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Патент USA US2126448

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Aug"
1938.
c. c. CAMPUS
2,126,448
CONTAINER HOUSING FLUSHING APPARATUS
Filed’ July 51, 1934
'7 Sheets—-Shee‘t l
1 NVENTOR.
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Aug- 9, 1938..
c. c. cAMPus
$126,448
CONTAINER HOUSING FLUSHING APPARATUS
Filed July 51, 1934
7 Sheets—$heet 2
IN VENTOR.
Aug. 9, 1938.,
c. c. CAMPUS
2,126,448
CONTAINER HOUSING FLUSHING APPARATUS
Filed July 31, 1934
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Aug. 9, 1938.
c. c. CAMPUS
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CONTAINER HOUSING FLUSHING APPARATUS
Filed July 31, 1934
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2,126,448
Patented Aug. 9, 1938
umrso STATES
PATENT OFFICE
2,126,448
CONTAINER . HOUSING’ FLUSHING
APPARATUS
Cesare C. Campus, Santa Monica, C‘ali?, as
signor to Paul A. Campus, Santa Monica,
Calif.
Application July 31, 1934, Serial No. 737,715
34 Claims.
,‘This invention relates to.,a tank or container
able funnel or a like. contrivance is provided, as
by suitable means. for the purpose of housing
therein, a flush valve and other accessories, such
after described, which has answered the purpose
under the most severe conditions,‘ when this in
vention was reduced torpractice and tested, thus 5
proving that it is possible to obtain a 100% si
phon-proof flush valve under the most severe
conditions above described.
(bl) Noisy ?ushing.—To eliminate this, the
water is throttled by the control valve; this 10
in one ‘piece with a closet bowl, or attachedtoit ' shown in the appended drawings, and herein
as an air chamber, or a pressure reducing valve,
or a strainer etc. or all, for thepurpose of elimi
5
mating the various inconveniences resulting at
present in the use of ?ush valves in combination
with a closet bowl, and to convey any leakage or
10 exhaust from any or all of the said contrivances
housed therein, into the bowl, as hereafter de
scribed.
(a) Danger of back-siphoniny.-There is no
flush valve at present on the market that can be
considered 100% siphon-proof; in fact, even a
very small passage caused by corrosion, or by
some matter lodged under the piston valve caus
ing a leak of only. about a gallon per minute, if
vacuum occurs in ‘the: supply pipeline, back-si
phoning will occur, no matter what type of vac
is; withdrawn simultaneously when the flush
valve is operated, otherwise it will fail to work.
However, a pressure reducing valve could be
used to eliminatev this inconvenience, but there 15
is not always an adequate place where it can be
installed. , An appropriate place would be in the
wall, within easy access for inspection or repairs,
but in very ‘few-cases the possibility for such a
with sufficient volume of air to break the vacuum
rational, arrangementpresents itself, but .a tank 20
or-container, housing a pressure reducing valve
will solve the problem in the neatest and most
practical manner.
(0) Failure to ?ush-To obtain a quiet ?ush
ing. when the pressure in the main is too high,
in the supply pipeline; in fact, the largest air in
let that I know of, is only 1/8" diameter; where
ducing theopening of the control valve, but if
uum breaker, or any otherv such contrivance is
used in ‘combination with a flush. valve» Inde
pendently of the practicability of such appa
ratuses, ?ush valves are at present not supplied
as to be efficient, an air inlet must be of the same
diameter as the inside diameter of the supply
pipeline, and must also be suitably located. A
flush valve can be considered 100% siphon-proof
only when back-siphoning does not. occur when
the valve is operated under the following condi
tions, namely:
When the piston valve is completely open;
When no siphon breaker, no. check-valve or
any other such contrivance is used,_and
Whether or not the valve is in good working
order.
4.0
method is satisfactory as long as no other water
. . This invention answers to all these requisites in
.full by means and in the manner hereinafter
described.
.
.
.A. container, the interior of which is kept, in
constant communication with the atmosphere by
means of an opening thereon,‘ ‘housing a ?ush
valve, without the usual tail piece that connects
said flush valve to the bowl and conveys the ?ush
water into it, thus leaving an air space. between
the top of the bowl and the outlet of the flush
valve. Under such conditions it is obvious that
it will be physically impossible for a vacuum of
any intensity and duration to raise a drop of
water from the bowl, thus positively preventing
back-siphoning. To prevent the Water from
spilling, but to convey it all into the bowl, a suit
say 90 lbs- the water is suitably throttled by re
said 90 lbs. pressure-drops to 20 lbs., and the flush
valve is operated, the bowl will not flush; of
course not for lack of pressure, but, because the 30
reduced passage in the control valve is not su?i
ciently large to allow the full volume of water
obtainable at the 20 lbs. pressure. In fact a
flush valve will ?ush a bowl even at a water
pressure as low as 10 lbs. 'if the full volume of
Water at this pressure is available. This incon
venience-can be eliminated by a pressure re
ducing valyehoused in a tank, which will always
give the full volume of water physically possible,
at any pressure to which it has been regulated,
unless thepressure in the main drops below that
at which the pressure reducer is set.
, (d) . Hammeringr-This
inconvenience
is
at
present also eliminated by throttling the water
with the control valve; however, an air chamber, 45
housed in the tank, ,will better answer the pur
pose. A pressure reducing ‘valve can also be
used, because hammering ‘never occurs at low
water pressure; thus it can be seen that the three
inconveniences described in paragraphs 1), c, and 50
d, can all be prevented by the same medium,
namely by a pressure reducing valve.
This tank or container differsfrom the ordi~
nary flushing tanks at present in use, as it is
operated from the side instead of from the front, 55
2
2,126,448
and it does not contain the ?ushing water, but
collects all leakage and the exhaust from the
auxiliary valve, and conveys them into the bowl,
and in combination with the other members
This mechanism practically substitutes the usual
tail piece which conveys the water into the bowl.
Said member i5 is provided at the upper end
with ports I6 for the air supply for the free ?ow
housed therein, prevents back-siphoning, noisy ing of water from the outlet of ?ush valve 9, and
?ushing, hammering, and failure to flush, in the at the lower end is provided with screen l8 to
manner above described.
reduce the noise of the ?owing water; also to
The foregoing objects and advantages with my keep ring [9 in position and to facilitate the re
subsequent features that may be developed in moval thereof. Cover 20 of tank or container,
10 the description, may be best appreciated from. a . .when removed, allows free access to the appara
description read in conjunction with the drawings tus, and by unscrewing caps 21 and 22, an in
in which?
spection of the parts can be made, and new parts
Fig. 1 represents an elevation back-view of the
substituted, if necessary. Slip-joint supply con
apparatus, partially in section.
duit 23 is connected to member I0 by nut 24
Fig. 2 represents an elevation back-view par
15
and the lower end to hub 25 of bowl l2 by bolts
tially in section of another form of the inven
26. When auxiliary valve 29 is operated, the
tion.
exhaust water from dash-pot M discharges into
Fig. 3 represents a fragment of the elevation the tank through openings 30, located one at each
side-view in section on line A-F of Fig. 2.
side of the valve shell; rubber gasket 3| is to pre
Fig. 4, represents a fragment of an elevation
vent leakage and to give flexibility, thus pre- _
back-view, partially in section of another form of venting possible breaking of the parts when they
the invention.
are assembled, in case of imperfections. All the
Fig. 5 represents a plan view of Fig. 4.
foregoing described characteristics of members
Fig. 6 represents a fragment of an elevation
I0, H, M, [5, l8, and I!) are a part of this in
side-view in section, on lines a—-b—c-—d of Fig. 5. vention, as they all cooperate with the tank to
Fig. 7 represents a fragment of an elevation obtain the wanted result, namely; elimination
back-view of another form of the invention.
of back-siphoning, to obtain air constantly under
Fig. 8 represents a plan view of Fig. '7.
the undersurface of auxiliary valve 29, and to
Fig. 9 represents another form of the invention prevent spilling of water from the container to
30 when the flush valve is not housed in the tank.
the floor.
The construction of my invention shown in
The major characteristics of ?ush valve 9 are
Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, '7, 8, and 9, inclusive, is as not here described, as they form the subject of
follows:
patent pending application Ser. No. 725,438, ?led
‘i, in Fig. 1 represents a tank or container in May 14, 1934.
combination with a closet bowl, housing a flush
Fig. 2 represents another form of a tank or
ing apparatus; this form eliminates back-si
container, housing a ?ushing apparatus. This
phoning, allows the air constantly under the form has the same prerogatives as the forms
undersurface of auxiliary valve 29 and the water illustrated in Fig. l and described above, but
discharging therefrom and any leakage from the differs inasmuch as it has an air chamber 21
?ushing mechanism is collected in the tank and to prevent knocking, and tank 1 is lower and
conveyed into the bowl. Ori?ce A is to allow extension 32 is higher, thus creating two con 40
the water from the flush valve to enter the rim tainers R and S. Container R substituting funnel
through passage C and into the bowl, through I4, shown in Fig. l and container S housing air
perforations under said rim, and with ori?ce chamber 21, provided with conduit 28, protrud
45 B to allow the leakage collected by the tank to
ing downwardly to prevent the air therein from
drop into the bowl through passage B and per
escaping, thus preventing hammering; one end 45
forations under the rim. Said tank is also pro
connected to supply pipeline 8—2, the other end
vided with port E to connect ?ush valve 9 with
to ?ush valve 9 by nipple 31; this valve does not
operating handle 8, which protrudes outside the differ practically from the ?ush valve 9 shown in
tank to operate said ?ush valve, and to allow the patent pending application Ser. No. 725,438, ?led
air to enter the tank; port F to allow supply May 14, 1934. Operating handle 8, extension ll, 50
pipe 8-2 to be connected to ?ush valve 9, and conduit ID are for the same purpose, and practi
to also allow the air to enter said container, jet cally the same as shown in Fig. 1 and described
supply conduit I0 carries at the top end, ex
above. Passages C, D and ports E and F are of
55 tension ! i, which in combination therewith forms
the same character and for the same purpose as
a bolt-like member to fasten tank 1 to bowl [2
those shown in Fig. 1, but ori?ce B shown in Fig.
by tightening nut l3, the other end of exten
1 is substituted by annular space T formed by the
sion H carries ?ush valve 9 protruding at one inside wall of container S and the outside diam
side; this arrangement eliminates the'spud and eter of air chamber 27. Ring i9 is kept in posi
60 tail piece which usually connect the flush valve
tion by member 15 provided at the upper end 60
to the bowl, thus leaving a space between the out
with air inlet I6 to ease the flow of water from
let of the valve and the top of the bowl. It is the flush valve, and at the lower end is provided
obvious that this non-continuity of conduit from with screen 18 to minimize the noise of the flow
the valve to the bowl positively eliminates back
ing water, practically the same device as shown
65 siphoning under the action of vacuum of any in Fig. 1. Cone Ill-2 forms an annular space
intensity or duration. Funne1 l4, inserted into in combination with member i5 which prevents C: U
ori?ce A is for the purpose of preventing the over?ow from container B owing to the onrush
water from over?owing, and to convey the same
of the air therein, and also allows the water
into the bowl; this is obtained in combination collected in the tank, to be conveyed through
70 with the bowl, provided with suitably sized pas
said annular space into the bowl practically in
sage therein and proportionally sized perforations the same way as the annular space T formed by
under the rim to prevent back-building of the air chamber 21 in combination with container S.
water, and in combination with member I5 ex
Fig. 3 is a fragment of an elevation side-view,
tending downwardly to a suitable depth, obtains sectioned on line A-F of Fig. 2, showing the
75 the inrush of air, thus acting as an injector.
side structure of bowl l2, tank '1 and cover 20
3
2,126,448‘
thereof, and only the mechanism Structure of
the complete‘ jet supply conduit,'~consisting of»
which the-motive power oflthe vacuum can draw
extension l! which in combination with conduit
pollution back into the watersupply.
it? ‘forms a bolt-'like‘me'mber which connects tank
l‘?rmly to bowl [2, by means of nut l3, and
.jet ‘supply conduit ‘23 connected to member Ill with
Fig. 5 is a plan view of Fig. 4, showing a frag
ment‘of bowl l2 and tank '5,- more clearly show
nut 26, and the lower end which carries nozzle‘
3-3, is connected tohub‘ 25, protruding from bowl,
by means of bolts 26, as shown in Fig. 2; rubber
10 gasket 3i and packing 35 are to prevent leakage
and to give flexibility, thus preventing‘breaking
of the parts in case of imperfections thereof, when
they areassembled and fastened together.
This Fig. 3 shows more clearly the disposition
of passages C, B, and K through which the scour~
ing and re?lling water is conveyed into the bowl.
Fig. 4 represents another'form of the invention,
showing the tank or container housing a pressure
reducingvalve and a strainer, besides a ?ush‘
20
valve.
‘
‘This form, in addition to being 100% siphon
proof, as the ‘other forms in Figs. '1 and 2, also
eliminates the necessityof throttling the control
to‘pass- through‘the rim ports of the bowl, from
ing the disposition of the various mechanism
housed‘therein, namely: ?ush valve 9 carrying
offset ‘5ll,*au-xilia-ry valve mechanism 45 attached
thereto ebyslip-jointiconduit tube 42 and nuts 43
and‘ strainer 38' attached to pressure reducing
over?owa'to enter the’ tank.
'
‘ Fig. 6 is an elevation view on lines A--B--C——D
of Fig. 5, which‘showsa fragment of bowl H
in one piece with tank 1, which, instead of conveying the exhaust or leakage from the housed
mechanism into, the bowl from the inside of the
tankyconv‘eys said‘leakage‘ from the ‘outside of
valve, which is customary in the prevention‘of
the .tank,fthrough port 59 and guided by ‘ribs
25 knocking, or of noisy flushing, and from which
60, and being located above the level of the upper
method derives the failure of flushing, more spe
ci?cally described in paragraphs 22,0, and d, also
the pressure reducing valve eliminates the knock
ing of the water without the use of an air cham
30 ber, as shown in Fig. 2.
This form shows tank ‘I in one piece with bowl
it, a pressure reducing valve 36 of an ordinary
type, connected to ?ush valve 9 by nipple 3'! and
to strainer 38 by nipple 39; this strainer isprovid
ed at the lower end with water supply 8-~2 enter~
ing tank ‘I through opening G, provided with leak
proof slip-joint 4U; outlet 64 is connected by nipple
39 to ‘pressure reducing valve 3%, as more clearly
shown in Fig. 6.
Flush valveQ is of an ordinary
the tank or container.‘ This view shows clearly
the construction of strainerapparatus 38, show
ing‘ clearly the. water supply conduit 8---2 dis~ 3.0
charging into ‘conduit ‘6| travelling upwardly and
entering strainer, 62, from which the water, free
of any matter, enters chamber 63, which is pro-
vided ‘with outlet‘ 64 (shown in dotted line to
facilitate the reading ‘of this drawing, but the 35
real position is shown in Figs. 4 and 5), con
nected to pressure reducing valve lit by means of
nipple,39,. ;Cap 65, when removed allows strainer
described; nevertheless it has some characteristics
of its own, namely:
shown ,inFig. 4; :
three-cycle type that carries a separate jet con
trivance, as shown in Figs.‘ 1, 2, and 3, and above
.
'
.
(a) Auxiliary valve mechanism 4'! is separate
from the body of flush valve 9, and is carried by
strainer 38 and. connected to valve 9 by slip~joint
tube £52 and nuts 63, and is operated by ordinary
handle mechanism 8 connected thereto, through
perforation E on the tank 1.
,
"
Fig. 7 is another form of the invention, showing 45
a small fragment of bowl l2 in one piece with
tank 1: , Thislform has the characteristic of two
separate air inlet contriva‘nces to prevent back
siphoning; one is formed'by ‘tail piece 10, pro
vided’ with air ports 46, carrying at the. top ex 50
(11) Seat M; of piston valve 45 ‘is elongated
downwardly, thus forming ‘a sleeve, which in co
operation With the lower end' of valve shell 9,
provided with air ports 46 will act as an air
injector, either when the ?ushing water rushes
through thus. preventing spilling, or, under the
the shell- of valve 9, provided with conduit 69,
discharging-‘the air under the undersurface of 55
piston valve 45, and the undersurface of auxiliary
action of the vacuum, in case it occurs in the
valve 29 is also exposed and for the same purpose
supply pipeline, thus preventing back-siphoning.
as shown in Figs. 1, 2, and 4, and‘above described.
This will allow the ‘air to enter freely into dash
pot chamber M, thus preventing piston valve 60
(.0). Outlet M for the ?ushing water is located
atone side of the ?ush-valve shell, carrying mem
ber 46 to convey the water into bowl i2 through
spud 69. and . opening 5!}, carried by bowl l2.
~Said member 48 is provided with ?ange 5!, which
is connected to ?ange 52 carried by spud member
tension 1l,‘-the top end of‘ which is connected
to ?ush valve 9 and the other is formed by air
inlet '68, located above the ‘former one, and on
from opening under the action of the vacuum, as
speci?cally describedin Fig. 4, ‘paragraph d. The
exhaust from valve 29 through the open bottom
'51 ofhauxiliary valve mechanism 4| drops into
69, held ?rmly together by bolts 53, thus forming
tank ‘1 and passing through opening 59 located 65
the conduit which substitutes the usual tail piece
that conveys‘ the flushing water into the bowl.
Bolts?ii are suitably disposed to fasten or un
‘is conveyed into the bowl.
fasten them.
I
,
‘ (d) The water from dash-pot M discharges into
the tank when auxiliary valve 29 is‘ operated by
handleil; this disposition of auxiliary valve mech
75
end of the bowl, in case this overflows, the Water
from the bowl will be prevented from entering
62 to be taken out by‘ handle 66, to clean it
from any matter caught therein. Annular offset 40
51 from’ the shell of the strainer is‘to hold aut~1~
ilia'ry valve 41', provided with conduit’ 42 and nuts
43,’to be connected‘to ?ush valve 9, as more clearly
40 piston type, and of course is not the same as the
70
10
valve 38 connected to ?ush valve by nipple 3i.
Perforationsl58 on, bowl 12 are the usual means
to‘ attach the‘ toilet seat to the bowl. Opening
59 and ribs 6b are to convey any water that has
been collected in the tank, into the bowl. This
type prevents ‘any water from the bowl, if it
above upper end of bowleand‘ guided by ribs 68
In“ substance, this form shown in Fig. 7 is for
In fact,
the‘ container housing 'a ?ush valve, provided with
‘the same purpose as'the other forms.
contrivances‘ to prevent back-siphoning, and the
anism allows the air to enter the ' valve when
aininlet thereof is also supplied from the inside
of the tank, by means of ports or perforations
under the action of vacuum directly from the
atmosphere, instead of as in‘ordinary flush'valves
thereon; it also housesan auxiliary valve mecha
nism;- thei‘discha-rge of leakage therefrom is also 75
4
2,126,448
collected by the tank, and conveyed therefrom
into the bowl, and ?nally the ?ush valve is op
erated by handle mechanism protruding outside
the tank.
Fig. 8 is a plan view of Fig. '7 showing tank 1,
complished by the device as shown, economically
and without complications, and by having re
duced to practice said invention, the advantages
a small fragment of bowl I2 formed in one piece
with tank or container 1. It clearly shows the
themselves, it is therefore my intention to include
all such forms and modi?cations of my inven
tion that come within the range and scope'of
the invention, as expressed in the appended
10
claims.
What I claim as my invention and desire to
secure by Letters Patent, is:
disposition of the flushing apparatus, water sup
ply conduit 8—2 entering from one side of the
10 tank, and connected to flush valve 9, which car
ries the auxiliary valve mechanism 4| operated
by handle 8, protruding from the tank, and port
59 to allow any water dropping into the tank,
to be conveyed by means of ribs 60 into the bowl.
Fig. 9 shows container 1 housing a contrivance
15
to prevent back-siphoning, almost similar to
the one shown in Fig. 1, formed by funnel I4,
inserted and ?tting tightly into member 13; the
top end of funnel I4 carries member 14, provided
20 with air inlet 15, and conically shaped extension
described herein have proven to be real facts.
Obviously, other forms will readily suggest C1
1. In a water closet having a bowl, means for
directing water into said bowl, and a tank sur
rounding said means and having a passage in
constant communication with the bowl whereby
any ?uid in the tank will drain into the bowl.
2. In a water closet having a bowl, a tank, a
16 receiving tail-piece member ‘I1, extending
conduit connecting the bowl and tank, means for
admitting air into the tank, means for admitting
air from the tank into said conduit above the
downwardly at a suitable depth into extension
water level in the bowl, and a ?ush valve dis
16, thus forming annular space 18, and injector
like contrivance to allow the air to rush in under
25 the action of the onrush of the water from flush
valve 9, thus preventing the water from over
?owing from the funnel. Tail piece 11 is pro
vided with ?ange ‘I8 and ports l6, and is threaded
to receive ?anged nut 19 to tighten tail-piece
30 11 in position, which at the upper end carries
flush valve 9, and is provided with air inlets 8|],
to supply air to the inside top of tail piece 11,
to allow the water to flow freely from outlet 8|
charging into the conduit, said valve having its
discharge end in the tank above the maximum
level that can be attained by the water in the 25
bowl.
3. The combination with a toilet bowl having
a ?ushing valve therefor, of a housing for said
?ushing valve, said housing being provided with
means for directing any water accumulating in
the housing into said toilet bowl, and separate
means for discharging ?uid from the flush valve
into the bowl.
Control valve 82 is connected to
4. In a water closet comprising a bowl and a
the water supply, the other end is connected to
35 ?ush valve 9 by nipple 83; handle 8 is to operate
the ?ush valve; 20 is the cover of the tank, to
which is fastened the flush valve by ?ange 18
and nut 19, provided with packing 81; nut 85 is
40 provided under the undersurface with three ribs
88, thus forming three spaces large enough to
?ushing valve therefor having means associated
therewith for directing ?uid from the valve into
the bowl, the combination with a housing for said
of ?ush valve 9.
convey all the water collected from any source
by the tank, into the bowl, through annular space
89 and port holes 90, by tail-piece 9|, the lower
45 end of which is connected to the bowl; the air
supplied into the tank, enters from ports 92 lo
cated in any suitable place'on the tank. This
form of the invention does not differ from the
others, except that the flush valve is not housed
in the tank, but it houses the mechanismprevent
ing back-siphoning, which receives the air supply
from the inside of the tank, entering through
openings suitably located on the walls of said
tank. To allow the water to ?ow freely from
55 the outlet of the flush valve into the bowl, the
air also is provided from the inside of the tank,
same as in the other types above described, and
?nally, any leakage dropping into the tank is
collected by the same, and conveyed into the
60 bowl, the same as in the other forms of the in
vention.
This tank can vbe of the ordinary type
at present in use, and therefore, can be fastened
to the wall; old tanks can also be used by making
on them the required perforations for the parts
65 that have to be attached thereto, or housed there
in._ The ?ush valves at present in use, none of
which are 100% siphon-proof are made relatively
safe by means of vacuum breakers and check
valves, but when used in combination with this
70 apparatus, as shown in Fig. 9, all types of ?ush
ing valves are made 100% siphon-proof without
the aid of any of the above mentioned, unreliable
contrivances.
From the foregoing description, it will be seen
75 that the purpose of my invention has been ac
flushing valve, said housing being provided with
means for directing any water accumulating
therein into the bowl.
5. In a water closet having a bowl, the combi
nation of a ?ushing valve therefor, means for
directing fluid from the valve into the bowl, and
other means for collecting leakage from the
valve and directing it into the bowl.
45
6. In a water closet having a bowl, the combi
nation of a ?ush valve discharging into said
bowl, an auxiliary valve for controlling operation
of the flush valve, means for operating the auxil
iary valve to permit the ?ush valve to open, a 50
housing for said valves, said auxiliary valve hav
ing an outlet discharging into the housing, and
means for directing ?uid from the same into the
bowl.
7. In a water closet having a bowl, a tank L
above the bowl, a flushing valve housed in the
tank, said tank having an opening therein com
municating with the bowl, and being vented to
atmosphere, means for directing fluid from the
valve into the bowl, the discharge end of said CO
valve being sufficiently above the maximum level
that can be attained by ?uid accumulating in the
tank to permit air to be drawn from the tank
into said valve discharge upon occurrence of
vacuum in the supply line.
8. In a water closet having a bowl, a tank, a
?uid conduit passing through the tank and dis
charging into the bowl, means for admitting air
to the tank and from the tank into the conduit
above the bowl, and means for directing any ?uid 70
accumulating in the tank into the bowl.
9. In a water closet having a bowl, a tank hav
ing an outlet communicating with the bowl, a
flushing valve, means within the tank for direct
ing ?uid from the valve into the outlet from the 75
5
2,126,448
tank, said means being. vented tov atmosphere
above the level of the bowl, and means for direct
,ing'?uid accumulating in the tank into the‘ bowl.
10. In a’ water closet having a bowl, a tank, a
?ushing valve for the bowl having a supply line
communicating
therewith, ‘ means
within the
open communication at all times with the bowl,
‘said discharge outlet of the valve having a io
raminated discharge member.
>
'
19. In combination with a water closet bowl, a
housing, water supply means within said housing "ca
for ?ushing. the'bowl, and ?ush water conducting
tank for breaking a vacuum in the supply line,
said tank having a passage in constant com
means from the housing to the bowl in‘communi
munication with the bowl to drain any accumu
lation of ?uid therein into the bowl.
additional open passage communicating with said
bowl for draining water from the housing into the .1 O
11. In a water closet having a bowl, a ?ushing
valve therefor, a housing for the valve,.an auxil
iary valve controlling. operation of the ?ushing
valve and means forconstantly supplying air to
15 the lower face of the auxiliary valve from said
housing.
cation with the housing, said housing having an
bowl.
‘
‘20. In combination with a Water closet bowl, a
receptacle, a valve controlled water supply means
in said receptacle, a jet supply means for the
bowl connected to said valve, water supply means ,
‘12. In a water closet having a bowl, a supply
for the rim of said bowl in open communication
with said receptacle and means for‘ providing
line therefor, a strainer and pressure reducing
open communication between the interior of said
valve- in said supply line, a ?ushing valve receiv
ing fluid from the reducing valve, an auxiliary
receptacle and the atmosphere; said receptacle
having. an additional unobstructed connection .20
.
valve communicating with the ?ushing valve and
controlling operation of the same, a housing for
said strainer, reducing valve, flushing valve and
auxiliary valve, said housing communicating with
In ‘CA the‘bowl, whereby any leakage accumulating in
the tank will drain into the bowl, and means for
operating the auxiliary valve.
13. In a water closet‘ a bowl having a rim and
provided with two passages communicating
therewith, a tank above the bowl having open
ings communicating with said passages, means
for directing scouring and re?lling ?uid to the
bowl through one opening and passage, the other
opening and passage conveying fluid accumulat
ing, in the tank into the bowl.
14. In a Water closet including a bowl having a
rim provided with two passages communicating
therewith, a tank abovethebowl having open
ings registering with said passages, a ?ushing
valve in the tank discharging ‘through one open
ing‘and“ passage ‘to the bowl, a water hammer
cushioning device in the other opening and pas
sage and a ?uid supply line for directing ?uid to
the flushing valve through the water hammer
cushioning device.
15. In a water closet including a bowl having
a rim provided with two passages communicating
therewith, a tank above the bowl having open
ings registering with said passages, a ?ushing
valve in the tank discharging through one open
ing and passage to the bowl, a water hammer
cushioning device in the other opening and pas
sage spaced from the walls thereof, and a fluid
supply line for directing ?uid to the flushing
valve through the water hammer cushioning de
vice, the space between the cushioning device
and the walls of the opening and passage per
mitting ?uid accumulating in the tank to drain
into the bowl.
16. In combination with a water closet bowl, a
housing, a water supply conduit in said housing
and a valve on said conduit within said housing,
said housing having drainage means in con
stantly open communication with said bowl.
17. In combination with a water closet bowl,
an open housing, a water supply conduit extend
‘with the bowl to drain said receptacle into the
bowl.
21. In combination with a water closet bowl,
means for preventing back siphoning of the bowl
comprising a receptacle having open communi is
cation with the atmosphere, a water supply pipe
extending into the, receptacle, aivalve on said pipe,
and a ?ush water connection from said receptacle
to the bowl arranged to receive water from said
Valve, said water connection extending into said 30
receptacle and having its ends spaced from the
discharge end of the supply pipe and having open
communication with the interior of said recep
tacle.
‘
22. In combination with a‘ water closet bowl, a 05 Cr
receptacle, a' valve controlled water supply means
in said receptacle, a jet supply means for the bowl
connected to said valve, water supply means. for
the rim of said bowl in open communication with
said receptacle, and means for providing open 4-0
communication. between'the interior of said re
ceptacle and the atmosphere; said jet supply
means forming clamping means for securing said
receptacle to the bowl.
23. In combination with a water closet bowl, a 45
receptacle, a valve controlled water supply means
in said receptacle, a jet supply means for the bowl
connected to said valve, a water passage for the
rim of said bowl in open communication with said
receptacle, and means for providing open com
munication between the interior of said receptacle
and the atmosphere.
24. A device of the class described, comprising
a ?ush pipe, a casing of larger diameter than the
pipe and surrounding and attached to a portion
of the same, said casing having an opening there
in and that portion of the pipe surrounded by the
casing having an opening therein for placing said
portion in communication with the. bottom of the
casing.
60
25. In a ?ushing device for toilet bowls, a tank
above the bowl, a water supply pipe extending into
the tank having an open discharge end in the
tank above the water level in the tank, a control
valve in said water supply pipe, a water receiving
pipe below the open end of the water supply pipe
ing into said housing, and a manuallyoperated
and a funnel on the upper end of the water re
valve on the discharge end of said conduit within
said housing, said valve having a discharge outlet
ceiving pipe spaced apart from the discharge end
of the supply pipe.
70 within the housing, said housing being in open
communication at all times with the bowl.
18. In combination with a water closet bowl,
an open housing, and a water supply valve in said
housing, said valve having an open discharge
outlet within the housing, said housing being in
26. In a ?ushing device for toilet bowls, a tank 70
above the bowl, a water supply pipe extending
into the tank having an open discharge end in
the tank above the water level, a control valve. in
said water sup-ply pipe, and a water receiving
conduit below the water supply pipe having its 75
6
2,126,448
upper end spaced apart from the discharge end
of the water supply pipe.
27. In a ?ushing device for toilet bowls, a tank
above the bowl, a. water supply pipe extending
into the tank having an open discharge end in
the tank above the water level in the bowl, and
a water receiving conduit below the water supply
pipe having its upper end in the tank and spaced
apart from the discharge end of the water supply
10 pipe.
28. A device of the class described, comprising
a flush pipe, a casing of larger diameter than the
pipe surrounding the same, said casing having an
opening therein and that portion of the pipe sur
15 rounded by the casing having an opening therein
for placing said portion in communication with
the casing.
'29. In a flushing device for toilet bowls, a bowl
having a hollow rim provided with spaced perfor
20 ations, a pipe for supplying ?ushing water to the
rim and through the perforations into the bowl,
the combined areas of the perforations being so
proportioned with reference to the internal diam
eter of the supply pipe that spilling of water from
25 said ?ushing device is prevented.
30. In a flushing device for toilet bowls, a bowl
having a hollow rim provided with spaced perfor
ations, a ?ush valve for admitting ?ushing water
to the bowl, a container housing the flush valve
30 and having communication with the bowl rim,
and a pipe for supplying water to the flush valve,
the combined areas of the perforations being so
proportioned with reference to the internal di
ameter of the supply pipe that spilling of water
from said ?ushing device is prevented.
31. In a flushing device for toilet bowls, a tank
above the bowl, a Water supply pipe extending
into the tank having an open discharge end in
the tank above the water level in the bowl, and
40 a water receiving conduit below the water supply
pipe having its upper end in the tank and spaced
apart from the discharge end of the water supply
pipe, said water receiving conduit having an open
ing therein for placing said pipe in communica
tion with the bottom of the tank.
32. In a ?ushing device for toilet bowls, a sup
ply pipe, a flushing valve having a discharge end,
means for directing‘ ?uid discharged from said
end into the bowl, said discharge end constantly
communicating with atmosphere and being
spaced from the maximum level which can be at 10
tained by the water in the bowl a distance at
least substantially equal to the internal area of
the supply pipe, and a housing surrounding the
valve and directing means and in constant com
munication with the atmosphere.
15
33. In a flushing device for toilet bowls, a con
tainer for the ?ushing device, a supply pipe, a
pipe spaced from the supply pipe and receiving
water therefrom and directing the same into the
bowl, the space between the pipes being in com 20
munication with atmosphere, said communicating
space and the walls of the container surrounding
the communicating space being so proportioned
as to prevent su?icient increase in velocity of
air moving toward the supply pipe under the 25
action of vacuum in the supply pipe line to cre
ate back siphoning, said toilet bowl having a rim
provided with perforations, the combined areas
of the perforations being so proportioned with
reference to the internal diameter of the supply 30
pipe line that the water will be prevented from
spilling from said container.
34. In a ?ushing device for toilet bowls, a sup
ply pipe, a ?ushing valve in said pipe behind the
bowl, means for directing ?uid discharged from 35
the valve into said bowl, a housing having side
walls surrounding the valve and directing means,
and an operating handle for the valve projecting
through one of said side walls in a direction trans
verse of the longitudinal axis of the bowl.
CESARE C. CAMPUS.
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