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Патент USA US2126367

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Aug- 9, 1938.
M. E. cLAw‘soN ET AL
2,126,367
TANK FOR VOLATILE LIQUIDS
‘Filed June s, 1936
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Patented Aug. 9, 1938
2,126,367
PATENT
OFFICE
2,126,367
UNITED STATES
TANK FOR VOLATILE. LIQUIDS
Millard E. Clawson and Frank Mohnk, Ponca
City, Okla., assignors to Continental Oil Com
pany, Ponca City, Okla., a corporation of Dela
ware
Application June 5, 1936, Serial No. 83,679
3 Claims.
Our invention relates to tanks for volatile liq
tion or design, is ?tted with a relief valve 2 which
uids and more particularly to a gas collector head
likewise may be of any suitable construction or
for a casinghead gasoline tank relief valve.
With volatile liquids, as for example, casing
93. head gasoline, it is di?icult to gauge and investi
gate the contents of tanks containing them. This
is particularly true during the summer months
when the temperature of the atmosphere is such
as to create relatively high vapor pressure within
the tank. Casinghead gasoline, for example, has
a vapor pressure of 13 pounds per square inch
at 60° F. At 70° F. the vapor pressure rises to
design. In the drawing, the relief valve 2 is held
on seat 3 through the action of the spring 4, act
ing upon a valve stem 5. Valve stem 5 projects
above the valve at 6. A hook ‘I is .adapted to en
gage any suitable opening in the projection 6. An
end of hook ‘I is provided with threads 8 which
are adapted to be engaged by a nut 9 provided
with an operating handle I0. Normally the pres
sure of spring 4 is adjusted by nut I I such that it
will be suf?cient to- hold the valve 2 upon its seat
about atmospheric or slightly above, namely about
15 pounds per square inch. At 80° F. the vapor
through a considerable pressure range. A gas co1~
lector head I2 is provided with a gasket I3 and an
15 pressure is about 18 pounds per square inch, at
90° F. about 21 pounds per square inch and at
100° F. about 25 pounds per square inch. It will
be seen that, if the temperature is in the vicinity
of 100° F. a vapor pressure of 10 pounds over at~
20 mospheric is developed. In order to prevent
undue strains‘ being impressed upon tanks con
taining volatile liquids such as casinghead gaso
line, it has been the practice to ?t tanks adapted
to contain these liquids with relief valves. If
25 these vapors are released to the atmosphere in
the case of casinghead gasoline, a distinct ?re and
explosion hazard is created and the vapors re
leased represent a distinct economic loss.
One object of our invention is to provide a head
adapted to collect the‘ gas released from the tank
by the relief valve.
Another object of, our invention is to provide
means for recovering the vapors released.
Other and further objects of our invention will
35 appear from the following description.
-
In the accompanying drawing which forms part
of the instant speci?cation .and is to be read in
conjunction therewith and in which like reference
numerals are used to indicate like parts in the
various views;
Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of a tank ?tted
with apparatus containing one embodiment of
our invention.
Figure 2 is a sectional view of a gas collector
45
head.
In general, our invention contemplates provid
ing a chamber into which the vapors, discharged
by the relief valve, are adapted to collect. Means
are provided for lifting the valve mechanically.
50 We provide means whereby the vapors withdrawn
from the gas collector head are absorbed by a
liquid absorption menstruum to prevent their loss
to the atmosphere.
More particularly referring now to the drawing,
55 a tank I which may be of any suitable construc
opening I4. The gasket I3 is adapted to engage 15
an upstanding ?ange I5 formed upon the valve
body I6. The opening I4 permits the threaded
portion of the hook 'I to project through the gas
collector head I 2. A nipple 20 communicates with
the interior of the gas collector head I2 and is
threaded at 2| to receive a pipe 22. The pipe 22
communicates with an ejector device 23. A suit
able reservoir 24 is provided for the storage of
gasoline, light oil or the like. A pump 25 is adapt
ed to take suction from reservoir 24 through a
pipe 26 and discharge through pipe 21 to the
ejector.
In operation, let us suppose that it is desired
to gauge the contents of. tank I. Usually a
gauging opening 30 provided with a suitable cover
plate 3I is formed in the tank. If the cover plate
3I were opened, the vapors present in the gas
space above the level of the liquid within the
tank would be discharged to the atmosphere, pre
senting a ?re hazard and a loss of valuable gaso 35
line in the form of vapors.
According to our invention, the gas collector
head I2 is ?tted with a gasket I3 engaging the
?ange l5 and the hook ‘I engaging the opening
in the projection 6 of the valve stem 5. The op
erating handle is then rotated to lift the valve
2 from its seat against action of the valve spring
4. This spring will then serve to hold securely the
gas collector head upon ?ange I5. The pump 25
is then started and liquid gasoline or other suit as 5
able menstruum is pumped from reservoir 24
through pipe 26, through pump 25, through pipe
21, into the ejector device 23 which will produce,
through the well known action of an ejector, a
reduced pressure in pipe 22. Vapors released
to the collector head I2 will be withdrawn there
from through pipe 22 and become entrained in
the liquid gasoline or other menstruum and be
absorbed thereby. Liquid gasoline has the prop 55
2
’
2,126,367
erty of absorbing gasoline vapors and will hold obvious that various changes may be made in
the vapors in the liquid gasoline.
It will be noted by reference to Figure 1 that
branch pipes 30 and 3| ?tted with valves 32 and
33 are provided and that valves 36 and 31 are
?tted at the intake and discharge ends of the
pump 25.
During the operation just described,
details within the scope of our claims without
departing from the spirit of our invention. It
is, therefore, to be understood that our inven
tion is not to be limited to the speci?c details
shown and described.
Having thus described our invention, what we
I
valves 36 and 31 are opened and valves 32 and claim is:
1. In a tank for the storage of volatile liquids,
33 are closed. After the tank has been gauged,
the pump is stopped and the operating handle I!)
a relief valve, a spring for urging said valve to
is rotated to permit the spring 4 to again seat‘ ' seated position, a ?ange surrounding said valve
the relief valve 2. Valve 31 is closed and valve
on the exterior of said tank, a casing adapted
33 is opened and the pump is again started. The
to be seated upon said ?ange, a member project
gasoline in reservoir 24 is then pumped through
pipe 26 through pump 2'5, through line 3|, back
to the tank. When it is again desired to gauge
the tank, it will be necessary to ?ll reservoir 24
with liquid gasoline. Just after the gas collector
head is ?tted and before the valve 2 is lifted from
20 its seat, valve 36 is closed and valve 32 is opened.
The pump is then started and gasoline is pumped
from the tank through line 30, through line 21,
into reservoir 24.
If the absorption medium be
any liquid other than the gasoline from which
the vapors were derived, lines 30 and 3| may go
to another source or tank in which the menstruum
liquid is stored.
It will be obvious that we have accomplished
the objects of our invention. We are enabled
safely ‘to release the vapors ‘in a tank full of.
volatile liquid on a warm day when the vapor
pressure of the liquid is comparatively high, and
save the loss of the vapors. _ In addition, in a
case in which the vapors are inflammable or
explosive, as with casinghead gasoline, we reduce
the ?re hazard.
It will be understood that certain features and
sub-combinations are of utility and may be em
ployed without reference to other features and
40 sub-combinations. This is contemplated by and
is within the scope of our claims. It is further
ing through said casing from the exterior there
of, adapted to engage said valve, means for op
15
erating said member from the exterior of said
casing to lift said valve from its seat, said casing
being provided with an opening, a conduit com
municating. with the interior of said casing
through said opening for the eduction of vapors 20
from said casing, and means for contacting said
vapors with an absorption menstruum.
2. Ina tank for the storage of volatile liquids,
a relief valve, a housing for said relief valve po
sitioned exteriorly of said tank, means operable 25
from the exterior of said housing for lifting said
relief 'valve from its seat, said housing being
provided with an eduction conduit, said eduction
conduit communicating with an absorption sys
tem, the construction being such that vapors
released from said tank by the lifting of said
valve will pass to the absorption system.
3. vIn a tank for the storage of volatile liquids,
a relief valve, adjustable means for holding said
relief valve upon its seat, a readily removable 35
housing positioned over said valve exteriorly of
said tank, a common means for holding said
housing in position and lifting said relief valve
from its seat.
MILLARD E. CLAWSON.
FRANK MOH‘NK.
40
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