or choked
proportion to the increased tendency of the pieces
55 by those in the other piece. Experimentation has
rounding surfaces one upon the other in direct
to vibrate caused by blows or impacts in any part 55
2
2,126,326
of the typewriter, or other utensil, comprising
metal elements in combination with one another.
In other words, the spot-welding at the axial or
medial lines integrates the two pieces at or in
the central zone of these pieces and so positively
and completely chokes off all vibration or motion
of the two pieces relatively to one another in the
surrounding area, thereby completely choking or
deadening the sonorousness of either of the inte
II)
grated pieces of sheet-metal. Or again to express
it popularly, by increasing the trouble of sono
rousness by splitting the sheets of metal, the
An inwardly-turned ?ange I5 forms the top edge,
and at the bottom edge on either side are aper
tured integral inreaching lugs I6.
The loci of
the spot-welding I4 are in substantially central
or medial zones of each ?at plate, except in the
upward side extensions, where additional spot
welding is placed substantially centrally or me
dially in the area of the upward side extensions.
The loci of the spot-welding I4 are determined
by the loci of the maximum potential amplitude 10
of vibration in the plies, and in metal sheets of
identical form, size, material and thickness, such
trouble of one sheet is killed by the trouble of
loci are usually in central or medial zones.
the other by integrating the contiguous sheets by
sheets of narrow width, by so locating the spot
>;: means of spot-welding.
When, however, the
sheets are cut to form extensions, spot-welding
substantially centrally of the extensions is de
sirable for good results in choking the sonorous
ness, and when surfaces are in a different plane
from other parts of the sheets, spot-welding sub
stantially centrally in the different plane surfaces
is desirable for the effective elimination‘ of sono
rousness.
This application is a division of my application,
Serial No. 47,731, ?led November 1, 1935, Patent
No. 2,104,482, Jan. 4, 1938.
Other features and advantages will hereinafter
welding, a single row of fewer spots suilices com
pletely to deaden the vibrations and eliminate
the sonorousness, but where there are protuber
ances in edges of the sheets the location of spot
welding in the protuberances centrally or medi
ally thereof effectively chokes or nulli?es the vi
brations
and so eliminates
the
sonorousness
thereof.
In Figure 2, a sheet-metal front cover I‘! of
an Underwood portable typewriter is formed of
an inner ply i2 and an outer ply I3, the plies
being sheet-metal, of steel or other weldable
worked metal, and being spot-welded together
at the loci I4. It will be noted that the top sur
faces of the front cover I’! lie in a plane or
appear.
In the accompanying drawings,
Figure 1 is a perspective view of a mask for
a portable typewriter, with parts cut away in a
side and rear wall to show the improved sound
deadening construction.
Figure 2 is a perspective View of the front cover
of a portable typewriter.
Figure 3 is a side elevation of a portable ma
chine, with some parts removed and other parts
shown in section where they embody the im
proved sound-deadening construction.
Figure 4 is an isometric view of a paper-table
of the sonorousness-deadening construction.
Figure 5 is an isometric view with parts of
the top cover, and the front cover broken away
to show the embodiment of the invention in an
Underwood noiseless typewriter.
igure 6 is a side elevation, partly in section,
showing a type-bar in engagement with the
cushioned stop-ring embodying the improved
sound-deadening construction.
Figure '7 is a front View of the stop-ring,
Figure 8 is a cross-section of the platen with
a juxtaposed type-bar head, showing the im
proved sound-deadening construction both faced
and backed by rubber.
Figure 9 shows an edge view or section of a
snot-welded noiseless plate.
Figure 10 is a plan view of the platen shown
in Figure 8, but with a part broken away, and
showing a lengthwise section.
Figure 11 is a view similar to Figure 10, but
Y. with the outer rubber platen-surface stripped
Figure 12 is an isometric inside view of the
side frame of an Underwood standard typewriter,
showing a panel for closing the opening in the
side frame, parts of the frame and the panel be
ing broken away.
In Figure 1, a sheet-metal mask
In
II
of an
Underwood portable typewriter, as shown in pat
TI) ent to Lentz No. 1,901,398, of March 14, 1933, is
formed of an inner ply l2 and an outer ply l3,
the plies being sheet-metal, of steel or other
weldable worked metal, and having identical
form, size, material and thickness, and being
spot-welded together at a plurality of loci Ill.
planes substantially at right angles to the plane
30
formed by the front face of the cover, so that
separate spot-welding is made in the central or
medial zones of these top surfaces, inasmuch as
such zones possess the maximum potential am
plitude of vibration with consonant sonorousness.
In Figure 3, the mask II and the front cover
H are assembled with a frame I8 of an Under
wood portable typewriter, as shown in patent to
Lentz, No. 1,901,398, mounted on legs I9, the
former by means of inwardly-turned lugs 20 on 40
the frame of the machine, which lugs are tapped
to receive screws 2i passed through apertures in
the lugs I6, and the latter by the inwardly
turned lugs 28 tapped to receive the screws 2|
passed through apertures in the front cover, and
the rear wall of the mask II is also secured to
the rear wall .53 of the frame I8 by the screws
2|. A carriage 22 reciprocates with reference to
the frame I8 by means of the rear carriage-rail
23 and the rear frame-rail 24 and interposed 50
anti-friction elements or balls 25 and the front
carriage-rail 26 and the front frame-rail 21 and
interposed balls 25, and has the usual roll platen
28 carried thereon across the path of movement
of type-bars 29. A paper table 30 embodying
the sonorousness-choking invention is mounted
on the carriage by means of apertured pendent
lugs 3| pintled upon supports 32. Reference to
Figure 4 clearly shows the inner ply I2 and the
outer ply I3 of the paper table 30, the loci I4 of
the spot-welding being in zones coincident with
the lengthwise lines running through the zones
of the maximum amplitude of vibration, or the
zones of the maximum potential sonorousness.
In Figure 5 is shown an Underwood noiseless
typewriter having a top-cover 33, a part broken
away at the front showing the inner ply I2 and
the outer ply I; which are spot-welded at the
loci I4 of the zones of the maximum amplitude
of vibration of the plies, and also having a front 70
cover 34, a part similarly broken away to show
the outer ply I3 and the inner ply I2, and on
which are loci I4 of the spot-welding. The top
cover 33 and the front cover 34 are secured to
the frame or casing 35 by screws 36.
3
2,126,326
In Figure 6, the usual metal segment 31 car
ries the segment rod 38 on which is mounted
the type-bar 29 adapted to strike the platen 28,
and the stop-ring 39, which has a central ridge
at a plurality of spots in a manner to mute said
4U, backed by soft rubber 4|, the stop-ring 39
machine by absorbing noise caused by the oper
ative concussions, said laminations having edge
portions that extend beyond the region of weld
ing spots, and are free for independent vibration
to effect the muting.
3. A typewriter provided with a keyboard and 10
having metal types which produce noisy concus
sions at the operation of the keys, and having
other noisy concussive metal parts, said type
writer having a framework which is muted by
and its rubber backing 4| being secured to the
segment 3'! by means of the screws 42.
The
stop-ring 39 embodies the sonorousness-destroy~
ing improvements in inner ply l2 and outer ply
I3 spot-welded together at the loci indicated at
l4. It is apparent that the type-bar 29 inter
cepts the stop-ring 39 before striking the platen
and that the elasticity must suffice to quickly
and effectively return the type-bar to its initial
15 position, so that the elimination of sonorousness
in the stop-ring 39 contributes substantially to
complete elimination of sonorousness from the
typewriter.
In Figures 8, 10, and 11, a platen 28 has the
20 usual outer rubber cylinder 44, an inner soft
rubber cylinder 45 and an intermediate metal
cylinder 43 embodying an inner cylinder I2 and
an outer cylinder is spot-welded together at the
loci l4 indicated in Figure 11, that is, at points
selected most effectively to check the sonorous
vibration ‘of said cylinders.
35
40
50
(30
means of an extensive ?xed frame-member that
is built up of similar free-edge sheet~metal lam
inations whose bodies are spot-welded together
means of an extensive ?xed frame-member that 15
is built up of similar free-edge sheet-metal lam~
inations whose bodies are spot-welded together
at a plurality of spots in a manner to- mute said
machine by absorbing noise caused by the oper
ative concussions, said laminations having edge
portions that extend beyond the region of weld
ing spots, and are free for independent vibration
to effect the muting, said laminations forming a
panel used for enclosing noisy typewriter-mech
anism, the laminations of the panel having sim 25
ilar contours.
4. A typewriting machine having a platen and
In Figure 12, the side frame 46 of an Under
wood standard typewriter has a large opening 41 ' provided with a muting device in the form of a
which is closed by a removable panel 48 which is
framework-‘boxing to serve as a mount for the
formed of an inner ply I2 of sheet-metal and an
reciprocating and other concussive parts of the
outer ply l3, the two plies being spot-Welded to
typewriter, said framework including an exten
gether in a central or medial zone de?ned by the
sive area of laminated sheet-metal casing, the
loci 14. The frame 46 is, provided with an upper laminations being spot-Welded together at scat
?ange 49 formed to provide a recess 50 for the
tered points to give to said framework the mut
passage of the typewriter carriage and having ing capacity.
a pendent side Si in which are mounted screws
5. A typewriting machine having a platen and
52 passing through tapped holes in the remov
provided with a muting device in the form of a
able panel 48 and securing said panel 48 in the framework-boxing to serve as a mount for the
opening 41 and fast against the perpendicular reciprocating and other concussive parts of the
wall of the pendent side 5|.
typewriter, said framework including an ex
It is now clear that by utilizing my improved tensive area of laminated sheet-metal casing, the
device for eliminating sonorousness from the laminations being spot-welded together at scat
sheet-metal parts of a typewriting machine, I tered points to give to said framework the mut
have substantially eliminated sonorousness from ing capacity, said muting laminations forming the
the entire machine, and it is further clear that principal portion of the top plate which is ar
my invention is similarly meritorious and useful ranged at the front of the platen, and overlies
in eliminating sonorousness from any other the main portion of the typewriter-mechanism.
utensils having sheet-metal parts of steel or
6. A typewriting machine having a platen and
other Weldable worked metal.
provided with a muting device in the form of a
Variations may be resorted to within the scope framework-boxing to serve as a mount for the
of the invention, and portions of the improve
reciprocating and other concussive parts of the
ments may be used without others.
typewriter, said framework including an exten
Having thus described my invention, I claim: sive area of laminated sheet-metal casing, the
1. A typewriter provided with a keyboard and laminations being spot~welded together at scat
having metal types which produce noisy concus
tered points to give to said framework the mut
sions at the operation of the keys, and having ing capacity, said muting laminations forming
other‘, noisy concussive metal parts, said type
the principal portion of the top plate which is
writer having a framework which is muted by arranged at the front of the platen, and over
means of an extensive ?xed frame-member that
lies the main portion of the typewriter-mecha
is built up of similar free-edge sheet-metal lam
nism, said typewriter including a ?nishing case
inations whose bodies are spot-welded together which encloses the typewriter-mechanism, and
at a plurality of spots in a manner to mute said
machine by absorbing noise caused by the oper
ative concussions.
-
2. A typewriter provided with a keyboard and
having metal types which produce noisy concus
sions at the operation of the keys, and having
other noisy concussive metal parts, said type
writer having a framework which is muted by
an inner framework on which said mechanism is
mounted, said ?nishing case having side walls, a
front wall, and a rear wall, said walls being
formed of laminations spot-welded together at
scattered points to enable them to mute the noise
of the operation of the typewriter-mechanism.
WILLIAM F. HELMOND.
40
45
50
55
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